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Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Graduation Projects 2013-2014 Architecture Urbanism Landscape Architecture


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Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Graduation Projects 2013-2014 Architecture Urbanism Landscape Architecture


Contents

6 Caroline Bos, Altruism and Design

8 Architecture

10 16 22 28 34 40 46 52 58 64 70 76 82 88 94 100 106 112 118

Abdessamed Azarfane, Bayt Narda Beunders, Space to believe in Fabian van den Bosch, The AHK does not exist...  Marc Brummelhuis, The New Rietveld Academy Jordi Calvera Montagut, Ecovillage Inti Urcu Annemarijn Haarink, A stage for the polder Dennis Huiskens, Rehabilitation in the dunes Maarten Kemperink, Community centre theatre Wendy van der Knijff, To the farm Wouter Kroeze, International Piano Academy Amsterdam Margaux Platenburg, From wood Eric Ritsma, PRO-vision Bart van der Salm, Grounding Mindaugas Savickas, Baltic Notes Martijn Tjassens Keiser, The Urban Campsite Menno Trautwein, Mosveld Market Hall Gertjan Vlaar, Food resort GabriĂŤl Zitman, Thinking with the hands Ivar van der Zwan, A Front for the Back


124 Urbanism

126 132 138 144 150

Veronika Kovácsová, Urban Permeability Bart van Leeuwen, Hilversum Media landscapes Jessica Tjon Atsoi, SUCCESsion!  Atilla Vredenburg, New Kadiköy City Iris Wijn, Designated use of Sloterdijk

156 Landscape Architecture

158 164 170 176 182 188 194

Bieke Van Hees, Bricolage Jasper Hugtenburg, Laid-back coast donald marskamp, caldic collection - caught in 97º Simona Serafino, Scrigno d’acqua (water casket) Leen Vanthuyne, Ravines Revaluated Inge Vleemingh, Go nuts ! Frank van Zuilekom, Jammo Já

202 Archiprix 2015 Nominations


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5


Altruism and Design Caroline Bos Visiting critic


On Sunday 2 November this year, I was at the Academy of Architecture as a ‘visiting critic’ to view the work of the new crop of graduates and, together with an internal committee, to draw up a list of nominees for the Archiprix. What struck me, but didn’t surprise me considering I have known the Academy a long time, was the atmosphere of zeal; an old-fashioned word that is not so readily associated with higher professional education nowadays, but how good it felt to see it was still there – that highspirited commitment of the students and, lest it be forgotten, the teachers. Groups of individuals committing themselves with application to a joint goal is increasingly recognised as an essential characteristic of a successful organisation. After fifty years of dedicating himself to studying the behaviour of ant colonies, the biologist E.O. Wilson came to the conclusion that the ant society was the most advanced on earth apart from humans. And the reason for that: due to their inherent altruism, ants still fulfil their duty diligently and tenaciously after millions of years, as opposed to numerous other species that have passed into extinction. We, as humans, can learn a lot from this: it is not competition that wins the day, but team spirit. And this quality is already within us; this instinct is essentially the force that drives us forward, just like ants on their path. It is, therefore, probably no coincidence that a place where architects, urban planners and landscape architects are trained has similarities with an ant colony. It is still relatively normal in these professions to commit oneself almost unselfishly to a greater good, or a broadly driven project. Trust and a certain amount of altruism form the foundation of a classical profession that, let us hope, will continue to exist for a long time, even though extinction seems to be a concrete threat. I also saw the importance of work that is focused on a collective interest reflected in the graduation projects; all self-chosen themes were related to significant issues in the modernday world. How should we deal with people in need of care? How should we deal with water-related problems? How should we deal with nature and culture? It was also clear from viewing the graduation projects that the zeal that the students had put into their work, and which had led to frequently impressive results, was not a question of blind optimism, unbridled passion for work or superficial sensationalism. This actually signified intense work and elaboration to the most minute details, with the individual character of the chosen solution as evidence of ultimate commitment. I suddenly felt very much at home, transported back to my own beginnings when UNStudio was still Van Berkel & Bos Architectuurbureau, and our closest associates were students and former students of the Academy of Architecture; people who put their soul into a detail that

works, from every perspective and on each scale level, and who can also often make it themselves. The architectural essence (by which I also mean the landscape architectural essence and urban planning essence) consequently becomes a matter of the greatest individualism, as well as the greatest collectivism. Altruism and creativity coincide in a practical gesture. Could that be a definition of zeal? Without wanting to make this mere word play, or drawing on an etymological reference work, I would like to conclude that the approach to design that the Academy of Architecture applies make this study programme very distinctive and extremely valuable. And for me, that is best exemplified in the wisdom and commitment that we share with ants. Successful design essentially comes down to the altruistic, skilful and constructive contribution to the continuation and improvement of a complex and universal ecosystem.

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Jarrik Ouburg Head of Architecture Department


Diversity A workshop in the city. Social housing in Morocco. A theatre in the polder. A modern cheese farm. A piano academy. A market hall in Amsterdam North. A spiritual building for everyone. An urban campsite. A new Rietveld Academy. A music school in Lithuania. A community centre theatre. An ecovillage in Ecuador. A food resort in the Central Market Hall. Social housing in the hidden alleyways of Amsterdam. A plea for the thinking ‘doer’. A new provincial government building. A rehabilitation centre in the dunes. A central building for the Amsterdam School of the Arts and an in-between home for the last stage of life. The quantity and diversity of graduation projects for the degree programme in Architecture is impressive once again this year.  Each student at the Academy has been asked to develop a personal plan for his or her graduation project; a plan in which a personal motive is addressed and further developed. This approach has not only ensured that a broad palette of assignments have arisen, but also that the elaboration of the plans has been exceptional. The student works on his or her plan while graduating. In this sense, the student already becomes an architect while graduating and not at the time of the degree ceremony, because as an architect, you are ultimately what you do, what you make.

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Architecture

Abdessamed Azarfane Bayt

An alternative for social housing in Morocco

‘Bayt is the Arabic word for house. But not the house we are familiar with in the Netherlands. The term bayt, unlike the literal translation, covers several scale levels of the house, the house being a component of the ensemble and one’s own (living) room as a component of the house.’ As the title suggests, this project is about housing. The motive for this was fuelled by a fascination on the one hand and frustration on the other hand; a fascination for the historical, local and cultural urban planning and architecture in Morocco: if you walk through the streets of the old medina of Fez or Marrakesh it is nearly impossible not to be impressed by its appearance. On the other hand, there is a great frustration with the contemporary way of building in Morocco that, in essence, has nothing to do with the age-old tradition of urban planning and architecture, and the way in which the social class of Morocco is moved outside of the city. As a result of the introduction of the modern ‘western’ manner of urban planning and the fast modernisation of the country, the living environment of traditional Morocco is, in my opinion, largely disappearing, which is leading to a discrepancy between living environment and inhabitants. Today, this rift is most apparent in the way in which the lower social class (including slum dwellers) is being moved out of the city into so called ‘new towns’ outside the city, specially built and subsidised for the less well-off, under the guise of charity. To what extent can it still be called charity when it causes segregation and discrepancies? To what extent does this ‘charity’ really contribute to the living circumstances of the lower social class? To what extent is removal of the slums the solution for the ongoing migration to the city? This is a problem in which politics, strategy and design are entangled. In this plan, I will present a different perspective on the current (social) housing policy in Morocco. On the basis of a case set up in Casablanca, this plan will explain the possibilities for rehousing slum dwellers in the city. The city, the district, the neighbourhood, the cluster and the house are presented in an alternative way. The new medina is a combination of the social and cultural character of the medina, the ingenuity of the slums and the efficiency of western urban planning; a living environment in which inhabitants and accommodation are attuned to each other, in a resultsoriented plan to guarantee sustainable accommodation for the ongoing migration to and from the city.

Graduation date 27 08 2014

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Commission members Jeroen Geurst (mentor) Rogier van den Berg Samir Bantal

Additional members for the examination Peter Defesche Marcel van der Lubbe


Abdessamed Azarfane

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Architecture

medina

sidi moumen

location of the case

old medinas

tramline tram stop

Project location in Casablanca, Marocco

entrance area dagla

slum >

< government

private >

< public

bayt

derb

hay

houma

house

cluster

neighbourhood

district

> 3-7 family members

> 40-60 houses > cluster square(s)

> 200-500 houses > neighbourhood squares > craft workshops > shops basic facility

> 1800-2000 houses > public square > public functions > mosque > hammam > commerce (shopping street) > leisure

living public functions/commerce collective space neighbourhood

2-3m

4-5m

6-8m

derb

zenka

shariâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i

residential street/ cluster

nieghbourhood street

district street

Perceptible transitions between public and private

man-made

Toolbox

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smart / sustainable

privacy / culture

expandable

grain

collective

density

district layout


Abdessamed Azarfane

1

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

2 2

2

3

3

2

2

3

2 2

5 2

2

2 2

4 1

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1

4

2

2

5

2 2

2 3

2

5

2

3

2

2

5

2

2 3

2

2

5

2

2

2

2 2 5

2

1 3

1

1

2

5

2

3

2 2 2 3

2 2

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1

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2

1

3

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2

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1

1

5

9

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5

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3 5

2

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2

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3

2 2

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3

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9

2

2 3

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4

2

2

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5 5

2 2

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2 2 5 3

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3 2

2 2

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3

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3

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5 2

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2 2

3

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1 2 5

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2 5 2 2 5 3

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7

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8 1

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From master plan to new living environment

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B

B

B

Architecture

keuken opp:3,5 m2

slaapkamer

slaap/leefkamer

slaap/leefkamer

opp:7,0 m2

opp:8,8 m2

dakterras

opp:4,6 m2

opp:28,1 m2

salon opp:8,5 m2

patio

opp:7,5 m2

A

leefkamer opp:6,0 m2

badkamer

A

slaap/leefkamer

A

opp:7,3 m2

A

A

A

opp:2,5 m2

balkon

Ground floor

B

B

B

opp:1,8 m2

Floor

GSEducationalVersion

Roof terrace

GSEducationalVersion

Section A-A

Section B-B GSEducationalVersion

Patio

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Living room


Abdessamed Azarfane

Shopping street

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Architecture

Narda Beunders ‘Space to believe in’

A spiritual building for everyone

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to believe in a building? Trust in something that is always there for you, gives you space to be who you are. Whatever thought, emotion, feeling is burdening you, you can always go there. Everyone is welcome, regardless of cultural background, be they religious or non-religious. There is space for everyone. A place of worship that fits in with our current society. I believe in it, do you? I stood silently in the St. Peter’s Basilica. The image was breathtaking. An array of questions about religion, materials, building, construction, about the who, what and why of this enormous church went through my mind. The monumental character of the building, however, overshadowed my personal experience. The space made me small, normal proportions seemed to have vanished and the human size was clearly lost. There was an intangible spatiality, a form of scalelessness. The spatial perception of religious buildings has had a huge impact on me for years. I find it fascinating what such a building can do to me. The overwhelming St. Peter in Rome, the intimate Bruder Klaus Field Chapel by Peter Zumthor, or the expressive churches of Gottfried Böhm. And still I couldn’t quite define what it was that fascinated me. A type of positive energy which is released upon entering, and the simultaneous feeling of being an intruder in the house of God because I am not religious at all. A few years ago, the headlines of the newspapers read ‘The church is on its way out’ and with the rise of new kinds of religion and even a book as a manifesto for a church of non-believers by Alain de Botton, the subject remains relevant. The changes in our society also create a different view of religion. What we know as ‘churches’ may well be geared too much towards one target group and the monumental character likely originates from a bygone time. That is why I have spent the past two years visiting a church or other place of worship every week, to discover what a building needs to be able to believe in it. I have documented over 60 buildings in sketches, analyses and descriptions of my spatial experience. I have noted the dimensions and relations using knee height, footsteps, arm length, wing span and my height, to finally arrive at a design of a place of worship which is based on the human dimensions. A new building, where the spatial experience is a translation of the abstract concept of believing. In short, a spiritual building which connects with the needs of our current society.

Graduation date 24 06 2014

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Commission members Machiel Spaan (mentor) Martine de Wit Tom Jonkers

Additional members for the examination Mariette Adriaanssen Rik van Dolderen


Narda Beunders

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Architecture

Situation IJburg Joris Yvensplein

Ground floor / ground level

1042

15600

3600

2500

16642

9500

1042

Construction schedules

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-1 floor

View of roof


Narda Beunders

Address on the street

Entrance

View from entrance

View to entrance

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Architecture

Tour of two levels gives the feeling of togetherness different dimensions

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Narda Beunders

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Architecture

Fabian van den Bosch The AHK does not exist... ...the AHK building

The AHK is not present on a physical, intellectual and substantive level. Whereas the faculties have a distinct presence, the AHK doesn’t even have a home and is a guest of the Theaterschool. With the design of the AHK building, I aim to give the Amsterdam School of the Arts a place in the community - the central link between the faculties and a meeting place for and between students, teachers, staff members, professionals and the public. The essential intervention of my project is adding a new layer to the Mr. Visserplein. The square, defined by the adjacent existing buildings (blank façades / the décor), is lowered a level and forms the foundation for the AHK building at the heart of the community. Traffic stays on the ground level, and is demoted from protagonist to an ancillary role and fuses with the new intervention at the Mr. Visserplein. The lowered square is made accessible by wide stairs – a clear transition from the hectic bustle into the investigative and ‘creative’ world of the AHK. The existing beautiful underground pedestrian tunnel will be reused as ‘aorta’ of the AHK building. Exhibition spaces, workplaces and studios will become an integral part of ‘the network’ Amsterdam (direct connections to tram lines 9 and 14, metro, underground parking and the Academy of Architecture and the Netherlands Film Academy). Openings have been cut into the ‘aorta’. The thick concrete walls (72 cm) create surprising lines of sight, straight through the building, into the workplaces, library and the surroundings. The studios are structured in the configuration of a ring around the former tunnel, some are opened up to the surroundings for maximum exposure, some only have a sound outlet in the roof to the city. Awareness on a sloping floor – photography in a ‘soft’ space – playing violin with dramatic acoustics to the rhythm of the city. At the same time, the studios represent the direct context of the Mr. Visserplein; carrying your grocery bags past choreography at the Theaterschool or drinking coffee accompanied by a cello soloist...’ The workplaces and the library are situated below the studios spaces. The contact between the public square and the students is indirect - through large atriums. The daylight enters indirectly, sometimes through a high façade, sometimes through small openings in the ceiling. Contrasts of light and shade enhance the subdued and quiet atmosphere of the library. It is a cross-disciplinary library, ordered alphabetically for cross-pollination. For example, Händel, Herzog & de Meuron and Hiroshige are filed next to each other. The workplace is large (how nice!) with workbenches and above all empty space for larger projects. Working outside is also possible. The showpiece of the AHK building is the former tunnel; 2.500m2 of exhibition space, theatre space or concert hall are up for grabs. The existing large opening in the roof provides long sight lines – to the surrounding buildings (as once intended). This design offers opportunities to give the AHK a place within the community and offers students the opportunity to step out of their comfort zone through inter-faculty collaboration and by being in a challenging environment. Through this design, I have tried to create a platform with inspiring accommodation quality for the students of the AHK and the Mr. Visserplein. The students will determine and interpret the accommodation quality – owning the space, much like the film Pina, an important source of inspiration for my graduation plan, in which Wim Wenders beautifully portrays the reciprocity of use and context. Graduation date 19 06 2014

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Commission members Rob Hootsmans (mentor) Jarrik Ouburg Kamiel Klaasse

Additional members for the examination Paul de Vroom Joost Hovenier


Fabian van den Bosch

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Architecture

Location: the Mr. Visserplein, Amsterdam. The AHK building at the heart of the faculties.

Inspiration: Wim Wenders - Pina

By using the underground tunnel as objet trouvĂŠ, it takes on a new quality

Programme research: the AHK building as a missing link between the faculties

Volume study

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Fabian van den Bosch

What defines the square isn’t the path of the street, but rather the façades of the buildings > making the square (or the building) perceivable.

Floor plan level 01

Using the ‘dead’ façades of the Mr. Visserplein as a décor for the AHK building > the students form the new context of the Mr. Visserplein.

Using the hidden quality of the underground world as a particular and unique quality of this place > the tunnel becomes the heart of the AHK.

Floor plan level -01

Property of a complex system, which cannot be deduced from each of the separate components but only from the model as a whole.

Section/scale model

25


Architecture

The (public) library, along the former tunnel and below the former pedestrian tunnel

In the middle of the AHK building, level -02, but still in the middle of the city

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Fabian van den Bosch

Scale model (1:100) of the Mr. Visserplein with the design for the AHK building

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Architecture

Marc Brummelhuis The New Rietveld Academy

At the junction of the Minervalaan and the Apollolaan, H.P Berlage once imagined a metropolitan junction with the Rijksacademie van Beeldende kunsten (Royal Academy of Visual Arts) as the main attraction. Due to various influences, this was never realised, but eventually the Hilton hotel emerged at this location under the guise of the ‘The New Way Of Life’; something the hotel has not been able to fulfil for decades already. The assignment for the location at the end of the Minerva-axis is twofold. On the one hand, the programme has to contribute a great deal to a more lively scene at this metropolitan location, while on the other hand the building has to fit into its urban planning context. Using the Rietveld Academy as a programme is a return to the original Plan Zuid of Hendrik Petrus Berlage. He envisioned that the counterpart of Station Zuid, which in his view symbolised Labour, needed to be located at the other end of the axis as the finishing touch and should symbolise the Arts: ‘The Academy of the Visual Arts’. In his mind, by connecting the two, a complete society would be created and every man would receive a place within Plan Zuid. The design assignment focuses on designing The New Rietveld Academy. How does this Academy distinguish itself from the other art schools and how can this become spatially tangible? How does the Rietveld conduct itself in relation to its surroundings? Concept The Rietveld Academy focuses on conceptual thinking. Conceptual thinking is fuelled and fortified by inspiration. By creating ‘chaos’, the apparent certainties are removed so the student is stimulated to research and choose his or her own path and inspiration. The generic school archetype does not meet these requirements. By taking apart this archetype, an inspiring landscape in the interspaces of the programme is created by the students. Within these spaces, the various disciplines come together and create cross-pollination. Design: The design is made up of different concentrations of modules, which are connected by interspaces, patios and squares within a grid. The grid is rotated 45 degrees in relation to the urban planning. This makes the Rietveld clearly tangible in its environment. The rotation enhances the ‘wandering’ through the inspiring landscape because it forces one to seek orientation within the landscape. The main route is executed as a circle so there is no longer a difference in hierarchy between the different disciplines. The rotated grid creates a serrated exterior wall on the edges of the building. This makes it possible to have deep sightlines, as a result of which the school shows fragments of itself. The student can withdraw from the landscape, in order to gain the necessary concentration. This is possible by choosing the light spaces, a silent space in the roof landscape, or one of the many ‘foxholes’ on student studios. In the darker rooms below the inspiring landscape, there is space to work with audio and video. By allowing the Minerva-axis to reach into the building, the building anchors itself at the location. By executing the axis as a slope, the roof opens up and a place for a public landscape roof is created with a lot of space for art. The entrance to the Rietveld is situated on the slope, as is the entrance to the public restaurant, the Student Art Hotel and the Sandberg Institute.

Graduation date 30 06 2014

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Commission members Arnoud Gelauff (mentor) Ton Schaap Machiel Spaan

Additional members for the examination Marcel van der Lubbe Jeroen van Mechelen


Marc Brummelhuis

Patio

Square

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Architecture

Diverge

Inspiration CHAOS

Decide

Concept ORDER

Converge

Concentration

Generic archetype school floor department, each department his own floor

Scheme design process (Rozenburg and Eekels), after The White Space by Jarrik Ouburg

Old program structure

New program structure

Inspiration landscape

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Marc Brummelhuis

square

Student Art Hotel

patio

entrance

Sandberg Institute ramp Minerva axis

Ground floor plan (0)

concentration light

19.000 m²

do, build, realize (inspiration)

concentration dark

Original metropolitan plan by H.P. Berlage

Urban design principles

Sequence main routing with patioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s/squares

Section Rietveld inspiration landscape

concentration light concentration dark

restaurant

cars

audio workshop

foxholes Student Art Hotel

bicycles

entrance

entrance Sandberg Institute

ramp Minerva axis

Public roof floor plan (+1)

Basement floor plan

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Architecture

The New Rietveld Academy with the ramp and green roof, the Student Art Hotel and Sandberg Institute along the Apollolaan

Entrance on the ramp

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Marc Brummelhuis

Entrance

Facade

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Architecture

Jordi Calvera Montagut Ecovillage Inti Urcu Mountain of the Sun - Ecuador

In a world in which the current urbanisation processes threaten to destroy the ecological balance, it is clear that new models and alternatives need to be investigated in the framework of the urbanisation debate. Behind these urbanisation processes, which advance the homogenisation of territories, cultures and consumption methods due to globalisation, there is, oddly enough, no real sustainability vision. One thing that has become clear is that the current model cannot be indefinitely continued in the future. This graduation project is a search for an alternative model for peri-urban growth in Latin America in general, and in Ecuador in particular, in alliance with the territory. The term territory refers to the space in which nature and culture merge. Territory This research deals with the small-scale types of territorial authority in the peri-urban zone around the capital city of Quito in Ecuador. This is, ecologically speaking, a vulnerable area and a favourable area in a cultural sense, due to the new constitution, approved in 2008, and the tourism in the region. The capital is regarded as a bioregion of networks in which small, sustainable communities – or ecovillages – take responsibility for the territory that they inhabit. This allows them to anticipate the needs of the capital in order to generate a source of income. The emphasis is on four sustainability principles, which, as research has shown, characterise the ecological city: 1 Appreciating the site-specific characteristics such as identity, local knowledge, nature and cultural heritage; 2 The strengthening of the local government through a higher degree of participation by citizens in decision-making processes; 3 The local enshrinement of employment; and 4 The preservation of the context-specific balance between man and environment. Case study The native community of Carcelén Mitad del Mundo was chosen as a case study for this research and is located in the Equinoctial valley in the peri-urban zone north of Quito on the equator. What is interesting about this community is the fact that the native inhabitants– the Huasipungueros – received a piece of land from the estate they worked at under precarious working conditions, as a result of the Agrarian Reform Law of 1964. Besides these native Huasipungueros, there are new inhabitants who do not own land or a house. The native community managed to organise itself as a registered native community causing them to become a legal entity and other laws now apply – such as the specific legislation for indigenous peoples - in accordance with the new constitution. The ecovillage In this context, the ecovillage represents existential convictions of a social nature, more specifically the sustainability of life on this planet. The essence of this is, on the one hand, the archetype of indigenous of life in a community and, on the other hand, life in harmony with the nature which is so characteristic to the philosophy of life of the native communities. The moment these native communities become fully-fledged sustainable communities, they will no longer be dependant on the economical situation of the country. They will reach a higher level of selfsufficiency and sustainability and will strive for a feasible utopia: the ecovillage. This research proves that the ecovillage is a feasible alternative for peri-urban growth, in order to offer a better perspective for the future of small-scale sustainable communities through bottom-up organised, local initiatives. The value of this research is the translation of the utopian idea of the self-sufficient community into a number of very concrete proposals which have a good chance of success within the given context. Graduation date 26 09 2013

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Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Christien Klaufus Ahmed El-Shafei

Additional members for the examination Rick van Dolderen Herman Kerkdijk


Jordi Calvera Montagut 1

3

2

4

1. Unbridled growth Quito metropolis 2. Indigenous community 3. Equator monument 4. Motorway

35


Architecture

20 k m

evenaar

equator latitude 00˚00’00”

monument

equator line

native cosmology

urban planning concept peripheral distribution provisions territory-bound

Community park

Neighbourhood below

Community park

Neighbourhood below

stone quarry neighbourhood Qhapaq Ñan museum

territory

as the space in which nature and culture merge

Dance group rehearsal space

the stone quarry: the new motor

Neighbourhood above

Dance group rehearsal space

Neighbourhood above

renewable energies park

Existing situation

Sun calendar Mountain of the Sun sunlight at equinox at 12:00

New situation

nature

culture

water and agriculture

Katekilla mountain: indigenous cosmology and tourism

irrigation plan

36

rural tourism


Jordi Calvera Montagut

multi-level system of collectivity building on the mountain using local materials horizontal connection

separate high differences

connecting low differences

01 02

03

04

N

square

01

connecting low differences

separate high differences

37


Architecture

Image caption

native community dance group

mountain of the sun theatre 38


Jordi Calvera Montagut

acoustic situation 01: amplified concert 1,250 spectators

acoustic situation 02: amplified concert + dance 1,250 spectators

Cucutรก Colombia bamboo bridge

acoustic situation 03: unplugged theatre /concert 950 spectators

bamboo

Andes musical instruments

stone

mined from the quarry

39


Architecture

Annemarijn Haarink A stage for the polder

A theatre situated in the Belmermeerpolder with Waterland and the skyline of Amsterdam as dĂŠcor.

This graduation project is a design for a theatre complex in the Belmermeerpolder, situated just outside the city boundaries of Amsterdam North in the municipality of Waterland. It offers 450 seats spread out across a theatre space and a concert hall. It is therefore a relatively small theatre at a unique location. The theatre can be reached via the water, on foot, by bicycle and possibly by car. The location was carefully chosen due to its accessibility by water from the city of Amsterdam and other surrounding villages. The exact position of the theatre within the Belmermeerpolder in which it is situated has been tailored to the functioning of the polder and the orientation with respect to the city and prominent points in the landscape. The Belmermeerpolder is situated between the villages Broek in Waterland, Holysloot and Zuiderwoude. Leaving the city behind on the way to the theatre, passing beneath the A10 ring road, you suddenly enter the polder landscape with many panoramic views that contain few buildings. The buildings are often hidden. En route through the landscape, by boat or over the narrow pathways, the built elements slowly unravel, but never reveal themselves fully. The landscape starts to show its own choreography in relation to these built elements. The journey from the city through the landscape serves as an introduction to the theatre. The manner of unravelling and concealment in the landscape strongly influenced the manifestation and positioning of the theatre building, as well as the research into the historic way of building on this soft peat soil. The casual style of the building refers to the farmyard layout, in which each part derives its precise position from the experience of and relationship with the environment. The use of materials is related to water levels, the skylights emphasise the main function of the programme component. The vertical slats form a contrast with the horizontal landscape and provide a fragmented image so that visitor never loses contact with the environment. The slats are omitted at special places, and the focus is shifted here to a framed part of the landscape. The peat landscape of Waterland increasingly encroaches. In order to slow down this process, the water board keeps the groundwater levels as high as possible. This has a major impact on the farmers in this area. Cows and harvesters sink into the land, so that the land can no longer be maintained. The landscape as we now know it is therefore unsustainable. The Belmermeerpolder is ideally suited in size to serve as a heliophyte filter. By raising the water level further, and letting the accompanying natural change of vegetation take its course, there are only small adjustments needed in order to purify the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;blackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sewage water of the theatre and the entire adjacent village Broek in Waterland. As a result of the changes to vegetation and the harvesting season for the reed, the purifying polder will form a dynamic environment for the theatre and a new source of income for the polder and its surroundings.

Graduation date 30 01 2014

40

Commission members Jo Barnett (mentor) Tom Berkhout John Lonsdale

Additional members for the examination Michiel Spaan Jan-Richard Kikkert


Annemarijn Haarink

Sketch of the landscape from the water

Theatre building as seen from the Middenweg of the Belmermeerpolder

Inner courtyard of the theatre building

41


Architecture Broek in Waterland

Noord Holland kanaal

Zuiderwoude

Bozemeertje

Volgermeer polder

Belmermeer polder

Holysloter Die Holysloot

Belmermeerpolder in relation to Amsterdam

Belmermeerpolder in relation to Amsterdam

Cross-section of the landscape close to the jetty in the bosemeertje lake

Belmermeerpolder new situation in the summer

Belmermeerpolder new situation after the harvesting season in the autumn

Belmermeerpolder new situation in the winter

Belmermeerpolder new situation in the spring

42


Annemarijn Haarink

Inner courtyard of the theatre building as seen from the entrance

Birdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye view of the theatre complex (after the harvesting season in the autumn)

Large theatre space with the polder as extension of the theatre and as dĂŠcor

43


Architecture

doorsnede CC foyer en theater schaal 1:100

Cross-section theatre space

doorsnede CC foyer en theater schaal 1:100

doorsnede DD omloop en foyer schaal 1:100

doorsnede DD omloop en foyer schaal 1:100

Cross-section inner courtyard with circular walkway and foyer

doorsnede AA binnentuin - theehuis/cafe en restaurant schaal 1:200

Cross-section restaurant, entrance building and inner courtyard doorsnede AA binnentuin - theehuis/cafe en restaurant schaal 1:200

doorsnede BB theater en muziektheater schaal 1:200

doorsnede BB theater en muziektheater schaal 1:200

Cross-section theatre space, foyer and concert hall

44


Annemarijn Haarink

Scale model photo of the concert hall

Concert hall with the skyline of Holysloot as dĂŠcor

Scale model of the theatre complex

45


Architecture

Dennis Huiskens Rehabilitation in the dunes Sports rehabilitation centre

Rehabilitation is about the physical and mental recovery of a patient, mainly by using sports and exercise. At the time of rehabilitation, there are moments of happiness and moments of sadness; moments in which the patient searches for individuality and comfort or social interaction and activity. A care environment should support the patient in this by offering stimulus for sports, exercise and encounters and, simultaneously, security for the mental recovery and moments of personal treatment. The location of the sports rehabilitation centre is at the place where the dune landscape merges into forest landscape. Wandering through the dune landscape, a feeling of freedom and collectivity arises, while in the forest landscape a feeling of security and individuality exists. The sun and wind in your face, contrary to the shelter of the forest landscape. The design goes along with the experience, scale and use of the landscape. By adding architectural mass to the landscape, the existing experience, scale and use are enhanced. The walls form a division between: the dune and forest landscape, the openness and sheltered nature, landscape and human scale, collectivity and individuality. The walls enhance the experience of the two types of landscape and organise movement and sight in the landscape. Within the architecture, it forms the division between sports and exercise and the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stay. The walls also organise the vertical accessibility of the architecture. A space is realised below the dune where the patient can work on his physical constitution together with others. A space which relates to the dune landscape through the large openings in the dune body. Space for the patient is created between these openings. While using these spaces, there is both interaction with the landscape and the activities in the landscape, as well as the fellow users of the sports rehabilitation centre. The patient rooms are situated within the forest landscape, and thus separated from the collectivity. The secure nature of this type of landscape meets the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. The need to be on oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own. The interaction with the forest landscape is intimate and personal, facilitated by small wall openings. The use of wood inside the accommodation gives it a warm and human feel. The design is not just about carefully designing a care environment for a specific group of patients, but simultaneously shows an approach in terms of the interaction with the landscape. An architectural intervention in the landscape should benefit the landscape. The landscape approached as monumental cultural heritage, where choices are made between recovery, improvement and renewal. The aim is to arrive at an intervention which contributes to the well-being, the experience and the use of the landscape. Not building in the landscape, but building with the landscape.

Graduation date 09 04 2014

46

Commission members Uri Gilad (mentor) Maike van Stiphout Serge Schoemaker

Additional members for the examination Jan-Richard Kikkert Lada Hrsak


Dennis Huiskens

47


Architecture

Longitudinal section wall with visibility of the vertical opening. At the top, the habitable spaces of the animals are visible

Wall as division between the forest and dune landscape, the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stay (human scale) and the sports rooms (landscape scale)

Transition between dune and forest landscape Transition between openness and shelter Transition between collective and individual

Digging out the lake has resulted in a natural, enclosed feel

Image situation dune lake â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Wed

48

Difference in spatial feel between forest and dune landscape, open versus secure

Flows in the landscape are mainly concentrated within the dune landscape

Sand drifts in the landscape under the influence of the south/south-west wind perceivable


Dennis Huiskens

Maps (left to right) basement, ground floor, first floor, second floor, third floor and fourth floor.

Longitudinal sections over front room swimming pool and patient accommodation, dune landscape drawn inwards and forest landscape set against the architecture.

Longitudinal sections over towers, at the top of the towers one is above the landscape and freedom manifests itself.

Faรงade view patient accommodation within the forest landscape

49


Architecture

Zoning map

50


Dennis Huiskens

Cross and longitudinal sections over wall with visibility of habitable spaces of the animals

View of the forest landscape from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;living roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the patients

View of the forest landscape from the patient room

View of the dune landscape in the direction of the sports rooms

51


Architecture

Maarten Kemperink Community centre theatre Ostade

For my graduation assignment, I have designed a building complex at the location of the Ostade theatre at the Van Ostadestraat in De Pijp, as a replacement for the existing building which comprises, aside from a theatre, of workshops and housing. The programme has largely been adopted, be that as it may further geared towards the specific needs of De Pijp. The living units are tailored for single people and can be used as a studio space. Spaces have been added to the theatre, so it can function as both a community theatre and a community centre. The foyer of the theatre functions as a community centre during the day. The most important theme is the theatre also functioning as a building for social-cultural activities, because community centres have also been closed down in De Pijp. Attempts to have community centres run by volunteers have failed, due to the fact that civic participation is no longer subsidised. On the other hand, small community theatres are exceptionally successful, because they are run by the combination of a few professionals and a lot of volunteers and quickly generate activities, which enable the theatre to function as a community centre. The programmatic combination of the theatre with living and working provisions can create extra synergy, which can be an enrichment for the separate activities. The design assignment aims to relate the two in such a way that a spatial coherence arises between them, without taking away from its independent functioning. The building complex has many surprising vistas between the different users. The wedge, where stairs of the different users are situated, plays an important role in this. Aside from the many stairs in the wedge, the wedge also mediates between the straight and the round shapes of the building.

Graduation date 13 12 2013

52

Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Marcel van der Lubbe Hans Hammink

Additional members for the examination Ira Koers Bart Bulter


Maarten Kemperink

53


Architecture

Impression of the façade

Sections

Community centre visitor

Theatre audience

Artists

Course participant

Workers

Relation scheme

Location analysis

54

Residents

Stairs in wedge

Artists’ stairs

Residents’ stairs


Maarten Kemperink

Super knotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: the point where many of the vistas between different users converge

Analysis building structure

Impression courtyard

55


Architecture

Scale model frontal view

Scale model photographs

Ground floor

56

First floor


Maarten Kemperink

Living deck

Impressions

Second floor

Fourth floor

57


Architecture

Wendy van der Knijff To the farm

Design of a modern dairy cheese farm

My childhood memories of growing up on a cheese farm were the impetus for this graduation project. I experienced the farmyard as a place of discovery and the surrounding level polder landscape fascinates me to this day because of its dominant and changeable overcast skies. I no longer recognise the accessible atmosphere and visible everyday rhythm of the farm life from my memories in modern farms in the Dutch landscape. On the contrary, as a result of increased scale, automation and the shift in product sales to the supermarket, modern farms now radiate an anonymous atmosphere and have seemingly lost the relationship with their environment. The farm is a mechanism that continually transforms. The design of a modern cheese farm illustrates how architecture can be a means to return value to this mechanism within the cultural agricultural landscape. During the design process, the typology of the default farm building has been left behind and the essence of the farm life researched and emphasised. By uniting the essence with the current manifestation and management, a new typology of the farm is created in which the cow is the main focus. The healthier the cow, the better the production. To make the cow a visible component within the building, a raised roof is introduced, giving the cows the choice to stay inside as well as outside. This intervention ensures the large quantity of cows will not spend their entire lives in the cowshed, but have the maximum amount of surface area achievable available to them. The other programme is situated below the roof, so the available surface area is used twice. This creates vertical relationships between the processes of the farmer and the cow, such as the cheese factory and directly above it the robotic milking system, or the feed storage situated below the feeding area of the cow. The placement in the landscape and dimensions of the design are in line with the historical â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;copeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; structure of the polder landscape and illustrates that the large scale and the range of dimensions of modern farms can enhance the experience of the landscape instead of impairing it. The styling of the design is inspired by the trench silo which, with its elongated concrete wedges, is known as the one of the components of the farm which disfigures the landscape. In my opinion, they are quite beautiful elements which frame and enhance the landscape through their dimensions. At the same time, they make the processes of farm life visible and perceivable; a fresh harvest of grass lends the trenches colour and scent. An empty trench allows the landscape to dominate and indicates the end of the season. The unity in the structure of the cheese farm on the elongated farmyard makes the building easily readable at a glance and does not emphasise the building, but actually its contents, as a result of which room is created for the pastoral and old customs at the farm are resurrected.

Graduation date 14 04 2014

58

Commission members Jan Richard Kikkert (mentor) Ira Koers Bruno Doedens

Additional members for the examination Herman Kerkdijk Gianni Cito


Wendy van der Knijff

59


Architecture

reclaimed land Polder Nieuwkoop 1809 reclaimed land Aarlanderveensche droogmakerij 1786

Location

Typical â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;copeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; polder parcellation

cattle in meadow

cattle in meadow

summer accommodation

1. Scenario farm expansion/ elongated plot

summer accommodation

approachable yard dairy shop approachable(60 yardcows) Scenario farm during childhood

2. Maximized cattle residence dairy shop

surrounding yard planting cattle in shed

surrounding yard planting

+m2

cattle in shed supermarket

3. Intervention: elevated platform with drainage floor disconnection supermarket

anonymous yard

disconnection

anonymous yard

Scenario farm expansion (150 cows)

View from polder

60

4. Vertical relation between farmer and cattle


5000

Wendy van der Knijff

7000

2000

5000

Structure ground floor

Structure sheds

Silage clamps

61


Architecture

N

Platform + 6500

N

Ground floor + 0.00

Mechanical milker above the cheese shop

Public meander through the silage clamps

Ground floor area

Dairy

62


Wendy van der Knijff

meadow = nourishment cattle

drainaged ďŹ&#x201A;oor: -top layer (rubber, grass,compost) -comfort layer -permavoid units -ďŹ lm -grooved concrete

+ protection soil compaction + attracts migratory birds

compost = nourishment meadow

silo to store urine fraction

Cyclus cattle manure

Cattle shed

63


Architecture

Wouter Kroeze International Piano Academy Amsterdam

Assignment A piano academy for classical and contemporary classical music in Amsterdam with an international character. Target group The piano academy trains and educates exceptionally talented young pianists for a career as a performing musician at the highest level. Students are between 17 and 25 years old. They have usually received proper preparatory education. Aside from specific education, approximately 25 students are provided with an instrument and housing within the academy. On two axes The location is situated on two axes. Axis I lies between the Concertgebouw and the Valeriusplein. It is the axis that runs along the Johannes Verhulststraat. Axis II lies between the WWI monument and the Vondelpark. Structure of the district The Concertgebouw area was created between 1880 and 1910. The neighbourhood is made up of long straight residential streets formed by the closed housing blocks at the edge of the lot. The inner areas are enclosed private gardens. Three programme components Living, studying, and education (classes) align with that which borders the lot. Living, with a courtyard at street level, is focused on the district. Classes take place on the axis with the Concertgebouw. This is located 90 centimetres above the level. This is also the entrance for the teachers. Studying is situated at the Valeriusplein in a deepened, covered courtyard. Studying is separated from the other programme components. There are no entrances at the Valeriusplein. The library forms a physical partition within the building. Structure of the building The music study predominantly takes place in separate rooms. The cells surround a courtyard. A cell is a private room which borders on a public courtyard. Three patios The three patios each have their own function and identity. The three functions are pointed inward and each has their own circulation. The traffic space around the patios opens up the programme on the outer edge of the building. The circulations meet each other in the centre of the building. Every patio has its own, personal, specific acoustics with: 1.8; 1.6 and 1.4 seconds of reverberation time. Materialisation The outer shell of the building, where the music rooms are, is made of concrete and brick. The traffic spaces situated on the inside are made of wood and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;soundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; like a sound box. Graduation date 17 12 2013

64

Commission members Rob Hootsmans (mentor) Gianni Cito Ira Koers

Additional members for the examination Herman Kerkdijk Bart Bulter


Wouter Kroeze

65


Architecture

Valeriusplein in the Concertgebouw area

Two axes: I: ‘music’-axis and ‘park’-axis

Valeriusplein ca. 1935

Characteristic structure of the district

Research into block transformations

Research into linking cells

Programme and materialisation

Research into cells

Sketch of the music room and hallway

66

Research into linking cells

Scale model, view from the patio (original scale 1:200)


Wouter Kroeze

11.

12.

3.

19.

15.

6.

5.

Valeriusstraat

14.

10.

13. 1.

7. 2.

5.

Image caption 9.

4.

16. 8.

43200

Johannes Verhulststraat 18.

GROUND FLOOR 1:200

BEGANE GROND 1:200 6. student entrance 1. patio 1.8GROND sec. (level=0) 11. study rooms BEGANE 1:200 2. patio 1.6 sec. (900+level) 7. 6.hallway/cafeteria 12. open music studenten ingang 11. studieruimte 16. room receptie/kantoor patio 1,8 sec. (peil=0) 1. 1. patio 1,8 sec. (peil=0) 6. studenten ingang 16. receptie/kantoor 11. studieruimte 12. open muziekkamer 3. covered patio 1.4 sec. 8. teachers’ entrance 13. gate 17. badkamer 7. hal/kantine 2. 2. patio 1,6 sec. (900+p) 12. open muziekkamer 7. hal/kantine 17. badkamer patio 1,6 sec. (900+p) 8. docenten ingang (p=0) 13. poort 18. entresol 3. overdekte patio 1,4 sec. (900+p) entresol (900+level) (level=0) and shafts 14. stijgpunten docenten ingang (p=0) 19. vide 13. poort 14. stairs, lifts18. 9. leslokalen (900+p) 8. 4. 3. wonen (900+p) patio 1,4 sec. (900+p) overdekte 10. bibliotheek 5. gang 15. toiletten 19. vide 4. living (900+level) 9.9.classrooms (900+level) 15. toilets 14. stijgpunten leslokalen (900+p) 4. wonen (900+p) 5. hallway 10. library 10. bibliotheek 15. toiletten 5. gang

16. reception/office 17. bathroom 18. mezzanine 19. atrium

17.

19. D-274

ENTRESOL

0 ,3 ,6

1,8

3,5

7,0 m.

Characteristic floor plan

17700

Section of living patio and study patio with a view of the inner façades

5

,5

78200

Valeriusplein

4. wonen (900+p) 5. gang

9. leslokalen (900+p) 10. bibliotheek

7,0

14. stijgpunten ,3 ,6

1,8

3,5

7,0

doorsnede C schaal  1:300

Façade on Johannes Verhulststraat

67 D-274

D-274 7,0 m.

gevel Johannes Verhulststraat

0 ,3 ,6

1,8

3,5

7,0 m.


Architecture

Photo montage of scale models in location photo

Scale model of wooden hallway walls in concrete structure spread over two floors

68

Photo montage of scale model of music rooms linked interiorly (original scale 1:20)


Wouter Kroeze

Scale model of a music room with fragment of the faรงade in brick and concrete

Scale model (original scale 1:200)

69


Architecture

Margaux Platenburg FROM WOOD Workshop in the city

This plan puts work made by hand back on the map. A few hundred years ago work made by hand was vital to survival. People made their own homes, tools and cooking utensils. Today, everything can be purchased and we have forgotten how things are made. What material is it made of and where does it come from? By letting people make their own things, they become involved with the product. This plan illustrates how an existing workshop in Amsterdam changes from an inaccessible place to an accessible workshop. The city-dweller can now experience the manufacturing process from beginning to end themselves. ‘Learning by doing.’ Green woodworking No electric machinery is used in this workshop. You can learn how to work fresh wood with tools: green woodworking. This is originally an English craft from the 19th century that has almost disappeared. They were the workers without a horse or tractor who cut down trees in the forest. Because the tree was too heavy to transport, they made parts of the furniture while in the woodlands. The way of working is translated to an urban environment in the assignment. In Amsterdam, 40,000 trees are cut annually. Until recently, these trees disappeared into the shredder. Stadshout Amsterdam has jumped into this niche by reusing the trees. In this way, they help build a circular economy; the cut trees from the city get a second life and remain in the city. The workshop is part of this circle; one can experience the entire process here, from chopping down the tree to making your own chair. Urban environment The workshop is situated in a courtyard on the Middenweg in Amsterdam-Oost (Amsterdam East). To be able to concentrate on your work, a quiet place was chosen in order to be able to withdraw from the busy city. The block is not designed as a closed housing block, but both the block’s edge and the inner area have become closed of through the years. The inner area is not accessible to the public and is occupied by nine garages, which are lumped together. Intervention This unreachable courtyard has the potential to be used more effectively. The inner area will be opened up and entrances to the city are created by puncturing holes in the block’s edge. The programme of the wood workshop will be combined with functions related to the neighbourhood. In this way, the inner area will become part of the neighbourhood once more. The nine garages will not be removed completely. The structure of the existing walls yields an interesting spatial division. By only keeping the walls, the closed lump of garages changes into nine airy ‘rooms’. Each room will receive a new interior space, which simultaneously creates outside space. You step into a different world for a moment. Around you, you can see a landscape of interior and exterior spaces; a mysterious image of black charred wood. A few trees grow between the ridges and pieces of wood are scattered everywhere. Everything is handmade. In some places, a view of the completely wooden interior spaces is created. You can work there with wood, but you can also have a cup of coffee or just walk around.

Graduation date 09 07 2014

70

Commission members Florian Schrage (mentor) Machiel Spaan Paulien Bremmer

Additional members for the examination Job Suijker (green-wood-man) Marco Pannenborg (constructor) Jan Richard Kikkert


Margaux Platenburg

71


Architecture

Closed housing block Middenweg, Amsterdam

Through the years, the courtyard was fully developed with a number of garages lumped together; half of which are vacant.

The courtyard will become a workshop

Nine existing garages

Here, you van learn how to work with fresh city wood

A workshop in the city; a hidden place to retreat and work with city wood

Maintaining the walls

This creates â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;roomsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Landscape of inside and outside space

openbare route HOUTROUTE The basic material is the cut city tree

The Middenweg is three metres above the inner area. As a result, the public route and the wood route are separated from each other

STADSHOUTWINKEL

The block edge will be cut open in five places to enter the inner area. This is the entrance on the Middenweg; you can walk past the wood shop into the inner

72


Margaux Platenburg

The new inner landscape of wood. The outside is charred wood to make it sustainable

The inside of each â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is made of different types of wood from Amsterdam

Cross-section Wakkerstraat-Ringdijk doorsnede wakkerstraat - ringdijk 1:100

73


Architecture

The first stage of woodworking. The wood comes in here, and there is enough outside space to split the wood.

The last stage of woodworking. The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; where you can assemble the created parts in peace

74


Margaux Platenburg

Partial elaboration of one â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Every room is built up out of a wooden construction. The walls and floors are finished with variations of thickness, woodtype and rhythm

75


Architecture

Eric Ritsma PRO-vision

A house for a province with vision

The motive for this plan is the now completed move of the local government of the province of Utrecht to the stately â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fortis buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; alongside the A27 motorway; a choice which was met with a lack of understanding and caused a lot of discussion. Aside from the financial arguments, the question that is central to this study is whether or not this is appropriate accommodation for a government body with an image problem. A modern organisation can no longer do without terms such as the New Way of Working, Working 2.0 and flexitime working, and neither can the province. In order to make these changes visible, office buildings are equipped en masse with colourful wallpaper and hammocks while the archetype of an office has only marginally been developed. The new provincial government building is researching how these changes can help to disseminate the ambition and the identity of the provincial government through its accommodation. This ambition starts with the location, not on the periphery but in the heart of the city. By aligning with the development of the area around the station, it stands at the heart of the community. The result is an (apparently) continual and open office landscape in which secondary functions such as catering, sports and meetings are not hidden, but now actually have a central position. The interplay of the different floors creates a range of atmospheres, which enables everyone to decide for themselves which workplace is fitting to the work activities at that moment. Contacts and relationships are therefore created, which are no longer based on position or role, but on personal preference and identity. PRO-vision contributes to a provincial government, which adopts a servient position. Aside from offering workplaces to their own workforce, it offers workplaces to flex workers, which enables the core to expand and shrink without lack of occupancy and thus creating the opportunity for the provincial government to show its identity.

Graduation date 08 07 2014

76

Commission members Laurens Jan ten Kate (mentor) Don Murphy Marlies Boterman

Additional members for the examination Marc A Campo Florian Schrage


Eric Ritsma

77


Architecture

Open workplaces

Entrance and square

78


Eric Ritsma

Cores

Statenzaal (Council Chamber)

Meeting square

Lobby

Workspace

Restaurant

79


Architecture

80


Eric Ritsma

81


Architecture

Bart van der Salm Grounding

An in-between home for the last stage of life, a place to die in the city

The historic fortified city Zwolle has a rich history of hospices spread throughout the city, which have been part of the urban and social structure for centuries. The first hospice was founded in 1306 and the presence of different hospices in the city centre of Zwolle continued up until the first half of the twentieth century. The in-between home (Tussenthuis) can be placed in the tradition of these historical core values. The in-between home will be a new hospice; a place in the city centre of Zwolle, where people can stay to spend the last stage of their life in a grounded living environment; a place to die in the city. Specific to this in-between home is the possibility to stay there with a partner or an entire family. The term in-between home (Tussenthuis) is also a symbol for the moment between this life and the next world. The architecture of the ‘in-between’ and the historical city landscape, along with the underlying morphology of the location, form the structure of the in-between home. The theme grounding has been given expression through the rituals, materialisation, tectonics, the urban planning placement and the scenic set-up of the complex. Aside from the fact that this in-between home is for people, it is also an in-between home for the flora and fauna of the historic ‘stone city’. By creating niches, plates, recesses and places to nestle, the existing and surrounding urban landscape is also able to become grounded. Animals come to hibernate, and plants and insects can literally inhabit the walls of the complex. The in-between home is built with walls that, at the same time, also function as an in-between home for the local landscape and its inhabitants. In this way, a place of death also becomes a place of life, and the mass that creates space is also the space that creates mass: reciprocal dependency and mutual necessity. After their stay in the in-between home, the buildings and the landscape continue to represent a value in someone’s life; they become monuments of remembrance for a loved one who passed away. Therefore, the complex in the city slowly gains the same value as the hospices of the olden days; they cherish the memories of people who were able to spend their last living days together in a grounded environment. An essential place in the city, an essential place for the city.

Graduation date 26 08 2014

82

Commission members Laurens Jan ten Kate (mentor) Herman Kerkdijk Maike van Stiphout

Additional members for the examination Mariette Adriaanssen Paul de Vroom


Bart van der Salm

Chapel interior

83


Architecture

Overview scale model scale 1:100

B X

B

B

D

T D

B

T D

B

T D

B

T

T

B D

D

Z

D

T

X

X

D

B

Z

X Architectural structuring of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;in-betweenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (D: domain B: outside / city - T: architectural in-between - X / Z: plasticity / section / grain size)

Urban integration (1 and 2 south side - 3 and 4 north side)

84

1

2

3

4


Bart van der Salm

Site plan

1.

2.

1.

2.

1

Two person accommodation (1 ground floor - 2 floors)

2

1

Five person accommodation (1 ground floor - 2 floors)

2

85


Architecture

Technical sections at the site of the courtyard and the Noordhof

1:1 details (resp.): wall ground floor (fortified brick from Zwolle + Vecht size 21 cm x 10 cm x 4 cm) - wall floors (Vecht size + prefab) - ceiling (Vecht size + oak veneer ceiling) - chapel (prefab wood laminate + oak columns)

Entrance

Noordhof (North courtyard)

Zuidhof (South courtyard)

Chapel exit

86


Bart van der Salm

Courtyard - remembrance

Borders / Patios - sharing and privacy

Garden spaces / borders - landscape buffers

Kleine Aa - reception and departure

The transition within the landscape provides an intense experience of the seasons

87


Architecture

Mindaugas Savickas Baltic Notes Re-Arch for a music machine

Experiment This project is an architectural experiment on how to reuse waterfront industrial heritage for cultural purposes. Inspired and driven by the changes happening on the shipyard territory of the Baltic harbour-city Klaipeda. Context With its Prussian, German, Soviet and Lithuanian history, Klaipeda provides visitors and inhabitants with a rich cultural context. It is a unique urban collage with an abandoned, but remarkable 20th century industrial complex – ‘Schiffswerft Memel - Lindenau und cie’ (1919) contrasting with the medieval castle fortifications on the delta of an old river. City inhabitants as well as visitors gather here to celebrate the biggest events of the year, such as Sea Festival, Tall Ship Races, annual Castle Jazz and Song Festivals, etc. The site is turning into a vibrant celebration place. Incentive Klaipeda’s music students lack quality conditions for their development. There are three music schools in the old town area. They accommodate 400-500 students a year. However the facilities are 60 to 80 years old and are poorly equipped considering music practice. Meeting the highest standards is the new ambition of Klaipeda, which has recently become a musical harbour of the Baltic sea due to its proactive posture in the entertainment business. Therefore, I suggest a new accommodation at the centre of city activities. Approach At the spot where WWII German steel ships were made, I propose a learning platform for young and adult musicians. It is a playful Music Factory under the industrial roof of a former ship berth. This state-protected heritage was used to hold ships and operated cranes and rails bringing those ships from the water basin. Now all of this will be employed to create an adaptable practice space. It will also work as a ‘backup stage’ benefiting the new Castle Podium. Developing this new learning platform is like building ships. Large steel volumes stand freely ‘floating’ within the existing structure engaged in a balanced dialogue. Programme The school programme is gathered inside these ‘musical ships’. Main practice halls are located on the ground floor utilising the rail tracks, in this way enabling podium and audience platforms to be adapted for various genres of music practices. Cranes will be operating mobile recording studios and will be able to adjust ceiling height to meet the delicate reverberation times. Other functions like a café on the waterside will be open for public and accommodate intimate free student concerts. Meanwhile, private school functions will be located on the upper floors. 55 individual and group practice rooms will accommodate approx. 300 students and approx. 100 teachers. A lifted ‘deck’ (+7,50m) will facilitate the auditorium of the school with a music library and a study floor employing an inspiring view of the marine panorama. Impact It is a Re-Arch operation where war machines start playing music, giving a new purpose for the whole public waterfront and setting an example for the future developments. Graduation date 25 09 2013

88

Commission members Ruurd Roorda (mentor) René Bouman Holger Gladys

Additional members for the examination Robert Winkel Judith Korpershoek Bart Bulter Rob Doomen (Pieters Bouwtechniek) Margriet Lautenbach (Peutz akoestiek)


Mindaugas Savickas

89


Architecture

Harbour industry - breaking through the wall

Image caption

Image caption

Context scheme - the junction of the main public streams

Image caption

Ground floor plan - catalysing the surroundings

90

Image caption


Mindaugas Savickas

Cross-section

Initial design

Factual usage

Proposed ground floor usage - main halls

Proposed school level +7.50

Dialogue between mass and structure

Form study

91


Architecture

1st floor - meeting / group practice rooms

2nd floor - individual practice rooms

92


Mindaugas Savickas

Model - western facade

Interior impression

93


Architecture

Martijn Tjassens Keiser The Urban Campsite Synergy between young and old

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;It is often very difficult to go on holiday with the whole family, if you have a child or a young person with a disability. That is why the Stichting Wigwam Vallei Nederland (Wigwam Valley Netherlands Foundation) specially organises the Wigwam holidays: staying in an adapted large wigwam holiday house or in a small wigwam house, with an adventurous activity programme for all children. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Stichting Wigwam Vallei (Wigwam Valley Foundation) This assignment translates the concept of the wigwam to an urban campsite with the objective to make the city of Amsterdam more accessible to children with a disability by means of this small green oasis in the city. Volunteers Using the city as location, this project seizes the opportunity to research the social added value of this new target group in the city. The urban campsite is largely dependent on the help of volunteers. Every volunteer is tasked with spending time with a child. During the day, the volunteers participate in activities with the children so the parents are relieved and can also enjoy their holiday. Previously, the role of the volunteer was fulfilled by students, but in this project this task is taken on by senior citizens. Lonely senior citizens as volunteers Lonely, often single, senior citizens who are physically fit, but who are at risk of becoming socially isolated often have a greater chance of physical decline according to research. Changes in the healthcare system ensure that senior citizens can live at home for a longer period of time. By creating a lively living environment with room for contact, senior citizens are less likely to become socially isolated and the pressure on the healthcare system is relieved. Balance between seeing and being seen With many different target groups in one enclosed area, it is important to find a balance between private and public. Every user has different needs and they are able to determine their position in relation to the other users themselves. This is achieved by dividing the functions vertically and horizontally into different domains. The ground floor is completely geared towards the activities, liveliness and spending time together. The higher you are in the building, the more opportunities there are to retreat and the more peace there is to be found. It is horizontally divided into two domains. The domain of the guest and that of the permanent residents, the senior citizens. This way, no one is forced to make contact. However, the open set-up and the view into the upper levels stimulates contact. The urban campsite reveals the balance between seen and being seen and stimulates contact between different people.

Graduation date 29 10 2013

94

Commission members Thomas Dill (mentor) Tom Jonker Harvey Otten

Additional members for the examination Floor Arons Herman Kerkdijk


Martijn Tjassens Keiser

95


Architecture

Weesperzijde, Amsterdam

Wandering, discovering and shelter

Contact between floors. ground floor: activities, upper floors: retreat

Domain of guests and residents

1 Existing faรงade

3 Place floors

N

Guest rooms

96

2 New construction to be attached to faรงade

Interior bedroom

4 Attach membrane between floors

Senior citizens accommodation


Martijn Tjassens Keiser

BEGANEGROND 1:100

N

Ground floor - activities

Floor - sleeping/retreating

1E VERDIEPING 1:100

N

Doorsnede A 1:100

Section

97


Architecture

Restaurant and domain for residents

Courtyard - activity spaces

98


Martijn Tjassens Keiser

Courtyard - activity spaces

99


Architecture

Menno Trautwein Mosveld market hall

Partially covered market in Amsterdam North

Markets worldwide are a great representation of how the local population coexist, what foods they eat and how they eat. Markets abroad are often located in fantastic market buildings, initiated by municipal administrations as a socio-economic impulse for the city and due to hygienic considerations. In the Netherlands, the government has limited itself to a supervisory role in the last hundred years with regard to markets, and the once very rich variety in market accommodation has been reduced to temporary collections of stalls and vans. Now, more than ever, a city market hall has great potential in Amsterdam: requirements for the accommodation of food commerce are becoming more and more strict, consumers have become more appreciative of the quality and origins of their food, consumers have become accustomed to extended opening hours and there are still city districts with great socio-economic differences which could flourish with the impulse of a proper functioning market hall. I chose a location in my place of residence, Amsterdam, which has potential for a market hall and which at the same time needs a socio-economic impulse: the location of the current open air market at the Mosveld in Amsterdam North. In my design I have been guided by three key pillars: - the market as a socio-economic engine for Amsterdam North; - the market as a food temple, promoting healthy and conscious eating; - the market as a promoter of a new sustainable lifestyle. As a result of the urban planning setting in the middle of Volewijck, the oldest neighbourhood of Amsterdam North, at a junction of important routes for all types of traffic and a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw from the future Noordzuidlijn (north-south metro line), the new market hall will be the heart of Amsterdam North. The partially covered marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will strengthen the activity of the adjacent shopping streets in a programmatic way and make the Mosveld neighbourhood into the centre of Amsterdam North. In my food temple, all stages of food are represented and made visible: from production to sales, from preparation to consumption, from waste to energy. Apart from a covered market hall and an air-conditioned fresh produce hall, the programming of the market complex will, therefore, also consist of a market restaurant, a market cafĂŠ, market greenhouses for educational food production and accommodation for market administration including installations for waste water purification, waste recycling and energy generation. In line with the objective to create a self-regulating building and inspired by the industrial saw tooth roofs in Amsterdam North, the market roof has been designed to allow daylight to shine on the market floor and the rays of the sun and rainwater are collected by the roof to be used for energy and water. Sun roofs, glass roofs and rainwater pipes are supported by Y-shaped trusses, placed in a grid which is fine-tuned to the organisation of the market and to the human scale. By allowing variation in the configuration of the roof and placement of more closed programme components, a variety of continual spaces will be created within the largest market complex, which will create space for the market, the visitors and future events.

Graduation date 26 05 2014

100

Commission members Miguel Loos (mentor) Gus Tielens Northon Flores Troche

Additional members for the examination Marcel van der Lubbe Klaas Kingma


Menno Trautwein

101


Architecture

Mosveld Noorderpark station

MARKT

30

30

50

50

50

MARKT

MARKT

MARKT

70

30

Amsterdam CS

70

30

N

50

70

30

N

N

TO DESTINATION

FROM A PLACE OF PASSAGE

Amsterdam Zuid

SOUTH

NORTH

air-conditioned fresh produce hall groente/fruit/kaas

partially covered itinerant style market

market café

vlees/vis/melk

0

solar panels to the south

Daylight from the north

10m

hard-baked clinkers herringbone bond

wood frames untreated Radiata Pine

30°

ka na alp do laa t, o refl or h ve ec et p rsp tee re an rt h fab nin b et gs da eto ric gli nne hti ch ng t n n pla aa r d fond e m te ark po tvlo lijste er n,

2100

300

hwa

700

hwa

300

4000

Evening lighting indirect via ceiling

400

52°

33

13000

5m

prefab concrete scantling-roof slabs

prefab concrete trusses and beams windows to the north

Solar panels on the southern corner 30°

1200

300

15000 4050

4500

1200

4050

4800

1200

elektra en water

afschot

vuilwater

elektra en water

afschot

afschot

floor marking stall layout

0

2m

afschot

vuilwater

5m

café

ouder- en kindcentrum Wingerdweg

banketbakkerij Gerlofsma

pizzeria San Remo

Genco Turkse supermarkt

30

BUS

buurtcentrum Ons Huis

30

30

noorderpark restaurant marktbeheer

NH Galaxy Hotel 290 kamers en 10 conferentiezalen

biogasinstallaties

hotel fruitboomgaard

café

marktkassen

helophytenfilter schoolmoestuinen

schoolmoestuinen

BUS

pin-automaat Rabobank

Islamitische vrouwenorganisatie El Kuba

102

varkensweide

basisschool De Klimop

schoolmoestuinen

scholen

30

30 slagerij El Rief

0

20m

40m

café koffiehuis Blokker

eetcafé Mosveld

café Bij Jan

30


10101010

Menno Trautwein

Partially covered market (upstairs) and alternative use of the covered square (downstairs)

SMALL MARKET AND SPORTS AND PLAYING

NO MARKET/EVENING

EVENT E.G. FOOD FILM FESTIVAL

SEASONAL FESTIVITIES E.G. ICE RINK + CHRISTMAS MARKET

gratis elektrisch opladen gratis gratis gratis elektrisch elektrisch elektrisch opladen opladen opladen tribune tribune tribune tribune

theater theater theater theater gesloten gesloten gesloten gesloten

sport sport sport sport

sport sport sport sport

gesloten gesloten gesloten gesloten ijsbaan ijsbaan ijsbaan ijsbaan

skaten skaten skaten skaten afgesloten afgesloten afgesloten afgesloten

biertafels biertafels biertafels biertafels

eetkraampjes eetkraampjes eetkraampjes eetkraampjes

kerstmarkt kerstmarkt kerstmarkt kerstmarkt gesloten gesloten gesloten gesloten

50505050

0 0 0 0 10101010

50505050

0 0 0 0 10101010

50505050

0 0 0 0 10101010

50505050

0 0 0 0 10101010

50505050

SOLAR POWER

RAINWATER

WASTE WATER RECYCLING

The metabolism of the market square

FOOD RECYCLING

103


Architecture

Air-conditioned fresh produce hall

If it rains

104


Menno Trautwein

Market restaurant

Accommodation of market supervisor and recycling installations

105


Architecture

Gertjan Vlaar Food resort

A new use for the Central Market hall

The Central Market hall is situated at the centre of the Foodcenter grounds in Amsterdam West, which is not accessible to outsiders and was used as a wholesale market for food for the inhabitants of the city. The hall has lost its function as a result of the rise of food sector companies at the Foodcenter, where the trade is now done directly. The immense dimensions of the hall are intriguing. Playful repetitions in the interior of the market hall resemble a landscape of which the scale is difficult to define. The market hall is covered, but at the same time feels like you are in an outside space. The lived-in interior shows layers of renovations, and the building has been modified to serve the user over the years. These layers speak volumes of the former intensive usage of the hall. Is it possible to add a new layer, so this almost forgotten building will once again gain a new significance for the city? The municipality of Amsterdam wants to make the Foodcenter more compact and use the available space predominantly for new housing for the city. Recently, a number of different urban planning proposals were made. In times of crisis, however, it is hard to develop and finance large-scale plans. By leaving the Foodcenter as it is and, in addition to that, making the market hall public, new scenarios can be created for the future. The market hall can strengthen the identity of the location in the collective memory of the city and thus become a catalyst for future developments. Food resort Aside from the intensive (traditional) use of the Foodcenter grounds, there are new trends and developments in the field of food. By making the market hall accessible to the public as a Food Resort, it becomes the perfect location to support the aforementioned developments and to link them to the Foodcenter. By introducing new target groups, encounters and new opportunities arise to programme the market hall, different rhythms in programming make the destination different every moment of the day, this is the idea behind the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Food Resortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. The foundation for the programme is laid by the establishment of a hotel school, to ensure a stable basis with regard to programme elements. New layer The roof of the market hall is in need of replacement, despite recent renovations. By placing a glass roof on the existing structure, the possibility arises to realise a garden, which is organised around food and its production. This garden functions as a binding element between the intended target groups. Through properly shaping this element spatially, new types of spaces are created in the market hall, which makes it possible to fit in a programme element such as a hotel school. Moreover, the garden amplifies the intangible scale of the market hall, and blurs the transition between inside and outside. The value of the garden differs per target group. The gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purpose is to function as a botanical garden for new crops, a production garden and as a park where one can relax. In and bordering the garden encounters and/or trade take(s) place between different target groups. Programme elements, such as the buffet restaurant, a daily market, the craft workshops and a theatre at the centre of the garden, each function with their own rhythm within the Food Resort. Graduation date 27 06 2014

106

Commission members Marcel van de Lubbe (mentor) Pieter Jannink Pieter van der Pot

Additional members for the examination Rik van Dolderen Herman Kerkdijk


Gertjan Vlaar

107


Architecture

24h 24h

huidig huidig e pr e pr ofe ofe s ssi bezoe bezoe sion on ker ker a al l urban urban foo foo dp stude studdepi io nt notn ni ho hieo amba am e t t b e e r cht alcsht r ls c el c eli ijk jk e e

ambachtelijke ambachtelijke bedrijven bedrijven

onal ol essi ho rof p onal ol essi ho rof p

food A

M

S

T

buffetbuffet restaurant restaurant

resort

E

R

D

A

M

marktmarkt

lezingen/ lezingen/ evenementen evenementen

12h 12h

Public access by means of a temporary bridge construction

n relatie tot huidige context 1:2500

tuin tuin

Programme aimed at encounters between target groups

Visitor’s experience

Resort hotel

Grondpakket + bak minimaal 4200 mm

Grondpakket + bak 3000mm Onderslagbalken 1600x800mm - 2400x1200mm Kolommen 1600x1600 mm - 2400x2400mm

Grondpakket + bak 1800mm Onderslagbalken 800x400mm - 1200x600mm Kolommen 800x800mm - 1200x1200mm

Grondpakket + bak 600mm Onderslagbalken 200x100mm - 300x150mm Kolommen 200x200mm - 300x300mm

Grondpakket + bak 1200mm Onderslagbalken 400x200mm - 600x300mm Kolommen 400x400mm - 600x600mm

1:20

Professional’s experience

Building concept

Relationship construction and garden

enario toekomstige context 1:2500

food A

Dwarsdoorsnede

Façade

108

Accessibility

M

S

T

resort

E

R

D

A

M

Conference centre


Gertjan Vlaar

Programme components connected to garden on different levels

Spaces below garden formed through construction

109


Architecture

Level existing floor

110


Gertjan Vlaar

111


Architecture

Gabriël Zitman Thinking with the hands Plea for the thinking doer

From an early age, I did a lot building, tinkering and playing around. There is nothing that gives me more fulfilment than to figure things out or create things with the utmost concentration. Once I’ve started, my hands do more than simply execute what my mind conceives. A complex reciprocity arises between both the hands uncover things which the mind didn’t think possible. My graduation project is an experiment in letting architectural thinking and building directly influence each other, hence the title: Thinking with the hands Thinking with the hands is an instruction to myself: I aim to research what happens when I start making something without a preconceived and concrete plan. A plea for the thinking doer. To discover what starting by making will yield in an architectural sense, I started without a programme of requirements, without a location, without an idea. In a setting that resembled a cross between a studio and a laboratory, I began experimenting with the board: a linear wooden element with dimensions of, in my case, 1:10:250. I proceeded to research this given element step by step, randomly as such: what if I wanted to create a stable surface with a few boards? Together, a few bent boards formed a surface, a number of these surfaces formed a cube and a 10 x 10 x 10 cm cube became a pavilion of 5 x 5 x 5 metres somewhere in the polder. Process I recorded the entire process of making, testing and developing in time-lapse videos. These videos enabled me to reflect on what happened in each step and helped me determine the agenda for the next step. Not every step turned out to be a step in the right direction, but also the less fruitful sideroads eventually contributed to the phase my project is in at the moment. I dedicated the last weeks of my graduation project to the – in this framework – last step of my experiment, building an arbour in the courtyard of the academy. This construction represents the current state of affairs of my research of what you can do with a board. It is a prototype, not a final project.

Graduation date 26 08 2014

112

Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Ira Koers Haiko Meijer

Additional members for the examination Herman Zeinstra Peter Defeche


GabriĂŤl Zitman

Photo: Jeroen Staats

113


Architecture

Stills from time-lapse â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thinking with the handsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Selection from first series of models made with wood veneer

Building a pavilion of 5x5x5 metres in the polder

Model of paper

114


Gabriël Zitman

Stills from time-lapse ‘building of the arbour’

The arbour in parts

115


Architecture

Connection detail

View into the construction

116


GabriĂŤl Zitman

View outside from inside

The arbour

Fotografie spread: Jeroen Staats

117


Architecture

Ivar van der Zwan A Front for the Back

New scenario for the invisible city centre of Amsterdam

Nowadays, it is possible to find the hidden spots in the city using smart phones and internet. Getting lost is no longer a possibility. Will this virtual environment also influence the constructed environment? After all, a smart phone allows us to see behind the façades of the city and suddenly we are able to find businesses and shops on the third floor at the back of a building. Because of this, shops and cafés are no longer tied to eye-catching locations. With my graduation project I examine if it is possible that these functions end up at hidden places, like the many alleyways of Amsterdam. The design around the Keizerrijk alley (between the Spuistraat and the Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal) includes 20 houses, combined with studio/shop space. It illustrates a scenario which further condenses Amsterdam, but also a way to add a new scale to the city centre. The public route along roof gardens and studio/shop spaces makes this new Amsterdam accessible to all inhabitants of Amsterdam: a Front for the Back. The ‘back’ of the block south-east of the Palace on Dam square is made accessible by two alleys: the Keizerrijk alley and the former Kaatsbaansteeg, which will be restored to it’s former glory. The design is spatially built up out of a series of 15 brickwork slabs, all in the same linear direction as the two alleys. When walking through the project, one always moves in the linear direction of the alleys, or straight through them. The openings in the slabs collectively form the space for the public route. It leads inhabitants and visitors along two public roof gardens and a number of atriums and ends up at a public roof terrace. Between the gaps, there are also a number of residential and retail typologies. The houses are designed in such a way that the inhabitant also experiences moving through the various slabs. The stairs run along the brickwork slabs, like a sort of alley inside a house. Or through the slabs, in which case the brickwork is part of the stairs. You repeatedly step into the wall, and only then do the stairs continue.

Graduation date 15 05 2014

118

Commission members Laurens Jan ten Kate (mentor) Laura Alvarez Holger Gladys

Additional members for the examination Tom Frantzen Albert Herder


Ivar van der Zwan

119


Architecture

1/1000

120

N


Ivar van der Zwan

121


Architecture

type C_100m2 attic/family home 3 bedrooms 1 layer 1x

type D_90m2 attic/family home 3 bedrooms 3 layers 4x

122


Ivar van der Zwan

brickwork wall brick 100mm joint 10mm brick 100mm total 210mm

brickwork wall brick 100mm cavity 40mm high-quality isolation 80mm brick 100mm total 320mm

Floor cold below floorboards 18mm subfloor 18mm floor screed 80mm osb 12mm pressure-resistant 80mm isolation vapour-permeable foil wood boards 18mm joisting 145mm total 370mm

floor cold upstairs bankirai boards 20mm wedges 28mm rubber granulate 10mm roof covering 5mm Isolation PIR 112mm lewis floor 16mm rubber granulate 15mm wood boards 18mm joisting 145mm total 370mm

floor home-dividing floorboards 18mm crosslaths/iso 30mm crossbeams/iso 50mm rubber granulate 10mm floor screed 85mm osb 12mm wood boards 18mm joisting 145mm total 370mm

123


Arjan Klok Head of Urbanism Department


New ways of master planning Professional practitioners in the field of urbanism are currently racking their brains to determine what type of master plans they should produce, what primary motives to embrace, and what horizons to open up for cities wanting or needing development. The new generation of young ‘urbanists’ could be pointing the way. They seem to be eager in their quest for new ways of constructing master plans for city development or, to phrase it differently, master plans for the development of ‘urbanity’. A strong local interest and commitment is combined with intriguing new thoughts. What if we take the principles of ‘succession’, the logical stepwise development of balanced natural ecologies, as the leading principle of urban development? Can this way of working overcome the current problems in city development and produce more satisfying neighbourhoods? What if take a chess-like approach combining simple temporary forms of use in the interim period with far-reaching, even controversial interventions, such as taking away still useable buildings to realise really meaningful improvements in the city’s public space framework? How should we deal with urban heating? How should we reconstruct, renew and design public spaces in a way that we create an ideal comfortable physical climate in highly urbanised areas? It could make the difference between a city you hate or a city you love. These are some of the questions and suggestions raised in this year’s collection of graduation projects. Could or should these starting points, themes and principles become the future basic motives for the construction of master plans for vivid urbanity? Food for thought and debate!

125


Urbanism

Veronika Kovácsová Urban Permeability On Plants and Plinths

Human civilisation is becoming ever more urban. With the growing densification in our cities, green and open (public) spaces are being put under pressure. As the number of built, non-permeable surfaces increase, storm water absorption, biodiversity and a pleasant microclimate in our cities are threatened. All non-permeable materials contribute to extreme water conditions in the city (low ground water level or flooding) and to the so-called ‘urban heat island’ effect. Alongside this development, the number and quality of public spaces is being put under pressure. How do we provide the necessary built urban environment (housing, infrastructure) of a growing city, and at the same time enhance and offer lively, inclusive public spaces with a comfortable microclimate? Urban permeability is hereby introduced as an influencer of human comfort in urban spaces. On one hand open, breathing, absorbing and cooling green spaces in cities, on the other hand accessible, inclusive and lively ground floors of buildings, both types acting as catalysts of social interaction. Two totally different areas in Bratislava are compared: a dense historical centre (Old Town) with scarce porous spaces and a vibrant social city life and a 1970s prefab mass-housing neighbourhood (Petrzalka) with an excess of unused greenery, and a limited offer of vibrant public spaces. The aim of this project is to show how these two neighbourhoods can reinforce themselves and to investigate and identify measurements that can be taken to fix the missing social and microclimatological links in their urban fabric. Both neighbourhoods have a similar density of inhabitants, but their urban fabric is totally different. Only 6% of the total surface of Old Town is open and green, and the dominant non-permeable surface area is supporting the development of the urban heat island effect. Petrzalka, on the contrary, has a high amount of ground vegetation (about 66%), open corridors for fresh air to enter, but a deteriorating public life due to large distances between buildings, disorientated planning and marginal social functions on ground level for people to pass by and meet. Urban permeability is hereby introduced as an influencer of human comfort in urban spaces. On one hand open, breathing, absorbing and cooling green spaces in cities, on the other hand accessible, inclusive and lively ground floors of buildings, both types acting as catalysts of social interaction. Two totally different areas in Bratislava are compared: a dense historical centre (Old Town) with scarce porous spaces and a vibrant social city life and a 1970s prefab mass-housing neighbourhood (Petrzalka) with an excess of unused greenery, and a limited offer of vibrant public spaces. The aim of this project is to show how these two neighbourhoods can reinforce themselves and to investigate and identify measurements that can be taken to fix the missing social and microclimatological links in their urban fabric.

Graduation date 19 12 2013

126

Commission members Donald van Dansik (mentor) Lisette Klok Sanda Lenzholzer

Additional members for the examination Erik Meinharter Zuzana Hudeková


Veronika Kovรกcsovรก

127


Urbanism

Relative huminity

Temperature

70%

37.8°C

60%

35°C

50%

32.2°C

40%

29.4°C

30%

26.7°C

danger

36.7°C (afternoon) city centre

When it‘s over 35°C outside, I rather do not leave my apartment.

caution

urban heat island effect

less hazardous, adaptive body temperature

Temperature in densely built centres from 1-10 °C higher, 10% less humidity and 30% weaker wind than in surrounding countryside

36.7°C 36°C 35°C 34°C 33°C 32°C 31°C

heat stress nausea, vomiting, headaches, and low blood pressure and the latter can lead to fainting or dizziness

heat stress / Hyperthermia - occurs when a body produces or absorbs more heat than it dissipates

33.5°C 31.5°C Old Town

Petržalka

15km

Measurements: 19.08.2013 | 12:00 -14:00 | Sunny

dense built mass = lively street life, but insufficient green space for a healthy microclimate and uninviting environment for fauna & flora socially deteriorating area, where anonimity rules. There's lots of green, open spaces - lots of potential for a inviting microclimate and potential for a development of a better social life on a community level.

I (Old Town) V (Petrzalka)

<15

15.1 - 20

>3500

500 - 1500

15.1 - 20

20.1 - 25

1500 - 3500

<500

% 65+ (2025)

6%

51% Old Town

air temperature 29°C

Open/ porous surface

asphalt/concrete in the shadow 25°C

94% Petrzalka

green green wet/in shadow in sun 26°C

Effects of materialisation

Built/ sealed surface

Old Town

49%

Built/ sealed surface

Petrzalka

ns

tize

tar, bitumen

i va c tisla Bra

56°C

soil 30°C

128

Petržalka

Population density 2012 (people per km2)

Open/ porous surface

22°C

Old Town

asphalt/concrete in the sun 46°C

all temperatures self-measured with an infrared thermometer

How can the vast green carpets, avoided overheated squares and street be utilised while preserving and improving the ecological structure and characteristics of the area?

By letting the people adopt and re-create the green spaces between their buildings. They will feel more responsible and connected to their living environment.


Veronika Kovácsová urban fruit forest

outdoor cinema

outdoor market

multifunctional playfield area

collective food production gardens

urban meadows

Petržalka 2020+ activating the public space and grass fields

129


Urbanism

Visualisation Petr탑alka 2020

Urban food production in collective gardens

Raised beds (for elderly and disabled) to join the collective food production

130


Veronika Kovácsová

Citizens picking up fruit from food forest to make their own jams, pies, syrup or schnaps

200m

Fruits from the food forest directy to the kitchens of locals!

Local farmers harvest and take their produce home The local vegetables get directly into the homes of the people

Local Food proximity

The local supermarket buys produce from the local market

Newly opened café in the plinth buys many of the local produces for their cakes and homemade fruitshakes

131


Urbanism

Bart van Leeuwen Hilversum Media landscapes

Why expand 172,000m² in green space when 194,800m² commercial real estate is vacant in Hilversum? The municipality has set up a plan to expand the existing MediaPark. The private campus will be enlarged and this will affect the last piece of green space within the town borders. The media landscape has developed into a circular economy over the last decade. This has caused the conditions for establishing a business to change, as a result of which the spatial model of a campus has become outmoded. As a dissenting opinion, this proposal provides a set of spatial interventions to make the existing vacancy more attractive. In this way, Hilversum can continue to develop into the media village of the future. Chain of media landscapes Based on the existing media structure, vacancy levels and distinctive landscape qualities, a succession of characteristic areas can be shown. The MediaPark, home to the broadcasters and studios, is situated on the north side of Hilversum. Directly south is a residential area where the media previously thrived. Bordering this district is the rustic centre of Hilversum. These areas have the potential to be further developed based on their own quality. Vacancy levels, with different grain and real estate costs per area, will be made suitable for different types of media businesses. A historical ribbon forms the central connecting element between the areas. This creates four types of areas, each with its own characteristics and core values. From north to south the following areas can be distinguished: the Mediafactory, the MediaPark, the Mediawijk and the Broedplaats. Every area is geared towards a focus group from the media chain with a spatial network of media areas in the direct vicinity of each other as final objective. Development of a media district with allure In a villa district where the media previously thrived, a large number of villas typical of Het Gooi area are vacant. By creating more planological space and improving the spatial quality, the vacant real estate will become more interesting for development. A media pathway that runs from the MediaPark to the centre, will form the landscape backbone of the area. The front sides of the plots change into a green entrance area of the office. An open-air studio has been developed on a first plot, while the next plot offers space for the terrace of a grand cafÊ. The rear sides are used functionally. Cars will be parked there and there is space for expanding the villas. In this way, the villa district will develop into a media district with allure. The green heart of the media region Instead of competing with other places in the region, Hilversum will have developed itself on the basis of its own green and leafy qualities by 2040. As a result of the small development grain, current demands can be better anticipated. All developments together form the new green foundation of the village. Hilversum and media will enhance each other once again. The media pathway will be used by media workers, but will also form the connecting element between the centre and the surrounding countryside. The basis of the Hilversum media landscape is not to compete, but to distinguish itself.

Graduation date 29 04 2014

132

Commission members Ad de Bont (mentor) Marco Broekman Maarten Lankester

Additional members for the examination Kirsten van den Berg Ingeborg Thoral


Bart van Leeuwen

133


Urbanism

53.3

RTL studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

No expansion of the outmoded campus model...

fit in the current vacant real estate

...but a network of sites with their own spatial characteristics

broadcast building

Vacancy levels 25.000m2

Unit 250-7.000m2

Vacancy levels 92.800m2

Unit 250-10.000m2

Vacancy levels 13.000m2

Unit 50-500m2

Vacancy levels 13.200m2

Unit 50-2.000m2

Vacancy levels 47.190m2

Unit 200-3.000m2

office

Office villa

shop premises

business building

Why build 172,000m2 anew when 194,800m2 commercial real estate is vacant in Hilversum?

134


Bart van Leeuwen

135


Urbanism

The private MediaPark will be opened and will have a view of the attractive heath landscape of Hilversum

A media pathway will connect the different areas and form the landscape backbone of the developments.

In a villa district where the media previously thrived, a large number of the villas typical of Het Gooi area are vacant. By creating more planological space and improving the spatial quality, the vacant real estate will become more interesting for development. The front sides of the plots change into a green entrance area of the office. The rear sides are actually used functionally.

136


Bart van Leeuwen

The epicentre of the media currently has the image of an average business park along the A1 ring road. The current image of asphalt and the car will be replaced by a green work environment. The MediaPark will once again be able to do justice to its name.

137


Urbanism

Jessica Tjon Atsoi SUCCESsion!

Model for dynamic urban development

The space for the urban development of Amsterdam is largely found in the transformation of the banks of the IJ river from the port to the urban area. Because the expectation is that Amsterdam will continue to develop as a powerful economic centre over the next decades and will also increase in size, this shift from port to city will continue. Following the transformation of the Westerdokseiland, the remaining ports within the ring are a logical next location, particularly the Westelijk havengebied (western port area), and the A10 ring road. Here, the city with its qualitative centre is relatively close. It is a development within the developed area and is, therefore, in line with the compact city idea. In addition, it is an area with its own quality and feel, because of its location by the water and its scale. Plausible but not easy. It is no longer about a peripheral border to the ports, which had already migrated towards IJmuiden. This is still largely â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the real thingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Moreover, the size (270 hectares, more than 30% water) is of a different order than the separate developments of the Java, KNSM or Borneo Sporenburg areas. The connection of this area to the city itself is also clearly not as strong as with the previous locations. In addition, the ideas and conditions of urban development have been shifting significantly for a number of years: from steering to creating conditions, with a new relationship between public and private roles and responsibilities. The current economic crisis and the subsequent cutbacks by governments and market players have led to a standstill in development planning. The big investors are holding off and a large quantity of less powerful players such as CPOs (Collective Private Commissioning) must bear responsibility for new developments. The urban planning profession is no longer able to design a plan, but is forced to take uncertainties into account, changeability and the evolution of expectations and circumstances. The ambitions of the city of Amsterdam for the development of het Westelijk havengebied (the western port area) will be realised by applying an urban planning strategy, which is based on succession. A gradual and adaptive transformation will be made possible by the connection to the development of separate plots. Rules of play and management will guide the development into a mixed urban and watery area with roots in the ports, without already anticipating one desirable outcome too rigidly. The solution lies in the introduction of timely right of use embedded in five plot types, whereby the weight of the rules and the connected urban ambition becomes greater, the longer it is used. Conversely, the space and the freedom to initiate shorter lasting initiatives and functions in an accessible way increase. Creating extra quality is stimulated using a reward system. This strategy makes every development possible, small, large, with low or high investment levels, for long or short periods, so that the development of the area immediately gets going. Because every development has to contribute to the area, the area will be made suitable for new initiatives later. This will lead to a dynamic development that will, in time, evolve spatially and in terms of functionality similar to the process of succession.

Graduation date 15 05 2014

138

Commission members Hans van der Made (mentor) Boris Hocks John Breen

Additional members for the examination John Westrik Olga Russel


Jessica Tjon Atsoi

2015

2025

Image caption

2035

139


Urbanism CONCEPT 1300

1500

1700

1900

locatie: grootandel laagwaardige bedrijven en havenindustrie

GAMMA

2000

shop

shop

shop

shop

shop

shop

shop

pioniersfase - verbinden laagwaardig wordt hoogwaardig werklocatie

GAMMA

opvolgfase - verrijken werkgebied wordt woonwerkomgeving

shop

Succession in the ecology

Succession in the urban development climaxfase - gelaagd woonwerkomgeving wordt stedelijk geactiveerd gebied

Scheme living environment as interplay between condition factors and actors

shop

ecosystem/living area/succession phase

shop

SUCCESSIEGRAAD

VARIABELEN

WAARDE

economisch klimaat

hoog - laag conjunctuur

investment scope

economy

actors & condition factors = dependent on scale

connections

embedding (scale levels)

programme

context (environment)

ecological community

external factors

ecology

conditions (physical and non-physical) these factors are often determined in legislation and regulations; this makes legislation part of (almost) each condition factor.

environment profile

area climate

internal factors

green structure

continuity

flora and fauna

quality

watersystem

cycles

sound, smell, external safety

limiting - not limiting

soil quality air quality public

land holding

public-private spent %

private building

land value

low-high

function living

programme

living

mix: %

working

working

provisions

provisions

(internal) structure

living area (city/urban area)

morfologie infrastructure

accessibility

parcelling structure

fine

building structure

grain size, fsi, osr, gsi

historical structure

present/readability

building typology

flexibility, diversity

space types

diversity

k&l

density, sustainability

local above local

governments

national type 1 type 2

social institutions

actors

type 3 art sectors

cultural institutions

heritage sectors media libraries

citizens

inhabitants visitors workers

businesses

service x

department 1

service y

department 2 Mutualism/ commensalism/ parasitism

level 1 institution 1

level 2

institution 2 architecture, visual arts, dance, film, literature, music, music theatre, theatre, design archives, archaeology, monuments museums, intangible heritage

organisation 1 organisation 2 organisation 3

broadcasters national, city, district libraries group a group b group c

individual p individual q individual r

competition/ cooperation

individual s

sector a sector b sector c

branch a branch b

category

group

business x business y business z

sector d

sub-group

interaction

sub-group individual/member

effect succession process

interactions between and within groups/ individuals: cooperation work against or with symbiosis

mutualism (both groups benefit), commensalism (one benefits the other has neither advantage nor disadvantage), parasitism (one benefits the other has disadvantage).

competition

140

effects of the various forms of interactions adaptation specialisation (niche development) displacement


Jessica Tjon Atsoi

2015

2025

2045

141


Urbanism STRATEGIE lot = building + green + road (+ water) 1 yr

1. Every development is possible different developments, small or large, with low or high investment levels, can get a place in the area.

10 yr 50 yr

20 yr

2. Linking long-term or short-term developments in the time leads to a dynamic situation which evolves spatially and functionally within time

3. Every development contributes to the area, depending on the investment level in terms of building, premises, road and/or water

4. The whole leads to added value for the area in terms of structures (building structures, water and road network) and social cohesion.

Kaveltypen

0-2 years pioneer environment

2-5 years early adapters environment

5-10 years investment environment

10-20 years growth environment

>20 years established environment

0-10 years dynamic water environment

> 10 years water environment

Rules and development process

nieuwe ontwikkelingen maken ook weg en water. Zo ontstaat geleidelijk een verbonden netwerkstructuur

in de bestaande situatie wordenzones gereserveerd voor hoofdstructuren

nieuwe ontwikkelingen spiegelen bestaande ontwikkelingen

Bestaande gebouwen worden herontwikkeld met nieuwe functies, waarmee het karakter van het gebied verandert functies met een kortlopend gebruiksrecht hebben minder ontwikkeleisen en activeren snel het gebied

New developments connect to the existing road and water system, mirror existing developments, also create roads and water. A connected network structure gradually arises.

In the existing situation. zones are reserved for main structures

door waardestijging wordt pioniersontwikkeling vervangen door hoogwaardiger ontwikkelingen

Functions with a short-term right of use have less development conditions and quickly activate the area

door waardestijging wordt pioniersontwikkeling vervangen door hoogwaardiger ontwikkelingen

de vrije ruimte kan worden ingezet voor evenementen om de wijk op de kaart te zetten

... maar ook grote percelen kunnen in een keer ontwikkeld worden

en bestaande bebouwing wordt hoogwaardiger geprogrammeerd

een afstand van minimaal 60 en maximaal 180 meter tussen twee wegen zorgt voor een gebalanseerde permeabiliteit

bezonningsregels bepalen het maximale bouwvolume en garanderen voldoende lichtinval

In het gebied zijn kleinschalige ontwikkelingen mogelijk

Sunlight regulations determine the maximum construction volume and guarantee sufficient daylight

The free space can be used for events to put the district on the map

The increase in value causes pioneer development to be replaced by high quality development

Ook ontwikkelingen op het water zijn mogelijk maar altijd drijvend en op voldoende afstand van de kade zodat het water ervaarbaar blijft

beeldkwaliteitsregels garanderen een gevarieerd geveldbeeld De gemeente investeert in de hoofdstructuur, openbare ruimte, bruggen en verbindingen

Exterior aesthetic quality regulations guarantee varied elevation

142

The municipality invests in the main structure, public space, bridges and connections

Developments on water are also a possibility but always floating.


Jessica Tjon Atsoi

Strategy map -urban level Coentunnel

Co e

nh

av en

Cornelis Douwesterrein

A10 Vlo th

av en

NDSM

mine

uth

en av

ho

ven rvaha

II

en av

sh

u uri

rc

Me

Distributiecentrum

Ne

Alfadriehoek

ptu

ne

sh

av en

en av uth

ho

Buiksloterham

Isolatorweg

A5 Sloterdijk I

*

*

*

* *

Westerpark

A10

Spaarndammerbuurt

Station Sloterdijk

zeeheldenbuurt

ouddorp Sloterdijk

Telepoort

Westergasfabriek

volkstuinen complex

Overhoeks

Westerdokseiland Bos en Lommer Staatsliedenbuurt

Management map

foodcenter

Jordaan

Co

en

ha ve

Co

en

n

ha

ve

n

Vlo

Vl

ot

th

ha

av en

ve

n

ut ve ha n

cu er

ho

aven

n ve

riu

M

ven rvaha mine

en av

sh

ha

rvah

ut ho

mine

en

av

sh

riu

cu

er

M

Ne

Ne

pt

pt

un

un

es

ha

ve

es

ha ve

n

n

ho n

n ve ha

ve ha

ut

ut

ho

Management- main structure

Management- water structure

Management - public space

Management - public transport

143


Urbanism

Atilla Vredenburg New Kadiköy City Istanbul

I have been visiting Istanbul since the age of one and over time I have seen the settlement Istanbul grow from a city to a mega metropolis with more than 13.5 million inhabitants. In the last 10-15 years, the consequences of the city’s rapid growth have been revealed. The city, which grows by 500,000 inhabitants per year, shows that quality of life inside Istanbul is deteriorating dramatically. Integral urban development Traditionally, Istanbul has formed an important economic intersection point between Europe and the Far East. With the growth of the economy in Asia, the importance of Istanbul as intersection point is increasing again, where knowledge from the West and money from the East meet. Istanbul is the fastest growing city in Turkey and is the most important cultural, international and economic capital within the economic triangle of Turkey (Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir). Istanbul actually represents Turkey and is the gateway to the international world. Due to the strategic location and economic importance of Istanbul, there is a high demand for offices and dwellings. Nowadays, developments are mostly on large plots along the motorways around the city. Commonly these are mono-functional and high-rise developments. These are little cities on their own without any interaction with the surrounding city and a lack of interest and attention for the existing ecological layers and public space. This development has brought a lot of unattractive places for inhabitants and/or offices being established. The high pressure of the rapidly growing city leads to short-term vision and quantity is more important than quality. Apart from a ‘who pays, decides’ attitude, there are not many other development strategies in Istanbul. Because of the high pressure of the rapidly growing city, the public transportation development is only approached as a infrastructural operation. There is a lack of focus of how these developments could bring other economic developments for the surrounding areas. My proposition is that the Marmaray (the new rail tunnel which connects Asia with Europe) and HSR are the motor for new urban developments. This includes a optimal usage of strategic and promising locations in relation to public transport. What is missing is an integral plan for urban development. Different urban developments need to be adjusted so a harmonised development will occur. The essence of my project is making an integral urban design, in which the quality of the urban development in Istanbul will improve through time by using existing components and making these stronger by inserting new elements. Three main goals of the project are: 1. Creating a super establishment climate, so Istanbul gets a stronger position inside the global region. 2. Invest in connections, literal (infrastructure) and figuratively (meeting places): Super connectivity. (instead of COD invest in TOD). 3. Invest in the ecology of the city to improve the quality of life (super public space)

Graduation date 04 11 2013

144

Commission members Henk Bouwman (mentor) Hans van der Made Mario Genot

Additional members for the examination Kirsten van den Berg Pieter Jannink


Atilla Vredenburg

CBD MASLAK

CBD LEVENT

M3- 300.000 pass.

M4 - 300.0 00 pass.

Mecidiyekoy

Besiktas

TAKSIM BRT ass.

Uskudar

00 p

- 80.0

Kabatas Karakoy

B- 2

EMINÖNU

CBD ATASEHIR

00

0.0 pas s.

Yenikapi

ass.

00 p

700.0

M5 -

KADIKÖY CITY HSL - 60

M2

.000 pa

ss.

M1

PROJECT AREA NEW KADIKÖY CITY

-1

- 71

.30

5.0

0.0

00

00

pa

ss.

pa

ss.

EXISTING AND CONTRUCTION METRO/HSL PROPOSAL NEW METRO / HSL

MASS HOUSING

EXISTING FERRY EXISTING HIGHWAY/RINGWAY

COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT

35%

Istanbul

hoogopgeleid en jonge bevolking

40 mln

Ankara

90 mln bevolking

bevolking

480 mld GDP

Izmir

1.2 bln GDP

145


Urbanism

Vision for New Kadikรถy and surrounding

Making place old industry is moving

Beautifull new location along the sea

New project area of 83 ha.

OV-KN

OOP

NIEUW

Kadikรถy in the center of the city

IO AT ST

P KO EN ATS

N

Trein

Essential project interventions

146

BUS

PLA

VER

Master plan


Atilla Vredenburg

Image caption

Image caption

147


Urbanism

P.

academia army P. mall

harbour rail

P.

P. ?

Project area existing situation (industrial zone and train emplacement)

Image caption

Cross section park

148

Project area existing surrounding (no place for people on the streets)


Atilla Vredenburg

Kadikรถy along the bay

149


Urbanism

Iris Wijn Designated use of Sloterdijk A park + a forest of asphalt and concrete

This design for Amsterdam is a development scenario, which researches what the possibilities are for the Sloterdijk station area. Sloterdijk was historically developed as a gateway to the city and a hub for railway, road and water. There are a lot of current spatial issues related to this area today - hub development, mobility, vacancy levels of offices, recreation, ecology, expected volume of excess water the area will have to accommodate, house building problems, which are currently insufficiently exploited. At the same time, the public space and the functionality of the area around the station are in need of extensive revision. Sloterdijk is currently in a downward spiral. The real estate value is decreasing, vacancy levels are increasing and the general image of this area is not good. Because the land of the area is largely property of the municipality, it is of great importance to stop this downward spiral. To be able to develop Sloterdijk from hub to designated use, the focus has been placed on local connections, public space and specific solutions for living in an existing utilitarian area. This involves viewing the vacancy levels and empty spaces in this area, and the overdesign of the infrastructure, not as problematic but as opportunities. The interventions in this design follow projects and/or interests that have been suggested in the past and for which financial reservations have been made by different authorities. Examples of this are: the station square, the station, the cruise terminal, restoration of the wedge structure of Amsterdam, development of the Haven Stad, new housing targets for the metropolitan region of Amsterdam, connection between Nieuw West and Sloterdijk and the downward revaluation of the Haarlemmerweg. Design The public space has become the binding factor in this project. The park wedge south of the planning area serves as a water buffer for the station area and a recreational zone for employees, students of the schools, new inhabitants of Sloterdijk and the inhabitants of Slotermeer. Open spaces between the blocks connect private to public and living to working. The redeveloped streets make the area into a unit, the squares around the station offer orientation to the place and give Sloterdijk its own identity within the metropolis of Amsterdam. The new buildings weave between the existing buildings; the added mass is nearly equal to the existing mass. The consolidation of almost 3,000 houses occurs in a horizontal and vertical direction. The new connections and programme cause Sloterdijk to open up to Nieuw West and in this area the transformation of Haven Stad begins. The conversion of vacant offices within the planning area creates new possibilities for development. In this way, the vacancy levels are concentrated and vacant, depreciated buildings in the park zone can be demolished. Multiple scale levels and disciplines (landscape, urban planning, architectural elaboration) are applied in this project to achieve an integral plan for the area. A phasing model provides insight into the design steps that need to be taken to realise the design, whereby the balance between infrastructure, space and programme is inserted into each phase.

Graduation date 08 10 2013

150

Commission members Matthijs Bouw (mentor) Hans van der Made Frans Boots

Additional members for the examination Ingeborg Thoral John Westrik


Iris Wijn

151


Urbanism

Square east side of the station

New functions around the station

Living in a utilitarian area

152


Iris Wijn

Phasing model

Infra > Space > Programme

153


Urbanism

Sloterdijk is a park with a forest of asphalt and concrete

154


Iris Wijn

existing

design

STREETS 9%

PARK

SQUARE

11% 91%

45% wonen

44% Sloterdijk bestaand

werken Sloterdijk ontwerp

Ravel Amsterdam

Olympiakwartier Almere

Massena Parijs

Wilhelminapier Rotterdam

Zuidkade Rotterdam

voorzieningen/ dienstverlening

Season plantation

N 0

25

50

100 m

Plantation on the shore

155


Maike van Stiphout Head of Landscape Architecture Department


The essence Climate change and its consequences on our living environment are the subject of study. The possibilities for absorbing heavy rainfall in the city are being sought. The designers are bringing more wilderness and landscape into the city and that is in keeping with the desire for more nature in the urban environment. The field of landscape architecture is currently shifting the focus from the city to the surrounding countryside. The change in scale in agriculture and the biotechnology industry in the Netherlands, which has been hit by diseases, are on the design table. Whether or not it is possible to use the change in scale to shift the responsibility for the landscape and animal welfare from the government to the farmers is being examined. The exodus from the European countryside and the degradation of the landscape is also occurring. As a result, new collectives relating to sustainable food production are being set up, due in part to revenue generated by tourism and eco-services, such as water retention and biodiversity. The nice thing about a review of the graduation projects is that they reflect the current social situation and display a desire for a better future. What an optimistic field of study, we actually have.Â

157


Landscape Architecture

Bieke Van Hees Bricolage

An answer to the Flemish new housing target

bricolage ~, Noun Faire du bricolage [masculine] - to do crafts; bricoler - to tinker with, to fix up When we drive through Flanders today, the urbanised appearance is the first thing we notice. Flanders is also referred to as a ‘nebulous city’, as one large city lacking structure. In recent years, a lot of research has been conducted into the processes behind this urbanisation. This demonstrates that the urbanisation is more complex than is often assumed. The consequences are great. Ribbon developments become silted up, with as a consequence the building-up of village centres and further merging of villages. As a result of the increase in asphalting and building in flood-sensitive areas, there is less space for water and there are consequently more floods (with more damage). The further fragmentation of the undeveloped space leads to a loss of ecological quality and fragmentation of the recreational network. In addition, an ‘invisible’ landscape and a generic mix of buildings lead to the loss of identity and living quality. At the same time, Flanders needs 330,000 new houses by 2030. The central question in this research is how the Flemish landscape can be made perceptible once again and how it can steer the new housing target. The underlying landscape has indeed been pushed to the background, but it has not disappeared. The landscape has the specific potential to once again function as the bearer of identity, recognisability and a (new) programme. In addition, the urbanisation and the landscape are inextricably linked. Here lies an opportunity to interrelate the new housing target for 2030 with the landscape problems. The solution is sought in linking red and green developments, as a result of which every red development helps build the landscape. The preference of Flemish citizens for a detached house on a large plot has been used as the point of departure. Unlike the Netherlands, there has always been a great dynamic at the lowest scale level in Flanders. There is a deeply rooted culture of private initiative. Solutions for further urbanisation of the rural areas of Flanders also demand a design at the lowest scale level, for and by the people who live there. It follows that a Flemish town is chosen as pilot location. The town of Berlaar is exemplary in terms of its location and the aforementioned spatial issues. Scale analysis of the region and the town creates a toolbox for landscape living, water systems and road networks, elaborated into a landscape design for two sub-areas. The profiles for the water system and the road network have been carefully designed and a fitting hierarchy arises, which makes the construction of the networks readable and perceptible. For the component (landscape) living, historical typologies, which occur in the area today, are translated into new typologies with comparable landscape components. Eventually all these interventions at the level of a village lead to a transformation at the level of Flanders in its entirety. New living environments are created and the structure of the landscape grows through interventions from the bottom up, in an organic way, by means of bricolage.

Graduation date 07 11 2013

158

Commission members Marie-Laure Hoedemakers (mentor) Han Dijk / Boris Hocks Karen de Groot

Additional members for the examination Jana Crepon Sander Lap


Bieke Van Hees

159


Landscape Architecture De Randstad (The Randstad conurbation) 1976 1988 2000 2050 2030

20% 1976

After Sprawl, Xaveer de Geyter

1988 2000

25%

2050 2030

De Vlaamse Ruit (the Flemish Diamond)

1976 1988 2000 2050

20%

2030

25%

1976 1988 2000

Onderzoek KU Leuven

+

+

+

2050 2030

Flanders 1976-1988-2000-2050

Scale comparison and building percentages Randstad - Vlaamse Ruit

+

Developed versus undeveloped space in Flanders

+

+

+

+

farmyard living 20m

+

forest living

100m

20m

waterhoeve Waterhoeve

+

living room Wonenininone een kamer

estate Landgoed

Historical landscape typologies are translated into new typologies, fitting the landscape berm

voortuin

1m

fietspad

kasseien

1.5m

2.5m

rijbaan

kasseien

fietspad

7.2m

2.5m

1.5m

16.2m

+

+

+

+

1:2

1:2

hooilanden

weiland / akker

variabel

M

N

mestvrije zone 5m

weiland / akker

tuin 1,5m

1:2

2m

2,5m

1m

7m

1:8

oever

beek

variabel

ruimte voor water

pad

variabel

2m

variabel

voortuin 1m

1:2

pad

rijbaan

groenstrook

fietspad

7m

2.6m

3m

voetpad

1.5m

1.5m

rijbaan

fietspad

berm

6.5m

2.5m

1.5m

voortuin

1:3

oever 2,5m

oever 1,5m

3,5m

struiken 3m

tuin variabel

12m

minimal

mestvrije zone 5m

12 45

1:2

pad

weiland / akker

ideal

1:10

oever

1,5m

2,5m

1,5m

oever

tuin

10m

variabel

O

12m

voortuin

1m 3m

1m

1m

1m

rijbaan 1m

3m

V

groenstrook

rijbaan

fietsstrook

1.5m

6.5m

fietsstrook

berm

voortuin

1.5m

13.5m

rijbaan 1m

voetpad 1.5m

zachte berm 2.5m

XS

2.6m

13.5m

1,5m

S

berm

12 45

weiland / akker

groenstrook

1.5m

16.2m

voortuin

mestvrije zone 5m

fietspad

zachte berm 2.5m

rijbaan

harde berm

7m 13m

2.5m

rijbaan

zachte berm

7m 13m

2.5m

voortuin

voortuin

The profiles for the water system and the road network have been carefully designed and a fitting hierarchy arises, which makes the construction of the networks readable and perceptible.

160

weiland / akker


Bieke Van Hees

Berlaar in 2030

As members of the youth movement, we are at the centre of social life of the village. We are in need of a new premises and a close-knit bicycle network. This would enable our members to safely reach our grounds. As a local entrepreneur I am closely involved with the village. Investments in the quality of it reinforces the bond with existing and new customers.

Bert, 29 years old LOCAL ENTREPRENEUR

As a market gardener, I find it important that there are enough opportunities to expand my business! In addition, I could also benefit from a proper functioning water system.

As a cattle farmer and owner of a B&B, I find an appealing and diverse rural area important. I would also like to contribute to the management of it. I still need land for my cows.

Nele, 21 years old Karel, 37 years old Jan, 53 years old SUPERVISOR MARKET FARMER KLJ GARDENER

As one of the oldest inhabitants of Berlaar, I have seen the village change and grow dramatically in the past years. A lot of open spaces and connections have disappeared. I also understand that not everything will return to how it used to be...

As mayor, I support and facilitate new developments provided that quality is added to the landscape. All inhabitants and recreational users benefit from it.

As a nature guide I would advocate a more robust water system and better connections between valuable places in our town. Both nature and agriculture can take advantage of this.

Walter, 52 years old MAYOR

Johan, 48 years old NATURE GUIDE

Maria, 74 years old BORN AND RAISED

From an economic standpoint it is also interesting for our business to invest in our place of establishment. A presentable environment has an effect on our clientèle, after all.

As a horse owner I represent a new type of owner in the agricultural region. I too adjust my business to the landscape and I am dedicated to adding riding tracks and other recreational routes.

Danny, 41 years old HORSE OWNER

Vera, 39 years old ENTREPRENEUR

When I cycle to school, I have to cross various busy roads and I hardly ever get to cycle on a bicycle path. A more close-knit network can be used by both inhabitants and recreational users. As manager of the water system, I plead for the widening of the streams and tributaries. A good water policy prevents floods and has ecological quality. Combined with living we can also make new living environments.

Stef, 11 years old Luc, 43 years old LIKES TO CYCLE WATER SUPERVISOR

As a young family we are looking for an affordable plot to build on. We would like to raise our children in a green environment, so we would like to help build the landscape

An & Dries, 28 en 32 years old WANT TO BUILD A HOUSE

Participants with different interests work together to realise their common goal

161


Landscape Architecture

existing shed transform into a place of information and shelter for recreational users and storage space for local clubs

junction between steenweg and the landscape behind it is accentuated by the construction of cobblestone roads - which are also used to reduce speed on the steenweg

for local traffic only

a simple seating element encourages meetings

Simple additions and small interventions give the landscape between village and river meaning once more

Forest living on the north side of Berlaar: a new living landscape serving as connection between village and river

162


Bieke Van Hees

Single row of trees accentuates the secondary access roads

Alder trees along the the fringes of the valley soften the edge of developed areas

Preserve the view of the church tower

Valley of the Broekloop will be widened and extended to the edge of the ribbon development. This causes relatively wet grasslands, with, among other things, cuckooflowers.

Suggestion-lanes for cycling on the roadway: the car is a guest

Semi-paved roads form an important link in the slow traffic network

Increase visibility of the water system by widening existing ditches

On the edge of the village landscape and living meet each other; the brook valley is extended up to the road, edges of developed areas softened; in the distance the church tower is visible.

163


Landscape Architecture

Jasper Hugtenburg Laid-back coast

Outstanding coastal quality through building with nature

The seawall of Hondsbosch and Petten is a tough, nearly 6km long dyke that has separated the North Sea from the northern part of Holland since 1880. The dyke forms a thin and therefore fragile line between sea and land. It completely shuts of the hinterland from the sea, partly because the dyke has been significantly raised after the initial construction. This problem is most evident in the coastal village of Petten. Here, the sea is nowhere to be seen and, therefore, the village has gradually turned its back towards the coast. Moreover, the seawall’s resistance strategy towards safety is ultimately unsafe: where the hard, immobile dyke is built on a soft foundation of sand that is subject to erosion and is therefore gradually undermined. Local history with a great number of floods has repeatedly shown that solid constructions in a sandy shore are short-lived. In this graduation project, I have investigated whether a resilient, retreating movement that integrates the existing seawall in a new coastal landscape offers perspectives for both safety against flooding and Petten as a coastal resort. In the lea behind the existing seawall, a new resilient coast can be developed. This can be done without giving up the entire medieval polder behind the seawall: 18th century engineering maps show plans for a back-up dyke that today still gives a good indication for the position of a sustainable coastline. First, a sufficiently high water barrier must be made at this location. This barrier can be made from clay that is extracted from the seawall, since that will now lose its function as a water barrier. The new dyke will form a new link between the coastal tows of Petten and Camperduin from which the emerging coastal landscape can be observed. By consequently making two holes in the former seawall the ‘invited’ tidal currents ensure that the zone between seawall and water barrier is filled with water and sediment, soon raising this area well above sea level. The former seawall remains present as an elongated island that acts as a breakwater for the hinterland. This island is accessed via a narrow bridge over the route of the Kamperkade, which is the former division between Pettemer and Hargerpolder. To protect the island against erosion and at the same time create a beach, this line is extended as a breakwater representing the part of the Kamperkade that in past centuries was taken by the sea. The northern opening in the seawall forms the mouth of a channel that connects the village of Petten to the inland water system of the Schermerboezem. This proves to be an excellent location for a new marina along the Dutch coast. The marina and related properties will form a new district of the village of Petten with a very distinct and dynamic character but well connected to the other districts. A second breakwater at Petten will ensure a wide beach in front of the seawall, protecting this part against erosion. Part of the sand form this beach will blow over the seawall, gradually turning it into a dune. Through these interventions, and especially the resulting natural processes, in the course of two to three decades an attractive, resilient coastal zone will arise. The ‘laid back’ coastline is brought in line with the rest of the Holland coast that now only the island and the village and marina of Petten will protrude from, as ‘outstanding’ features along the Dutch coast.

Graduation date 25 06 2014

164

Commission members Rik de Visser (mentor) Bruno Doedens Sander Lap

Additional members for the examination Mirjam Koevoet Cees van der Veeken


Jasper Hugtenburg

165


Landscape Architecture

Present situation

Aerial view of the village of Petten, located directly behind the seawall

Breakwater indicates historic coastlines

Narrow bridge towards island

Cross-section of salt marsh housing development Measures and direct effects

Development over time

166

Floating houses at the end of the boardwalk


Jasper Hugtenburg

Petten behind the seawall (present situation)

Petten behind its new dunes

New dunes in NW storm situation

The polder behind the seawall (present situation)

The seawall transformed into a breakwater island

Island in NW storm situation

167


Landscape Architecture

Aerial view of the breakwater island

Access to the breakwater island

168


Jasper Hugtenburg

Impression of Pettenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marina as a salt marsh living area

Impression of the access to the island

169


Landscape Architecture

donald marskamp caldic collection - caught in 97º

A country estate is originally a ‘country house, the second residence for the land owner. It is characterised by its objects and the interior, the sole purpose of which are entertainment, adventure, mysticism, tranquillity, lighting or romance. This has also been the aim with Voorlinden, situated on the inner dune edge near Wassenaar. An country estate for dignitaries from The Hague and surrounding areas, with a rich history in occupancy and park layout. In recent history, the user and the landscape of the country estate have become far removed from the original use, with the acquisition of the country estate by Joop Caldenborgh and his goal to establish a museum there, for his Caldic Collection. Is it possible to return to its original function of entertainment? Country estates are celebrated as complete complexes, in which landscape and building are designed as a cohesive unit. In my masterpiece, I regard the landscape of the location, the art collection and the architecture as one and I look at the whole of the assignment as if I were a holistic director. The basis of the design is represented in a tableau composed based on the painting Vogelconcert (Concert of Birds) by Melchior de Hondecoeter, as an exponent of the rich country estate culture during the Dutch Golden Age, and a relief work by Jan Schoonhoven as a representation of the Zero movement from the sixties. These works capture the contrast between the colourful atmosphere and the romantic nature of the country estate and its landscape, and the minimalistic and mathematical nature fundamental to the Caldic Collection. This contrast and the corresponding suspense are perceivable throughout all the levels of the design. A grid composed from the two main axes of the current country house and the raised garden, and the previous country house and its classical landscape garden, is used as an organising principle for the new spatial additions. This abstract and constant grid equals a grid of 97 degrees, parallelograms instead of square cells. The spatial additions in the country estate consist of vertical and horizontal planes. A scale model of 64 planes, representative of the cube, serves as a ‘machine’ for the spatial functioning of the museum landscape. This was inspired by the project ‘Incomplete Open Cubes’ by Soll Lewitt. The Zero movement regarded the creative process of the artist as completely insignificant and uninteresting. A machine could do the same, the personal aspect is in the concept and not in the production. Soll Lewitt called this ‘the idea becomes the machine that makes art.’ The grid and the ‘machine’ are mathematical, the placement of the planes, on the contrary, is instinctive, derived from the landscape and emotion. Ten constellations of planes and six environments are created which relate to the country estate and the art collection. The scenography and the perception of the art is linked to the landscape. The experiences and appearances can influence your mood, direct your thoughts, or allow you to perceive things differently. The experiences and possibilities that the different types of landscapes at the country estate and the great diversity of art have to offer, are used to arrange the collection spread across the estate into the different constellations. Not a static place for the collection somewhere on the country estate, but a museum that responds and interacts with the entire landscape, the atmosphere of the estate and is itself influenced by the art collection. The museum leaves the building, takes the art along with it and is absorbed into the landscape. Graduation date 09 07 2014

170

Commission members Hanneke Kijne (mentor) Ira Koers John Lonsdale

Additional members for the examination Bram Breedveld Mirjam Koevoet


donald marskamp

171


Landscape Architecture

Context

01

03

02

04

05

06

07

08

09

10 Constellations

172


donald marskamp

10

09

08

07

06

05

02 03

04

01

173


Landscape Architecture landscape

architecture

art

meadow

environment

looking | field of view | scale | alienation elongated and linked together

characteristics; light, flat, open, green, grass, direct light, wide field of view

wide empty world in which the sense of scale can disappear art which plays with spatial sense and time dioramas, collages, artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books, objects

park

daylight | physics | mathematics | daily material

small-scale, compact and full

characteristics; light, flat, open, colourful, diverse light, staged views from the country house, flowery grass mix

organic colourful with directed sights and moments art which lets one perceive things differently abstract art, photography, objects

edge

small-scale, stacked and loose

characteristics; dark with light rooms, flat, a low ridge on the edge, filtered light, relation rooms with annexes and Stinzen plants

close to home | accessible art | all eras and styles green, accessible, annexes and various styles art which arerecognisable, accessible and just beautiful paintings, objects, photos

dune ridge

rejection | attraction

characteristics; dark below, light above, steep, enclosed, filtered light, view above or below, trees and shrubs

steep, concentration suspense and the unknown art which conjures feelings of aversion or attraction objects, paintings, photos

linear stair function

forest

image | sound | light | narrative

closed and grouped

characteristics; dark, intimate, enclosed, filtered light, short sight lines, trees

the place for fairy tales and stories dark whispering art which tells a story with image and/or sound, video, objects installations

dune characteristics; light, sloping landscape, closed and open, direct light, trimmed trees

open, shifting in relation to ground level and scattered

large | colourful | cheerful | alienating scale eternal â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;barbapapaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; landscape what is large is small and vice versa art freedom in human scale and colour explosion photos, paintings, objects

Scenography in which landscape, architecture and art come together

8

8

7

7 3

1

1

5

2

4

3

6

2 1

Paths

174

1 Driveway

2 Paved path

3 Cart tracks


donald marskamp

Scale model 1:100

4 Seasonal path

5 Mowed path

6 Cow path

Constellation in the dunes

7 Forest lane

8 Foraging

175


Landscape Architecture

Simona Serafino Scrigno d’acqua (water casket)

Water catchment design as a strategy to mitigate the desertification risks

Water casket addresses the problem of water management in the Salento region, a peninsula in the southeastern part of Italy. Water management is an ever more important issue in the Mediterranean basin: due to the ongoing climate change rainfall has significantly reduced and concentrated in extreme events, which imply difficulties in water catchment and reuse. Wrong water management contributes, in the long term, to a growing risk of desertification, as many lands in the region are already experiencing. Salento is one of these lands, in which increasing drought and land abandonment are tangible signs of the increasing desertification. Though, the region is not poor at all in terms of water: it can count on a huge underground water reservoir which has accumulated over centuries thanks to the geological conformation of the place. Salento is a karst raft lying on the sea bed, in which atmospheric water has always infiltrated through special sink holes in the ground, mainly placed at the foot of low hills called serre. This reservoir, however, started being abused in the 1800s with wells withdrawals, which have grown uncontrolled in number in the latest decades, when the region has known an unprecedented urbanisation due to massive tourist exploitation. At a time, however, no policy has been established to favour rain water infiltration in order to refill the reservoir. Water is instead collected and brought to the sea through an ‘artificial’ canal network to clear out the flooding areas where it would stay a while as soon as possible before infiltrating completely. Its population has a very special character: that of living off their land with a strong sense of connection to the articulation of the seasons, which lead them to alternate between different places and landscapes – though very close to each other – according to the time of the year. The challenge of this work is that of approaching such a multifold complexity with the instruments of the landscape design. Its primary goal is of course to produce a rationalisation of the water management. This happens, however, through a reading process of the territory at the different scales, which represents a chance to make hidden qualities and structures of the landscape emerge. The study has resulted in a survey of the countless existing infiltration sinkholes, which are completely neglected in the landscape, and the criticalities of the areas around them, whose economic value and uses are now deeply affected by the flooding risk. The design proposes, therefore, to stop the water drainage to the sea and reactivate the sinkholes structures by connecting them with new landscape signs at the territorial scale. These actions identify some infiltration areas, which are worked out in order to grant the necessary storage capacity in a limited amount of space. This strategy generates immediately some consequences. The new signs, based on the neglected sinkholes layer, which now emerges again, act as strong structuring elements in the fragmented land use patchwork. The presence of water makes possible the generation of new landscapes, which are based on the valorisation of the local elements and integrate functions headed at strengthening the social community. The new hierarchy helps defining the functions of currently abandoned areas and addressing the development of the villages in a sustainable way. Besides achieving such results this water catchment design strategy enhances a further layer in the landscape structure – that of seasonality. The alternating presence and absence of water generates different landscapes in time, each with its own seasonal vegetation, fauna and – what counts the most – atmosphere. A similar place where one can go under completely different conditions, for very different purposes. Finally, it is a place where Salento’s seasonal approach to life can mirror itself. Graduation date 19 03 2014

176

Commission members Lodewijk van Nieuwenhuijze (mentor) Jana Crepon Gianluca Tramutola

Additional members for the examination Rik de Visser Silvia Lupini


Simona Serafino

1- Rainwater catchment

2- Seasonal rainwater storage

3- Water purification

4- Water infiltration to the aquifer

5- Improving landscape qualities and uses

6- Improving landscape qualities and uses

WATER PRINCIPLES

177


Landscape Architecture

From house reservoir

To a regional reservoir

Sinkholes

WATER CONCEPT

Farmer plot October 2012

Farmer plot August 2013

TA V I A N O

“solar fields”

RACALE widespread city

ALLISTE

olive crops

TAVIANO, RACALE, ALLISTE and widespread city

Existing private gardens, mainly orchards

arable land

Existing land use: the parchwork system

Existing ‘neglected’ carsic structures

Existing situation

pears

figs

almonds tree

New urbanization Project proposal

Sinkhole- 15th February 2020

178

LANDSCAPE QUALITY: The orchards as a botanical garden

A new landscape structure for the patchwork: Doline and Vore (sinkholes)

The canals: runoff and rain water catchment and transportation to doline

open landscpae 15th June 2020


Simona Serafino

Site map Taviano

DOLINA has a new identity in the landscape structure: dry season: 180 d/y

Oxalys pes caprae

Dipsacus fullonum

Anemonoides nemorosa

iris pseudopumila

Calendula comunis

Juncus bufonius

Anemone comunis

january

Wet season: 10 d/y

Iris revoluta

Oxalys pes caprae

Asphodelus microcarpus

Lythrum salicaria

Paeriploca graeca

Narcissus tazetta

Anemonoides nemorosa

Anemone coronaria

Muscari atlanticum

Anemonoides nemorosa

Brassica oleracea

Ohyris sphecodes

Daucus carota

Bellis perennis

Bellis sylvestris

Juncus bufonius

Biscutella didyma

Bellis perennis

Allium roseum

february

march

Anthillys vulneraria

Oxalis corniculata

april

Laurus nobilis

Carex flacca

Daucus carota

Anemonoides nemorosa

Avena sterilis

Bellis perennis

Oxalis articulata

Arum italicum

Arbutus unedo

Oxalis articulata

may

Wet season: 60 d/y

Extreme storm event wet season: 1 d/y

Lonicera implexa

Brachypodium ramosum

Daucus carota

Andryalia integrifolia

Avena sterilis

Brachypodium ramosum

Bidens frondosus

Oxalis articulata

june

Alcea biennis

Bidens frondosus

july

Daucus carota

Alcea biennis

Brachypodium ramosum

Pistacia lentiscus

Achillea licustica

Oxalis articulata

Asparagus acutifolius

Bidens frondosus

Oxalis articulata

Brachypodium ramosum

august

Asparagus acutifolius

Pistacia lentiscus

Smilax aspera

Quercus calliprinos

Oxalis articulata

Asparagus acutifolius

Bidens frondosus

Oxalis articulata

Bidens frondosus

Quercus virgiliana

Quercus pubescens

Arbutus unedo

september

october

Oxalys pes caprae

Calendula comunis

Oxalis articulata

november

Dipsacus fullonum

Arbutus unedo

Dipsacus fullonum

Calendula comunis

december

179


Landscape Architecture

Site map Wadi park

180


Simona Serafino

Wadi park- 28th February 2020

Water Calendar

Wadi park- 18th December 2020

Wadi park- 13th August 2020

181


Landscape Architecture

Leen Vanthuyne Ravines Revaluated

An attractive storyline for the ribeiras of the city of Funchal, capital of Madeira Island.

The objective of this project is two-fold. It tackles the problem of mudflows, a recurring phenomenon on Madeira Island, and at the same time presents a case for a much deserved revaluation of the public face of the three ravines of Funchal, from the mountains to the coastline. ‘The ravine is a vertical landscape, a geological cross-section from mountain down to ocean, a chasm that guides the young and fearless tourist through the layered strata of tuff and basalt. The ravine is a tough and yet attractive story full of adventure.’ In the master plan, the three ravines are divided into five distinct zones, based on the fluviogeomorphology; the shape of the ravine. For each zone, problems are pointed out, solutions are proposed and a landscape target image is defined. One ravine has been looked at in detail, resulting in an area-wide proposal. This is represented in a 1:5000 plan, accompanied with schemes, profiles and details. 1 stream crest For the mountaintops, a landscape transformation plan is laid out. It includes a phased strategy for the construction of a network of ‘gradoni’ (fine-line terraces) and check dams. Desertification is countered with planting, using a rich palette of indigenous species. Two new hiking routes will be made alongside the gradoni, expanding the existing walking network. One ‘gradoni path’ can be followed towards the mountain village of Curral, the other will reactivate an existing levada pathway. 2 canyon These dramatic slopes are left untouched by design. At the final pieces, new ‘open type dams’ are implemented, as envisioned by the Portuguese engineers. Care is taken to retrace a heritage levada walking path, so that hikers will be allowed to walk along the impressive new dam landscape. 3 suburban valley In the suburban fringe of the ravine, the mess of valley floor functions is reorganised. The ‘poios’ (agriculture terraces) on the flanks are rewilded with forest to improve slope stability. A new walking network is established on the existing terraces and unused farms can be rented out to tourists. A linear park accompanies the stream, with clearly defined urban development possibilities. 4 old town canal If traffic and parking space along the canal is reduced to 50%, new opportunities will arise: properties on the edge of the ravine can be made open, abundant in green and much more attractive to tourists. Monumental buildings are reorganised to serve a public function. 5 debouchment The end flow of the ravine is made open and unobstructed. Traffic crossing the canal is reduced to minimal roofing. New, large-scale building opportunities arise alongside the river’s mouth. Sturdy riverside piers open up and embrace the marinas. The time has now come to show the ravines as a useful and attractive man-adapted natural phenomenon that needs to be seen, and will hopefully be seen and visited by many new styled nature loving tourists. The area around the three gulches (São João, Santa Luzia and João Gomes) still constitutes the founding site of the city of Funchal. As the situation stands today, they present all the characteristics of a ridiculously oversized gutter, something that inspires horror and is best forgotten and hidden from human eyes.

Graduation date 12 09 2014

182

Commission members Maike van Stiphout (mentor) Steven Delva Michael van Gessel Bram Breedveld

Additional members for the examination Rik de Visser Hank van Tilborg


Leen Vanthuyne

183


Landscape Architecture

Hand drawings: four phases of geological activity on Madeira island

=

Hand drawing: average rainfall Madeira island

Hand drawing: main ravines (ribeiras) on Madeira island

scheme: gradoni cut & fill construction

Phasing scheme: gradoni network and checkdams

Materialised details: gradoni and path

Cross section: gradoni network and checkdams

Scheme: gradoni planting palette

184

+

+


Leen Vanthuyne

Collage: gradoni and gabion dam

Collage: Levada da Negra crossing gradoni

Cross section: valley route B

Materialized details: valley path

Cross section: valley route A

Cross section: valley route D

Schemes: transformation of flanks (left) and valley floor (right)

Existing and proposed long section

185


Landscape Architecture

Plan fragment: zone 3 - ‘Suburban Valley’

Analyses fragment: historic pathways in the ravines flanks

Landscape section: zone 4 ‘Old Town Canal’

186


Leen Vanthuyne

Plan fragment: zone 4 ‘Old Town Canal’

MARINA

Plan fragment: zone 5 - ‘Debouchment’

187


Landscape Architecture

Inge Vleemingh Go nuts !

Industrial Agriculture creates landscape for benefit and satisfaction

In ‘t veurjaor gao’w dan langs den es, wi-j loopt daor samen hand in hand. En bi-j de bekke in ‘t gros, vleegt onze lieve in de brand. De kalvere stoeft haost deur den draod, de kieften reert hoog an de loch. (In spring we walk past the raised field, we walk together hand in hand. And by the brook in the grass our love ignites. The calves almost dash through the fence, the lapwings cry high in the sky) Go nuts ! is an example of how we can deal with the spatial and social issues concerning industrial agriculture; a transformation from mono and depletion to multi and exploitation, in which we do not deny or ignore the large-scale nature and impact of this industry. We take this characteristic as a challenge and create a new multifunctional landscape. The origin of the meat on our plates is visible in the landscape. Go nuts, because the Netherlands needs a daring plan to fuel the discussion about industrial agriculture. Moreover, the fourth generation of import farmers add a loving beneficial layer to the landscape. Finally, these entrepreneurs will plant six hundred hectares of free-range forest filled with nuts. This plan demonstrates the ability of the industrial biological pig farm in de Peelhorst to add a valuable spatial structure to the landscape. The plan illustrates a new perspective for a region, which seems to be locked down. The fourth generation of import farmers were born and raised here and will bring love and care to de Peelhorst. This is in line with the character and the advantages of de Peelhorst; the large scale, the Peel-Raam Line and the entrepreneurial spirit. The Peel-Raam Line is the backbone of the plan. By taking advantage of the open and closed side of the Line, certain functions can be given a logical place. The massive functions will be located on the defence side, such as free-range forests for the pigs, industrial buildings, biomass crops and the transformer station. On the field of fire side of the Line, there are open, reed sewage fields, which purify water and replenish the subsoil water reservoir. This prevents drought damage to arable farming. The new structure of reed sewage fields and free-range forests forms a link between various nature and forest areas and contributes to the ecological structure and increase of the biodiversity. The missing part of the defence wall will be restored and will have a double function, with piping for the supply of pig feed and the drainage of manure to the transformer station. A new pig farm with industrial buildings, cattle sheds, free-range forests and reed sewage fields form a unit which is referred to as ‘nutsgoed’ (utility goods). The underlying relationship becomes evident in the avenues, which link the different components and the biomass forest which encloses the nutsgoed. The villages, bunkers and nutsgoederen (utility goods) will have a visual relationship created by the wide avenues with sightlines that connect them. These routes directed at landmarks in the environment remind of the old heaths paths directed at the churches in the area, in the age of the wild Peelhorst. The avenues and free-range forests are accessible to visitors and are the link between the villages and the channel. Relocating the pig farms will free up space at the edges of the horst, near the villages. The space for temporary initiatives, new crops, village functions and regional activities will transform the village edge. There will be space on the Peelhorst, room to breathe, room for new opportunities for everyone. Organic agriculture, sustainable innovative arable farming, new nature reserves and a beautiful landscape framework to cycle and rummage through, to discover and learn. This way, large-scale industrial agriculture will create a loving and recreational landscape beneficial to entrepreneurs and pleasure for its inhabitants. Not bad, Go nuts! En d’n hemel waas veurroej, mist hing op ’t land, ‘s oaves laat da stong de piel in brand. (And the heaven was fire red, fog hung on the land, late at night the Peel was on fire.) Graduation date 10 07 2014

188

Commission members Hank van Tilborg (mentor) Maike van Stiphout Lonny van Ryswyck

Additional members for the examination Bruno Doedens Sylvia Lupini


Inge Vleemingh

pedunculate oak

English oak

American oak

walnut

horse chestnut

planting arrangement planting arrangement

sweet chestnut

Silver Birch

Normal pear

wild apple

medlar

elderberry

hazel

jerusalem artichoke

Final result

Jan

Feb March Apr

May June July Aug Sept Oct

Nov Dec

189


Landscape Architecture

The emergence of the Peel-Raam Line

The large quantities of cattle indicate the significance of and pressure on the region

After WWII pioneers are attracted to the new agriculture

The Peel, the Peel-Raam Line and the plan area

The flexibility of the entrepreneurs in the Peelhorst is enormous

The Peel-Raam Line is the backbone

Organic pig farm in free-range forests

The forest is a menu for the pig; in the summer apple, pear and elderberry, in the autumn acorns and nuts and in the winter medlar and Jerusalem artichoke.

Replenishing subsoil water for innovative arable farming

New structure is link between nature reserves

Village periphery transforms with broader companies

190

Scale models; vision (countryside Eisendorp), elaboration (utility) and detail (haha ditch)


Inge Vleemingh

The vision shows what the Peelhorst could look like when the entire Peel-Raam Line is filled with public utilities.

191


Landscape Architecture

One of the nutsgoederen (utility goods), the Stichtingshoeve (foundation farmstead) is elaborated in a design which clearly shows how the free-range forests, the farmstead and the cattle sheds relate to each other.

More animal-friendly system

Company growth

Sustainable companies

ground water Reduction drying out

Decrease odors and contamination risk

Increase biodiversity and living areas for flora and fauna

100ha less stalls = 200 football fields

Go nuts! is a large intervention with advantages at different levels and themes. The area needs a coordinated intervention

192


Inge Vleemingh

The defence channel is on the field of fire side where reed sewage fields purify waste water and produce biomass. The defence wall accommodates piping and forms a recreational connection.

In the free-range forests the pigs roam free. Visible to everyone who wants to know where his or her food comes from. In addition, the forests from a connection for nature, cyclist and hikers.

The farmstead is the crowning glory of the public utility. The entrepreneur lives here, accessible to the MiddenPeelweg and connected to the free-range forests via new lanes.

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Landscape Architecture

Frank van Zuilekom Jammo Já Val Bisagno - Genova

Genoa is a historic city in the north of Italy and is well known for its role in several wars, pesto and, of course, Christopher Columbus. The city’s strategic location and morphology caused the city to develop naturally between the Apennines and the coast of Liguria. The underlying landscape and the climate contributed to an elongated, but very compact city, which manifests itself to the coast. The old city centre of Genoa, Centro Storico, is in its scale comparable to the ring of canals of Amsterdam, but it is far denser. Space is limited as a result of the underlying relief and the increase in infrastructure. This has caused a decrease in quality of life, predominantly in the central area around the port and the old centre. The port has played a pivotal role since the earliest history of the city. The city’s growth ran parallel to that of the port and with time the port and the city grew together. These developments caused the last open spaces within the city limits to be filled with infrastructure. Concept Lack of space and the subsequent water issues are not unique to Genoa. The issues at the scale of the coast of Liguria, the city, districts and the inhabitants require an integral approach. The valleys drain the water from the mountains with a rise in the months of October and November. In the current situation, the valley is regularly flooded during these two months and is ‘dry’ during the other months. The idea is to give the valley another function during these ten other months. By accommodating the peaks of October and November during the other months, a more constant stream of water can be established. In this way, the valleys will be safer and the large open spaces can be used for city life, recreation, relaxation, exercise etc. Transforming the valley and making it accessible and greener will improve the quality of life in the city. The transformation of the 22 valleys that Genoa had or has, naturally creates 22 connections to the coast of Liguria and/or the Apennines.

Graduation date 02 07 2014

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Commission members Hanneke Kijne (mentor) Roberto Cavallo Han Dijk

Additional members for the examination Rik de Visser Jana Crepon


Frank van Zuilekom

195


Landscape Architecture

Apennines

Port Genoa

Ligurian sea

DAMAGE IN â&#x201A;Ź

Water problems Genova

196

VICTIMS


Frank van Zuilekom

200 mm

150 mm

100 mm

50 mm

jan

feb

mar

apr

may

jun

jul

aug

sept

oct

nov

dec

Average Rainfall Genoa

Vision on the future stream Val Bisagno, through the seasons and at peaks

197


Landscape Architecture

Vision on coastline of Genova

Identity of the Val Bisagno

198


Frank van Zuilekom

Zoning map Val Bisagno

199


Archiprix 2015 Nominations


Abdessamed Azarfane Bayt An alternative for social housing in Morocco

Bart van der Salm Grounding An in-between home for the last stage of life, a place to die in the city

202


Ivar van der Zwan A Front for the Back New scenario for the invisible city centre of Amsterdam

Iris Wijn Designated use of Sloterdijk A park + a forest of asphalt and concrete

203


Colophon Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Waterlooplein 213, 1011 PG Amsterdam, The Netherlands T +31 (0)20 531 8218, info@bwk.ahk.nl, www.academyofarchitecture.nl Advisory Board Jarrik Ouburg, Maike van Stiphout, Arjan Klok Editor-In-Chief Klaas de Jong Translation Richard Glass Photography Hielke Zevenbergen (p. 4,5) Photography models Hans Krßse Graphic Design Studio Sander Boon, Amsterdam Printing Pantheon drukkers Š 2015 Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


Master of Architecture / Urbanism / Landscape Architecture Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Architects, urbanists and landscape architects learn the profession at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture through an intensive combination of work and study. They work in small, partly interdisciplinary groups and are supervised by a select group of practising fellow professionals. There is a wide range of options within the programme so that students can put together their own trajectory and specialisation. With the inclusion of the course in Urbanism in 1957 and Landscape Architecture in 1972, the Academy is the only architecture school in the Netherlands to bring together the three spatial design disciplines under one roof. Some 350 guest tutors are involved in teaching every year. Each of them is a practising designer or a specific expert in his or her particular subject. The three heads of department also have design practices of their own in addition to their work for the Academy. This structure yields an enormous dynamism and energy and ensures that the courses remain closely linked to the current state of the discipline. The courses consist of projects, exercises and lectures. First-year and second-year students also engage in morphological studies. Students work on their own or in small groups. The design

projects form the backbone of the syllabus. On the basis of a specific design assignment, students develop knowledge, insight and skills. The exercises are focused on training in those skills that are essential for recognising and solving design problems, such as analytical techniques, knowledge of the repertoire, the use of materials, text analysis, and writing. Many of the exercises are linked to the design projects. The morphological studies concentrate on the making of spatial objects, with the emphasis on creative process and implementation. Students experiment with materials and media forms and gain experience in converting an idea into a creation. During the periods between the terms there are workshops, study trips in the Netherlands and abroad, and other activities. This is also the preferred moment for international exchange projects. The Academy regularly invites foreign students for the workshops and recruits wellknown designers from the Netherlands and further afield as tutors. Graduates from the Academy of Architecture are entitled to the following titles: Master of Architecture (MArch), Master of Urbanism (MUrb), or Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA).

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2013-2014 Graduation Projects features the work of students who earned their degree during the 2013-2014 academic year at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture. The projects by the 31 Masters of Architecture, Urbanism and Landscape Architecture are introduced by visiting critic Caroline Bos.

Graduations projects 2013 2014  
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