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At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL

BLUE RIDGE HOMES AND THE GREATEST HITS HOUSE p.10

2018

HUMBLE HOMES P.24

A S p e c i a l P u b l i c at i o n

of the

B o z e m a n D a i ly C h r o n i c l e

MY MAN-MADE TABLE p.28


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At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

Table of Contents

BLUE RIDGE HOMES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 IN THE FAMILY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 HUMBLE HOMES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 DIGITAL SOLUTIONS FOR ALL . . . . . 20 CRAFTERS HEYDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 PROFILE OF A CARPENTER: HEIDI ROGERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 MY MAN-MADE TABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 DYNAMIC DEUX-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 FALL ENTERTAINING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 STATE OF THE MARKET. . . . . . . . . . . . 46

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Hannah Overton, Hannah Stiff EDITED BY: Whitney Bermes CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS:

DESIGN AND LAYOUT:

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR:

2018

Matthew Gasbarre

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Chronicle Staff, Whitney Kamman, Zakara Photography, Kimmie Geer, Anna Baker, Krya Ames, Lindsay Kay Kordick, Darby Ask

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

At Home

At Home

Cindy Sease COVER PHOTO: Whitney Kamman

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Blue Ridge Homes

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and the

2018

Greatest Hits House BY: HANNAH OVERTON

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2018

The home is lavish, yet still incredibly warm and inviting. The interior design is classic Montana rustic. I’m led under a barrelvaulted ceiling that covers a spacious living room with a stone, wood-burning fireplace. We make our way into one of the two master bedrooms, where Carvalho shows me his architectural design table. He still draws with a No. 2 pencil.

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Campbell smiles. “I was hoping you would say that.”

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When Campbell and Carvalho answer the door and welcome me inside, I can’t help but say, “Wow!”

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s I drive up to the personal spec home of Carolyn Campbell and Richard Carvalho, the builder/designer/ interior decorator duo of Blue Ridge Homes, the first thing I notice, aside from the breathtaking beauty of the home itself, is the view. “Briarcrest” sits on 1.5 acres and is surrounded by the Bridger, the Spanish Peaks and the Tobacco Root mountains. The driveway leads under a stone porte-cochere so that the split-five car garage is tucked neatly behind the front exterior of the home.

“I was trained in 1977, and I’m actually faster with a pencil than on the CAD system,” he says. “Plus, my plans have a little more soul to them. CAD drawings are black and white. No heart.” The master bedroom connects to a master bathroom, a walk-in closet and a space for a separate vanity. Everything is open, not just in the master bedroom, but throughout the entire home.

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Credit: Blueridge Homes


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

Credit: Blueridge Homes

“When I was in college at the University of Hawaii School of Architecture, one of my assignments was to draw a house with no doors,” Carvalho says. “If you take all the doors out of this house, it still functions with privacy.”

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We make our way back through the living room and into the gourmet kitchen. Next to the kitchen, a wrap-around mudroom holds a pantry suitable to store enough utensils and cookware for an entire restaurant. Next to the mudroom, a sportsman’s room, complete with a steel door and lock, is the last stop before entering the three-car garage. Outside, the porte-cochere connects the home to a separate above-garage studio apartment. Back inside the main home, we head upstairs to private living quarters featuring two bedrooms, a full bathroom, a kitchenette, a common area and a balcony. There’s that amazing view again, overlooking the Bridgers. “You can see we’re big on views.” Campbell says. Carvalho designed and built the home, and Campbell is responsible for the interior design. This formula of designing, building and decorat-

ing homes to live in and showcase has provided the couple with an unparalleled level of expertise. "Budget is huge,” Campbell says. “Clients give us an idea of their wish lists and their budget, and we can immediately tell if the two will match.”

ents are visual. Having a real life space for them to walk around in, measure and experience gives people a thorough understanding of their own designs. They can quickly determine whether they want a larger or smaller living room, or if their furniture will fit through comparison of the spec house.

“A lot of architects will build some- Years ago, after meeting on the job thing not cognizant of final price,” site for Gallatin River Ranch, the two Carvalho says. “If you want 3,000 quickly discovered they could form square feet and this trim level, I can a successful business and partnertell you within 3 percent of how ship. At her request, Carvalho built much it will Campbell a cost, no matbarn with liv“‘Modern’ looks cool, but ing quarters ter who builds it. That kind people always come back above the of quick, real- and say, ‘This feels warm, stables. life feedback this feels like home.’” “I thought, is wonderful. we’ve got If they want to add a fourth garage bay, I can something here,” Campbell says. tell them in five minutes what it’s “We can market this as, ‘A barn good going to cost, whereas an architect life!’” will draw it, figure it out, get back to The couple began designing, buildthem in two weeks.” ing and decorating live-in barns. “This is how good we are,” Camp- Soon, clients were requesting live-in bell says “A banker once told me he barns while Carvalho finished deloves working with us because we signing and building their homes. never ask for more money on the Blue Ridge Homes took off, and the budget. And I looked at him and couple was averaging 14 projects a said, ‘You can ask for more money?’” year. They had their first house featured in Parade of Homes in 2003, The couple has found that most cli- with over 5,000 people viewing the


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

Credit: Blueridge Homes

home. They continue to stick to traditional craftsmanship and classic design. “Briarcrest was featured in Parade of Homes last year, and we were one of the only homes still designed traditionally and rustic,” Campbell says. “‘Modern’ looks cool, but people always come back and say, ‘This feels warm, this feels like home.’”

Credit: Blueridge Homes

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“Our own specs feature products, designs and interiors that we want to try,” Carvalho says. “Being a builder is like a being a singer. You sing commercial songs because you know they will be hits. Your favorites are the ones you do for your own pleasure. We take the best features of the last ten houses and they will go into our house. This is a greatest hits house. It just feels good.”

Credit: Blueridge Homes


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In the

Family SON DESIGNS PARENTS’ DREAM HOME BY: HANNAH STIFF


Credit: Darby Ask

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“We got to cross that item off our bucket list,” Kerrie says.

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ruce and Kerrie Robertson always had a dream of having their favorite architect design a home for them. Three years ago, they got to move into that customdesigned home.

The architect, Cole Robertson, says Bruce and Kerrie were “exceptional clients.” They are also exceptional parents. Cole, a graduate of the Montana State University architecture school, said working with his parents was wonderful, even when they had to talk through tough financial conversations. Those hard chats paid off. Today, Kerrie and Bruce live in a state-of-the-art modern “pod concept” shed house with stunning views throughout. The three pods include an entertaining pod, a master suite pod and a garage pod. The inspiration for the 2,500-square-foot house came from the Robertson family’s humble roots. Bruce’s father was a farmer outside of Big Sandy.

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“He was 6 years old before he saw the lights of Big Sandy,” Bruce recalls.

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Though farm life was humble, Bruce wanted his dream home to reflect those early agriculture days. So Cole married a love of the outdoors with a building style typical during the late 1800s on the Northern High Plains.

Credit: Darby Ask

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“Our final design was inspired by the organic expansion of agricultural buildings on farmland,” Cole explains. “These buildings ‘sprouted’ from a single point, slowly expanding outward from a central gathering area on the property.”

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Using the outward expansion concept, the house is separated into autonomous “pods” by a long hallway, featuring custom childhood art by Cole and his older brother Aaron. Between the living room, kitchen, and Kerrie and Bruce’s first floor master suite, a private courtyard is cozily shielded from neighboring houses. Through the living room, the courtyard is accessible from a glass garage door. One tug at the modern glass door, and the kitchen and living room transform into an indoor/outdoor entertaining space. An avant garde circular metal fire pit creates warmth year round, allowing Bruce and Kerrie to fully entertain and enjoy the space.

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Credit: Darby Ask

Credit: Darby Ask

From massive to miniature, windows throughout the house help pull in the outdoors and offer stunning mountain views from multiple vistas. Using large pinewood planks along ceilings and railings through-


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

Credit: Darby Ask

Credit: Darby Ask

out the home, Cole was again able to reference ag construction practices commonly used to cobble together barns and outbuildings. The corrugated metal roof that adorns the house is reminiscent of grain bins and an agricultural sensibility that somehow looks chic when it’s placed atop a crisp brown and white shed-house.

While the house is impressive enough with its unique design and flawless finishes, there’s something else that draws in the visitors and means a great deal to the Robertson family. A set of maple wood planks - beaten by feet, pounded by basketballs, steeped in stories - adorn several corners of the custom home.

From the couple’s pine-ceilinged master bedroom, another door opens onto a separate backyard with a view (albeit a decent recess away) of the neighbors. The yard connects via the side of the house to the front entrance. The functional-flow design makes the couple’s home seem much larger than it’s 2,500-square-footprint.

For 20 years, Bruce coached high school basketball in Laurel. He coached both his sons and teams full of other young men until 2001. Five years ago, Bruce recalls the gymnasium floors were being redone and the old boards sold off.

Cole says he may have pioneered the shed house design in the Gallatin Valley, but it’s catching on quickly. “So many people drive by and take pictures of our house,” Kerrie says with a smile. And many of the people who brought their dream home to life also come through the house with visitors, anxious to show off their part in the project. The general contractor, Josh Blomquist, for example, brings framers to the house to show them the completed masterpiece. Cole regularly brings clients and colleagues to his parents’ place; showing off his portfolio in person tends to capture people’s attention quickly. Bruce and Kerrie are gracious hosts, always ready to show off their bucket-list home. As Cole puts it, his mother is a tidy tornado, always keeping the house looking magazine-quality clean.

Cole and Bruce decided to purchase some of the old basketball court. Bruce scored a vital piece of gymnasium: the coach’s box where he spent so many memorable hours. Today, that coach’s box greets visitors as they walk through the front door of the house. The box is split between the entryway and a sliding barn-style door at the back of the house. Cole also saved part of the gym floor and has integrated it into his newly built home. As he raises four daughters of his own, sharing and creating memories with his girls is a delight. It’s an added bonus that Cole has his parents living in the same town, happily opening their doors to grandchildren and visitors. After all, Bruce and Kerrie are eager to show off their custom home designed by their favorite architect. *Cole Robertson is the founder of Plum Design Lab. Find more of his work at www.plumdl.com

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Humble Homes SMALL SOLUTIONS FOR A GROWING PROBLEM BY: HANNAH STIFF


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hey say good things come in small packages. The new Human Resource Development Council “Humble Homes” at the corner of 24th and Beall streets certainly fit the adage. Known as the Tidbit and Box Loft, the 300- and 600-squarefoot tiny homes were unveiled in September during the annual Parade of Homes event. The Humble Homes are an effort by the HRDC to create affordable housing and a path to homeownership to a demographic that may not otherwise be able to afford Bozeman prices. Partnering with local builders Constructive Solutions, the HRDC funded the Humble Homes building project. The two homes boast their own detached garages, permanent foundations,

17 and modern building techniques and materials. The Tidbit is listed at $130,000, or $430 per square foot. The Box Loft is for sale at $170,000, or $283 per square foot. While that breakdown doesn’t exactly scream affordable on a price per square foot basis, HRDC Community Development Manager Brian Guyer says some costs are unavoidable, no matter what size house you build. “The price per square foot is not the metric to use,” Guyer says. “There are some costs that are fixed and unavoidable, like the kitchen and bathroom, no matter the size of a house.” Another comparison point in favor of the Humble Homes is the median home price in Gallatin County. According to the Gallatin Association of Realtors, for the second quarter of 2018,


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the median sales price increased 6.7 percent to $395,000 for singlefamily homes and 16.4 percent to $290,950 for condo or townhouse homes. According to the City of Bozeman, the definition of “affordable” is “affordable housing” is “not spending more than one-third of your monthly income on housing.” The Humble Homes are the HRDC’s latest effort to meet the city’s mandate to provide more affordable housing, Guyer says. And though they are small, the Humble Homes feature modern design elements, cheery exterior facades and fine finishes throughout. The homes also mirror the tiny living trend unfolding on HGTV and DIY TV channels. But Guyer wants the community to know this latest round of HRDC housing isn’t a fad.

“These homes are on a permanent foundation,” he explains. “They are not going to be here today and gone tomorrow.” Each tiny home has its own garage and plenty of crawl space to add nearly 300 extra square feet of storage per unit, which adds to the livability and longevity of each home. Guyer says the Humble Homes feature small living spaces, but plenty of room for skis and other toys in garages for both units. Despite the conservative interior blueprints, local design shop The Architect’s Wife stepped in to demonstrate how to tastefully fill the pint-sized living spaces - think unique art, funky furniture and a mix of modern and timeless pieces. The HRDC already has a list of potential buyers for each home. Currently the Box Loft is under contract and the HRDC is still looking

for a buyer for the Tidbit. To be qualified to own a Humble Home, Guyer says buyers must have completed a home ownership class and financial counseling. Like traditional home ownership, buyers for the Humble Homes must qualify for a loan through their bank of choice. Also like any other homebuyer, future Humble Home owners will not be immune to the whims of the market. “These buyers won’t be insulated from the ups and down of the housing market,” Guyer explains. But because the Humble Homes are intended to remain affordable for future buyers, there is a cap on how much they can appreciate each year (2 percent). That, Guyer explains, is to ensure that someone like a teacher could afford a Humble Home today and years down the road.


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** “We prevent these houses from being flipped,” he says. “So no owner ever gets a windfall of profit.” The homes also must be occupied as primary residences; no renting on AirBnb or VRBO allowed. The idea is to add another set of thoughtful neighbors to a wonderful corner of town, Guyer explains. In an effort to integrate the homes into the neighborhood, the HRDC invited neighbors over to have a look before the rest of the community got a chance to check out the modern new builds. When the Parade of Homes showcased the Humble Homes in its event last month, it was the first time ever that tiny living or HRDC housing was featured in the showcase. Guyer says the expertise from Constructive Solutions Lead Architect Mark Wiseman certainly elevated the Humble Homes to meet the standards showcased throughout the homes on display. The work paid off: the community response was “overwhelmingly positive”, Guyer says. Children especially adored the cozy living spaces. “These homes are proof of concept as we see it,” Guyer says. “We hope they will be replicated and add diversity to what’s being built. We hope this project sparks builders’ interest.”

Breakout Box: History of the Humble Home Lot During the development of the West Babcock land trust, HRDC was left with a remaining lot; resting on the corner, it had unwieldy setbacks that made its development less than desirable at the time. Now, 20 years after the development of the land trust, rapidly escalating home prices have led HRDC to seek out new solutions to providing affordable housing. One such solution is tiny homes. Working with an architect and builder, HRDC devised a plan to divide the remaining lot into two small lots. The project is intended to test the tiny home concept for market demand/acceptance, create comparable sales for builders interested in similar homes, and demonstrate how awkward lots can be maximized for affordable housing. The homes will be sold to qualified buyers and held in HRDC’s Community land trust to ensure permanent affordability. *Information courtesy of the HRDC.

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Digital Solutions for All BY: CHRONICLE STAFF


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ecently, a frustrated Bozeman couple wandered into the showroom at SAV Digital Environments on North Wallace Avenue. The couple had purchased an internet package from a local telecommunications company that ended up leaving their home with several dead zones. They attempted to solve the problem themselves by buying Wi-Fi extenders. No good. They consulted a local retail company that inevitably pushed more product on the couple, but that still did not solve the problem either. Finally, they made their way to SAV where they met Scott, the director of quality and customer. Scott spoke with the couple for an hour that day and for another hour on the phone the following day before touring their home and providing a consultation. As he informed the couple of several potential solutions, they then asked how much this consultation is going to cost them. He said, “Our goal is to help you find the best solution to fit your needs, not to squeeze every last penny out of you.” SAV is synonymous with seamless design, cuttingedge technology, and quality customer service. The company was formed as Studio AV in 2005, when owner Cory Reistad dreamt of creating the best audio and video environments possible. As technology progressed, so did business. They now outfit homes and businesses with not only A/V systems, but climate control, shades and lighting, security systems, and more, all of which can be automated with a press of a button on your smart phone, or even with voice. Wireless capabilities are also an in-

Credit: Whitney Kamman

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home advancement we have seen take leaps within the last four or five years. “What’s really important to us is clean, reliable, good-looking technology,” Scott says. “We hide wires to help preserve the aesthetics of the environment, we use flush details to help eliminate bulky components, and we sell appealing products that complement the environment.” Though typical integrations involve visible products, if requested SAV is able to install “invisible” electronics, including speakers built into walls, pin-hole cameras, shades that roll up into concealed pockets, and even mirrors that transform into televisions.

Credit: Whitney Kamman

“Most everyone likes the idea of cuttingedge technology, but they don’t necessarily know how to get it,” “Smart mirrors are really cool,” Scott says. “You can get your agenda, morning news, or a movie in your bathroom or living room. And it’s all in the mirror!”

Credit: Whitney Kamman

SAV is known for servicing some of the most beautiful and luxurious homes in southwest Montana, but a lot of people should know SAV values all integrations, large and small alike. “Most everyone likes the idea of cutting-edge technology, but they don’t necessarily know how to get it,” Scott says. “People

Credit: Whitney Kamman


At Home

Credit: Zakara Photography

2018

Credit: Zakara Photography

Stopping by the SAV showroom is a great way to find out what’s possible within your budget, not to mention getting a glimpse at some premier technology. You will see the fogging glass, camouflaged sound systems, automated shades and lights, and soon the latest in voice AI. It’s exciting to think that not only is this high-tech industry in our backyards, it could also be in our homes. “This is the age of evolving design and technology,” Scott says. “Though we base our hearts in Bozeman and Big Sky, we have clients from Flathead to Paradise Valley to Missoula to Jackson, Wyoming.”

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Credit: Zakara Photography

The couple that wanted to kill their dead zones was presented with an option to achieve flawless internet connection. During their in-home consultation, Scott saw instruments laying around. Noticing music is important to them, he said, “We could create an immersive audio experience in here too that you could turn it off in one room and on in another from your phone.” Their faces lit up when they heard the word “immersive.” The solution was a mesh of overlapping wireless access points throughout the couple’s home with an end result being fast, reliable internet and then audio streaming from anywhere. And they can control everything from their phones, including shutting off internet to certain devices.

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who would want a cool audio system or a good security solution, it’s within arms reach and we’re here to help.”

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Crafters Heyday LOCAL BOUTIQUE OFFERS UNIQUE CRAFTING CLASSES FOR ALL ABILITIES BY: HANNAH STIFF

Credit: Kimmie Geer


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25 Credit: Kimmie Geer

f you thought local lifestyle boutique Heyday only offered home decor, accessories, apparel, books, stationary, bath and body products, kitchenwares, and gift wrapping to boot, think again. The beloved downtown Bozeman shop also offers a range of workshops for the aspiring crafter in you. Whether you would like to weave your own wall hanging, arrange seasonal flowers or take an introductory watercolor painting class, Heyday has you covered. Collaborating with the best crafters and artisans from the community, Heyday staff thoughtfully line up a roster of talent to teach their workshops each season. To find out more about Heyday’s crafty fall classes, we talked to Workshop Coordinator Emma Stafford.

Credit: Kimmie Geer

Q: When and why did HD start offering workshops? Stafford: The workshop series at Heyday is almost as old as Heyday itself. The idea was borne out of a sense that the Bozeman community needed a place to come create and partake in a fun, light environment. With the expansion of the store in April 2017, we now have a workshop space for that very purpose. Q: What has the response been from workshop participants? Stafford: We have had overwhelmingly positive feedback from our workshop participants. Of course, we see our series as work in progress and are always seeking to improve and build upon our foundation. Workshops, like retail, are constantly shifting, changing and evolving. We want to move along with


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26 Credit: Kimmie Geer

tide while still holding onto the classic crowd-pleasers. Q: How do you decide which workshops to offer and which instructors would be a good fit? Stafford: Most of our instructors are people whose work we admire and have asked to join our series. There are others who have come to us with their ideas. As the workshop series has grown, we have learned the importance of making sure our workshops reflect the Heyday brand. Q: What else should the community to know about Heyday workshops? Stafford: We are always on the lookout for the next big thing in the workshop world. If you have a great idea for a workshop, let us know! We love hearing from artisans and creatives in the Bozeman area and beyond.

Credit: Kimmie Geer

Prices for Heyday workshops vary according to the cost of the materials being used. At a recent Bohemian Hoop Wall Hanging class, instructor Katie Dolen explained to her class that everything she taught was intended to be replicable by participants at home. Dolen, the owner and creative behind Ward Weaving, sent her class home with extra hoops, yarn, feathers, beads and glue to ensure they could create another hoop hanging on their own. Stafford says that’s a major goal of hosting the workshops: teaching participants the skills and confidence they need to create art at home. The camaraderie at each workshop is just an added bonus of getting friends and strangers together to learn a new skill. So find a class that piques your interest, grab a friend, and get ready to get crafty!


w/ Canyon Craft Co. - Oct. 27

Intro to Water Color Painting w/ Bon Temps Collective - Nov. 3

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w/ Wild Blume - Nov. 6

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Fall Wreaths

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Woven Wall Hangings

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Fall Workshop Lineup

Christmas Wreaths Dec. 1 & 2 (Class signups start Nov. 9)

Credit: Kimmie Geer

More information, updates and a list of previous Heyday workshops are available at: heydaybozeman.com

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Credit: Kimmie Geer

Credit: Kimmie Geer


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Profile of a Carpenter:

FALL 2018

Heidi Rogers BY: HANNAH OVERTON

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Credit: Morgan Pier


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2018

t’s not every day you meet a female carpenter. Heidi Rogers has worked as a carpenter and independent contractor for the last five years and in that time, she has rarely encountered another female carpenter on a job site. While she has a deep respect and admiration for her male mentors and coworkers, Rogers feels that it is important to get more diverse perspectives at work. She attributes the lack of women in her field to societal hurdles. “Maybe it’s that tools are primarily marketed to men, or that women aren’t taught to safely use them ,” she says. “More female role models in the field could also encourage more women to explore carpentry .” None of these hurdles hindered Rogers. Initially, she set out to be an architect and attended college at Montana State University. After going on to earn a master’s degree in architecture, Rogers immediately went into carpentry as a way to round out her skillset. “I wanted to learn the other half of this whole field,” she says. “Designing and building seem so connected to me. It felt really important to learn the trades before I could call myself an architect. You can’t learn that unless you actually work with the materials.” Through a little hustle and a lot of determination, Rogers worked her way onto a job site. Now, she works on 12-15 different projects a year, of varying scales , throughout the Gallatin and Paradise Valleys. Many jobs are start-to-finish custom homes, with Rogers’ work ranging from framing to sidingto hanging doors to completing trim. “I especially love homes that are carefully placed and connected to their site and landscaping,” she says. “It’s important that houses are built to last. Even if you’re not a skilled carpenter, you can feel when a house is built with integrity and good materials.” “I just got hired on to a timber framing crew and it goes along with the ethic of building things to last. (My style is) thoughtful, quiet and steady. Simple, not meticulous, but careful. I’m thinking about design every day on the job site. Beautiful moments happen during construction.” Three years ago, the Red Ants Pants Foundation invited Rogers to teach a pilot Carpentry 101 class at their annual Timber Skills Workshop in White

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Credit: Morgan Pier

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30 Sulphur Springs,, Montana. Until then, the four-day workshop taught women the basics of safely felling, bucking and limbing a tree. As the workshop grew, Red Ants Pants began expanding their offerings; participants were given the option of Chainsaw 101 or Carpentry 101. “The mission of the Red Ants Pants Foundation is to develop and expand leadership roles for women, preserve and support working family farms and ranches, and enrich and promote rural communities.... And we believe in maintaining traditional work skills because a strong back, calloused hands, and good craftsmanship should not be a thing of the past” Carpentry 101 class was designed to create a comfortable space for women to learn. The 12 female participants are taught the basic operation and maintenance of power tools and the fundamentals of carpentry. They are introduced to power saws, routers pneumatic nail guns and more. Safety is a must. The all-

female environment eliminates societal hurdles around carpentry, so women can relax and wholeheartedly learn. “Just having strong, capable, feminine role models is important. It’s good energy.” Participants hone their skills while working on an individual project. This year, everyone built their own chair. “It was cool to see everyone take ownership of their project,” Rogers says. “The attention to detail was so impressive!” Rogers will continue to teach the Carpentry 101 class and looks forward to seeing the workshop grow. Eventually, she will become a certified architect and design her own projects. Until then, she is happy to learn as much as possible. “I think women especially like to be taught how to use something properly before they just pick it up. Once they feel familiar and comfortable with the tools, they can do the rest themselves.”


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Credit: Morgan Pier

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Credit: Morgan Pier


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BY: HANNAH OVERTON


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The finished product in coffee table position

I

felt a brief tinge of angst when my boyfriend told me he wanted to build a coffee table. We had been living together for a few months and our place was really coming together. We managed to hit every sale in Bozeman, regularly driving a route that took us out to Target, then Ross, then Bed, Bath and Beyond, then TJ Maxx, then Pier 1 and finally World Market. There were also occasional stops at Ashley Homestore if it was the weekend and we had just gotten paid. We’d hit garage sales, thrift stores and Craigslist, pulling together an eclectic mix of new and used stuff. All we needed was a coffee table, and when he said he wanted to build and design one, I was appre-hensive. I had never seen him build anything - outside of the graphic design realm - in the time we had been together.

His reasoning made sense: He wanted a game table to play Dungeons and Dragons with friends and he wanted it to be real wood. “But, my living room,” I said. “It’ll look really nice,” he promised. In my head, I saw a pile of wood collecting dust in our garage with unopened cans of stain nearby. I immediately went to my friends to complain. He went to his computer to design the table. Admittedly, he had an unfair advantage. His familiarity with CAD allowed him to make a 3D design that could easily manipulate the overall dimensions (height, width, depth, placement of dice trays, etc.) and show how each piece would fit together. Once satisfied with his design, he calculated the source and

quantity of materials and created an itemized parts list. His plan was to make a normal looking table, but when you pull the top off, voila! Room for games and dice and little 3D printed monster figurines and drinks. He showed me his design. “What if something spills?” I asked “I’m going to seal it so it’s spillproof,” he said. “What if something spills on my couch?” I still wasn’t completely sold on the idea. I had worked so hard and spent so much damn money on making my apartment look nice. The last thing I wanted was a jankity eyesore in my living room. “Keep cool,” I told myself. “Maybe he won’t even build it.” He went to Home Depot and bought the wood, wood conditioner and

33


At Home

stain. I helped him carry it all into the garage. At that point we had had a few discussions on my lack of faith and needing to be more supportive. Through a tight smile, I told him I couldn’t wait to see the finished product and if worse came to worst, maybe someday we’d have a basement and could keep it there.

IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL

He measured each piece and cut the wood with an aggressive tooth hand saw and a miter back saw. Then, he measured and drilled dow joints and used wood glue to put each piece together. While the glue dried, everything was held together with clamps. Once dry, he planed and sanded the joints so they were flush. For the dice trays, he made relief cuts into the wood and used a chisel and mallet to chip away the recess. He cut the top leaves from 3/4-inch plywood and sanded them flush to the table top, then cut and lined the leaves with adhesive veneer using a heat gun. He in-serted pull rings into the leaves for easy removal of the table top.

2018

Carving out the dice recesses

I avoided the garage until the top section of the table was complete. I had to admit, it looked incredible, even in it’s un-sanded, un-stained state. He triumphantly stood on top of it. “It’s indestructible,” he said. “This thing is solid. And heavy. When it’s done, I may need help getting it into the house.” After attaching the legs and the bottom shelf with wood glue, he created his own corner braces out steel angle. He filed the edges of the pieces of steel and then beat them with a ball-peen hammer, coated them in gun-blueing, and scrubbed it off with steel wool for accent. To guard against rust, he sprayed the steel angle and screws with polycrylic.

34

One down, six to go

Dowel joints, while simple, can provide a very strong connection with the right application of wood glue

Once construction was complete, he sanded the coffee table with 220 grit sandpaper and coated it in wood conditioner. After laying down two coats of stain, he applied three coats of poly-urethane, lightly sanding between each coat. Finally, he attached his hammered steel angles to the top corners of the table and brought it inside.

With any removable pieces it's important to test fit and allow enough space to accomodate any layers of paint or polyurethane when finishing the piece.


At Home

A quick wipe-down with wood conditioner helps prevent blotchiness when applying the stain.

IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA

Fabrication complete, onto the finishing process

FALL 2018

Depending on desired depth of color, one or two coats of stain is all it takes.

Apply 3-6 coats of polyurethane for a durable and even finish

This entire process took three months from start to finish. It’s a beautiful coffee table. It looks better than most of what you will find in a store and you would never notice that right below the top leaves are decks of cards and action figures. Plus, it’s unique, made from his blood and sweat, and my tears. In fact, several of his friends have asked if he’d be interested in building them a table. This do-it-yourself project sparked inspiration in my boyfriend, and he spends even more time working out designs and dreaming up new projects. As for me? I’m happy to sit at my gorgeous, one-of-akind coffee table, drinking coffee and eating crow.

The finished product ready for some games

35


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

Dynamic Deux-o SELF TAUGHT TEAM TACKLES RE-DESIGNS WITH SKILL & HUMOR BY: HANNAH STIFF

36


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

M

ichele Oakland and Heather Klein will be the first to tell you that they’re not professional decorators or interior designers. That fact doesn’t deter them from their passion: creating beautiful spaces on a budget. Together, the pair founded the company Re-Deux Designs. “We’re creating a niche for people who are looking for a more economical way to decorate their home,” Klein explains. “Not everyone can afford to hire a designer.” Not that there’s anything wrong with that, the Re-Deux team reiterates. But for the budget-conscious client, Oakland and Klein come to the rescue. “We are not designers,” Oakland explains. “We are not trying to compete with interior designers. We like to redo things. We like to help people decorate.” The team says they specialize in re-creating spaces to help clients fall in love with their home without spending a fortune. In practice, that means Klein and Oakland do everything from moving furniture around to give a room a new vibe, to re-staining leather couches to make them look fresh from the showroom floor, to painting and staging rooms. So far, they’ve tackled projects that include hanging heavy glass doors as artwork, painting intricate wooden bannisters, re-covering chairs with cowhide, creating outdoor entertaining spaces, and more. Long before their venture into the decorating business, the pair was friends in Billings, some 20 years ago. Both ended up in Bozeman after their husbands moved for banking jobs. Klein and Oakland experienced their own career shifts over the years, too. Klein went from banking to working at a church. Oakland stayed busy as a hairdresser and an active member of her church’s outreach team. It was a personal project that launched the duo into their first attempt at re-creating a space.

37


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

38

“Heather wanted to redo her house,” Oakland explains. “She said, ‘It just isn’t me.’” So Klein enlisted Oakland’s help giving her house a facelift. Together they painted doors and restained stairs and bannisters. “We just started changing my whole house,” Klein recalls. “We started giving everything a fresh look.” Whether helping frustrated novice renovators with a paint job or repurposing furniture to give it new life, Oakland and Klein are happiest when they can tackle a project themselves. “I tell clients, ‘Let’s get all your decorating stuff out,’” Oakland says. “‘Let’s make your things look different, like brand new stuff. You don’t need a new table, you just need to stain that.’” Outsourcing the work to “professionals” can add up quickly and many projects the Re-Deux team

feels comfortable tackling for their clients. “One thing that sets us apart is we do a lot of the work ourselves,” Klein says. “We don’t try to hire the work out if we can do it. If we can paint it, we’ll paint it. We love doing the hands on work of it.” If they aren’t able to complete a certain task, the Re-Deux team refers clients to their Rolodex of competent local handymen, painters and carpenters. While Oakland and Klein are happy finding bargains for clients at TJ Maxx, they also serve folks who have more upscale flavors in mind. The team recalls a client who was having a hard time selling his home in an upscale Bozeman neighborhood. After carefully staging the place, their client found a buyer. So far, the Re-Deux team has unplugged from traditional advertising. “People mostly hear about us by word of mouth,” Klein explains.

“We started out helping friends and now we’re helping friends of friends.” While they do have business cards with an email address and cellphone number, they do not have a website or post their work to social media - yet. And no matter how their next clients find them, Oakland and Klein are ready, with a sense of humor and arsenal of skills, to boot. “We try really hard to listen to the client and not push our style on them,” Klein says. “It’s their home and they have to love it.” Oakland adds that each job truly is a labor of love. “We are doing this because we like to work together and with our clients,” she says. “We have so much fun. It’s really the primary reason we do it.” **To reach Oakland & Klein, send a message to redeuxdesigns1@ gmail.com


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL

2018

39


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

40

Fall Entertaining GATHER ROUND THE COMPANY IN A COZY SPACE WITH TASTY FOOD BY: HANNAH STIFF


IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

You don’t have to order new decorative pillows and burn cinnamon and pumpkin candles all day to get ready for a fabulous fall party. We teamed up with Latitude 45 Owner Karen Rose to talk about the basics of entertaining well and finding a timeless style for your home, no matter the season.

At Home

C

risp air, crunchy leaves and pumpkin spice everything signal the return of fall. In Montana, that might also mean dragging out snowsuits for Halloween costumes and studded tires when the roads get slick. Though Montanans know how to hunker in for a long winter starting in September, it’s still nice to be able to gather friends and family around a cozy hearth before the days get even shorter.

Latitude 45 is Rose’s outdoor event venue that can be used for weddings, family reunions, corporate retreats, farm-to-table dinners and more. Saddled beside a craggy hillside along rolling farm fields outside Logan, Rose launched her company at her scenic property earlier this year. One

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At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA

dinner at her place and instantly you want more - more stunning views, more meals prepared with Montana ingredients by renowned private chefs, more of Rose’s entertaining tips to try at home. While the weather is too chilly for outdoor farm-to-table dinners, Rose says the party does not have to stop. To kick things off, lace up the hiking boots and get ready for a full moon hike this fall, Rose recommends.

FALL 2018

“Pack backpacks with hot cider, Fireball to add, pumpkin bread, baked apples with brie cheese, caramel corn and other favorite snacks,” Rose says. “Hike up to a hilltop, spread out blankets and watch the moon rise!” If you prefer to entertain indoors, Rose has tricks for saving money, while setting a stunning table. “The key to pulling it all together is to start with quality dishes,” Rose says. “Quality china dishes mostly from England are well made and sport beautiful colors, patterns and shapes. Once you have started finding that classy look, then your eye is drawn to other pieces like it.”

42

While on the dish hunt, Rose recommends turning each dish over to look at the country of origin and the manufacturer. “Cheap dishes look cheap but are the same price as the expensive ones at thrift stores so search for quality only,” Rose explains. “Then add linens - white pure linen is always best. For glassware, think beautiful crystal and simple serving pieces.” Once you feel confident about your table settings, it’s time to spice up the decor in your home. “I decorate for fall by focusing on Thanksgiving,” Rose says. “I like to spray paint pumpkins gold and silver and fill an antique cart with them and some gourds, leaves and chrysanthemums. I put out apple baskets on my front deck.” For the table, add small vases of beautiful feathers (quail and pheasant feathers work well in Fall arrangements) or smaller baskets of apples and gourds. Set miniature pumpkins atop small wood stumps to add interest and dimension to the table. If you have a favorite fall flower, add it sparingly to your feather vases or intertwine in a simple garland around your pumpkins and gourds.


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

43 If the idea of entertaining a large group is daunting, Rose says keep it simple put your new table setting and decor to use for a small group of friends. After a trial run with an intimate group, Rose says you will know which pieces are just right and which belong somewhere else. “Decide what stays and what goes after that then keep adding and subtracting,” Rose says. “Make some favorite delicious foods and pour good drinks and you are set to entertain again.” To find those tasty eats, Bozeman registered dietician Lindsay Kordick shared a few of her fall favorites with us. Kordick stresses that healthy meals don’t have to taste bland. To start, she recommends a sweet potato, farro and kale salad. “This salad makes me think of the diet of the pilgrims,” Kordicks explains. “Whole foods and simple ingredients combine to provide big flavors. No need for marshmallows - it’s likely not something pilgrims ate.”

For a main course, serve guests a warming, hearty dish. Kordick recommends a tasty tomatillo chili bisque. Pair the savory soup with Kordick’s favorite “brain muffins.” “They are my version of a bran muffin,” Kordick explains. “The name comes from the high omega-3 content of these gems. Omega-3 fatty acids, specifically DHA, are essential for brain function. Walnuts and flax meal are both excellent sources of omega-3s.” To drink, serve cider from Rocky Creek Farms. Bring your own apples to press or enjoy the organic apples from the farm; whatever you do, make sure to make enough cider for everyone! With a table set for a feast and recipes to fill plates and bowls, it’s time to gather the guests around. So light the pumpkin spice candle if you must, and get ready to open your doors to friends and family this fall season - come whatever weather may.


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

Tomatillo Chili Bisque

Photo and recipe credit: Lindsay Kay Kordick

44

Serves ~6

1 Tbsp olive oil 3 cloves garlic, pressed and minced 1 large yellow onion, chopped 7 oz canned green chiles 1 can low sodium canned diced tomatoes, with juice 1/2 tsp salt 1/4 tsp black pepper 2 1/2 tsp chili powder 1 1/2 tsp cumin 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper, to taste 2 lb fresh tomatillos, husked and chopped 2 cups low sodium vegetable broth 2 cans white beans, drained and rinsed 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves. 2 cups light sour cream

Heat olive oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat. Add garlic and chopped onions and sauté until fragrant, ~5 minutes. Add green chiles, tomatoes, spices, and tomatillos. Continue to sauté ~ 5 minutes. Add vegetable broth, beans and cilantro and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer covered for 20 minutes, until all vegetables are very soft. Use an immersion blender to puree all ingredients (alternately, you can transfer amounts of ingredients into a blender and puree). Whisk in sour cream. Allow to heat through over low heat, about five minutes, then serve. Garnish with roasted pepitas (shelled pumpkin seeds).

Nutrition Info per 1 1/2 cups: 319 calories, 9 g fat, 16 g protein, 35 g carbohydrates, 9.5 g fiber


1 1/4 cups wheat bran 1/4 cup flax meal 1 cup low fat buttermilk 1/3 cup no sugar added applesauce 1 egg, beaten 1/2 cup brown sugar 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract 1 cup all purpose flour 1 tsp baking soda 1 tsp baking powder 2/3 cup golden raisins, divided 2/3 cup chopped walnuts, divided

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Mix together wheat bran, flax meal and buttermilk and let stand for 10 minutes. Beat together applesauce, egg, sugar and vanilla and add to the bran mixture. Stir together flour, baking soda, and baking powder. Stir flour mixture into buttermilk mixture, until just blended. Fold in 1/3 cup raisins and 1/2 cup walnuts and spoon batter into lined muffin tins, filling each nearly to the top. Sprinkle tops of muffins with remaining walnuts and raisins. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of a muffin comes out clean. Cool and enjoy! Store in an airtight container.

2018

Makes 12 muffins

FALL

Brain Muffins

2 yams or sweet potatoes, cubed Olive oil spray 1/4 tsp salt Ground black pepper 1 1/2 cups vegetable broth 1/2 cup farro, rinsed 1 cup kale, chopped 1/4 whole red onion, thinly sliced 1/2 cup pecans, chopped

IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA

Serves 6-8

At Home

Sweet Potato, Farro, and Kale Salad with Maple Vinaigrette

Vinaigrette 1 tsp olive oil 1 1/2 Tbsp white wine vinegar 1 tsp Dijon mustard 2 Tbsp pure maple syrup 1/4 tsp salt Ground black pepper Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place sweet potato cubes onto a baking sheet and spray with olive oil, then sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast sweet potatoes for 12 minutes, or until cooked through (but not mushy). Remove from oven and place sweet potatoes into a bowl and refrigerate. Bring vegetable broth to a boil then reduce heat to mediumlow. Cook for 30 minutes or until all broth has been absorbed. Transfer farro to the bowl with the sweet potatoes and chill for 30 minutes. When sweet potatoes and farro have cooled, toss with onions, kale and pecans. Whisk together dressing ingredients and pour dressing over the salad. Toss to coat. Serve immediately, or chill for three to four hours prior to serving. Nutrition Info per 2/3 cup: 164 calories, 7.5 g fat, 2 g protein, 20 g carbohydrates, 3.5 g fiber

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At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA FALL 2018

46

State of the Market

I

AN UPDATE ON HOUSING BY: HANNAH STIFF

t’s no secret that Montana State University’s soaring enrollment, a growing tech sector, and families flocking to the valley for a great quality of life continue to influence the local housing market. According to population estimates released by the U.S. Census Bureau earlier this year, Bozeman is ranked the fastest growing micropolitan area of its size in the nation. While builders stay swamped with projects, the City of Bozeman looks at urban infill and affordable housing options, and renters do their best to cope with a volatile market, we looked to real estate professionals to offer insight into the status local housing market. Bozeman Berkshire Hathaway Owner and Broker Mike Basile says the housing market might just be “leveling off.” “At the beginning of the year, we had a lack of inventory and a tremendous amount of buyers,” Basile explains. “That probably went right through July. Then, all of the sudden we’re seeing a lot more inventory - homes - on the market.” The Gallatin Association of Realtors echoed Basile, saying the housing market during the summer was “active” and buyer competition manifested in fast-paced negotiations and sales above asking price. Price tags around the valley reflected the competitive market. In the second quarter of 2018, median home sales prices again rose. For a single-family home, the median sales price increased 6.7 percent to $395,000 and 16.4 percent to $290,950 for condominiums and townhouses. The average home price continued to rise steeply to $538,637 in the second quarter. That’s a more than a

13 percent increase over the same time period last year. In the second quarter alone, realtors sold 468 single family homes, a more than 10 percent increase in sales over the previous year’s second quarter sales and a rapid uptick from the 283 single-family homes sold in the first quarter of 2018. Single-family homes spent an average of 59 days on the market before being sold. Townhomes and condos were on the market for 62 days, on average in the second quarter, before selling. According to the National Association of Home Builders, in August, high home prices, lack of inventory, rising interest rates and increased building material costs moved housing affordability to a 10-year low, and guided the Gallatin County market to its current status. By summer’s end, the housing frenzy slowed somewhat. Bidding wars became less frequent and buyers, for the first time in a while, had more time and more inventory. “The housing supply outlook in several markets is beginning to show an increase in new construction and a move by builders away from overstocked rental units to new developments for sale,” according to GAR. “These are encouraging signs in an already healthy marketplace.” Another sign of good luck for buyers: price reductions. “Though there a fair numbers of buyers, they have more to choose from now,” Basile says. “There are a significant amount


At Home IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA

construction and operating in city limits, I just don’t see how we’re going to have prices drop dramatically.”

of price reductions. The increase in inventory combined with price reductions means we’re having a leveling off of market. It’s a better market for buyers. And for sellers, they have to be a little more in line with the market is doing.”

Bozeman isn’t the only area with hefty home prices. Outlying towns like Belgrade, Manhattan and Three Forks are getting spendier, too.

According to GAR data, median household income has risen 2.6 percent in the last 12 months and while home prices are up 6 percent. “That kind of gap will eventually create fewer sales due to affordability concerns, which is happening in several markets, especially in the middle to high-middle price ranges,” the association of realtors states.

FALL

“Belgrade prices have risen dramatically this year,” Basile says. “They are not quite what Bozeman is, but they’ve risen dramatically. This year we’ve seen more increases than I’ve ever seen in Three Forks as far as number of sales, price increases and number people looking there.”

2018

Despite busy markets around the valley, Basile insists it’s a great time to buy.

While that seems like a breath of fresh air for anyone in the market to purchase a home, Basile says prices in Bozeman will likely never plummet or return to previously more affordable prices. And he should know; Basile has worked in real estate in the Gallatin Valley for 38 years.

“Interest rates are as low as they’re going to be for the foreseeable future,” he explains. “By the end of this year, interest rates will have risen four times. Rates are still under five percent, but by this time next year, I envision we’ll be in mid fives to sixes.”

“I don’t believe we’ll get back to a truly more affordable Bozeman,” Basile says. “The market can certainly dip, but with the cost of land and

**For more information on real estate trends in Gallatin County, visit gallatinrealtors.com

New Listings

47

A count of the properties that have been newly listed on the market in a given month.

Q2-2018

707

Year to Date 1,141

1,081 1,088

652

645

276

542

253

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

- 8.8%

+ 1.1%

- 3.5%

+ 15.6%

Single Family

503

319

+ 9.3%

2018

- 20.7%

Condo/Townhouse

Single Family

Year-Over-Year Change

Condo / Townhouse

Q3-2015

528

-2.4%

234

-16.4%

Q4-2015

279

+4.5%

175

+10.8%

Q1-2016

434

-0.9%

227

-7.7%

Q2-2016

707

+9.3%

276

-3.5%

Q3-2016

553

+4.7%

207

-11.5%

Q4-2016

249

-10.8%

142

-18.9%

Q1-2017

436

+0.5%

223

-1.8%

Q2-2017

645

-8.8%

319

+15.6%

Q3-2017

545

-1.4%

234

+13.0%

Q4-2017

279

+12.0%

175

+23.2%

Q1-2018

436

0.0%

209

-6.3%

Q2-2018

652

+1.1%

253

-20.7%

12-Month Avg

479

+0.3%

223

-1.4%

New Listings

462

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

+ 5.2%

- 5.3%

+ 0.6%

- 5.5%

+ 7.8%

- 14.8%

Single Family

Year-Over-Year Change

Condo/Townhouse

Historical New Listings by Month

Single Family

Condo/Townhouse

800

600

400

200

0 Q1-2004

Q1-2005

Q1-2006

Q1-2007

Q1-2008

Q1-2009

Q1-2010

Q1-2011

Q1-2012

Q1-2013

Q1-2014

Q1-2015

Q1-2016

Q1-2017

Q1-2018

Current as of July 10, 2018.All data from Big Sky Country Multiple Listing Service®. Report © 2018 ShowingTime. | 4


At Home

Pending Sales A count of the properties on which offers have been accepted in a given month.

IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA

Q2-2018

Year to Date

899

516 467

461

243

250

Pending Sales

854

828

458

251

453

469

FALL

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

+ 16.5%

- 9.5%

- 1.3%

+ 13.6%

+ 2.9%

+ 0.4%

+ 9.1%

- 7.9%

+ 3.1%

+ 18.0%

- 1.1%

+ 3.5%

Single Family

Condo/Townhouse

Single Family

Single Family

Year-Over-Year Change

Condo / Townhouse

Year-Over-Year Change

Q3-2015

425

+7.1%

199

-6.6%

Q4-2015

226

-11.0%

148

+5.0%

Q1-2016

383

+0.5%

215

+23.6%

Q2-2016

516

+16.5%

243

+13.6%

Q3-2016

419

-1.4%

213

+7.0%

Q4-2016

277

+22.6%

123

-16.9%

Q1-2017

361

-5.7%

203

-5.6%

Q2-2017

467

-9.5%

250

+2.9%

Q3-2017

412

-1.7%

194

-8.9%

Q4-2017

298

+7.6%

137

+11.4%

Q1-2018

393

+8.9%

218

+7.4%

Q2-2018

461

-1.3%

251

+0.4%

12-Month Avg

387

+6.4%

200

+8.1%

Condo/Townhouse

2018

Historical Pending Sales by Month

Single Family

Condo/Townhouse

600

500

400

300

200

100

0 Q1-2004

Q1-2005

Q1-2006

Q1-2007

Q1-2008

Q1-2009

Q1-2010

Q1-2011

Q1-2012

Q1-2013

Q1-2014

Q1-2015

Q1-2016

Q1-2017

Q1-2018

Current as of July 10, 2018.All data from Big Sky Country Multiple Listing Service®. Report © 2018 ShowingTime. | 5

48

Closed Sales A count of the actual sales that closed in a given month.

Q2-2018

Year to Date

471

468

723

425

233

2016

+ 10.3%

208

715

751

240

373

346

389

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

- 9.8%

+ 10.1%

+ 9.4%

- 10.7%

+ 15.4%

+ 6.5%

- 1.1%

+ 5.0%

+ 12.3%

- 7.2%

+ 12.4%

Single Family

Condo/Townhouse

Single Family

Year-Over-Year Change

Condo / Townhouse

Year-Over-Year Change

Q3-2015

439

-0.7%

230

+10.0%

Q4-2015

342

+2.7%

161

-10.1%

Q1-2016

252

0.0%

140

+17.6%

Q2-2016

471

+10.3%

233

+9.4%

Q3-2016

475

+8.2%

228

-0.9%

Q4-2016

368

+7.6%

196

+21.7%

Q1-2017

290

+15.1%

138

-1.4%

Q2-2017

425

-9.8%

208

-10.7%

Q3-2017

451

-5.1%

215

-5.7%

Q4-2017

391

+6.3%

220

+12.2%

Q1-2018

283

-2.4%

149

+8.0%

Q2-2018

468

+10.1%

240

+15.4%

12-Month Avg

388

+8.4%

197

+9.1%

Closed Sales

Single Family

Condo/Townhouse

Historical Closed Sales by Month

Single Family

Condo/Townhouse

500

400

300

200

100

0 Q1-2004

Q1-2005

Q1-2006

Q1-2007

Q1-2008

Q1-2009

Q1-2010

Q1-2011

Q1-2012

Q1-2013

Q1-2014

Q1-2015

Q1-2016

Q1-2017

Q1-2018

Current as of July 10, 2018.All data from Big Sky Country Multiple Listing Service®. Report © 2018 ShowingTime. | 6


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Median Sales Price Point at which half of the sales sold for more and half sold for less, not accounting for seller concessions, in a given month.

$350,000

Year to Date

$370,300

Median Sales Price

$400,000

$395,000 $345,000

$365,000

$290,950 $230,000

$289,900 $260,250

$250,000

$225,000

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

2016

2017

2018

+ 5.8%

+ 6.7%

+ 15.1%

+ 8.7%

+ 16.4%

+ 4.5%

+ 5.8%

+ 9.6%

Single Family

Condo/Townhouse

Single Family

2017

2016

2018

+ 13.6% + 15.7%

+ 11.4%

Condo/Townhouse

Year-Over-Year Change

Condo / Townhouse

Year-Over-Year Change

+9.6%

Q3-2015

$330,445

+9.7%

$213,750

Q4-2015

$335,250

+12.5%

$210,000

+3.4%

Q1-2016

$329,500

+3.0%

$219,500

+12.6%

Q2-2016

$350,000

+4.5%

$230,000

+15.1%

Q3-2016

$349,900

+5.9%

$227,000

+6.2%

Q4-2016

$345,000

+2.9%

$269,360

+28.3%

Q1-2017

$350,993

+6.5%

$277,140

+26.3%

Q2-2017

$370,300

+5.8%

$250,000

+8.7%

Q3-2017

$379,000

+8.3%

$263,000

+15.9%

Q4-2017

$385,000

+11.6%

$241,725

-10.3%

Q1-2018

$410,000

+16.8%

$288,000

+3.9%

Q2-2018

$395,000

+6.7%

$290,950

+16.4%

12-Month Avg*

$392,000

+15.2%

$272,900

+22.3%

* Median Sales Price for all properties from Q3-2015 through Q2-2018. This is not the average of the individual figures above.

Single Family

2018

Historical Median Sales Price by Month

FALL

2016

+ 4.5%

Single Family

IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA

Q2-2018

Condo/Townhouse

$500,000

$400,000

$300,000

$200,000

Q1-2005

Q1-2006

Q1-2007

Q1-2008

Q1-2009

Q1-2010

Q1-2011

Q1-2012

Q1-2013

Q1-2014

Q1-2015

Q1-2016

Q1-2017

Q1-2018

Current as of July 10, 2018.All data from Big Sky Country Multiple Listing Service®. Report © 2018 ShowingTime. | 8

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49

Fall GardeninG needs

North 19th at Springhill Road

587-3406

www.CashmanNursery.com

1742058

$100,000 Q1-2004


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14300 Flaming Arrow, Bozeman | $1,495,000

Bozeman, Big Sky, Livingston & Ennis

eralandmark.com | (406)586-1321 | info@eralandmark.com Robyn Erlenbush, CRB, Broker/Owner. Each office independently owned and operated.

*Property subject to price change and prior sale. Please contact us for current status.

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4949 JACKRABBIT LN • 388.6400

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1243 W OAK ST • 586.2384

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bhhsmt.com 2001 Stadium Drive, Suite A 37 S Willson Avenue

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