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P O R T F O L I O O F B OX I A WA N G Master of Landscape Architecture II, 2017 Harvard Graduate School of Design


BOXIA WANG LEED Green Associate

375 Harvard Street, Apt 7 | Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138 814-777-4618 | boxiawang@gmail.com | bwang1@gsd.harvard.edu

Education

Harvard University | Graduate School of Design, Expected 2017 Master of Landscape Architecture II The Pennsylvania State University | Stuckeman School, May 2015 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Minor in Geographical Information Science (GIS). Study Abroad | Fall 2014| Akademie fĂźr Internationale Bildung, Bonn, Germany. University of Maryland | Summer, 2012 Geographical Information System Remote Sensing and Advanced Geo-Spatial Mapping courses

Awards & Publication

Distinction in 2017 Spring GSD Option Studio | May, 2017 Nominated GSD Platform 10 Sea Rise and Sun Set: Modeling Urban Morphologies for Resilience in Miami Beach ASLA Student Hornor Award | Pennsylvania-Delaware Chapter, 2015 American Society of Landscape Architects Student Honor & Merit Award Program Undergraduate Category Representing Landscapes: Digital | By Amoroso, Nadia Selected exploded axon graphic for Chapter 10: Landscapes the Fit Together, P119, 2015 Creative Achievement Award | The Pennsylvania State University, 2015 College of Arts & Architecture

Experience

Harvard GSD | Cambridge, MA, April-May, 2017 Research Assistant for Chalres Waldheim Harvard GSD | Cambridge, MA, Aug-Dec, 2016 Teaching Assistant for Landscape Architecture Core I studio SCAPE / Landscape Architecture PLLC | New York City, May-July, 2016 Intern, Landscape Architect WEST 8 | New York City, Jan, 2016 Externship, Landscape Architect PWL Partnership | Shanghai, China, May-August, 2014 Intern, Landscape Architect Southeast University | Nanjing, China, May-July, 2013 Intern, Architectural Design and Research Institute

Technical Skills

Rhinoceros 5: Vray, Grasshopper, SketchUp, ArcScene, CNC router, Laser Cutter Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign, After Effect, iMovie AutoDesk: AutoCAD GIS: ArcMap 10.2.2 | City Engine | ENVI


Contents 01

Alternative Society for Sea Level Rise, Miami Beach, FL Harvard GSD Spring 2017, Studio Advisor: Charles Waldheim

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02

Productive Green Belt, Jerusalem, Israel Harvard GSD Spring 2016, Studio Advisor: Alex Krieger, Ofer Manor

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03

Grey, Green, and Blue Landscape, Rome, Italy Penn State Spring 2014, Studio Advisor: Christopher Counts, Maria Counts

24

04

The Beauty of Erosion, Lake Erie, Ohio Penn State Fall 2013, Studio Advisor: Karen Lutsky

30

05

Cycle of The City, Baltimore, MD Penn State Spring 2014, Studio Advisor: Barry Kew

36

06

Industrial Revitalization, Ashtabula, Ohio

40

Other Works

44

Penn State Fall 2013, Studio Advisor: Karen Lutsky

GSD Landscape Core 3 Landform Study Design for Flooding, Newtown Creek Internship in Scape Landscape Architecture

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01 Alternative Society for Sea Level Rise

Sea Rise and Sun Set: Modeling Urban Morphologies for Resilience in Miami Beach Individual Project Studio Advisor: Charles Waldheim Harvard GSD Spring 2017 Nominated for GSD Platform 10 Distinction Honor

“New infrastructure projects are being developed for a landscape that no longer exists.” — Betsy Kolbert, New Yorker

of imagining a more resilient model of urban adaptation incorporating ecological performance through relation modeling of urban morphology.

This studio develops strategies for urban adaptation to the imminent effects of sea level rise and storm event in the fragile ecological and cultural context of Miami Beach. Members of the studio will be invited to develop innovative models of resilient urban morphology in response to the twin drivers of sea level rise and solar orientation. These models will be developed through a series of relational urban modeling exercises examining the geology and hydrology, ecology and typology of Miami Beach.

The design research agenda for the studio focuses on the development of relational modeling of urban form with respect to parameters of ecological performance. The discourses and practices of landscape urbanism have advocated for the deployment of relational urban modeling, this work has been most effective with respect to questions of land formation, field definition, ecological performance, and biological integration. While these are laudable goals, they have tended to neglect the more directly architectonic concerns of a built form, block structure, and overall urban envelope.

Miami Beach’s coastal barrier islands form one of the most recognizable and singularly valuable cultural landscapes in the world. Miami Beach is also the North American city presently under the most immediate threat of sea level and storm event. The city presently endures flooding on a regular basis. Often these are ‘blue-sky’ floods in the absence of any storm, and enhanced by the effects of the lunar cycle and associated ‘king-tides.’ In response to these conditions the city of Miami Beach has recently embarked on an ambitious program of civil engineering projects to elevate streets, install pump stations, and stay ahead of the ongoing slow disaster of sea level rise. While this work focuses on the immediate and shortterm challenges of urban adaptation, it does little to incorporate ecological systems, to enhance hydrological performance, or to imagine a coherent public realm. This studio takes up the challenge

This studio seeks to redress this imbalance through the performative modeling of urban form, in relation to various drivers of ecological performance. Among the myriad potential parameters of urban form, the agenda for the studio identifies two primary drivers: sea level and solar orientation. The case of Miami Beach has been selected precisely for the clarity of these two issues as relevant to questions of architectural identity and urban form. Miami Beach was created as a destination venue for solar spectacle and sun-drenched recreation since it was dredged up from the bottom of the Biscayne Bay over a century ago.

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Landform + Plublic Realm To keep the city alive while sea level continues to rise, decisions were made to elevate some of the edge for urban activities and allow the rest of the land adaptive to flooding. Therefore, the general strategy is to elevate the urban blocks so that they are the only “water proofing� area, while the rest of the land, including the landform closer to the edge and the water channels in between urban blocks, serves as green infrastructures. New development is imagined as a resort inviting tourists and a destination attracting local residents. Within the site limit, nine urban blocks with independent programs are connected to existing urban blocks by three elevated driveways. These driveways, looping around each block, are the only vehicular streets existing in the site. The blocks are relatively isolated to each other, and each of them is designed to have a special character.


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The Ecological Factor of Landform

Mangrove

Site Context

Landform Typology Module

Miami Beach used to be a Mangrove Swamp before civilized. Since the local ecology was destroyed. Planting different species of mangrove has different habits could benefit the city from different ways.

Eco and Hydro system

There are four types of mangrove communities dominating the southern Florida area, including overwashed island, fringe, basin and riverine mangrove communities. Each of those has different ecological functions as well as distinct preference of elevation, water salinity, and moist level.

Site Condition

The site is a 2000m x 800m square located on the west side of Miami Beach towards the bay. While the entire Miami Beach is facing the problem of Sealevel Rise, the lands adjacent to the bay is among the most vulnerable. Because of the built of the causeways which connect Miami and Miami Beach, water flow in this region is limited to the arrows in the diagram. Beased on this water flow, a grid system was created to locate the Mangrove Island.

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Mangrove Community

Landform Strategy Miami Beach used to be a Mangrove Swamp before civilized. Since the local ecology was destroyed. Planting different species of mangrove has different habits could benefit the city from different ways.

FRINGE + ELEVATE Elevate Edge Build up “wall� for Sea Level Rise BASIN

Equally Divided Grid System

+ HOLD Collect and hold on site for different uses RIVERINE

Rectangular grid

+ DISTRIBUTE Potential for distributing stormwater

Grid

Single

Grid

Double

Grid

Group

Grid

Group

Grid

Double

Grid

Single

Group

Grid

Group

Grid

Group

Unevenly Divided Grid System

OVERWASHED ISLAND

+ DIVERT barrier for salt water

Rectangular grid

Grid

Grid

Group


Transect Development

The Ecological Factor of Landform

Site Plan/General Strategy

Detail Design/Block Revolution

Process I: Rectangular Grid Block Structure

Process II: Modified Curvilinear Block Structure

Follow the original city grid, this proposal tests the porformance of rectangular urban form in terms of view towards the bay and shades of the blocks.

Blocks in the previous grid system are prevented to maximize views towards the bay. Thus, alternating the rows of blocks in curvilinear form work better.

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With simplified radial grid, mangrove islands are designed to distribute in the grids with size and density changes. A strip of islands intentionally separates saltwater and freshwater systems. Their size and shape change in relationship with current direction and its adjacency to the shoreline.

Each of those has different ecological functions as well as distinct preference of elevation, water salinity, and moist level. In this design, four zones of landform are generated in relation to each mangrove community.

Process III: Variation in Curvilinear Road System

Process IV: Final Block and Landscape System

Different proposals of how streets should be planned to connect the blocks and which blocks should be connected as a group.

Instead of a interconneted grid system, 3 major streets only connects the blocks on the same row. Secondary Streets are wrapping around each block.


Block and Buildings 3 major streets connects the blocks on the same row. Secondary Streets are wrapping around each block.

Street System At the end of the 3 major roads, there are boardwalks going through the landforms for pedestrain. Landform Zone 1 Overwahsed Mangrove Islands

Landform Zone 2 Basin Landform Zone

Landform Zone 3 Fringe Mangrove Zone

Landform Zone 4 Highland Riverine Zone

Group of larger Mangrove islands near the edge of the water reduces erosion and adapt with sea level rise.

Saltwater basins are distributed in this zone to both provide shelters for wildlife and collect high tide water during low tide.

This is where freshwater and saltwater meet. Red Mangroves dominate the fringe, protecting the shoreline of Miami Beach.

Stormwater are allocated in these channels and distributed to the bay. These channels largely reduce the chance of flooding in urban area.

Bay

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This study builds upon the concept of “heliomorphism” as developed by the Office for Urbanization and informed by a reading of Ralph Knowles’s conception of the “solar envelope.”

Large Mangrove Island Zone Washed Red Mangrove Islands

Tree Planting System The freshwater and salt water systems are separated by a “living“ seawall, where Mangroves are planted. Landform and Hydrology System The freshwater and salt water systems are separated by a “living“ seawall, where Mangroves are planted.

Urban

View factor vs. Solar factor Three rows of urban blocks. West row is sloped to maximize its view towards the bay. Middle row is shaped to minimize its shadow on other buildings and maximize its view, while solar factor overseas view factor.

Inter Tidal Zone Daily Flux Red Mangrove

Seasonally Flooded Zone Frindge (red+black) Mangrove Community


Block and Courtyard Typology

Block Typology 1 -Courtyard

Block Typology 2 -Tower on Plinth

Block Typology 3 -Grouped urban Block

Educational: Library, Bookstore, Cafe Reading, Sitting, Meditation

High-rise hotels as tourist resort/destinations

Artistic clustures of galleries, stores, small museums

Recreational: Gym, sports club, Boulder Playful, entertainment

June 21st 12:00 pm

June 21st 02:00 pm

Sept 21st 10:00 am

Sept 21st 12:00 pm

Sept 21st 02:00 pm

Dec 21st 10:00 am

Dec 21st 12:00 pm

Dec 21st 02:00 pm

Podium: Shopping on first 2 stories Garden/swimming pool on roof

Food: Resturant, Bar, Club Eating, Resting, Chatting

Buildings are built on higher land with waterways passing between them, collecting rainwater and distributs to larger pools at the end of the freshwater system.

Courtyard Urban Forestry

June 21st 10:00 am

Riverine Mangrove Zone

Courtyard Urban Forestry

Riverine Mangrove Zone

Courtyard Urban Forestry

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Inspirational Axon Urban strategy

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To keep the city alive while sea level continues to rise, decisions were made to elevate some of the edge for urban activities and allow the rest of the land adaptive to flooding. Therefore, the general strategy is to elevate the urban blocks so that they are the only “water proofing� area, while the rest of the land, including the landform closer to the edge and the water channels in between urban blocks, serves as green infrastructures. This new development is imagined as a resort inviting tourists and a destination attracting local residents. Within the site limit, nine urban blocks with independent programs are connected to existing urban blocks by three elevated driveways. These driveways, looping around each block, are the only vehicular streets existing in the site. The blocks are relatively isolated to each other, and each of them is designed to have a special character. For example, the first three blocks that are close water are programed for three themes related to activities in Miami Beach, including sports, food and reading. The second row includes brands of hotels in the high rises and shopping centers on the first 2 stories. On the other hand, people are invited to walk on boardwalks that going deeply into the mangrove islands, bypassing all zones of mangrove communities.


Public Acess around the islands

Public Acess along the fringe

Island Typology subject to tidal inundation, dominated by red mangroves difference between mangrove fringe forests and overwash islands: latter, the entire island is typically inundated on each tidal cycle. They are often the site of bird rookeries

Integration of Hydrological, Ecological and Social Influence The design of pedestain boardwalks, and mangrove islands and the changing tides interacts well together.

Public Acess Along the river

Fringe Mangrove Typology

Mangrove in Basin Typology

Red mangroves dominate fringe forests, but when local topology rises toward the uplands, other species may be included in zones above the water line.

Here, natural patterns of freshwater discharge remain intact. Salinity drops during the wet season, when rains cause extensive freshwater runoff; Saltwater and Freshwater Meets. Most highly productive.

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New Waterfront

of Miami Beach’s Bay Side

Based on research, there are four types of mangrove communities dominating the southern Florida area, including overwashed island, fringe, basin and riverine mangrove communities. Each of those has different ecological functions as well as distinct preference of elevation, water salinity, and moist level. In this design, four zones of landform are generated in relation to each mangrove community. A strip of islands intentionally separates saltwater and freshwater systems. Their size and shape change in relationship with current direction and its adjacency to the shoreline. Miami Beach’s coastal barrier islands form one of the most recognizable and singularly valuable cultural landscapes in the world. Miami Beach is also the North American city presently under the most immediate threat of sea level and storm event. The city presently endures flooding on a regular basis. Often these are ‘blue-sky’ floods in the absence of any storm, and enhanced by the effects of the lunar cycle and associated ‘king-tides.’ In response to these conditions the City of Miami Beach has recently embarked on an ambitious program of civil engineering projects to elevate streets, install pump stations, and stay ahead of the ongoing slow disaster of sea level rise. While this work focuses on the immediate and short-term challenges of urban adaptation, it does little to incorporate ecological systems, to enhance hydrological performance, or to imagine a coherent public realm. The city’s future is equally bound up in reconciling the tensions between its adaptations to sea level for survival on the one hand, and the ongoing demand for destination recreation, leisure, and excess on the other. While both water and sun, are found in abundance in South Florida, the precise regulation of their economies and interactions have been historically shaped through urbanism and architecture. As the climate changes, the sea rises, and storms increase, Miami Beach is transforming the baseline assumptions underlying its infrastructural and architectonic identity. In so doing, the City’s work raises larger scale and longer-term questions of the nature of the public realm as well as the potential for new relations between sun and sand, water and sky

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02 Productive Green Belt Oh, Jerusalem: Eternal Center / Generic Periphery Collaborator: Meng Zhu Studio Advisor: Alex Krieger, Ofer Manor Harvard GSD Spring 2016

“Jerusalem …. focus of the struggle between the Abrahamic religions, the shrine for increasingly popular Christian, Jewish and Islamic fundamentalism, the strategic battlefield of clashing civilizations, the front line between atheism and faith, the cynosure of secular fascination, the object of giddy conspiracism and internet mythmaking, and the illuminated stage for the cameras of the world in the age of 24-hour news.” ---Simon S. Montefiore Descriptions such as above, evoking the ancient, hallowed, Holy City, tend to obscure the fact that Jerusalem today is an area of nearly one million people comprising – outside of its historic walled center – many of the characteristics of any modern urban region, including a periphery of disjointed residential areas, strip malls, highways, job centers and other quite familiar conditions of contemporary metropolitan urbanism. But there is that amazing cauldron of history and artifice at the center, across centuries considered a “Center of the (Western) World.” So the studio will proceed remaining mindful of this dialectical condition, of course exaggerated in Jerusalem but common among cities worldwide, of a place with a canonical, treasured center surrounded by the

commonplace, mundane, ordinary peripheries of everyday urban life. In planning and designing for an area at the periphery of Jerusalem – and one of these will be a focus of the studio – how should one take into account that it is still part of Jerusalem: how faithful does one remain to the ‘idea of a city’ while attending to its contemporary needs. The studio proceeds in two parts, corresponding to either side of the March spring break week spent in Jerusalem. The first part of the semester will involve several exercises gaining an understanding of the city, both its history and its present characteristics. This will culminate with presentations that the studio will deliver in Jerusalem, where we will interact with student colleagues from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (Jerusalem), and the Lichtenstein University Institute of Architecture and Planning, who will also be visiting Jerusalem. Upon returning from Jerusalem the remainder of the semester will be devoted to the planning and design development of a specific area of Jerusalem.

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Greenbelt System Surrounding Jerusalem

Israel Environmental Considerations

Fragmented Pieces to a Whole

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Considering the exiting large public and commercial facilities (stadium, arena, shopping mall, aquatic center to be built), it is important to combine all of them into a whole civic park where citizens can easily get access to each facility.

However, the four facilities are separated by large infrastructure. There’s no pedestrian walk or public space to connect all of these public facilities. Also, the civic green corridor is actually stopped by these large developments. The green space system has no connection with the metropolitan park. So the first strategy is to connect and further to densify this area with more civic programs and public spaces to make the fragmented pieces into whole. And then a green corridor is shaped.


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Master Plan The project’s civic crossroad focuses on how to shape a civic environment in the basin topography in Jerusalem. There are some urban strategies adopted to ground this concept. It is the civic spine that connects all the programs together. The end point of the boulevard is the existing archaeological site on the west and an old rail trail with bike route on the east. The bike route is at relatively lower place and this area forms an arch-like park. The boulevard also intercept with a productive green corridor to allow green connection from north to south.


Productive Greenbelt Masterplan

Public Realm

Central Plaza Area

Urban Agriculture

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Landform/Stormwater Infrastructure


Function Diagram

Pedestrain Circulation

Program

Landscape System

Integrated Planting System

Approaching from the Entrance

Under the Canopy

Central Plaza Planting

Underground Garage

The primary continuing pedestrian path connects the north and the south. It goes up to the highest point in the site above the underground parking, allowing for good views. A secondary path which almost parallel to the main path is at a lower level.

Most hardscapes open space are located around the stadium and the arena for large amount of people flow in special events. In other times, they can also serve as exhibition area, markets and central plaza.

bove the underground parking structure, we want to plant crops on its roof. Since crops such as winter wheat, oats and barley are dry climate plants, they can grow off rain water without irrigation system. Each year, winter and summer crops alternates. Fruit fields, where both adults and kids can be engaged are located on the

The parking problem was addressed by elevate the ground level to create recreational space on top and accommodate parking lots underneath.

+ Main Path Connecting different Level + Secondary Paths dividing different programs

+ Urban Agriculture Farm + Stormwater Infrastructure + Larger Functional or Gathering Areas

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Central Plaza Program/Circulation

Central Plaza Elevation

1. Clean Skyline 2. Secondary Landmark 3. Shade 4. Gathering Space

Shading Canopy Canopies are scatterly placed to provide shade during hot seasons. Automatically, the areas under the canopy would become areas of interests which attracts people to gather around.

+ Circulation The primary continuing pedestrian path connects the north and the south. It goes up to the highest point in the site above the underground parking, allowing for good views. A secondary path which almost parallel to the main path is at a lower level.

+ Public Program and Productive Planting

| 20 | Underground Parking Structure The parking problem was addressed by elevate the ground level to create recreational space on top and accommodate parking lots underneath.

Crops are planted in the central plaza. Since crops such as winter wheat, oats and barley are dry climate plants, they can grow with rain water without irrigation system. Each year, winter and summer crops alternates.


Detailed Site Model 1:500 Landscape System This model shows how the landform created in site can serve as a green corridor that connects the existing green space system in Jerusalem. Not as a conflicting element, pockets of gathering spaces are located along the green belt, providing people with places to be educated about agriculture in Isareal, to interact with the crops, and to walk continuously in the larger green system context.

Public Program Most hardscapes open space are located around the stadium and the arena for large amount of people flow in special events. In other times, they can also serve as exhibition area, markets and central plaza. In the middle, there is a highly vegetated stormwater infrastructure running all the way from north to south. Adjacent to the infrastructure are our urban farms, growing different plants, some for interactive activities, some for educational purposes.

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Landscape System with Canopies

Serving as a green belt, connecting the existing green space system in Jerusalem


Three Productive Zones Urban agriculture fields are divided into three categories. The first one is at north, growing orchard on slope and vegetable on flat fields, with curvilinear paths going through the farm.

On SLope Orchard: apple, peach, bananas Vegetable Fields: Avocado, pepper, eggplant

Above the underground parking structure, we want to plant crops on its roof. Since crops such as winter wheat, oats and barley are dry climate plants, they can grow off rain water without irrigation system. Each year, winter and summer crops alternates. Fruit fields, where both adults and kids can be engaged are located on the south end.

Central Plaza Crop Planting: Winter: Winter Wheat, Barley, Winter oats Summer: Cotton, Corn Sorghum

Crops are planted in the central plaza. Since crops such as winter wheat, oats and barley are dry climate plants, they can grow with rain water without irrigation system. Each year, winter and summer crops alternates.

Fruits Needs Drip Irrigation: Table grapes, Table tomato, strawberries

Central Zone Crop Planting Strategy I

Crop Planting Strategy II

for Cotton Plant

General Planting Strategy Israel has been a pioneer in agriculture industry. It’s important to educate people about it and make the urban land more productive at the same time. So we propose a agriculture theme park in this area. We think that an urban agriculture park will not only attract people to this site, but also bring both ecological and economical benefit.

Combined Planting Strategy

for Corn and Sorghum

for Cotton, Corn and Sorghum

Furrows needed to plant cotton a. Plant on the ridge b. allow the roots to obtain water collected/saturated in the furrow

Corn and Sorghum can be planted on flat surace

Double Skip Row Spacing for dry climate (precipication under 100mm ) planted with 40 cm gap within a row

Planting them in Twin Row to maximize crop productivity

Planted with different density, the way of combining each of the plant can create different experience and spaces within the fields.

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Example 1: More of an open, under eye level layer Alternate the rows to allow maximum possibility of water in the soil

Create opennings in the fields

This way people can also move through the field, creating opennings

Adding seating and walkable areas in the fields

Example 2: Mysterious, maze like experience


Vegetated Corridor and Public Realm Overall Planting of the site also works with how people use the public spaces and how they circulate in the site.

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Connection of Green System The landform created in site can serve as a green corridor that connects the existing green space system in Jerusalem.


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03 Grey, Green, and Blue Landscape A Strategic Plan for Implicating New Infrastructure System in Rome, Italy Individual Project Studio Advisor: Christopher Counts, Maria Counts Penn State Spring 2014

The main focus of this project is to work with the topography in Rome and to create infrastructures that both treat stormwater during regular time and provide spaces for flooding in extreme events. In addition, according to National Geography, it is possible to have a 2 meter sea level rise in the next 200 years. So I first diagramed the flooding line and the sea level rise boundary in the city. By looking carefully and analyzing Rome’s contour lines in a 2 meter interval, I am also able to find larger valleys and smaller channels in the city that are possible to be flooded or become water conveying ways. However, since the city Rome itself provides the context of these waterways, instead of creating some natural looking area, I made those infrastructures into triangular forms, which suggest the urban fabric of Rome. The infrastructures intertwined in the spaces enclosed by the surrounding buildings, creating parks and pocket parks for both ecological and social meanings. At the same time, the larger ecosystem in Rome will be altered and improved thanks to the implication of those infrastructures. Three stages of study were conducted in order to conclude a pattern and come up with a strategic plan for this complicated urban situation.

Topography Overlay This is the initial step made to prepare for the rest of the analysis. All of the topographic information is based on the DEM image from USGS. Using GIS, I was able to extract contour lines from the DEM and adjust the contour intervals. In addition, a rough model of the city is created to visualize the landform condition. Water System Overlay With all of the information generated from GIS, first of all, it’s important to define the issue. A model of 2-meter and 4-meter sea level rise adding to the water system in Rome is visualized. The solution is to create green corridor based on the original landform of Rome. Potential waterways and watersheds are calculated and generated using GIS, thus leading to the proposed new water system for Rome. Urban Fabric Overlay The new water system should be somehow related to the urban context, by overlaying the water system to the urban fabric, including buildings and historical heritages, street structures and urban open spaces. Since the urban condition is never homogeneous. It’s necessary to zoom closer to small areas and look for the pattern of the overlapping districts. By doing so, a refined “green+blue” system is proposed.

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04 The Beauty of Erosion Discover and Appreciate the Distinct Character of Erosion Individual Project Studio Advisor: Karen Lutsky Penn State Fall 2013

The Great Lakes contain one-fifth of the world’s surface freshwater. Lake Erie, the shallowest of the Great Lakes accounts for only about four percent of this. Approximately 17 million people live in its dranage basin. About one-third of the total population of the Great Lakes basin is in the Lake Erie watershed. Approximately twelve million people live in the watershed, including seventeen metropolitan areas with more than 50,000 residents. The lake provides drinking water for about eleven million of these inhabitants. During the 1960s water quality issues in the Great Lakes became a concern and Lake Erie was perceived to be “dying”. By the late 1960s, Canadian and American regulatory agencies were in agreement that limiting phosphorus loads was the key to controlling excessive algal growth and that a coordinated lakewide approach was necessary to deal with the phosphorus issue. Open lake phosphorus concentrations declined due to the joint efforts made. These controls represented an unprecedented success in producing environmental results through international cooperation.

In 1987 the governments of Canada and the United States made a commitment, as part of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement to develop a Lakewide Management Plan for the Great Lakes which is coordinated by federal, state and provincial government agencies. The LaMP unites a network of stakeholders in actions to restore and protect the Lake Erie ecosystem. This project is inspired by how water erodes sand during the trip to the site. The goal is to educate people about erosion control while still celebrates its beauty.

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05 Cycle of The City A Study of Human Settlement Pattern & Urban Ecology, in Middle Branch, Baltimore Individual Project Studio Advisor: Barry Kew Penn State Spring 2014

Since 1970s, Baltimore has started to shrink. How it developed before this time and how it declined afterward have caused both social and ecological issues. However, the pattern of human settlement should be recognized and celebrate, instead of being denied. In order to represent four types of relationship between city development and the natural environment, the design explores how the engineering of city could work with ecology. This conceptual section describes how the landscape of Baltimore has changed during these four time zones, from the original natural environment to postindustrial era. When the philosophy of “second nature� started to appear, people are more concerned about bringing back nature and inserting green infrastructures into the urban context. The cycle of water level change in the site also represents people coming and leaving the city. The material used to hold water also changes through the section. Inspired by the conceptual Section, I came up with this plan to represent those four types of landscapes. Specific programs are also incorporated with different landscape types. [11] 29%

of the site is hardscape, which is suitable for people to move through the site and to gather with friends. And these are different hierarchy of paths that people could take. Based on the study from National Network of Environmental Management Studies (NNEMS), phytoremediation is applied to the site to clean up the mercury in the soil. Yellow Poplar and Hybrid willow are the two major species will be used. Most of them are planted with a grid pattern which is the most efficient way for absorbing mercury. In 10 years, woody plants started to take roots in the heathier sediment . The Willow trees planted for Phytoremediation there starts at 3-feet tall. In 20 years, the bay will be mostly cleaned, creating a healtheir micro-environemnt/climate for wetlands. It also has the ability to allow some woody plants to grow.

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06 Industrial Revitalization Working on Re-using existing industrial ruins to create a “softened“ landscape park Individual Project Studio Advisor: Karen Lutsky Penn State Fall 2013

First Energy announced on January 26, 2012 that it would be shutting down six older coal-fired power plants located in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Maryland by September 1, 2012. The decision to close the plants is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), which were recently finalized, and other environmental regulations. Fifty-seven employees at the Ashtabula Plant will be affected. As for what happens to the plants themselves, they will still be there, just not in operation. FirstEnergy isn’t far enough in its plans yet to start considering future development at the sites.

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Other Works Individual Project 2014-2016


Landform Study

Landcape Core I, Harvard GSD Fall 2015

+ Hold

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+ Hold + Distribute

+ Hold + Distribute + Infiltrate

+ Hold + Distribute + Infiltrate

Ecological Landform Strategy


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Section Series

Topography Plan


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New Stapletown Waterfront Employer: Scape Landscape Architecture

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Beer Sheva Quarry Competition Employer: Scape Landscape Architecture

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P O R T F O L I O O F B OX I A WA N G Master of Landscape Architecture II, 2017 Harvard Graduate School of Design

Boxia Wang Landscape Architecture Portfolio  
Boxia Wang Landscape Architecture Portfolio  
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