Page 1

2021

y o u r

P R E M I E R E

g u i d e

T O

b o u l d e r


Discover options and flexibility to help you stay on track. Own your journey.


Cruise into Hazel’s for super low prices everyday


BEST

OZs IN

BOULDER

All offers while supplies last. Additional restrictions may apply. Prices do not include tax. Adults 21+ recreational only.


LEARN FROM THE EXPERTS! JUMP-START YOUR CONFIDENCE & CREATIVITY!

Upcoming Online Classes

PRINTING

FILM PROCESSING

CUSTOM FRAMING

SCANNING

photo gifts

video transfer

• Photography 101 • Photography 201 • Lighting 101: How to Use Your Flash • Lighting 201: In the Studio • How to Capture Perfect Color • Essentials of Composition • Portrait Photography • Night Photography • Travel Photography • And More!

Workshops to Enhance your Photography • Wildlife Photography • Macro Photography • Astrophotography • Landscape Photography • Lightroom 101 • And More!

Learn More & Register Online at bit.ly/MCOnlineSchool

Colorado’s Favorite Photography, Video & Imaging Source Since 1967!

BOULDER • 2500 PEARL STREET • 303-443-1715

®

DENVER | WHEAT RIDGE | LONE TREE | COLORADO SPRINGS

mikescamera.com


*At participating stores only. Offer ends 9/20/2021. **At participating stores only. See store for details. No interest will be charged on the promo balance if you pay it off, in full, within the promo period. If you do not, interest will be charged on the promo balance from the purchase date. The required minimum monthly payments may or may not pay off the promo balance by the end of the promo period. Regular account terms apply to non-promo purchases and, after promo period ends, to the remaining promo balance. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%. Minimum interest charge is $2. Existing cardholders: See your credit card agreement terms. Subject to credit approval. ©2021 Carpet One Floor & Home®. All Rights Reserved.


STAFF

LUCY HAGGARD

STAFF

Publisher, Fran Zankowski Special Editions Editor, Emma Athena Circulation Manager, Cal Winn

EDITORIAL

Editor, Caitlin Rockett News Editor, Will Brendza

PRODUCTION

Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman

SALES AND MARKETING

Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Account Executives, Matthew Fischer, Sami Wainscott Advertising Coordinator, Corey Basciano Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar

GENERAL

Circulation Team, Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Bookkeeper, Regina Campanella Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Editor-at-Large, Joel Dyer Cover photo: Susan France Carly Herbert, model

11.....By the numbers Get to know the facts and figures 12.....Out with the old, in with the new Boulder’s alternative health treatments and therapies gain popularity 15.....What’s in a name? Boulder renames locations to better represent its values and people

Reader, welcome to Boulder.

16.....Co-work-work-work-work-work Shared workspaces are booming

oulder strong: a phrase we now hear everywhere, words we now see painted on buildings, stamped on T-shirts, crocheted around trees. At its core, strength is resilience, and that’s what we’ve filled these pages with: the idea that we are, indeed, resilient. From Q&As with local figures about different facets of community resiliency, to an explainer of Boulder’s updated Climate Action Plan, alternative therapy options, and how-to tips for growing strong houseplants, inside these pages you’ll see a world of strength — a community brought together by multiple tragedies this last year. We weathered a pandemic, a mass shooting, smoke-filled skies, and housing and employment

21.....Welcome to “Outdoor Rodeo Drive” Gear shops new and old 23.....Houseplants 101 Advice from the experts 25.....Q&As Learn from Jasmine Sim, Eric Budd, Chelsea Castellano and Donalyn Arbuthnot Whissen 30.....Feeling young, youthful and crazy Get the scoop on Boulder’s famous Thursday Night Cruiser Rides. 32.....Top Nibbles A veteran critic’s tastiest picks

BOULDER WEEKLY

Insider is a special issue of Boulder Weekly, which is available every Thursday throughout the county.

I

shortages — and we weathered it all together. As Khadijah Queen, poet and CU Boulder professor, said in a poem she wrote and delivered at a community vigil for the victims of the King Soopers’ massacre in March: “Let us mark the moment our voices and our works turned to roots bound to build shelter / the moment we reshaped the distance between us into song.”

sider

in

36.....Day trip delights Discover off-the-beaten-path adventures close to home

2021

B

18.....Boulder’s trifecta Mitigation, resilience and equity in the updated Climate Action Plan

BOULDER INSIDER ’21

303.494.5511 690 S. Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO 80305

I

9


Founded: 1858 Incorporated: 1871 Counties: Boulder County Elevation: 5,328 feet above sea level Land area: 27/36 square miles Highest Visible Peak: Longs Peak, 14,259 feet Water ways: Boulder Creek, South Boulder Creek, Boulder Reservoir Parks: Chautauqua Park, North Boulder Park, Martin Park, Bear Creek Park, Meadow Glen Park, Central Park, Settler’s Park, Scott Carpenter Park, Valmont Bike Park, Elmer’s Two Mile Park, Elks Park, Crestview Park, Wonderland Lake Park

Breweries: 22 Wineries: 3 Cideries: 2 Meadery: 1 Distilleries: 4 Dispensaries: 28 Churches/Synagogues/ Mosques: 59 Schools: 56 in the Boulder Valley School District Museums: 7

BOULDER WEEKLY

70% Population: 105,003 (2021) Population growth since 2010: 7.82% Median Age: 28.6 Average work commute: 19.7 minutes Average household income: $109,410 Persons in poverty: 20.4% Persons owning a bicycle: 70%

71 inches

14,259’

By the Numbers

Days of Sunshine: 245 Average Winter Low: 19 degrees in January Average Summer High: 88 degrees in July Average Rain Precipitation: 18 inches Average Snow Precipitation: 71 inches UV Index: 5.8

I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

11


COURTESY OF SALT OF THE EARTH

Out with the old, in with the new

Boulder’s alternative health treatments and therapies gain popularity

by Katie O’Leary

W

ould you call a salt therapist for a chronic sinus infection or use IV therapy to treat an autoimmune disease? No matter how “out there” alternative therapies may seem, many are gaining popularity as a way to complement traditional medicine — and for good reason. Most alternative therapies have been healing people for centuries and have a long list of from holistic treatments. In fact, according to a 2017 Pew Research study, about half of Americans report having tried some form of alternative medicine, such as herbal remedies or acupuncture. Interested in giving alternative medicine a try? If you’re looking to get creative with your traditional therapies. We’ve compiled a list of some of the city’s most popular healing spaces to help you get the most out of life.

I

tory issues than the general population. Upon this discovery, salt mines all over Eastern Europe were used as medical “resorts” for individuals struggling with respiratory conditions. Today, salt therapy is used to treat all kinds of illnesses, including chronic sinusitis, asthma, and hay fever. A typical salt therapy session is 45 minutes and involves sitting in a room while a halogenerator disperses microscopic salt particles into the room. Once these particles are inhaled, they cause your mucous membranes to thin and liquefy, allowing you to expel debris and pathogens. Struggling with chronic sinus infections or respiratory issues? Check

About half of all Americans report having tried some kind of alternative medicine, such ture, energy therapy or dies.

therapy. Salt of the Earth, 4520 N. Broadway, Unit D, Boulder, 303-435-1039.

Flotation Therapy

Commonly referred to as a sensory deprivation

Salt Therapy

12

FACT:

ability to provide deep relaxation, pain relief and

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


COURTESY OF SALT OF THE EARTH

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT!

Ma Ma approved.

MOST alternative therapies have been healing people for centuries and have a long list of health benefits: healing respiratory issues, treating anxiety, soothing irritated skin, reducing inflammation and more.

closed water baths that are typically 10 inches deep with approximately 1,000 pounds of Epsom salt dissolved into the tub. The Epsom salts create a buoyant in a neutral environment. Isolate, one of

Mon - Thurs and Sun: 11am – 10pm • Fri and Sat: 11am – 11pm 2010 10th Street, Boulder, CO 80302 • 303-545-6262 • zoemama.com

or can’t seem to kick an injury? Check out CryoFusion to give cryotherapy a try. CryoFusion, 2408 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 720-585-8115.

HONDA SUBARU TOYOTA ACURA

IV Therapy

sessions. If you’re looking for a truly tion therapy session is a great option. Isolate, 643 S. Broadway, Boulder, 720-256-6518.

Cryotherapy ancient civilizations to rejuvenate cells and promote healing. Today, wholebody cryotherapy treatments are used to treat a variety of conditions, including tendonitis, athletic injuries and joint pain. These treatments involve sitting or standing in a “cryo chamber” for three minutes. During this time, your body is exposed to subzero temperatures, which can provide pain relief and increase muscle stamina. For optimal results, patients wear minimal clothes, including dry thermal socks, thermal gloves, cryo boots and undergarments. BOULDER WEEKLY

The days where IV therapy was reserved for hospital patients have come and gone. Today, IV therapy has gained immense popularity as a delivery mechanism of essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to the bloodstream. Vitamin infusions into the bloodstream can bypass the digestive system, increasing and optimizing absorption. IV therapy can provide a wide range

Serving Boulder Since

1984

cies, and cleansing the body of free radicals. Hydrate IV Bar in Boulder is known for its a la carte selection of vitamin cocktails. Whether you’re looking to target anti-aging or your immune system, their eclectic menu of nutrient concoctions offers solutions for a variety of health concerns. Hydrate IV Bar, 1655 Folsom St., Boulder, 720-410-2163.

BEST OF BOULDER 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005

Folsom & Spruce • 303.449.6632 • www.hoshimotors.net I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

13


Boulder County Restaurant Week

October 8-17, 2021

A Local Celebration of Top Restaurants CHEF-CUR ATED MENUS R ANGING FROM $29-$49

PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS • • • • • • • • •

Ash’Kara Avery Brewing Co. Bohemian Biergarten Boulder Cork The Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse Brasserie Boulder** Cafe Aion** Centro Mexican Kitchen* Chautauqua Dining Hall

• • • • • • • • •

Chimera Corrida Dagabi Tapas Bar Dry Storage The Empire Lounge & Restaurant Fringe, A Well-Tapped Eatery The Greenbriar Inn Japango Leaf

*Brunch Only **Dinner & Brunch

• OAK at Fourteenth • The Post Brewing Co.* • River & Woods • Salt • Sforno Trattoria Romano • Ska Street Brewstillery • T|ACO • West End Tavern • Zucca ...and more

Dine Out To Give Back 10% Goes to EFAA for Fighting Food Insecurity

!

14

I

firstbiteboulder.com //

"

firstbiteboco //

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

#

firstbiteboco I

BOULDER WEEKLY


What’s in a name

Boulder renames locations to better represent its values and people. by Caitlin Rockett

S

ure, a rose by any other name might smell as sweet, but what if the name of the rose reminded us of past injustices, bigotry and violence? A rose is no longer a symbol of beauty if its name evokes loss and trauma. Poetics aside, words matter — names matter — and across the nation, communities are reconsidering and changing the names of landmarks, buildings and mascots that invoke racism and historical whitewashing. “When we talk about what is in a name, it is so much more than just that name, that tribe’s name, that indigenous meaning,” says Ernest House, a member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe and director of the Keystone Policy Center who helps Boulder City Council prepare for tribal consultations, including the talks that lead to renaming Settler’s Park Trailhead in downtown Boulder. “Indigenous cultures, we’ve survived in these locations for thousands of years and when we lose name recognition, we end up losing that place in time and people tend to forget, or maybe start to think that there is no tribe here anymore, maybe [Native Americans] are a vanishing race.” Over the last couple of years, the City of Boulder and the University of Colorado Boulder have both chosen to rename several locations to better represent Boulder’s values and the people of color who have made an impact on our community. Here’s a little about those people and places.

The People’s Crossing (fka Settler’s Park) renaming Settler’s Park as a part of the Indigenous Peoples Day resolution in 2016 — an effort to “correct omissions of the Native American presence in public places, resources and cultural programming.” The trailhead in downtown Boulder in Boulder violated a treaty and the sovereignty of indigenous people living in the area. There was little progress made on the renaming until 2019, when the City took the issue to a number of representatives of tribes who have historically name that commemorates the Indigenous presence on the parkland known as BOULDER WEEKLY

‘Settler’s Park.’’’ The consort settled on The Peoples’ Crossing because the area has “been a crossroads for Indigenous Peoples who have traversed and lived in the mountains and plains of the Boulder area since time immemorial.” City staff hope to have the renaming completed (new signage and maps) by Indigenous Peoples Day, Oct. 11, 2021.

Penfield Tate II Municipal Building and so-far only African American mayor. Now the downtown municipal building New Philadelphia, Ohio, Tate attended Kent State University on an academic scholarship, graduating with a degree in pre-law and political science and a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. After 14 years of military service, Tate headed to the University of Colorado Law School, where he received his law degree in 1968. In 1971, Tate to Boulder City Council, becoming an involved leader who stood up for the rights and protections of minority groups, including the LGBTQ+ community. After his time on council, Tate was a member of both the City Housing Authority and the Human Relations Committee in Boulder, the board of directors of the Colorado Housing and Finance authority, and the board of directors for the Denver Metropolitan Major League Baseball Stadium District. He passed away in 1993. His two daughters live in Boulder, and his son lives in Denver.

Albert and Vera Ramírez Temporary Building 1 (fka TB1)

TB1 was built in 1898 as a teaching hospital, and became the site of Chicano rights demonstrations in the 1970s meant to raise awareness around the need for academic and social services for underrepresented students. Albert Ramírez, a professor of neuroscience, was one of the sented group to achieve tenure as a full professor. He advocated for the creation of the Center for the Studies of Ethnicity and Race in America and the ethnic studies department, and founded and I

hosted the Equity and Excellence Awards Ceremony for a number of years. He and his late wife, Vera, welcomed underrepresented students to weekly Sunday gatherings at their home, offering guidance, encouragement and home-cooked meals. Ramírez, who still lives in Boulder, told CU Boulder Today that he looked forward to working with the campus to make TB1 “a living recognition and symbol of 50 years of dedication and commitment on the part of students, faculty and staff in working toward our common goal: achieving equity and excellence in each and every fabric of our university.”

Lucile Berkeley Buchanan Building (fka the education building)

Born in Denver, Lucile Berkeley Buchanan was the oldest daughter of emancipated slaves from Virginia who came to Colorado in pursuit of a new life. Buchanan graduated from CU Boulder in 1918 with a degree graduate from the university. But her hard work was met with racism as the university left Buchanan’s picture out of the yearbook and denied her the chance to walk across the Macky Auditorium stage to receive her degree. Despite the challenges of Jim Crow America, Buchanan dedicated her life to teaching Black students, enabling “thousands of students of color to lift themselves out of poverty, overcome oppression and realize their dreams,” Chancellor Philip DiStefano said in a statement about Buchanan. “She embodies the truest meaning of our university motto as it is inscribed on our seal — to ‘let your light shine.’ Renaming our education building in her honor is perhaps the best way to ensure that her academic achievements and lifetime legacy will live on.”

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: Lucile Berkeley Buchanan; a gathering celebrating the renaming of the municipal building; Mayor Penfield Tate II; the location The People’s Crossing; Albert and Vera Ramírez.

I

15


Boulder’s co-working scene is booming By Katie O’Leary

C

o-working spaces aren’t a new phenomenon. In fact, communal

popularity of communal workspaces is

conference rooms for meeting with clients or scene has options for all professional prefer-

growing chain’s fifth location.

Kiln

16

I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

ABOVE: KILN

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


Expansive Podcast studio Filming equipment Ergonomic, fully-furnished setups Event and conference spaces Outdoor terrace

Free espresso bar Lounge and event spaces On-site parking 24/7 secured access

Regus -

Office Partners on Pearl

working options. Regular networking and personal growth events Business lounge and meeting room access Storage options Professional receptionist to greet guests or clients

BOULDER WEEKLY

Free EcoPass ONE Boulder Fitness discount Free coffee and tea Indoor bike parking

I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

17


Boulder’s mitigation, resilience, equity trifecta City of Boulder updates its Climate Action Plan, reporting progress toward old goals, charting the course for new ones

by Will Brendza

18

I

I

n 2018, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (ICPP) released a rather urgent warning: If we cannot keep the planet’s temperature from rising 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit (1.5 C) by the year 2100, there will be irreversible — and likely catastrophic — effects. Some governments around the world are starting to respond to that warning. The EU commission on climate change recently raised its 2030 And Boulder isn’t far behind in updating its own: In 2019, the City initiated the development of its “next-generation climate action strategy” for its progressive Climate Action Plan (CAP). This June, the City released an update to that strategy — outlining its progress and raising Boulder’s sustainability bar even higher — in part to set some loftier mitigation goals to match the accelerating pace of global warming, says Jonathan Kohn, the interim director of the City of Boulder’s Climate Initiatives. But also to address the challenges of resilience and equity in the face of climate change. “We know the politics of climate planning are changing. I think the public is demanding bolder and more concrete actions by local, state and federal governments,” Kohn says. “We recognize that our approach really needs to be courageous and needs to be visionary and it needs to be collaborative.” The City of Boulder’s Climate Action Plan (CAP) has been helping direct the community’s efforts to offset climate change since 2007. It sets the City’s goalposts for reducing energy use, increasing the use of renewable energy sources,

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

reducing vehicle emissions and making strides toward meeting other goals set in the PART OF THE City of Boulder’s 1997 Kyoto protocol. It’s made Climate Action this city one of the foremost Plan involves leaders in sustainable city increasing use of management over the years. renewable energy As Kohn points out, Boulsources, like der’s Zero Waste recycling wind. and composting system is one of the most progressive management programs in the entire nation, constantly striving to achieve a more circular waste economy; the City’s renowned “greenbelt” of open space is a pinnacle of land-use conservation, acting as a carbon sink and ecosystem sanctuary; and Boulder’s decade-long attempted to emancipate itself from Xcel Energy and control its own electricity generation ultimately pressured Xcel into beginning to transition away from coal-based electricity generation. “Boulder is leading the way on much of that work, not just regionally, but nationally and internationally,” Kohn says. Currently, Boulder’s targets as outlined by the CAP have been to achieve 100% renewable electricity use by the year 2030 and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emission levels by 50% from 2005 levels by 2050. The recent update outlines a number of mitigation benchmarks the City is adding to that list. Now, it aims to reduce Boulder’s GHG emis-

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


Straight from the source

I

n June 2021, city staff published an update to the City’s Climate Action Plan: “Scientists tell us that we have until 2030 to make the massive, societal, systemsscale changes required to stave off the worst effects of climate change. While the situation is urgent, we are also in an incredibly inspiring moment. Every day, new leaders join the cause from every corner of the globe, including here in Boulder. Our community is poised to take the next step in this work, however, the city’s climate action work moving forward must look different than it has in the past.” City staff distilled key areas of action and with the community, must: • Act beyond its boundaries, collaborating with partners, other cities and government agencies to achieve impact at a larger scale, on topics • Focus city actions in support of achieving larger regional and national climate targets including: • Reduce emissions 70% by 2030 against a 2018 baseline • Become a Net Zero city by 2035 • Become a Carbon-Positive city (CarbonPositive means that an activity goes beyond achieving net zero carbon emisby removing additional carbon dioxide from the atmosphere) by 2040 • Allocate necessary time and resources to address the impacts of climate change in an equitable manner • Resilience and strengthen community capacity to adapt and thrive • Focus attention on natural carbon drawdown (which is becoming an increasingly important tool for managing emissions) • Account for the full scope of emissions in our community (including emissions associated with the creation of the goods and food purchased) • Address new focus areas for climate economic systems)

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

sions by 70% from 2018 levels by 2030; it wants to achieve net-zero status by 2035; and it even hopes to become a carbon-positive city by 2040. The update also outlines a lot of goals for increasing the community’s climate change resilience. Actions like increasing shade within the city to decrease urban heat island effects, and increasing Boulder’s carbon capture capacity by planting more trees and vegetation in and around town — which also helps improve mental health and community trust, according to the report. “It’s not only about mitigation and [resilience] at this point, though,” Lauren Tremblay, sustainability data and policy analyst for the City of Boulder, adds. It’s also about equity. The update illustrates and explains how emissions from the richest 1% of the global population account for more than twice the combined share of the poorest 50%. At the same time, globally it will be the poorest populations that experience climate change the earliest and the most severely, and who will be least equipped to cope with it. That’s why the City of Boulder is also adding new core equity principals into its CAP. The City wants to do what it can to help address those structural inequities. Options like offering assistance can help to provide equitable solutions for problems like energy insecurity. solutions that don’t just focus on one of those elements, [mitigation, resilience or equity],” Tremblay says. “But one that can really drive home all three.” It’s that line of thinking that’s led the City of Boulder, like many other cities, to recognize the need to move beyond the city-centric paradigm of

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

climate action. Kohn says the City is now starting to consider climate action from a systems-level approach. “Climate change is a wicked collective-action problem — meaning that individual change can’t [the individual],” Kohn says. As such, the City’s CAP now outlines goals to increase its work with private partners, other municipalities and state and federal agencies on an even larger basis. The stronger its network, the City reasons, the more power it has to actually meet the ambitious goals it’s set. Which are inarguably ambitious, both Kohn and Tremblay admit. It won’t be easy to reduce the City’s carbon footprint so much — it will take effort from both individuals and the City government to achieve that. It won’t be easy to increase for equity — it will require systemic change and action from the City of Boulder in concert with private partners, other municipalities and government agencies. It’s a formidable challenge the City is taking on, and employees like Kohn and Tremblay know warnings from the ICPP are not to be taken lightly. “Do I think [these new goals] are achievable? Yes, I absolutely think that they are achievable. It’s where we have to be,” Kohn says. “We have heard the dire warning that has been sounded by our climate scientists and we and local jurisdictions need to respond ... Now is exactly the time that we need to be as aggressive as we can to mitigate the worst impacts to the global climate catastrophe.”

I

19


OPENING September 2021 !"#$%&'$(&)*+,-.$/ 1155 13th Street %&'$(&)*+,-.$/ 012+!3&'$-&)45+6 On the Hill! 20

I

BOULDER INSIDER ’21

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


Welcome to the “outdoor Rodeo Drive” Pearl Street has finally peaked as mecca for outdoor enthusiasts. By Emma Athena

T

his summer, a new (yet familiar) sheriff settled into town: the outdoor recreation industry has officially set up shop on Pearl Street, and it’s looking to stay a while. As the pandemic induced a churning of businesses closing and opening downtown, a handful of new outdoor gear stores moved into Boulder’s iconic pedestrian shopping artery, joining about a dozen other outdoors-focused shops that’ve been slowly populating the cobbled street over the last couple years. Pearl Street “is sort of becoming the outdoor Rodeo Drive,” Scott Crabtree, who focuses on commercial real estate along Pearl Street and Boulder County with The Colorado Group, told 5280 Magazine. Need hiking boots? An expedition-weight puffy? A trail-running skirt? Climbing shoes? New flannels? A craft beer to go with that? And a carabiner to hold your life together? Look no further than the tulip-lined Pearl Street. And while it’s recently become a concentrated mecca for outdoor recreation commerce, providing a one-stop shopping experience for customers both local and visiting, it’s a place that’s been steeping in adventure culture for decades. The nearby Flatirons, access to Rocky Mountain National Park, Mount Sanitas looming overhead, and its proximity to the Boulder Creek Path have made Pearl Street a natural crossroads for all sorts of adventurers. As such, long-standing tenants like Patagonia, Montbell and Fjallraven have made their case for Pearl Street as home — other brands like Norrona, The North Face, Helly Hansen and Title Nine have more recently moved in and fortified the adventure commerce community. Still, not everyone weathered the pandemic. Colorado’s beloved Topo Designs shut its Pearl Street doors (but you can still find them in Denver). Among the new crop of stores, many chose Boulder as their first foray outside of their headquarter locations — telling of Boulder as a strong, yet still-growing adventure market. Backcountry, for example, a historically online-only retail shop based in Utah, is creating a 2,000-square-foot store on East Pearl. Down the street, Black Diamond Equipment, a mountain sports outfitter also from Utah, chose Boulder as its first non-outlet location. A few more blocks down, Stio, a Wyoming-based adventure apparel company, opened its second storefront. Over at

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

the 29th Street Mall, Vuori set up shop for the first time outside of its native California. Gear shops are nothing new to Boulder, however. Outside of Pearl Street, Neptune Mountaineering in the Table Mesa Shopping Center has been a locally owned, community-driven retail force for nearly 50 years. Its 2018 store makeover brought in a cafe and expanded its retail and gear-servicing space. (Check Neptune’s calendar for epic presentations and public talks by locally and nationally renowned adventurers.) Across town, off North Broadway, the Boulder Sports Recycler provides top-notch outdoor gear consignment. Shop here for the best deals on gear — plus, buying second-hand is the most environmentally friendly way to acquire new-toyou gear. Bring them any outdoor gear you no longer use, and they’ll sell it for you (for a small consignment fee). New or old, all these retailers are tapping into the growing and vibrant multi-billion-dollar industry of outdoor recreation. Headquartered in Boulder, the Outdoor Industry Association (OIA) is a trade organization for the outdoor industry, and they estimate the outdoor recreation industry contributes more than $12 billion a year to Colorado’s economy. In collaboration with members, the OIA represents and supports the industry in recreation and trade policy, sustainable business innovation and increasing outdoor participation. In OIA’s 2021 “Outdoor Participation Trends Report,” it highlighted the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on outdoor recreation: “In 2020, 53% of Americans ages 6 and over participated in outdoor recreation at least once, the highest participation rate on record. As the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged communities and forced a nationwide shutdown, outdoor spaces became places of refuge to safely socialize, improve physical and mental health, connect with family and recover from screen fatigue. Remarkably, 7.1 million more Americans participated in outdoor recreation in 2020 than in the year prior. Despite these gains, nearly half of the U.S. population did not share in the proven, positive health outcomes of outdoor physical activity.” According to Colorado Parks and Wildlife, 92% of Coloradans participate in some form of outdoor activity at least once every few weeks and 69% recreate between one and four times per week. All forecasts indicate these numbers will continue to grow. So Pearl Street, here we come.

The outdoor industry has large and varied impacts on Colorado. According to the Outdoor Industry Association and the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the outdoor recreation economy generates: • 149,000 direct jobs • 7,400 companies • $6.4 billion in wages and salaries • $12.2 billion in “Total Outdoor Recreation Value Added” (consists of the gross output of an industry less its intermediate inputs; the contribution of an industry to gross domestic product [GDP]). • 3.1% share of the state’s GDP

CARLISLE PHOTOGRAPHY

BOULDER INSIDER ’21

FROM THE TOP: Stio apparel; Black Diamond climbing gear; Vuori’s shop at the 29th Street Mall

I

21


VOTED BEST BBQ Best Restaurant Service Best Takeout Best Appetizers / Tapas Best Place to Eat Outdoors 701 B Main St., Louisville, CO

720-583-1789

www.lulus-bbq.com

22

I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


Houseplants 101

Houseplant Directory

Advice from the experts by Caitlin Rockett

H

umans and houseplants: We go way back, to at least ancient Rome. Plants purify the air, live in our homes and lift our spirits — but maybe you don’t know a pothos from a peace lily. We stopped by houseplant haven Terracotta (2005 Pearl St., Boulder) and asked coowners Adria Buonocore and Eben Metivier to give us their advice for getting started with houseplants.

Beginner Plants (low light)

Buonocore: always recommend to beginners is doesn’t need a lot of water — about once a month during the growing season (spring to fall) — and they do really well in low-light conditions. dry out between waterings. These typically like once-a-week watering. They also do well in lower light, and they grow really fast, so they’re very satisfying.” Metivier: “Philodendron birkins are another beautiful, easy beginner plant. Place them in indirect bright light and water once a week.” More recommendations: ZZ plant (zamioculcas), aglaonema (Chinese evergreen), parlor palm (chamaedorea elegans). While all of the mentioned plants will tolerate low-light conditions, they’ll thrive (read: put off new leaves, take on light.

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

Sturtz & Copeland, 2851 Valmont Road, Boulder, 303-442-6663. Huge selection with a knowledgeable staff. McGuckin Hardware, 2525 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-443-1822. This Boulder gem carries everything, including houseplants. Plants, Y’all, plantsyall.com, 720-504-4533. Plant stylist Anastasia will create a custom plan for your space. Boulder Gardens Florist, 3060 28th St., Boulder, 303-449-5757. Have a houseplant delivered to mom next Mother’s Day.

High Light

Buonocore: “Cactus, succulents. They love, love, love high, enough light, succulents end up getting leggy and kind of ugly. They’re really easy to over-water, so be mindful.” Metivier: “Cane begonias like bright light, too. Calathea is but they like higher light. California ginger (asarum caudatum) is a good bright-light plant.” More recommendations: Aloe (aloe barbadensis), jade plant (crassula argentea), croton (codiaeum variegatum). Note: Calathea, California ginger and crotons all like higher humidity. Crotons in particular have a reputation for being fussy, and will often drop leaves when moved.

Diagnosing common problems

Metivier: turning yellow it usually means overit usually means under-watering, or cupped, that could be under watering and possibly bug damage. Leaves that are pimpled or dotted see white spots on your plant, that’s usually mealy bugs. For just about any plant, except for some cacti, regular 70% isopropyl alcohol will get rid of mealy bugs. Just put it in a spray bottle and spray your plant down.” More recommendations: Large

collections of houseplants should be under a pest-prevention program. Inside Terracotta, where Buonocore and Metivier have hundreds of plants, they use nematodes in the soil, green lacewing hanging cards and PureCrop1 insecticide spray.

larger than the pot you’re starting with. So if you have a 4-inch pot, you don’t want to go bigger than a pretty much works for everything. You also want to remove as much of the old soil as you can without disturbing the roots too much. That’s a

Pet Friendly

Buonocore: “You always want to check with the ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) to see what plants are dangerous for your pet. We list on our tags whether a plant is pet friendly or not.” Recommendations: Parlor palms; pepperomia; spider plant; African violets; succulents, like haworthia and echeveria are safe.

Re-potting

Buonocore: “Use fresh, organic soil that has humus to add drainage, and a lot of organic matter for the plants to feed on. Pot size is really important. You don’t want to go more than two inches in diameter

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

kind of squishy and brown, you just want to get rid of the rotted parts.” Metivier: “We like to re-pot in pots that have a drainage hole, and then we put something like an aluminum screen on the drainage hole. hole, we add a layer of rock that the soil can sit on top of. Then we add the fresh soil (make sure the plant is centered) and water with yucca extract, which changes the molecular structure of water to make it physical stress of being re-potted because the plant is able to move that water around more readily.” Note: Yucca is high in natural wetting agents called saponins.

I

23


JUST ANNOUNCED

JUST ANNOUNCED

SEP 23 ............................................................................................ ROBERT FRANCIS NOV 27 ................................................................................... SHAKEDOWN STREET

OCT 2 ................................................................... ESSEKS + TSURUDA + CHEE NOV 2 ........................................................................................... YUNG GRAVY

FRI. AUG 20

FRI. AUG 27 THE AGE GAP TOUR

HEATHER LAND

88.5 KGNU & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT: ALBUM RELEASE PARTY

BANSHEE TREE

50 YEARS

SERVING THE FRONT RANGE MUSIC COMMUNITY Shop online at hbwoodsongs.com for no contact pickup or free local delivery (on purchases over $20)

LUCINDA WILLIAMS AND HER BAND BUICK 6

SAT. AUG 21

LOST DOG STREET BAND

THU. SEP 9

MATT HECKLER

FRI. SEP 10

GREYBOY

HERE COME THE MUMMIES WED. SEP 15

WED. AUG 25

CHANNEL 93.3 & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

PURITY RING

TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENTS

DAWN RICHARD

ELDERBROOK

THU. SEP 16 88.5 KGNU & UPSLOPE BREWING COMPANY PRESENT

GILLIGAN MOSS

CIRCLES AROUND THE SUN

FRI. AUG 27

RICKIE LEE JONES

SAT. SEP 18 AN EVENING WITH

ACOUSTIC AMBUSH

THU. SEP 23 88.KGNU + PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS

DIRTWIRE

SAT. AUG 28

GONE GONE BEYOND, BLOSSOMN FRI. OCT 1

THE INTOLERABLES

Open to customers or for pick-up with these new hours of operations:

Mon.-Fri. 10 am - 6 pm, Sat. 10 am - 5 pm, Sun. 12 pm - 4 pm

303.449.0516

FRUTA BRUTAL, B-LOVE EXPERIENCE A FUNDRAISER FOR MENTAL HEALTH

Plus: Eastman, Deering, Ohana, KoAloha, Danelectro

• Acoustic & Electric Guitars • Ukuleles, Banjos & Mandolins • Band & Orchestra Rentals • Lessons & Workshops • Books & Accessories

3101 28th St, Tebo Plaza, Boulder

WED. SEP 8 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

ROOSTER & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT: DAYMAKER TOUR

FLAMINGOSIS

LAUREN JOY, DJ SULLY

hbwoodsongs.com

MON. OCT 4 DISTORTION AND BLUE HEARTS!

BOB MOULD BAND

THU. SEP 2

SLOW CAVES

THU. OCT 7

88.5 KGNU & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

TOWN MOUNTAIN

PAT METHENY SIDE-EYE W/ JAMES FRANCIES & JOE DYSON

WED. SEP 8

CHANNEL 93.3 PRESENTS: THE MOTION PICTURE SHOW – DIRECTOR’S CUT

FRI. OCT 8

SAINT MOTEL

ROOSTER & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

MON. OCT 18

MINNESOTA

107.9 KBPI PRESENTS: THE HUN TOUR

THE HU

VCTRE

THE HAUNT THU. OCT 19

FRI. SEP 10

THE CELTIC CONNECTION, 88.5 KGNU & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT: THE HOME FROM HOME TOUR

THE HIGH KINGS

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

THU. OCT 21

WILD RIVERS

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

AN ACOUSTIC NIGHT WITH DISPATCH

LINDSEY LOMIS

SPECIAL GUEST: EMELISE

THU. SEP 16

SAT. OCT 23 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

JOHN HIATT & THE JERRY DOUGLAS BAND

ROOSTER PRESENTS

MERSIV

SUN. OCT 24

SMOAKLAND, SPECIAL GUEST, MEDUSO

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

DAR WILLIAMS HEATHER MALONEY

FRI. SEP 17

TUE. OCT 26 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

CHRISTIAN FRENCH

THE DEL MCCOURY BAND FRI. OCT 29

SARAH BARRIOS

SOME CREATURE TOUR

GETTER

SAT. SEP 18

SAT. OCT 30 97.3 KBCO & BELL’S BREWERY PRESENT

THE MOTET - HALLOWEEN 2021

ROOSTER, PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

YHETI

SUN. OCT 31 SWIMMING WITH THE CLOUDS TOUR

WHETHAN

HONEYBEE, THOUGHT PROCESS

NOV 4 ...... BILLY PRINE & THE PRINE TIME BAND PRESENT: SONGS OF JOHN PRINE NOV 17 ............................................................................................. CARIBOU NOV 18 .................................................................................. BRETT DENNEN NOV 19 ............................................................. THE LAST WALTZ REVISITED

WED. SEP 22 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

ANDY SHAUF + SON LITTLE SEP 24 ............................................................................................... ARDALAN SEP 25 .................................................................................... THE GOOD KIND SEP 26 .......................................................... DELVON LAMARR ORGAN TRIO SEP 30 ................................................................................................... A-TRAK OCT 1 ...................................................................................................... MIPSO

24

I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

BOULDER WEEKLY


Jasmine Sim has been a Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks park ranger/naturalist for five years. We asked her about life as a park ranger and resilience in and around the City.

by Carly Paul Boulder Weekly: What brought you to working as a park ranger in Boulder?

over 155 miles of trails by updating our design and construc-

Jasmine Sim: Following college I went into the Ameri-

appreciate nature.

response and urban and rural development throughout the southwest. Following that I knew I wanted to be outside and landed this dream job as a Park Ranger here in Boulder with an amazing crew of rangers who are passionate about their work.

BW: What can humans do to play our role in enabling resilience in our parks and open spaces to preserve them for future generations?

BW: Can you share a bit about the work that you do as a ranger?

JS: We all have the shared responsibility to protect our parks and open spaces. Visitors can foster that deep appreciation and care for the land by enjoying our parks responsibly

JS: Most of the time it is just being available to the public on the trails. We also respond to calls such as search and impromptu education talks on the trail. We do ecosystem and wildlife management helping with wildlife such as mountain BW: Where have you observed resilience in Boulder?

the rules and regulations and treating each other kindly out there. We need everyone’s help to protect and conserve our lands. If you see anything

JS: I see resilience all over. Throughout history the enjoyment of our landscape. Over 120 years ago we made

nesting raptor habitats in the U.S. despite the changes in our growing city.

We are available 24/7 to the public at 303-441-3333.

BW: How is Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks adapting to changes and preparing for the future?

BW: What is your favorite way to enjoy the Boulder community?

JS:

JS: [that] this is the place that I work and live. To be able to be a one of the best things is being able to see the eyes of kiddos light up when you tell them a sweet wildlife fact.

wildlife habitat. We’re improving our current trail system of

Q BOULDER WEEKLY

U I

E

S

This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

T

I

O

N

A

N

D

A

N

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

S

W

E

R I

25


Though our school provides access to all areas of curriculum, our focus is in the creative arts music, visual art and movement. Half day, full day and extended day schedule options. Healthy meals provided.

• BEST SELECTION - FRIENDLIEST STAFF • LOW PRICES - LOCAL VIBES • PRE-TARIFF PRICES ON TOP-SHELF IMPORTS • ALWAYS WORTH THE STOP • SERVING BOULDER SINCE 1964 • FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED

Now enrolling 3-5 year olds. Limited space available.

CURBSIDE PICKUP AVAILABLE 1235 Pine St., Boulder 303.800.0234

offbroadwaypreschool.org 26

I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-11pm • Sun 9am-9pm

6566 LOOKOUT RD. BOULDER, CO 80301 • 303-530-0108 www.facebook.com/GunbarrelLiquorCO/ I

BOULDER WEEKLY


Chelsea Castellano and Eric Budd co-lead the citizen’s initiative campaign Bedrooms are for People. We asked them about community resilience and how housing plays a role in a healthy, inclusive environment.

by Carly Paul Boulder Weekly: What does resilience in a community mean to you? Eric Budd: Resilience to me is how our community adapts to change... climate, economic and our aging community. Chelsea Castellano: Resilience looking through the lens of our initiative is to enable people of all backgrounds, races and classes to not only survive in our community but thrive and have places where they belong, do not feel threatened by eviction, and have community safety nets available. BW: Where do you feel you have seen resilience in the Boulder community? EB: When events affect the whole community, you really see the community come together and want to CC: The major events that bring people together are certainly more memorable, but it’s the day-to-day hardships that people reach out to help with that are so important to how we are resilient as a community. BW: What is Bedrooms are for People? CC: In Boulder it is currently illegal for more than three unrelated people to live together, which creates a limit on who is able to live together. Our measure would change this law to set the occupancy limit for unrelated people to equal the number of bedrooms in a house plus one. It is a really modest but meaningful change that will expand access to housing for people who need it. There are a lot of people currently living in our community who are living over-occupied and in fear of eviction. This has really negative outcomes that we have the power to change. That is why we have decided to put this measure forward to ensure that our BW: Why does this campaign mean so much to you personally? EB: communities — a house of people living together, supporting each other. Some were at threat of being evicted for technically doing something illegal and so we organized to pass a co-op housing ordinance. People want more options for housing. CC: You can’t have climate justice without resolving these social justice issues and … you see BW: What sort of evolution do you see Boulder undergoing in the future to remain an inclusive and accessible community? EB: Trying to address exclusionary policies, and a lot of it comes down to housing. How can we support a community that can make people feel welcome no matter what their background is, how much money they make, or what racial diversity they have? CC: It is really important to have representation that supports the will of the people and not just a select elite. One thing that we have been talking about as a systemic change is to make sure that our elected representatives are getting paid a living wage. We think that creates an opportunity for the

Q BOULDER WEEKLY

U I

E

S

T

I

O

N

A

N

D

A

N

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

S

W

E

R I

27


Donlyn Arbuthnot Whissen is a descendant of Boulder 59’er gold miners and a fine artist.

We asked her about multiple generations of life in the Boulder Valley.

by Carly Paul Boulder Weekly: Can you share a bit about your family’s relationship to Boulder? Donlyn Arbuthnot Whissen: I was born in Boulder and raised on Mapleton, and my family history goes back to the very beginnings of Boulder. My great-greatgrandfather, Carson Arbuthnot, arrived in the spring of 1859 at Haystack Mountain and wintered there at the same time that Chief Lefthand and the Arapaho were there. He was also elected sheriff of the Gold Hill and Sugarloaf mining districts. My other great-great-grand-father, George Bader, built a city block called the Bader block. I’m connected to Boulder’s past: the good, the bad and the ugly. Boulder has been changing since Boulder began. BW: Can you share a bit more about how you see the good, the bad and the ugly within our history? DAW: The ugly I am referring to is the pioneers’ involvement in the painful things that have been done to Native Americans here. My great grandfather William had ing the Native Americans. His brother Samuel, however, provided means to Colothe Lefthand family, and when I met them I said, “I’m sorry, my family was wrong and I hope that I can live in a way that will help heal the past.” My apology was accepted their home as a voting place, and they started organizations to support miners learning how to farm. I don’t want to deny the bad [nor] discount the good that pioneers did. I really appreciate all that Boulder does to have a relationship with the Arapaho and work with Native Americans to have representation in Boulder and to bring them home again. BW: How do you experience resilience through our history and in our community today? DAW: I am challenged with a disease, myasthenia gravis, and I tap into the resilience of the pioneers to keep going. My ancestors’ spirit has kept me strong. It [also] helps me be committed to live out the positive [legacies] of my ancestors and heal the negative things. For me personally, the whole Boulder Community Health System has really been a part of my own personal healing, they are part of my resilience team. I am so grateful that I have them in my life. Something I also think is resilient is the farm community, the farmers market and restaurants. In the beginning what helped Boulder thrive was the farming community and today it helps keep the connection to the land. BW: How do you enjoy the Boulder community? DAW: I paint it. I love to take old black and white photographs and paint them up. I love adding color, and growing up in Boulder has a lot to do with that.

Q BOULDER WEEKLY

U I

E

S

T

I

O

N

A

N

D

A

N

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

S

W

E

R I

29


Feeling young and youthful and crazy Get the scoop on Boulder’s famous Thursday Night Cruiser Rides.

Story and photos by Lucy Haggard

N

o one’s sure when the Happy Thursday Cruiser Ride “WHEN YOU’RE on the cruiser ride

who’s cruised since

and it’s been that

pants

This reporter joined the crowd on

30

I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


adventurer who’s cruised since the early days. “It’s a sacred thing.” The dichotomy between the adult riders and the high school crowd has recently led the ride to split in two. The younger group (organized through the Instagram page @2021_thursday_cruiser) tends to depart from the meetup of stops throughout the city for dance parties and various shenanigans. The adults (found online at @boulderbikenight) prefer to meander fog machines. This reporter opted to tag along with the latter crowd for a winding route through before ending up back near Pearl Street. Despite the decentralized nature of the guides bikers through a route of their own stays on the right side of the road and yells “Happy Thursday!” to layfolk. For more than a equipped with a toy lightsaber to direct the crowd. Though he doesn’t lead the ride every circus-type contraption out of his bicycle — many point to Gabriel as a primary reason the he didn’t join the ride to become its grand marBoulder Weekly.

and Gabriel is no exception. He’s connected and he hopes to go ride in other cities to see how they put their own spin on it all. Eventually Gabriel will abdicate the baton to the next HAPPY THURSDAY CRUISER RIDE

happens every week while the weather’s nice. Check out @boulderbikenight or @2021_thursday_

ing community on wheels every week.

fun.”

or the Happy Thursday Cruiser Ride Facebook the next ride.

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

31


SUSAN FRANCE

Top Nibbles

A veteran critic names his favorite Boulder food and dining attractions.

by John Lehndorff

I

SUSAN FRANCE

f you just moved here, we understand why. According to U.S. News & World Report, Boulder is the “No. 1 Best Place to Live in U.S.” for the second year in a row in 2021. What the endless lifestyle awards the city wins never quite capture is that Boulder is also one of the best places to eat and food shop in the country, as well as in Colorado. I’ve been writing about food in Boulder County since the late 1970s. The question I most often hear — be-

ABOVE: Christian Saber, owner of Rincon Argentina AT LEFT: A dry-aged tomahawk steak from Corrida

— is, “What are the best places to eat in My answer is always: “It depends.” It depends on what you like to eat, how much you like to spend and who you like to dine with. Here are a few of my favorite, non-chain Boulder eating destinations, the places I often suggest to visitors. These are strictly personal and by no means all the food attractions of the city, but it’s a good list to get you tasting.

Fine Dining:

Boulder boasts some extraordinary upscale eateries with great food and service.

Fourteenth, Corrida, SALT, River & Woods, Café Aion, or Mateo.

a reservation at Frasca Food and Wine, Flagstaff House, Black Cat Bistro, Blackbelly, Basta, OAK at

32

I

International Oases:

Perceived elsewhere as a bastion of blandness, Boulder is actually home to some diverse tastes. Grab a bite of soul and Puerto Rican fare at Rae and Kay’s Melting Pot, modern Israeli dishes at Ash’Kara, empanadas at Rincon Argentina, French bistro favorites at Le French Café, Turkish and Nepali eats at The Boco Restaurant, Greek at Kalita Café and Lebanese delights at Ali Baba Grill.

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

Asia’s Best: Boulder’s wealth of pan-Asian I

BOULDER WEEKLY


SUSAN FRANCE

eateries features Sherpa’s Restaurant (Nepali and Indian), Curry ‘N’ Kebob (Indian), Chez Thuy (Vietnamese) and Aloy Thai (Thai). Japanese and sushi spots include Amu, Tasuki, AOI, and Osaka’s, along with Formosa Bakery (Chinese) and Edward Zoe’s trio of eateries: Chimera Ramen, Pho Mi and Zoe Ma Ma.

Mexico and Beyond:

Yes, there’s a bevy of good Boulder burrito opportunities. To taste a wider range of Mexican and Central American fare, visit Tierra y Fuego, Mojo Taqueria, Centro Mexican Kitchen, La Choza, and try the chef-driven New Mexican cuisine at Hosea Rosenberg’s Santo.

The Dawn of Brunch: In the

1970s we believed that Boulder was the place where brunch originated. We may have been incorrect, but the city is still a great place for weekend or week day late-morning meals at Snooze, Tangerine, Parkway Cafe, Lucile’s Creole Café and the Walnut Cafe.

History and Culture:

To dine amid the city’s historic and cultural structures, grab a bite in the Boulderado Hotel, the gorgeous Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse, Roadhouse Boulder Depot (formerly Boulder’s train station), and enjoy brunch on the porch of the Chautauqua Dining Hall.

Naturally Plant-Based: In part,

the natural foods industry was born in the Boulder area. Besides the many natural foods markets and shops, diners looking for topnotch vegan, TOP: Thuy Le, owner of Chez Thuy MIDDLE: A healthy dish from Zeal BOTTOM: Fresh baked bread from Moxie Bread Co. INSET: Produce from Ollin Farms

BOULDER WEEKLY

The Bumbling Bee, Zeal, Organic Sandwich Co., and Fresh Thymes Eatery.

Art of the Loaf:

Boulder may be the place doughnut shops come to die, but we love real bread and have Moxie Bread Co. (on North Broadway), Kelly Whitaker’s Dry Storage, and Breadworks. While the city has other good bagel places, the best bagels in Boulder can be found at the new Rosenberg’s Bagels on the Hill.

I

Sweets for the Flaky: As a pie expert and bakery For places baking a wide range of goodies, look no further than Shamane’s Bakery, Spruce Confections and Lucky’s miss Kim and Jake’s Cakes. Find Mexican goodies at Panaderia Sabor a Mexico and buttery European classics at Le French Cafe. Try the New Zealand-style pies at Tip Top Savory Pies (in Gunbarrel).

Class Acts:

If you want to learn to cook, numerous Boulder classes are available. Home cooks — adults and kids — can learn about the world’s cuisines at the Food Lab. Professional chef training is provided Culinary Arts, The School of Natural Cookery, and the Vegan Fusion Culinary Academy.

Out on the Farm:

The Boulder Farmers Market on Saturdays and Wednesdays has a national reputation as being among the best in the country. Besides the market, many local farmers maintain farm stands in season around Boulder. Look for fresh crops and local foods at Munson Farms, Cure Organic Farm, Black Cat Farm, Growing Gardens, Sunbeam Farm, Naughty Goat Farm Stand, and other farm stands.

They Have the Meats:

I’ve listened to unschooled diners dismiss Boulder for 40 years as the “Tofu Town,” “Granolaville” and the “People’s Republic of Wheatgrass.” Local carnivores just chuckle and get out their steak knives at Blackbelly, Boulder Cork, Corrida and Steakhouse No. 316.

They Best of the Rest

: Pizzeria Locale and Barchetta (Neapolitan-style pizza), Audrey Jane’s Pizza Garage (American pizza), Jax Fish House (seafood), The Post Chicken & Beer (fried chicken), Glacier Ice Cream (ice cream), Trident Cafe (coffee culture), Ozo Coffee (coffee), Local Table Tours (culinary adventure), Flatirons Food Film Festival (culinary cinema), Cure (charcuterie and cheese), the Peppercorn (gourmet goods and cookbooks), Avanti and Rosetta Hall (food halls), and Piece, Love & Chocolate, Fortuna Chocolate, Moksha Chocolate (chocolate), Bookcliff Vineyards (winery), and Redstone Meadery (mead). John Lehndorff is Boulder Weekly’s food editor. He writes the Nibbles column. He is the former food editor of the Daily Camera and dining critic of the Rocky Mountain News. He hosts Radio Nibbles on KGNU (KGNU.org). Comments and questions: Nibbles@BoulderWeekly.com

BOULDER INSIDER 2021

I

33


Day trip delights

INFO. For more information about indigenous names and the ancestral homeland regions of tribes indigenous to Boulder Valley, see the Center for the Study of Indigenous Languages of the West, Arapaho Language Archive, Place Names, from CU Boulder. (colorado.edu/ center/csilw/languagearchives/arapaho-wordlists/place-names)

Discover off-the-beaten-path adventures close to home.

Story and photos by Griffin Paul

C

olorado’s Front Range earns worldwide attention with its outdoor adventure focal points (think the Flatirons, Rocky Mountain National Park, Brainard Lake, and more) and for good reason. Photos of these places can inspire vacations and draw hefty crowds. We’re here to remind you that for every sought-after summit and vista, there are at least three you can have all to yourself. Next time you’re looking for a Boulder-area (Héétoh-bíí3oonóó’, Arapaho name) day trip, here are a few ideas to try in places you may not have visited... yet.

Food: Colorado Cherry Pie Company

Lyons, CO

Mix and match activities for a full-day adventure. Drive Time: 25 min Activity: Creek hangs in the summer, Hall Ranch/Heil Valley Ranch Open Space, hiking, rock climbing, mountain Food: Mojo Taqueria, Lyons Classic Pinball, Stone Cup, Oskar Blues, Spirit Hound Distillers north from Boulder leads to the small but vibrant town of Lyons. Nestled up against the foothills at South Saint Vrain creeks, this little pocket of Front Range goodness has much to offer. Multiple creekside parks offer accessible and refreshing relief from summertime heat. Venture up Highway 7 to more than a day’s worth of rock Saint Vrain drainage. Just outside of town, miles of trails for mountain biking and hiking await in the Hall Ranch and Heil Valley Ranch open spaces (Arapaho, Cheyenne and Ute ancestral homelands). For bikers looking to catch a little air time, Lyons boasts its very own dirt jump track at Bohn Park. Visit in the wintertime for an evening of ice skating at LaVern Johnson Park or stop by Lyons Classic Pinball for some arcade fun on the way to or from any of these options. No adventure is complete without a taste of local food and drink. We recommend The Stone Cup, Mojo Taqueria, Oskar Blues Brew & Grill, and Spirit Hound Distillers to satisfy all your cravings.

Pinewood Springs, CO

Skip the hustle and bustle in Estes Park at only half the drive. Drive Time: 40 min 36

Activity: Lion Gulch Trailhead and Coulson Gulch Trailhead, Button Rock Mountain Loop (Longs Peak/Meeker and Ralph Price Reservoir views), dog friendly, horse-

I

Ever heard of Pinewood Springs, Colorado? Didn’t think so. You pass right through on the way to Rocky Mountain National Park from Boulder. Blink at the wrong time and you’ll miss it. We like it that way, so why not avoid the summertime Estes Park tourist trap (and cut your drive time in half) to have just as much fun? Right and horseback riding trails. Enjoy glimpses of resident creeks on either of the out-andback style trails offered at the Lion Gulch and Coulson Gulch Trailheads. If you’re a summit seeker, try the Button Rock Mountain Loop for a spectacular panoramic view of Longs Peak (Neniis-otoyou’u, Arapaho name) and Ralph Price Reservoir. Finished hiking? Well, any trip through Pinewood Springs isn’t complete without a visit to the Colorado Cherry Pie Company. This is a year-round ritual for us, and we strongly suggest you subscribe. Seasonal freshbaked pie offerings paired with a scoop of ice cream? Yes please. Milkshakes, malts and coffee delights? Yep. No sweets? Try a savory bison pot pie or the soup of the day.

Rollins Pass, CO

Alpine access and views on your terms. Drive Time: 60 min skiing, 4X4 driving Food: Khathmandu and New Moon Bakery in Nederland, Stage Stop Pub in Rollinsville Extra Credit: Ride the Carousel of Happiness The high peaks of the Continental Divide offer yearround fun, from winter time snowy adventures to summer BOULDER INSIDER 2021

time peaks and trails. Try the Rollins Pass area (Houusoo-no’ tih’ii-ceneni-i’, Arapaho name) for endless 4x4 off-road trail offerings, as well as a classic mountain bike outing up to the pass for a view down into the options for snowshoeing/skiing in the winter months. On the way home, check out the Stage Stop Pub in Rollinsville for a hangout spot with hard-to-beat views of the Continental Divide. Or, venture back to Nederland to try Kathmandu Restaurant for delicious Himalayan cuisine. Also, New Moon Bakery has a host of tasty breakfast and lunchtime offerings. Sample the carrot cake and you won’t be disappointed. Finally, for extra credit to an already epic outing, stop in for a smile and a ride on the Carousel of Happiness in Nederland, a joyful place with a remarkable story.

Buchanan Pass, CO

Enjoy an ‘in-between’ part of the Front Range. Drive Time: 50 min Activity: Start from Beaver Reservoir or Camp Dick, Buchanan Pass, Sawtooth Mountain, Red Deer Lake, Hiking, Biking, 4x4 driving Food: Jamestown Mercantile One of the ‘in between’ and less visited zones of the high peaks along the Continental Divide is the Buchanan Pass area (Arapaho, Cheyenne and Ute ancestral homelands). If you’re up for a long hike, mountain bike ride or exciting 4x4 adventure, take note. Starting at either Beaver Reservoir or Camp Dick off the Peak-to-Peak swim in beautiful Red Deer Lake, enjoying a multitude of keep your distance, as moose can be dangerous and unpredictable). The ambitious hiker has the opportunity to crest Buchanan Pass, or even soak in views of Rocky Mountain National Park to the north and the Indian Peaks Wilderness to the south from the remote summit of Sawtooth Mountain (Nii’eihii-nohuux, Arapaho name). On the way back home, try visiting the Jamestown Mercantile in the foothills above Boulder for a bite and brew. Check out the Merc’s calendar for weekly summertime outdoor music offerings and enjoy the Colorado sunshine.

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


Profile for Boulder Weekly

Insider Boulder 2021  

Insider Boulder 2021  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded