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Boulder County ’s Tr ue Independent Voice / FREE / www.boulderweekly.com / September 13-19, 2 0 1 8


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contents NEWS:

Learning to talk about suicide by Angela K. Evans

I’m Retiring Soon

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Dinner theater company celebrates 30 years in Gold Hill by Josh Schlossberg

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....................................................................... ARTS & CULTURE:

Siobhan O’Loughlin and the healing power of ‘Broken Bone Bathtub’ by Caitlin Rockett

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....................................................................... NIBBLES:

At harvest time, a Longmont farmer/ chef bottles ‘alive’ pepper sauces by John Lehndorff

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....................................................................... COMMUNITY TABLE:

Emily Morris of Roam Cone on using ice cream from New Zealand to tackle larger pursuits by Matt Cortina

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departments 7 THE HIGHROAD: How many tweety birds does it take to tweet the truth? 8 DANISH PLAN: Straight out of CU (and Louisville): A battery that could change the world 8 GUEST COLUMN: I fought for our country. Now NFL players are kneeling for me. 9 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 17 NEWS BRIEFS: Short news for short attention spans 31 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 40 WORDS: ‘A Body Built of Folk and Lore’ by Kayla Archibald-Hall 41 FILM: ‘John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection’ 43 THE TASTING MENU: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County 51 DRINK: Tour de brew: Backcountry Pizza & Tap House 55 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 57 SAVAGE LOVE: Lonely gay men 59 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Baby boomers smoking more 61 CANNABIS CORNER: Marijuana heats up Texas Senate race Boulder Weekly

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staff

commentary

Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Mariah Taylor, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Office Administrator, Leslie Yakubowski Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 18-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo

September 13, 2018 Volume XXVI, Number 5 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2018 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www. boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

Boulder Weekly

the

Highroad How many tweety birds does it take to tweet the truth? by Jim Hightower

I

n CorporateWorld, when trouble pops up and things get sticky, CEOs don’t wring their hands and try to dodge the issue. No-sir-ee, the chief gets paid the big bucks to step forward confidently and seize control... by ringing up the company’s PR consultants and having them try to dodge the issue. Jeff Bezos, Amazon Inc.’s boss, is an expert at this. The uber-rich online marketing colossus has been hit with a long string of exposés about the corporation’s nasty practices. From profiteering as a fla-

grant tax dodger and predatory killer of independent, local businesses to running a massive network of publicly subsidized warehouses with sweatshop labor, Amazon’s carefullycrafted image as a “cool” company is, well, getting fried in negative headlines and online chatter. Thus, Bezos (known for thinking outside the cage), has hired a flock of tweety birds to counter the negativity. They are former warehouse workers who now tweet full-time about how absolutely wonderful those warehouse jobs are. The tweeters tell us that air circulation in the warehouses is “very good;” in a 10-hour shift, they assure

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

us, lucky workers get not one, but two 30-minute breaks; and they’re even allowed bathroom breaks (within reason, of course). Bezos has given his Twitter testifiers the title of Amazon “ambassadors,” and each of their Twitter accounts is branded to look alike, topped with the corporation’s happy smile logo. It’s claimed that the tweeters are not scripted or told what to write — but you can bet every tweet is monitored by corporate supervisors. And note that Amazon won’t let reporters interview any of them. As Sen. Bernie Sanders said of this PR gimmick: “If Amazon actually paid all its workers a living wage and treated them with dignity, they would not have to pay dozens of people to tweet all day.” This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. September 13 , 2018 7


danish plan Straight out of CU (and Louisville): A battery that could change the world by Paul Danish

T

his could be huge. Really huge. Let’s hope it is. There’s a startup company in Louisville that started registering on the radar this week. Its name is Solid Power and its game is batteries. Rechargable solid state batteries. A couple days ago, Solid Power announced that it had closed a $20 million Series A investment round. The investors included Hyundai, Samsumg, chemical producer Solvay, Chinese battery producer A123 Systems, and Japan-based Sanoh Industrial Co. A123 Systems made an earlier investment in Solid Power, as did BMW. A solid state battery may not sound like the most exciting product in the world, but in this case it is. That’s because one of the biggest barriers to switching from a civilization powered by oil, coal and natural gas to one powered by electricity is inadequate batteries — and because Solid Power’s batteries hold two to three times as much energy as the best lithium-ion batteries. The latter represent state-of-the-art among commercially available rechargeable batteries. For example, auto companies currently struggle to produce electric cars that get 200 to 250 miles to a charge, and computer makers have a hard time producing portables with enough power to last through a workday. Solid Power’s batteries could make it possible for an electric car to run for more than 700 miles on a single charge and for computers to be used for two or three days without recharging. Similar transformative changes can occur in any product that uses battery power, from power tools to drones to grid-scale battery farms that store solar and wind generated power for use when the sun doesn’t shine and the wind doesn’t blow. And greater energy storage isn’t the only benefit solid state batteries offer. Solid Power’s press release announcing the $20 million investment listed four major advantages its technology has over lithium-ion batteries: 1) Two-to-three times higher ener8 September 13 , 2018

gy density than current lithium-ion batteries. 2) Substantially improved safety due to the elimination of the volatile, flammable and corrosive liquid electrolyte used in lithium-ion batteries. 3) Lower-cost battery-pack designs made possible by the elimination of pack cooling required by lithium-ion battery packs used in cars. 4) “High manufacturability” due to compatibility with automated, industry-standard, roll-to-roll production systems. The last means Solid Power’s batteries could be made with existing lithium-ion battery production technologies, which the company sees as giving it a major edge over other companies pursuing solid-state battery technologies. Solid Power will use the $20 million it raised to scale-up production via a roll-to-roll system, which will be fully constructed and installed by the end of 2018 and fully operational in 2019. The facility will have the capacity to produce about 10 megawatt-hours of batteries per year, according to Industry Week, a trade publication. That’s enough for potential customers to validate the company’s technology, according to Solid’s co-founder and CEO Doug Campbell. Solid Power was founded in 2012 to commercialize technology developed at CU-Boulder by mechanical engineering professors Conrad Stoldt and Sehee Lee. Campbell said his company is “at the center of the ‘electrification of everything’ with ASSB (all solid state battery) technology emerging as the clear leader in ‘post lithium-ion technologies.’ “Solid-state batteries are a game changer for EV (electric vehicle), electronics, defense and medical device markets, and Solid Power’s technology is poised to revolutionize the industry with a competitive product paying special attention to safety, performance and cost,” he added. So what could possibly go wrong? All sorts of stuff, of course. Scaling see DANISH PLAN Page 10

guest column I fought for our country. Now NFL players are kneeling for me. 
 by Samuel Innocent



I

’m a veteran of the U.S. Army. So it may come as a surprise that the day I read about NFL players kneeling during the national anthem, I could not have been prouder. I was proud because after serving my country for seven years, it felt like someone was finally looking out for me. As someone who served as a sergeant in Afghanistan, only to take a civilian job helping veterans upon returning home, I fully understand patriotism. I work hard to embody it every day. That’s precisely why I think it’s so important to stop mischaracterizing Colin Kaepernick’s movement as unpatriotic. Players are not kneeling to protest the national anthem, as they’ve explained time and time again. They are kneeling to say that the ways in which police officers and the criminal justice system treat African-Americans — people like me and my family — constitute a national crisis. I’m grateful for the players’ decision to take a knee. Because when many people set eyes on me, the first thing they see isn’t someone who may have missed his sister’s wedding, lost his father and buried several friends during his tour of duty. They don’t see a former combat medic who’d risked his life for their country or a man whose seven years of honorable service didn’t include a moment to grieve. Instead of a veteran, they see a black man first and foremost. And in 2014, police saw a potential criminal. The awakening came only a few

years after leaving the Army and returning home to my beloved New York. I’d enrolled in college, one of the major steps for reintegrating back into society after service. My new dream was to work on local policy. I commuted daily from the Bronx to Manhattan to attend my classes at City College of New York. One night, during the two-block stroll from the subway to my apartment, New York Police Department officers stopped me in my path. I fit the description of someone who’d just committed a crime, they said. “What was the crime?” I asked. They said they couldn’t tell me. When I asked if the description was for someone who looked like me — someone wearing a shirt and tie — they said I would have to call the station to find out. I was then put against a wall and searched. I felt humiliated and helpless. It was only when they asked for my ID that they saw my veteran status at the top of it. Finally, the degrading and unwarranted search came to an end. They told me to have a nice day. A part of me wanted to dismiss what had just happened to me as an isolated incident. But I knew that this practice disproportionally occurred in poorer neighborhoods and overwhelmingly targeted young black men.
A report by the New York Civil Liberties Union showed that innocent New Yorkers were subjected to stop-and-frisk tactics more than 5 see GUEST COLUMN Page 10

Boulder Weekly


letters Science alone can’t solve climate change

Flood anniversary is cause for pause

My career as a scientist has consistently reaffirmed that there’s often no free lunch: as you solve one problem, you often create another. For example, medicines have a lot of side effects, which are sometimes worse than the ailment they are intended to treat. Another prominent example that I am concerned a lot about is climate change. The industrial and technological revolutions improved many aspects of life, but the increased carbon emissions that enabled such changes is an unintended consequence. Tim Radford’s article “Geoengineered crops may help — and harm” (Re: Boulderganic, Aug. 23, 2018) points out the interesting suggestion that we might be able to mimic the effect of volcanic eruptions by spewing aerosols into the atmosphere, creating a synthetic “sunscreen” that will cool the planet. He discusses research that looked at crop yields after major volcanic eruptions and found that while plants do better with cooler temperatures, they do worse because of the reduced amount of sunlight. We are at a crucial point where something definitely needs to be done about climate change, which is not just a scientific issue but also an economic issue, since so many large companies are also large polluters. By themselves, scientists often don’t have enough power or influence on a macroeconomic scale, so I think it’s imperative that the government step in and do something. And in that case, why not do something as minimal as possible, such as a tax on carbon? For example, the carbon fee and dividend (CF&D) proposed by Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) would put a fee on carbon at the source, and then distribute all of the proceeds back to households. The fee envisioned by CCL is progressive, and it doesn’t significantly increase the size of government, meaning it’s agreeable to both political parties. Consumers will be encouraged to make more sustainable choices, as the cost of certain goods and fuels will increase, and companies that have a large carbon footprint will be encouraged to reduce their emissions to stay profitable. Numerous studies, such as those from REMI and Columbia University, have shown that carbon taxes will lead to increased GDP and reduce emissions substantially over the next few decades. You don’t need to be a scientist to help solve climate change. A simple phone call or email to your elected officials that you care about climate change can make a huge difference! Steven Moses/Broomfield

Sept.12 marked the five-year anniversary of the 2013 flood and the resulting devastation to people and property in developed areas of its path. Open spaces and agriculture areas were much less affected much than the homes and businesses. Those impacts are immeasurable. Recovery on Longmont’s infrastructure continues with costs exceeding $150 million.

Boulder Weekly

FREE

Another $60 million is needed to complete projects west of Sunset Street. City staff and contractors have worked hard to restore our St. Vrain Greenway and try to improve the channel to protect people, property and infrastructure from future flooding. But is this possible? According to the Army Corps of Engineers, there have been 11 floods in Longmont’s reach of the St. Vrain corridor in the last 142 years. Experts on

climate change, and common sense, tell us we can expect more frequent damaging flood events in the future. Perhaps rivers are perfectly predictable but only on time scales that are a little beyond the grasp of most planners and developers. River valleys tell us clearly where the river was in the past and where it will go in the future, but some people don’t like the message. see LETTERS Page 11

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GUEST COLUMN from Page 8

million times since 2002, with people of color comprising the vast majority. These racially discriminatory NYPD stops were ruled unconstitutional in 2013, but this year officials revealed that black New Yorkers were still eight times more likely than white residents to be arrested for low-level marijuana charges, despite the groups using it at similar rates. Tragically, racially biased policing isn’t contained to my hometown and leads to deadly consequences across America. Last year, a journalistic investigation found that black people were shot more often than white people by police, although black people were less likely to be found with a weapon. When I left to join the military, it wasn’t for me — it was for my family and loved ones who I would leave behind. I felt like I was doing my part, so they wouldn’t have to live in fear of events like 9/11 happening again. But my service in Afghanistan hasn’t made my family safer from the people sworn to protect us in our own backyards. So yes, I was proud of players like Colin Kaepernick, Eric Reid and Olivier Vernon because I knew how few people would be willing to risk their careers to shed light on issues that are urgent for people of color but that oth-

ers often sweep under the rug. I’m proud that when Americans tune in to be entertained, the players in turn make the world more cognizant of the need to change how law enforcement operates. The players are not disrespecting veterans by kneeling. My local Veterans Affairs hospital in Brooklyn has slowly shut down parts of the facility and forced veterans to seek care elsewhere. This truly is disrespectful and not the promise that this nation made to its service members. Disrespect is the struggle that veteran charities face when trying to raise money. If you feel that forcing America to grapple with its continued systematic oppression of racial minorities is disrespectful, take a deeper look at why it bothers you. I pray that one day my fellow countrymen will see me for who I am: a veteran and a black man who wants to be treated the same as everyone else — whether I’m in uniform or not. I fought for our nation abroad, and now the players fight for my inclusion at home. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Samuel Innocent is a former Army combat medic who served in Afghanistan and a Pat Tillman Foundation scholar

DANISH PLAN from Page 8

up manufacturing is easier said than done, as Elon Musk will tell you after spending a year in “manufacturing hell” as Tesla struggled to reach a production rate of 5,000 units per week for its Model 3 sedan. And for a cautionary tale closer to home, there’s the case of Abound Solar, a company that spent 16 years developing a highly automated process for making cadmium telluride solar cells by applying a micron-thin layer of cadmium and telluride to glass. With Abound’s process, every 30 seconds a 2-by-4–foot glass panel would enter the production line, and two hours later would emerge as part of a solar module. When everything was working properly, that is. Unfortunately, things didn’t always work properly. Abound ended up filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, despite having access to a $400 million loan guarantee that it had been awarded by the Obama administration, and leaving behind a cadmium contaminated production facility in Weld County that would require a multi-million clean-up. In order to compete successfully with lithium-ion battery makers and

with other companies racing to produce solid state batteries, Solid Power will have to do more than produce a product with two or three times the energy density of lithium-ion technology. Energy density is a measure of how many watts of electricity can be held by a given mass of a battery. Solid Power will also have to produce a product with a competitive power density, which is a measure of how fast electricity can be discharged from the battery when it’s needed. It will also need to produce a battery that, among other things, can hold its charge in below zero and above 120 degree temperatures, can be charged and discharged hundreds if not thousands of times without degrading, and will last for the life of a car — say 10 years. That’s a hell of a challenge. But the fact that several major companies are willing to put a little skin in the game is a good sign. Wish it well. If Solid Power is able to pull it off, it will change the world. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


letters LETTERS from Page 9

Much as we might like to, we can’t mitigate Mother Nature. Longmont Planning Department has a “Blueprint for Development” begun prior to the 2013 flood with designs for very extensive development along this corridor. There are 800-plus acres of private-owned property that were previously in the flood plain and, therefore, undevelopable. Now, due to massive publicly funded mitigation efforts with new parameters of the flood plain, these properties are developable and their value has skyrocketed. Their owners are anxious to start developing and making money. But does more development along our St. Vrain even make sense? Perhaps, but only if considerably set back from the banks of the creek. This not only protects people and property, but also the riparian health of the creek. Eightyninety percent of all wildlife is dependent on riparian habitat for survival. The 2013 flood was a wake up call. Five years later, it appears we may go back to sleep unless we limit future new or re-development along this corridor. It’s the responsible thing to do logically, morally, environmentally and fiscally. Shari Malloy/Longmont

Keep fracking away from homes and schools I was eager to sign the petition to get Safer Setbacks for Oil and Gas (#112) on the ballot, and I am overjoyed that we will get to vote on this in November. Fracking is an inherently dangerous industrial process that does not belong near our neighborhoods. When you combine fracking’s intrinsic danger with the fact that much of the oil/gas product is exported, that the industry costs taxpayers more than it gives, and that Colorado does not need to rely on this form of energy, you have to wonder why we would ever submit to living in such close proximity to oil and gas development. Since the explosion of a home in Firestone last year, Colorado has experienced at least 14 fires and explosions at oil and gas sites, some resulting in death or serious injury. More than 247,000 Coloradans live within half a mile of a well, and more than 140 schools are situated within half a mile, which is closer than the average evacuation distance in case of a blowout. Please join me in voting yes on Safer Setbacks for health and safety over fracking. Thank you for caring more for the health and wellbeing of our citizens than the profit/bottom line of the oil and gas companies. Jacqueline Wurn/Boulder Boulder Weekly

Gardner should take the lead on climate I am writing to second Randy Compton’s Aug. 23 call to pressure Sen. Gardner to support a national price on carbon (Re: “Solutions for climate change,” Letters). Indeed, this is a priority that could both sit well alongside other legislative efforts of our senator, and elevate him to a leadership role on an issue that his Republican colleagues are beginning to get on board with. Last month, Sen. Gardner urged senate leadership to reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) in the face of its impending Sept. 30 expiration. The LWCF, established in 1964, is a program that serves to protect some of America’s most precious natural areas, and to promote outdoor recreation. Sen. Gardner should be applauded for his support of it. As Sen. Gardner has demonstrated his support for America’s natural treasures, he should be aware that support for the LWCF will not be enough. Carbon emissions that the LWCF is incapable of addressing threaten our entire planet’s wealth of natural beauty. But, understandably, many Republicans do not favor overly constricting government regulations placed on the businesses responsible for supplying our society’s indispensable energy. There is, however, a way out. A carbon tax — a simple price put on the extraction of carbon-emitting fossil fuels from the Earth — puts the market, not big government, on the front line in the battle against climate change. Think Republicans won’t hear of it? In July, Reps. Carlos Curbelo (R-Florida) and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-Pennsylvania) proposed a price on carbon. And the turn of conservative attention to climate change is here to stay. As Mr. Compton points out in his letter, 68 percent of Americans support a revenue-neutral price on carbon. And with wildfires and hurricanes wreaking worse damage on our livelihoods and our economy by the year, the underlying issue isn’t going away either. I sincerely believe that, in ten years’ time, there will be herds of Republican senators and congressmen supporting fiscally responsible approaches to damping emissions rates. But the ones that will stand head and shoulders above their colleagues, in my eyes, will be the ones like Carlos Curbelo and Brian Fitzpatrick that take the lead, when there is not yet a political necessity for doing so. I would love for the Republican senator from my state to be counted among those ranks. Daniel Palken/Boulder

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September 13 , 2018 11


Opening up Learning to talk about suicide

by Angela K. Evans 12 September 13, 2018

T

he thing that I was really amazed by is that nobody ever asked me, ‘Why did you kill yourself?’” Dave tells me as we talk about his attempted suicide that left him dead for somewhere between 10 and 13 minutes in 1994. “Nobody really asked me.” So I ask him. “It was like, this is the last thing I’m taking in this world, I’ve had enough. I’d already lived with too much pain,” he says. “I just said no more. I said this is it, I’ve already had enough insults, I don’t like this, I hurt too much, I’ve hurt too long. And it’s not being attended to.” Everything that had been building all year — his entire life, really — suddenly broke loose, he says. Since then, as Dave has learned to rebuild his life, he’s also learned to not only talk about his experience but ask others about theirs. “Let them have a good chance to speak honestly and openly about what brought that on,” he says. “People want to talk about it, they really do. It’s no big secret to them, trust me.” Boulder Weekly


It’s advice I hear over and over throughout the course of researching efforts to prevent suicide: We have to learn to talk about it. One of the largest barriers to reducing suicide risk is the social and cultural stigma surrounding the topic. Any one person’s suicide can be caused by a complex variety of circumstances and no two situations are the same. Likewise, no one solution fits all to prevent it. Training health and other community professionals — from teachers, to law enforcement, lawyers and judges — in recognizing the warning signs is key in national efforts to reduce suicide risk, as is the availability, accessibility and affordability of mental health care. Still, a large part of prevention efforts, according to the experts, centers around destigmatizing suicide and mental health issues, and a large part of the destigmatizing process is learning to talk about it, whether that’s in the classroom, at home or in public. Unfortunately, the topic tends to make us uncomfortable. As a culture we are hesitant to broach the subject, to leave space for people to share their experience, whether they’ve lost someone they love to suicide or have grappled with their own thoughts. As is the case with most stereotypes, the stigma surrounding mental health and suicide starts to break down when we are personally confronted by someone who has experienced it and/or been affected by it. Most of the people I talked to about their work to prevent suicide have some sort of personal connection to the topic, and each person willingly and thoughtfully shared with me their stories of loss, grief and, ultimately, hope. In truth, I didn’t return the favor. As I interviewed them, one by one, I was constantly reminded of my own experience and the need to be more honest about it. Someone very close to me has struggled with suicidality for the last two decades, and I thought about her a lot while working on this story. I remember that winter day, driving my normal route, when the phone rang, an unidentified number showing up on the screen. I remember hearing I should probably call the hospital to find out if she was still alive. I remember agonizing over why I hadn’t asked more pointedly how she was doing the last time we talked, less than 48 hours earlier. It’s only been since this most recent attempt that we really starting talking about it, both with each other and other people. It’s becoming a more regular topic of our conversations, whether prompted by a high-profile suicide in the news or simply because it’s time to check in again, ask how she’s doing, Boulder Weekly

what she’s thinking about. It’s rarely an easy conversation, but it is a necessary one. I find the subject of suicide to be an uncomfortable conversation to have with other people as well. When the topic is mentioned casually in conversation — usually in reference to news headlines — I often sit quietly and let it pass. Many times in those moments I would rather not share my own experiences, afraid not of judgment necessarily, but rather of exposing my own raw emotion. Still, more and more frequently I feel compelled to tell my story, at least in part, in the hopes that perspectives can change, that people unexposed to the realities of suicide and mental illness will see things a little differently than before, that suicide can be destigmatized. When people interject, which they almost always do, with common misperceptions and/or platitudes about suicide, I often have to steer the conversation away from myself and switch into explanatory mode. In the United States, almost 45,000 people died by suicide in 2016, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), tenth on the list of leading causes of death after illnesses like heart disease, cancer, influenza and pneumonia, as well as accidents. At the same time, 9.3 million adults have had suicidal thoughts, 2.7 million have made a plan to attempt suicide and 1.3 million adults have attempted suicide. That’s roughly 25 attempts for every completed suicide. It’s a pandemic that’s getting worse. Between 1999 and 2016, almost every state saw a 30 percent or more increase. Colorado increased by 34 percent and ranked ninth in the nation for highest suicide rates. In 2016, the state saw its highest number of suicides to date, 1,156, according to the Office of Suicide Prevention’s annual report. It was the seventh leading cause of death for Coloradans that year and the leading cause of death for people ages 10-24. “If you knew there was a bomb going off somewhere in the country every 12 minutes, which is the suicide rate, maybe you couldn’t diffuse them all, but you would certainly try to detect the patterns and try to reach as many as you could before they exploded,” says Andrew Romanoff, president and CEO of Mental Health Colorado, a statewide advocacy organization. “We need to treat this like the crisis it is.” Romanoff’s cousin died by suicide in the backyard of his house while the rest of the family were inside celebrating New Year’s Day 2015. In her note,

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SUICIDE from Page 13

Romanoff says, she told the family that she loved them and there was nothing they could have done. “And then she said, ‘Please tell everybody it was a car accident,’” he says. “My guess is that even in her death, she wanted to preserve her reputation. She didn’t want to be known as someone who was suicidal or depressed or mentally ill so she came up with this cover story, which we couldn’t figure out a way to honor.” For Romanoff, it’s further proof of the stigma that surrounds mental health and suicide. “We tell people with mental illness to snap out of it, which is something we would never say to someone with cancer,” he continues. “It’s not a character flaw or a figment of [their] imagination. ... It’s an illness, and it’s treatable. Science has increasingly shown that on a neurological, physiological or biochemical basis, but even that we distinguish mental illness from physical illness perpetuates the stigma. It’s a false distinction.” Mental illness and suicide are often seen as “no casserole” situations, says Susan Marine, who lost both of her children to suicide four years apart. She now works with the Suicide Prevention Coalition of Colorado and is a member of the Suicide Prevention Commission under the Department of Health and

Human Services. “If your circle of friends know that your child had their appendix out, your friends are going to bring you casseroles. If they find out your child is seriously depressed they most likely won’t. I still think we have a lot of work to do to get to that point.” Although often correlated, suicidality is not relegated only to the realm of mental illness. More than half of the people who died by suicide in 2016 did not have a known mental health condition, according to the CDC. “Anybody can have suicidal thoughts and it could happen because they are experiencing an intense emotion or moment in their life that they are overwhelmed by and it seems like a solution and they don’t have a mental health diagnosis,” says Natalie Trombley a licensed clinical social worker with Mental Health Partners (MHP) working in Boulder and Broomfield counties. “I think that happens far more frequently than anyone is aware of or at least talks about.” In 2016, 3 percent of deaths in Boulder County were by suicide and in the 10-year span between 2006 and 2016, 683 people completed suicide. This number is the focus of MHP’s new suicide prevention campaign called Be 1 of 4,098, which aims to train 4,098 people in suicide prevention between now and December 2019. Boulder Weekly


“What we’re trying to do is train as many people as possible that can offer hope through positive action, such as how to approach or talk to a person who is potentially suicidal,” Trombley says. “We have to extend the conversation outside of the field of mental health, to make more people comfortable [with] talking about such a tough topic.” She likens it to the topic of sexual abuse, a once taboo topic that when undiscussed is often not dealt with. “Then, once that stopped and people starting talking about it, the incidence of sexual abuse declined quite a bit... because people were thinking about it, looking for it, talking about it,” Trombley says. “And this topic is no different.” She says most people are afraid to broach the subject with people potentially thinking about suicide out of fear — fear of what they may hear or their own inability to help or even that they’ll trigger the act simply by asking about it. “What actually happens is they are likely to feel some relief that you are willing to talk about it and, in turn, the conversation offers the potential for a positive outcome,” she says. “All the studies say that if somebody is going to complete suicide they’ve already thought about it, so you addressing it with them is not going to push them in that direction. It actually has the opposite effect, it actually helps them, it makes them feel heard, and you can try to get them care,” says Kristina Shaw, marketing director with MHP. “Mental health issues aren’t just mental illness.” More than 80 percent of people experience some sort of mental health issue during their lives, she says. It can take many forms and be something as common as stress. This is where education is key, prevention experts say, and it’s where most prevention training focuses. By teaching everyone from kids to adults to not only recognize common warning signs of suicide, but also to become comfortable asking friends, family members and coworkers about it, everyone can help break down the stigma that surrounds suicide, removing the cloud of shame that often hovers around it. “Our mission is to educate so that the kids see that it’s OK to talk about it, that it’s OK to get help,” says Kathy Valentine from Colie’s Closet, a peerto-peer training program that first started as a fundraising effort by a Fairview High student in response to the suicide of a family member. “Many times there’ll be kids talking about Boulder Weekly

themselves or talking about their friends.” Over the last three years, peer volunteers with Colie’s Closet have spoken to 9,000 kids throughout Boulder Valley School District about depression and suicide awareness, how to spot warning signs and what to do if a student or one of their friends is feeling this way. The hope is that by normalizing the conversation around suicide and mental health, suicide itself won’t become so common. And the only way to normalize the conversation is to continue having it. “We don’t have an easy way to talk in our culture about illness or pain or that life is hard sometimes. We have this sort of cheerful, optimistic, pullyourself-up-by-your-bootstraps expectation that everything can be solved,” says Joy Redstone, a social worker and addictions counselor at Naropa who lost her husband four years ago to suicide. “And sometimes people’s pain doesn’t need to be solved, it just needs to be heard or witnessed or shared with someone else.” The choice to listen, and not necessarily respond, can be scary. In my case, it comes with the uncertainty that one of the people closest to me may try again and we might not be so lucky next time. It can be painful to hear her say she’s having a hard day, or she’s overwhelmed, or even that she wishes she had been successful. As much as I want to say, “Please don’t do that to us,” I know that’s not helpful. That sort of sentiment does nothing to break down the shame and stigma around suicide. All it does is refocus the conversation around me instead of giving her the space to say whatever she needs to say, to let her be heard. Instead, I’m learning to listen, empathizing with her, recognizing that her experience in this world, living every day with mental illness, is something I may never fully understand. But I’m trying. I’m listening. “It matters that somebody gives a shit,” Dave tells me at the end of our conversation.”It really does matter that somebody actually cares.” If you or someone you know is in crisis please call the state hotline at 1-844-493TALK or 8255. For a free mental health screening visit mentalhealthcolorado.org. For more information about the variety of suicide prevention efforts, including trainings and support groups for survivors, going on around Boulder County visit hopecoalitionboulder.org.

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Boulder Weekly


news briefs Charles Philips/Wikimedia Commons

Hurricane Florence raises questions about your tax dollars at work

A

NASA study confirmed in January of this year that the increase in global methane in the atmosphere is largely attributable to oil and gas production and coincides with the onset of the boom in horizontally drilling and fracking in U.S. shale formations. Because methane is 82 times as potent a greenhouse gas as carbon dioxide, it is now understood within the scientific community that natural gas production is a major contributor to climate change and may, in fact, be more detrimental to hastening the Earth’s warming than burning coal to generate electricity. Global warming is one of the factors scientists claim is impacting the increasing occurrence of super storms such as Hurricane Florence, which is already generating 83-foot waves at sea and is expected to decimate the Carolinas this weekend. Despite this globally accepted scientific understanding, the Trump administration, via the EPA, announced on Tuesday, Sept. 11, that it intends to roll back the oil and gas industry methane rules, which were put in place to slow the release of the climate-altering gas. The only known explanation for the proposed rollback is that it would further increase profits for the oil and gas industry. In other super storm news, it was also discovered this week that in June — at the beginning of this year’s hurricane season — the Trump administration diverted nearly $10 million from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), including funding for disaster relief and preparation, to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The FEMA money is now being used by DHS to build more immigrant holding facilities so more families can be locked up.

Boulder Weekly

ACLU report shows Colorado imprisonment rates, spending on the rise

L

Public Domain ast week, the ACLU of Colorado released a blueprint for how the state can cut incarceration in half and save more than $675 million by 2025. The blueprint calls for pursuing reforms to Colorado’s drug policy, prosecution of that policy and sentencing laws. The ACLU’s blueprint (“The Blueprint for Smart Justice”) identified racial disparities in the state’s prison population. Colorado ranks ninth in the country for the rate of black people who are imprisoned, and fourth in the country for imprisoned Latinx people. Underscoring the report’s focus on changing drug policy, the ACLU found that the top offense for prison admissions in 2016 was drug possession, which accounted for one in every seven admissions to prison. “The war on drugs continues to play an outsized role in fueling Colorado’s prison population and, in turn, its prison budget,” said Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition Executive Director Christie Donner in a press release. “No one thinks the status quo is stemming the flow of either illegal drugs or drug addiction, and yet it persists and is getting worse, particularly for women.” In a one-year period from 2015 to 2016, Colorado saw a 17 percent increase in the number of individuals sentenced for drug possession, which included a 24 percent increase among women, the report found. An increase in incarceration rates also means an increase in spending for the state. There was a 579 percent increase in general fund spending in Colorado on corrections between 1985 and 2016, the ACLU found. “Colorado imprisons far too many people for far too long at a cost to taxpayers of nearly a billion dollars a year. It is a moral and fiscal crisis in our state,” said ACLU of Colorado Public Policy Director Denise Maes in the release.

Deadline to register assault weapons is Dec. 31

W

hen the City of Boulder passed a ban on the selling and possession of assault weapons in mid-May, it came with a stipulation: Anyone who already owned an assault weapon can either render it inoperable, surrender it to the police or keep it, if they register the weapon through the Boulder Police Department. The ordinance also banned high-capacity magazines and bump stocks and is currently being challenged in state court by several pro-second amendment groups. Since the policy went into effect on June 15, 19 firearms have been registered, according to a city hotline email from Boulder Chief of Police Greg Testa sent on Sept. 12. His email came as a response to at least some confusion by citizens looking to register weapons. The city ordinance defines an assault weapon as any semi-automatic center-fire rifles and pistols, as well as semi-automatic shotguns, that have the capacity for detachable or alternative magazine, a telescope or folding stock and any device that allows the weapon to be stabilized by the non-trigger hand. In order to register, gun owners must take the unloaded firearm to the main police station on 33rd Street, and leave it securely in their vehicle. Following a clear background check, the police department will register the weapon. Certification costs $20 for the first firearm and $5 for each additional one. After the weapon is registered, owners must use a recognizable carrying case any time they transport the weapon off of their property. Gun-owners have until Dec. 31 to register their weapons before possession of the weapon becomes illegal. For additional questions visit bouldercolorado.gov/police/firearm-certification.

Amy Goodman, Jim Hightower to talk in Boulder Journalist Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now, and progressive commentator Jim Hightower will speak at the Millennium Harvest House in Boulder on Sept. 15 as part of KGNU’s 40th anniversary celebration. “KGNU was one of the first subscribers to Democracy Now and Hightower Radio when they debuted in the 1990s, and it’s an honor to have both Amy and Jim with us to celebrate this milestone,” said Tim Russo, KGNU general manager, in a press release. The celebration runs from 5:30-9 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at KGNU.org. September 13, 2018 17


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Why creatures renowned for their reclusiveness end up in our yards and living rooms by Will Brendza

I

t’s easy to forget that there are else,” Alldredge says. Rather, it’s likely mountain lions lurking in Boulder’s because residential neighborhoods tend backyard, in the hills just beyond to be a very consistent source of food, the city. That is, until there’s one he says. It’s like a forbidden garden to actually lurking in the backyard. Or these creatures. “There are a lot of deer even inside of your home... in Boulder, and there is a lot of other On Aug. 9, a Boulder resident came small prey in Boulder, too: cats, dogs or home to their Marine Street house to raccoons,” Alldredge says. “You name it, discover that their housecat had been they’ll go after all of them.” replaced by a slightly larger version — a Still, it is a rare occurrence, Alldredge Puma Concolor, more commonly known assures. According to the GPS data, the as a mountain lion (or a cougar). The mountain lions tagged and tracked by beast had slipped inside their home National Park Service via Wikimedia Commons through a screen door, got trapped, devoured their pet, and made itself comfortable in its newly claimed den. It isn’t uncommon, it’s just part of living in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. And in fact, this incident actually followed several other sightings of mountain lions in Boulder that had people on edge and the local Parks and Wildlife officers on high-alert. The thing is, these animals are normally extremely elusive, and many Coloradans go their entire lives without seeing a single mountain lion. So, what is making these solitary, rarely encountered hunters venture into the generally predatorfree neighborhoods of Boulder? That was one of the questions that Mat Alldredge, a researcher with Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), wants to answer. Back in 2006 he began a comprehensive study of CPW generally moved in such a way as mountain lions centered in Boulder that to avoid residential areas, even though lasted more than a decade. they represent such fruitful hunting “We tried to capture as many lions as grounds. we could and put GPS collars on them,” he Obviously though, that is not always explains. On top of tracking their movethe case. ments, Alldredge says he and his team did “When you talk to an individual who a number of kill-site investigations to look has had a mountain lion hanging at the animals’ food habits, conducted staaround in their backyard for a few days, ble isotope analysis to retrace the cats’ it’s really hard to tell that person, ‘Hey, steps, and even tried some adverse condimountain lions generally avoid people, tioning to see if they could change mounand they’re avoiding people intentionaltain lions’ responses to humans. ly,’” says Kevin Blecha, a terrestrial biolo“We kind of tried to cover the board,” gist with CPW, and the lead author of a Alldredge says. new Colorado State University study According to Alldredge, they found published in the Journal of Animal Ecology. that the mountain lions who venture into Blecha worked with Alldredge on the neighborhoods, generally aren’t just CPW mountain lion study in Boulder, innocently lost. They’re looking for food. focusing on the animals’ feeding habits “They weren’t really traveling or denand how that relates to their movening in [neighborhoods], or anything ments. Boulder Weekly

Mountain lions typically spend four to five days eating one animal, like a deer, Belcha says, then, they’ll go off hunting for the next meal, whatever or wherever that may be. “And they’ll usually go about one to two days between those time periods,” he says. But, Blecha explains, when that time between eating events is stretched, the lions start to act a little more boldly. Whether it’s because they can’t find food, or because they’ve just been unsuccessful at hunting, they start to get seriously hungry, and human neighborhoods start to look a little more inviting to the big cats. “After about three to four days, their fear [of neighborhoods] just kept subsiding,” Blecha says. “And at about seven to 10 days, they essentially don’t appear to care that there are houses in their movement path.” Which, according to the data, usually happens around late winter and early spring, when wild food sources like deer, elk, rabbits and raccoons start to deplete at the end of the cold season. Alldredge and Blecha both quickly clarify that this doesn’t mean these apex-predators are more aggressive toward humans when they’re in town, though. “Really what this falls under is the realm of community ecology,” Blecha says. “Mountain lions, humans and mountain lions’ prey — which maybe are pets or deer or hobby livestock — we’re all entangled in this three-player game, and I don’t think that we’re ever going to be able to disentangle that.” Human-lion conflict is going to be a fact of life so long as people have homes in mountain lion country, he says. Alldredge agrees, “As long as we have habitats that attract prey, we’ll probably have lions coming into these areas.” So, their advice? Lock your doors and windows at night. Bring in the dog or the cat and try to keep any hobby livestock protected from predation. In essence, protect your pets and hope for the best. Because when big cats come to Boulder, they’re typically hungry and hunting.

Sep

14

Amanda Botur Confluence/Sangam Album Release

Contemporary and fluid, healing and interactive, a concert to raise the vibration in body, mind and soul.

Radio Show Taping

Calexico 23 Eric Andersen Sep

Sep

Live Theatre: Proxy.Vote presents

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25 Changed:

Live solo performance by Josh Fox

Oct

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Radio Show Taping

Laura Veirs & more tba

9/28 10/20 10/25 10/26

Full Concert: Joshua James Ajeet Kaur - World Tour Month of Modern Wrap Party Full Concert: Birds of Chicago & Daniel Rodriguez 11/10 Otis Taylor Tranceblues Festival

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Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact digger@etown.org September 13 , 2018 19


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OM

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buzz

Courtesy of Til Death Do Us Party

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Murder in the mountains

were on to something, as an hour after crossing paths with the animal, I’d be standing over a dead body. While foul play was indeed involved, it wasn’t anything I needed to report to police. Fortunately, it was all part of Murder 1876: Dead in the Water, an interactive dinner theater by Til Death Do Us Party productions. For the past 30 years, spouses Maggie Simms and David Brigham have orchestrated more than 1,000 mock homicides at the Bluebird Lodge, next-door to the criticallyacclaimed Gold Hill Inn, both owned by the Finn family since 1962. You couldn’t pick a better spot for a murder (staged or otherwise) than this remote, picturesque and slightly rough-around-the-edges village nestled at 8,300 feet. Established in its current site in 1872 (after a devastating fire in the original 1859 location), Gold Hill faced the typical boom and bust cycle common to nearly all Rocky

Dinner theater company celebrates 30 years in Gold Hill by Josh Schlossberg

M

y first thought was the slender, jetblack critter with the white-tipped tail prancing through Gold Hill — the historic mining town 11 miles northwest of Boulder — had to be a runaway puppy. On closer inspection, however, I discovered it was actually a fox, a rare color variant of the red fox, I later learned. In medieval times, superstitious villagers believed the sight of a black fox to be a bad omen. And maybe they

The more engaged you are with this interactive play, the more satisfying the experience — and the more likely you are to catch the killer.

see MURDER Page 22

INE AILS

Boulder Weekly

September 13 , 2018 21


FREE ARTS FESTIVAL

Courtesy of Till Death Do Us Party

Sat. Sept 15 - 4-8p

m Downtown Longmont MURDER from Page 21

Local Art & Artists

Live Music at 3 Stages Interactive Activities artwalklongmont.org brought to you in part by:

22 September 13 , 2018

Mountain mining towns, in its heyday growing as big as 1,500 and today stabilizing at under 300 residents. In 1920, Chicago-based women’s advocate Jean Wirt Sherwood bought the town’s only hotel, a three-story log building built in 1872 called The Wentworth. Renaming it Bluebird Lodge, it soon became the new, roomier digs for Boulder’s Bluebird Cottage, a vacation destination for single women. These days, the nine-room lodge can be rented out for family gatherings or events, but on the night I visited, it was the scene of a crime. Nearly 30 guests — a dozen or so dressed in Victorian garb, complete with frilly blouses and suit vests, bonnets and top hats — mingled in the old-fashioned parlor, seated on antique furniture or standing on the oriental rug, sipping glasses of Champagne and nibbling from platters of hors d’oeuvres as the buzz of anticipation grew palpable. Attendees included a family of four with a teenage girl, a group of a dozen chatty middle-aged women, and several couples, their ages ranging from about 30 to 70. Most were locals, though one couple hailed from Brooklyn, New York, while a 30-something woman in an old-West boustier — who claimed to see 60 plays a year — had traveled all the way from northern California. I got into a conversation with a young man training at a local police academy who feigned amusement when I lamely asked if he was there to research crime. Before long, a middle-aged woman in a black gown and veil strode into the room and a hush fell over the crowd. Bespectacled and empearled, she

announced herself as Cornelia BakerNelson-Holloway or “Nellie” (played by Carol Lopez), proprietress of the Lodge. Punctuating her statements by tapping the floor with a cane, she revealed how she was mourning the untimely death of her third husband, working in a mention of her “long stiff staff” (the first of frequent sexual innuendos sprinkled throughout the night). She informed us she was awaiting three former members of a defunct Shakespearean acting troupe holding its reunion a decade after a tragic accident at sea killed off most of its players. Nellie then split us up into five teams and, moments later, the characters sauntered into the room one by one to introduce themselves. We met extroupe member, indecorous blowhard, and candidate for Lieutenant Governor of the soon-to-be State of Colorado, Manchester Eaton Warwick (Michael Vasicek); the comical drunkard maid Rosie Monroe (Maggie Simms); J.W. Cabine (Sean Guderian), a card dealer at the local saloon whose degenerative disease forced him to walk with a cane; the prim and regal Margaret Katherine Blakemore (Julie Excell), former female lead for the troupe; the distinguished and charming Colonel Harlan Samuel Anders (David Brigham), war hero and saloon owner; and the troupe’s onceingenue Ophelia Payne (Jessica Troppmann), now fallen from grace and performing in a traveling circus. Seated in two separate dining rooms, we munched salads as the players schmoozed about, sharing their often unflattering thoughts about the town (“It’s in the middle of nowhere.”) Boulder Weekly


buzz on the bill: Murder 1876: Dead in the Water runs again on Sept. 14, 21, 22 and October 12, 20, 26, but — sorry to be the bearer of bad news — the shows are already sold out, though there is a waiting list. Maggie, David and crew start things up again in the spring (check goldhillinn. com for dates), but if you can’t wait until then, Til Death do Us Party arranges private murders for groups or businesses, as well as birthdays and Christmas by calling 303-473-0811.

and the other characters (“She’s a twobit whore!”). Guests played along, asking blunt questions to pry into their pasts, most of which were answered candidly, a few slyly avoided. Soon, Nellie stormed into the dining room to announce there had been a murder. Each group was led back into the parlor to view the grisly scene, gather clues, and then return to the table to compare notes. Dinner was served — stuffed bell pepper, wild rice and sweet potatoes for me, beef or chicken with vegetables for the others — while the actors circulated some more. Chatter mounted to a fever pitch as guests grilled performers with an intensity unbefitting polite dinner conversation. Luckily, at Til Death Do Us Party events, such behavior is not only condoned, but encouraged. I won’t give anything else away, but I can promise the storyline is packed with enough twists and turns, red herrings and hidden clues to satisfy — and confound — even a horror fiction writer such as myself. Though our team was confident we had unraveled the mystery, it turned out we only got things half right, and, alas, the winning prize went to another team. If you’ve never been exposed to dinner theater, it’s nothing like sitting passively in an audience peeping voyeuristically at the actors on stage. To the contrary, the fourth wall comes crashing down and the more engaged you are with players and teammates, the more satisfying the experience — and the more likely you are to catch the killer. After the nearly three-hour affair had ended, several guests gathered at Boulder Weekly

the Inn to talk with one another and the performers, all of whom had shed their costumes and personas. Perhaps the best testament to their acting skills was how jarring it was to meet the ordinary people behind their largerthan-life characters. Conversing with Maggie and David — who met doing classical theater and married 28 years ago — I learned that each of the 26 different plays they’ve written (with help from co-writer Jane Excell) take place during a specific year and include authentic period dress. David’s love of the past is the driving force behind the many tie-ins to Colorado, U.S. and world history, while Maggie handles the costuming. Sometimes they even manage to work in a bit of modern-day satire. For instance, one of their plays is loosely based on a historic event in 1905 when Colorado had three governors in a day. In Maggie and David’s version, the winning candidate was an uncouth loudmouth with an Eastern European wife who defeated a strident and no-nonsense woman who simply couldn’t understand why people didn’t like her. Before I headed down the mountain, I made sure to accost the soon-tobe-police officer one last time, asking if he had learned anything he could incorporate into his future career. “Not at all,” he told me through a polite smile. Even if Til Death Do Us Party can’t teach you how to crack a real-life case, it may help you solve a far more common mystery: how to entertain yourself for an evening without Netflix.

An Evening with Leslie Odom, Jr.

COMING SOON!

FREE COMMUNITY CONCERT

Latin Beats: Sonidos de las Américas SEPT 20 THU 7:00

Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra: Masters of American Song SEPT 22 SAT 7:30

Christopher Dragon, conductor Capathia Jenkins and Tony DeSare, vocalists

Rodgers and Hammerstein Celebration OCT 6 SAT 7:30

Christopher Dragon, conductor Sarah Jane McMahon, Gary Mauer, and William Michals, vocalists

An Evening with Leslie Odom, Jr. OCT 13 SAT 7:30

Brett Mitchell, conductor Leslie Odom, Jr., vocalist

Gershwin Concerto in F Conducted by Brett Mitchell

Schubert Unfinished Symphony

Brett Mitchell, conductor Joyce Yang, piano Three Black Kings ELLINGTON GERSHWIN Concerto in F JOHN ADAMS City Noir

Carlos Kalmar, conductor Michael Thornton, horn GOULD Spirituals for Orchestra GLIÈRE Concerto for Horn in B-flat major, Op. 91 SCHUBERT Symphony in B minor, D. 759, “Unfinished” WAGNER Prelude to Die Meistersinger

SEPT 28-30 FRI-SAT 7:30 ■ SUN 1:00

A Light in the Void OCT 5 FRI 7:30

Austin Wintory, composer/conductor Anthony Lund, writer/producer Maria Spiropulu, Alice Roberts, and Carolyn Porco, guest speakers

OCT 19-21 FRI-SAT 7:30 ■ SUN 1:00

Disney in Concert: Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas OCT 24-25 WED-THU 7:00

Christopher Dragon, conductor

HalfNotes

MPAA RATING: PG Presentation licensed by Disney Music Publishing and Buena Vista Concerts, a division of ABC Inc. © All rights reserved.

HalfNotes Please join us for family-friendly activities 1 hour before the concert.

These performances include FULL SCREENING OF THE FEATURE FILM!

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also supported by

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overtones Grandoozy these artists

Artists to watch at Denver’s new music festival by Caitlin Rockett

O

ne of the great joys of going to a big music festival is finding new music. Denver’s Grandoozy festival is offering more than 50 musical acts, from arena-filling stars such as Kendrick Lamar, Florence and the Machine, and Stevie Wonder, to upand-coming outfits like psychedelic rockers Post Animal and avant-garde electropop songwriters like Kelela. With Grandoozy upon us, we humbly offer this, a short guide on a few of the lesserknown artists we think you ought to catch, divided as best we can by genre. So yes, get out there and let Kendrick, Florence, Stevie, Miguel and Sturgill Simpson rock your world, but this is a buffet, children — try a little of everything.

HIP-HOP • BLACK PUMAS A psychedelic soul outfit from Austin, Texas, Black Pumas is a band you want to introduce your friends to now so you can remind them later how amazing your taste in music is. Loaded with fat grooves and psychedelic breakbeats, Black Puma channels the sex of Al Green and the kaleidoscopic insanity of Funkadelic. They are joining St. Paul and the Broken Bones on some tour dates this fall. Listen to: “Black Moon Rising”

Boulder Weekly

• DANIEL CAESAR Continuing the super sexy vibe on our list is Daniel Caesar, a Canadian-born rapper/crooner/songwriter and international ambassador of sex. Caesar’s buttery vocals draped over drowsy, ambient beats on the track “Get You” earned him Grammy nominations in the Best R&B Album and Best R&B Performance categories. Listen to: “Get You (featuring Kali Uchis)”

• SNOW THA PRODUCT Don’t confuse bilingual rapper Claudia Feliciano’s stage name, Snow Tha Product, for a drug reference; Snow is a nod to her favorite Disney character, Snow White, and “the product” reflects her desire to separate her personal and professional lives. Snow mixes tough rhymes with bouncy, melodic hooks, and is perhaps best known for her work on The Hamilton Mixtape track “Immigrants (We Get The Job Done).” Listen to: “Waste of Time”

ROCK • CHERRY GLAZERR If rock is dead, no one told L.A. noise pop band Cherry Glazerr. The band has seen a few lineup changes since forming in 2012, but

they’ve continued to make scruffy garage punk under the guidance of lead singer Clementine Creevy. The song “Teenage Girl” effortlessly combines the sweetness of 1950’s girl-group pop with the ethereal psychedelia of shoegaze, while tracks like “Juicy Socks” and “Moon Dust” offer delicious punk hooks reminiscent of Bikini Kill. Listen to: “Had Ten Dollaz”

• FLAURAL Conner Birch has called “psych rock” a “canopying term,” so we’ll avoid calling his band, the Denver-based Flaural, psych rock. Heavy on the synthesizers and driven by reverb-crunchy guitar riffs, Flaural offers expansive, swirling, colorful songs that tap into shoegaze, new wave and pop of yesterday and today. They are at once contemporary and retro. Listen to: “Hungry Lung”

• POST ANIMAL Listen to “Ralphie” by Post Animal, and you’ll think those opening guitar licks were sampled right off the Yes album. The vocals take that ’70s rock vibe right on home, channeling the mellow tones of Keith Emmerson. If you enjoy Tame Impala, this Chicago outfit will float your boat. Listen to: “When I Get Home”

ELECTRONIC • JON HOPKINS In April, The New Yorker called Jon Hopkins’ ambient brand of electronica a “soundtrack for a spiritual awakening.” He’s a composer and musician who’s been nominated for an Ivor Novello Award and the Mercury Prize. He’s collaborated with Brian Eno and Herbie Hancock. His DJ set at Grandoozy promises to be the stuff of electro dreams. Listen to: “Candles” and “Open Eye Signal”

• LEON VYNEHALL While Leon Vynehall’s newest album, Nothing is Still, is quietly atmospheric, his DJ sets offer something to shake your ass to. Vynehall releases from Ninja Tune, the record label that houses famed producers Amon Tobin, Kid Koala and Bonobo, as well as jazz saxophonist Kamasi Washington. Vynehall likewise deals in jazzy, trip-hop vibes. Listen to Vynehall’s Boiler Room DJ set for an idea of how he’ll work the floor at Grandoozy. Listen to: “It’s Just (House of Dupree)”

• ELI ESCOBAR New York DJ Eli Escobar deals in disco-tinged soul and funk. Escobar has deep knowledge of house September 13 , 2018 25


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LIQUID SKY PORTUGAL THE MAN 10:30 PM

LASER BOB MARLEY 11:59 PM

LASER FLOYD: THE WALL SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 16 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES / PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 1:30 PM

STARS AND GALAXIES

• THE DRUNKEN HEARTS Homegrown band alert: The Drunken Hearts got their start playing shows at The Mountain Sun chain of pubs after striking up a friendship with owner Kevin Daly, a Boulderite long invested in fostering up-andcoming local musicians. The Drunken Hearts evolved from an acoustic trio into an electric five-piece with spirited vocals, with lead singer Andrew McConathy delivering universal stories about love, life and the pursuit of happiness. Listen to: “Don’t Go”

3:00 PM

DYNAMIC EARTH 4:30 PM

WE ARE STARS

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 26 September 13 , 2018

• HEAD FOR THE HILLS Sure, Head for the Hills is bluegrass, but they incorporate elements of indie

POP • KELELA Kelela’s debut album, Take Me Apart, tells the story of a doomed relationship in reverse chronological order. She spent four years working on the album, meticulously blending R&B grooves with futuristic slink — Janet Jackson meets Bjork. Kelela (full name Kelela Mizanekristos) has said that her identity as a second-generational EthiopianAmerican informed the album’s sound and how she chose to “articulate my vulnerability and strength.” With Take Me Apart, it would seem Kelela’s strength is her vulnerability. Listen to: “Frontline”

• BISHOP BRIGGS London-born Sarah Grace McLaughlin moved to Tokyo with her Scottish parents when she was four, and was soon performing in the city’s notoriously vibrant karaoke scene. She said she knew quickly that she wanted to be a professional performer. Today, under the moniker Bishop Briggs (her parents were from Bishopbriggs, Scotland), she’s living the dream, belting out powerful soul songs like “River.” Listen to: “The Way I Do”

• BAYONNE There’s deep pleasure in watching Roger Sellers, aka Bayonne, move between sequencers, keyboards, pedals and percussion instruments to build a song; that much energy and sound emanating from one person is captivating. Rolling Stone named him one of its 10 Artists You Need To Know in February 2016. It’s 2018: Get with the program. Listen to: “Appeals”

• MAVIS STAPLES Mavis isn’t a lesser known artist — this woman’s been in the music game for more than 60 years, first as the lead singer of The Staple Singers, then as a solo artist. In every word she delivers in her rich, gravelly contralto voice is the story of a black woman who has survived in a world that told her she had no right. She’s said Bob Dylan proposed to her once, and we can’t blame the guy for trying. Listen to: “Ain’t No Doubt About It (featuring Jeff Tweedy)”

JAM/FUNK • KARL DENSON’S TINY UNIVERSE Blast off with coordinates set to Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe; chances are you’ll never want to come home. Down and dirty, swirling, progressive funk is what Denson and his band deal in, so come prepared to get down. As a saxophonist, flutist and powerful vocalist, Denson has headed his own projects (The Greyboy Allstars, Karl Denson Trio) and also toured with The Rolling Stones and Lenny Kravitz. Listen to: “Seven Nation Army”

BLUES • DRAGONDEER Hometown band alert: Dragondeer serve up piping hot slices of Mississippi Delta blues with a steaming side of psychedelic rock. The band recorded their latest album, If You Got The Blues, in California’s famed Topanga Canyon with producer Mark Howard, who’s worked with Willie Nelson, Neil Young, Tom Waits, Bob Dylan and Lucinda Williams. Listen to: “Don’t That Feel Good”

• THE SOUL REBELS The Soul Rebels are everywhere right now: They just did a Tiny Desk concert for NPR and debuted on late night TV on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. They’ve taken their brand of New Orleans brass across genres, collaborating with Nas, Pretty Lights, Lauryn Hill, Metallica and Marilyn Manson, just to name a few artists. Listen to: “Drinka Little Poison (4 U Die)”

• ANDY FRASCO & THE U.N. It seems right that we close out this list with Andy Frasco & The U.N., a party band if there ever was one. Guitarist Shawn Eckels and saxophonist Ernie Change have anchored this revolving group of players over the years, helping to cook up a stew of soul, blues, jazz and rock. Listen to: “Smoking Dope n Rock n Roll” Boulder Weekly


SEPTEMBER 14-16 | PEARL STREET MALL LIVE MUSIC, BREWS, FIREFLY MARKET & CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES FRIDAY 5 - 10 PM | SATURDAY 10 AM - 9 PM | SUNDAY 10 AM - 5 PM

PREVIEW FRIDAY (5-9PM) (SATURDAY 10AM-7PM SUNDAY 10AM-5PM)

PRESENTING SPONSOR:

SPONSORED BY:

BoulderFallFest.com

PRODUCED BY:


Dee Dee Bridgewater and The Memphis Soulphany Sept. 22, 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium

Starting at $20 at cupresents.org

Discounts for groups, youth, seniors, students and CU employees at cupresents.org/discounts

NEW! 3-CONCERT POPS SERIES

Choose all 3 concerts (9/29 A Tribute to John Williams, 3/23 Pixar in Concert & 5/4 The Music of David Bowie) to get 10% off single ticket prices!

Sponsored by:

A tribute To

JoHN WiLLiAMS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 7:30 PM Macky Auditorium, Boulder Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra Michael Butterman, conductor

Revel in fantastic music by America’s greatest living composer for film―the incomparable John Williams. With Star Wars, E.T., Jaws, Harry Potter, Jurassic Park and more, this concert will be a delight for all ages!

Tickets start at $15

WWW.BOULDERPHIL.ORG • 303.449.1343 Sponsored by Emily & John Koechel

28 September 13 , 2018

Boulder Weekly


Room for introspection

Siobhan O’Loughlin and the healing power of ‘Broken Bone Bathtub’ by Caitlin Rockett

T

Zach DeLon

here’s no room more vulnerable than the bathroom. It’s where we stand too close to the mirror and examine our pores, where we drop trou and bathe or relieve ourselves, where we put on make-up or shave our whiskers while giving ourselves pep talks before we head into a fastpaced world. It’s where we look down at the scale and judge ourselves against the images and numbers in our minds. It’s a place where we take care of ourselves, whether that’s with a long bubble bath and a book, or a bandage and some antibiotic ointment on a cut finger. For the most part, the bathroom is a solitary place (parents of young children, I see you and I hear your protestations), and because of that, it’s perhaps the ultimate room for introspection. But what does introspection look like when we can’t do it alone — in the her apartment’s shower-only setup. It bathroom, that is. When you can’t undress eventually took her around the world to yourself or wash your back or even get your talk candidly with strangers about trauma, whole right arm wet because there’s a cast suffering, generosity and connection — on it, how does that introspective bathroom all very naked in a bubble bath. time change when we Her friends offered have to ask others for much more than just help? their bathrooms; they ON THE BILL: Broken In her one-woman helped wash her hair, Bone Bathtub — presentplay, Broken Bone brought her wine and ed by The Enchantment Society and Siobhan Bathtub, Siobhan chocolates or made her O’Loughlin. The O’Loughlin explores dinner. They offered Lakewood Glens, Denver. human vulnerability in warm bathrobes and long Exact location provided to ticket holders day-ofthis most vulnerable of conversations. show. rooms, inviting a small The fiercely indepenaudience (between 10 dent O’Loughlin began and 18 people) into a to question her choices in real bathroom in a real home where she life. takes a real bath and talks about her real “I began to think of all the people I life. had shut out in my life,” she tells the And it’s real good. audience, tears in her eyes, scooping “You don’t have to believe me,” bubbles around her. So she invited us all in. O’Loughlin tells the Denver audience at Initially, Broken Bone Bathtub was the Sept. 6 premier, covered in bubbles meant to be a 30-minute monologue in a clawfoot tub. “You just have to based on journals O’Loughlin kept durbelieve that I’m doing the best I can, ing her recovery, but after the world and I’ll believe you’re doing the best premier at an Airbnb in Tokyo turned you can.” into an hour-long interactive conversaSeveral years ago, O’Loughlin had a bike accident in Brooklyn that left her tion with the audience, O’Loughlin ran spirit as broken as her right hand. Sitting with what felt natural. in a rain-soaked intersection with only a To date, she’s performed the show stranger to help her, O’Loughlin began a in Australia, Ireland, the U.K. and across journey. It started in her friends’ bathtubs the U.S. In total she’s been naked and where the ever-anxious O’Loughlin honest with complete strangers in five bathed after her accident because she countries and nearly 300 bathtubs. didn’t trust herself to keep her cast dry in The real beauty is the variability in Boulder Weekly

arts & culture

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 13

PAPER MOONSHINE 8PM FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 14

JEREMY DION 8PM MICHAEL & BITTERSWEET HIGHWAY 9PM SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 15

WOMEN IN SONG HOSTED BY SHANNA IN A DRESS 8PM SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 16

each show; the Sept. 6 show included stories about psychedelic mushroom trips gone wrong, broken spines and aging parents, all from audience members. More than once an audience member elicited hearty laugher from O’Loughlin and the rest of the crowd. As one audience member told a story of growing up “the fat kid,” several others nodded their heads and murmured statements of solidarity. We talk with O’Loughlin like she’s our friend; we help wash her back and hair and use lotion to give her a hand massage. Together, the audience works through individual pain, injustice and trauma, sussing out what worked and what didn’t work. With at least half the audience’s knees touching the lip of the tub, it’s impossible to escape the intimacy of the show — even more impossible with O’Loughlin’s gentle and warm demeanor. It seems wrong not to open up, even just a little bit, and share something when O’Loughlin looks you in the eye and asks if you’ve ever been jealous, or wonders if there was ever a time you were embarrassed to call your parents. You find yourself rethinking moments long gone, and re-evaluating their meaning in your life. You believe O’Loughlin, you believe yourself, and most importantly you believe other people. And for at least an hour, the world feels like a very loving place.

CHEYENNE SKYE 8PM MOLLY KOLLIER 9PM ELI PAFUMI 10PM MONDAY SEPTEMBER 17

BRODIE KINDER 8PM AVON DALE 9PM TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 18

THE LAND OF DEBORAH 8PM CAT DAIL 9PM WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 19

JAZZETRY NIGHT! FEAT. VON DISCO 8PM

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 20

FINN O’SULLIVAN 8PM KATIE COSTELLO 9PM ALEX SNYDER 10PM FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 21

TOM WEST 8PM BRANDON CALANO & MARTIN BETTER 9PM Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM September 13 , 2018 29


FREE

FALL

COMPOST

WORKSHOPS

Registration is required. Space is limited. Register online at www.BoulderCountyRecycles.org

Boulder



    

        

6-8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018 Boulder County Recycling Center, Education Room, 1901 63rd Street

Erie 6-8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 Erie Community Center, Mitchell Room, 450 Powers Street

Lafayette 11-1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018 Lafayette Public Library, Lower Level Meeting Room, 775 W. Baseline Road

Longmont Resource Conservation

720.564.2220 resourceconservation@bouldercounty.org

30 September 13 , 2018

6-8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22, 2018 Boulder County Parks & Open Space, Prairie Room North, 5201 Saint Vrain Road

Boulder Weekly


Benjamin D. Esham / Wikimedia Commons

BOULDER FALL FESTIVAL. 5 p.m. Friday,

Sept. 14, 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 15 and 16, Downtown Boulder, Pearl Street between 10th and 15th streets.

This three-day festival features local food, micro-brews, music, children’s entertainment and activities, and Firefly Handmade Markets all along the historic Pearl Street Mall. see EVENTS Page 32

SYMBOLS OF RESISTANCE: A TRIBUTE TO THE MARTYRS OF THE CHICAN@ MOVEMENT.

SANS SOUCI FESTIVAL OF DANCE CINEMA 15TH ANNUAL PREMIERE.

LEE CAMP FROM ‘REDACTED TONIGHT’: LIVE STAND-UP COMEDY EVENT.

7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, Chautauqua Community House, 900 Public domain via Baseline Road, Boulder, Wikimedia Commons chautauqua.com.

7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, Roser ATLAS Center, Black Box Theatre, National Library of Australia 1125 18th St., Boul- from Canberra, Australia der, 303-735-4577.

7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-443Troy Conrad 7510.

Symbols of Resistance is a documentary film that looks at the history of the Chicano movement of the 1970s with a focus on Colorado and Northern New Mexico. The film explores the struggle for land, the student movement and community struggles against police repression. Viewers get an inside look at how conflicts with government included resisting unprovoked police violence in urban areas and many protests against systemic language discrimination, judicial discrimination, disproportionate imprisonment, and the lack of educational and employment opportunities. These rising community and student movements were targeted by COINTELPRO (Counter Intelligence Program) of the FBI, working in tandem with other local, state and federal agencies. Ashly Villa and Jasón Romero Jr. will give an introduction, as well as participate in a panel discussion after the screening. Tickets are $12.

The Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema offers more screenings than ever this year. There will be live performances by Rosely Conz (Friday) and Life/Art Dance Ensemble (Saturday). Guests are encouraged to arrive at 7 p.m. to fully enjoy unique installations that accompany each live performance. This year, guests can enjoy a number of documentaries illuminating dance and the lives of dancers across the globe. Of course there will be regular screenings of spectacular and experimental dance shorts. Thanks to support from the Lafayette Cultural Arts Commission, there will also be two family-friendly screenings at the Lafayette Public Library (775 W. Baseline Road) starting at 2 p.m. on Oct. 6. Enjoy a more grown-up event at The Collective Community Arts Center on Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m.

Boulder Weekly

Lee Camp has toured the country and abroad with his fierce brand of stand-up comedy. George Carlin’s daughter Kelly said Camp is one of the few comics who continues in her dad’s tradition. Bill Hicks’ brother Steve said Lee is one of only a handful with Bill’s message and passion. The opener, Krish Mohan, is a socially conscious, Indian stand-up comedian and writer who regularly tours the country. With his quirky attitude, charming personality and intelligent humor, Krish captivates and engages audiences of all backgrounds, tackling hot-button topics like race, religion, war and immigration, while adding an optimistic philosophical and sociological twist. Tickets range from $15-$34.

September 13 , 2018 31


FOOTBALL SATURDAY • 3:00 PM FOLSOM FIELD

events

CU BOULDER EVENTS For more information on any event, visit calendar.colorado.edu. THURSDAY, SEPT. 13 CU Soccer vs. Utah State.

Javichu el jefe via Wikimedia Commons

3:30 p.m. Prentup Field, Discovery Drive, Boulder.

3 p.m. Folsom Field and Stadium, 2095 University Ave., Boulder.

President Trump: A Danger to the Republic?

CU Volleyball vs. Colorado State.

5:30 p.m. Hale Science, 230, 1350 Pleasant Drive, Boulder.

Silicon Flatirons: Entrepreneurs Unplugged: David Brown and David Cohen of Techstars. 5:30 p.m. Wolf Law, Wittemyer Courtroom, 2450 Kittredge Loop Drive, Boulder.

VOLLEYBALL

Favorite Eclipses.

7 p.m. Fiske Planetarium and Science Center, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder. Another showing on Friday, Sept. 14 at 7 p.m.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 14 CU Volleyball vs. Portland State.

SATURDAY 8:00 PM CU EVENTS CENTER

7 p.m. CU Events Center, 950 Regent Drive, Boulder.

12th Annual National Education Policy Center Research Panels. 1:30 p.m. Kittredge Central, Kittredge Multipurpose Room, 2480 Kittredge Loop Road, Boulder.

WEAR

BLACK

Oktoberfest.

2 p.m. University Memorial Center (UMC), 415-417, 1669 Euclid Ave., Boulder.

CU Football vs. New Hampshire.

8 p.m. CU Events Center, 950 Regent Drive, Boulder.

APPM Colloquium: Paul Sava.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 16 CU Soccer vs. Denver.

Geography Colloquium Series: von Dreden Stacy Fellowship Fellows Presentations.

MONDAY, SEPT. 17 Sutherland Seminar Series Diagnosis Part I: Bipolar Disorders.

3 p.m. Engineering Center, ECCR 245, 1111 Engineering Drive, Boulder.

3:30 p.m. Guggenheim Geography, 205, 1475 Central Campus Mall, Boulder.

Native Student Welcome 2018.

3:30 p.m. Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies, Reading Room, Back Patio and Front Patio, 1330 Grandview Ave., Boulder.

UMAS 50th Anniversary Chicanx Exhibit & Reception. 4:30 p.m. Norlin Library, CBIS, 1157 18th St., Boulder.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 15 CU Volleyball vs. Indiana State. 10 a.m. CU Events Center, 950 Regent Drive, Boulder.

1 p.m. Prentup Field, Discovery Drive, Boulder.

6 p.m. Muenzinger Psychology Building, Room E214, University of Colorado, Boulder.

Thompson Jazz Studies Combos.

7:30 p.m. Old Main, 1600 Pleasant St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 18 Building Digital Corpea.

10 a.m. Norlin Library, E206 CRDDS, 1157 18th St., Boulder.

Remote Sensing Analytics Workshop: Containerization for R&D Applications.

1 p.m. Sustainability, Energy and Environment Community (SEEC), S372, 4001 Discovery Drive, Boulder.

An Evening of Conversation with the Chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Jon Parrish Peede. 6:30 p.m. Hale Science, 270, 1350 Pleasant Drive, Boulder.

Visiting Artist Program: Julia Haft-Candell lecture.

6:30 p.m. Art and Art History Building, Visual Arts Complex, 1B20, 1085 18th St., Boulder.

Faculty Tuesdays: From Hungary to the Czech Republic. 7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall,1020 18th St., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 19 Russian Tea.

Noon. Macky Auditorium, 223, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder.

CMCI Media Entrepreneurship Fair.

4:30 p.m. CU IdeaForge, 2445 Kittredge Loop Drive, Boulder

CU Volleyball vs. Utah.

7 p.m. CU Events Center, 950 Regent Drive, Boulder.

Colorado’s Wild Bees: The Fascinating Ecologies of our Most Important Pollinators. 7 p.m. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), Paleontology Hall, 1035 Broadway, Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 31

SOCCER SUNDAY • 1:00 PM

PRENTUP FIELD

CUBuffs.com or call 303-49-BUFFS 32 September 13 , 2018

Thursday, September 13 Music Blooms at Bootstrap Brewing. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Boulder Bach Festival Opening Gala. 6:30 p.m. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Face Vocal Band. 7:30 p.m. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-651-0401.

Monophonics and Euforquestra — with Special Guests. 7:15 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

Conversations in English Thursdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

The Mountain Goats. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452.

Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

The Underground Movement: A Boulder and Denver Hip Hop Showcase. 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Events

Field Report (Solo). 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

Adultology: GET PICKLED! 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

The Ghandarva Concert Experience. 7 p.m. The Caritas Center, 5723 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-3066.

Beyond the Basics of Genealogy @ Meadows. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Honeytree Duo. 6 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont, 303-485-9400.

Big Buddy Training: Reading Buddies. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Joey Dosik. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

Cielo. 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More showtimes at thedairy.org.

Jonathan Tyler and The Northern Lights. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Cinema Program screening: Persona. 7 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

The Great Indian Novel. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Joel Kim Booster. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. The Miseducation of Cameron Post. 4:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org. Symbols of Resistance: A Tribute to the Martyrs of the Chican@ Movement. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Taste Test Thursday @ MAIN. 4:15 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. see EVENTS Page 34

Boulder Weekly


events events

LIVE MUSIC SATURDAYS

8:00pm NO COVER 9/15 WENDY WOO BAND

Texas Hold’em. 7 p.m. Breakers Grill, 380 Main St., Longmont, 303-772-3839. Friday, September 14 Music AJ Fullerton. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Alfredo Muro in Concert: Nights of Guitars. 7:30 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 303-666-4361. Amanda Botur Album Release Concert. 6:30 p.m. eTown, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 307-690-7848. Beethoven and Bach Piano Concert. 3:30 p.m. Flatirons Terrace, 930 28th St., Boulder, 303-939-0594. Big Paddy. 10 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Colorado Kind Festival. 3 p.m. Planet Bluegrass, 500 W. Main St., Lyons, 800-624-2422. Through Sept. 15. Denver Jazz Festival and Lindy on the Rocks. 3 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Through Sept. 16.

The

#

Clubhouse

FREE DRINK COUPON GOOD FOR 1 FREE DRAFT BEER WELL DRINK OR HOUSE WINE Offer Valid 9/15/18 7 - 9pm 1 Per Customer

2251 KEN PRATT BLVD

LONGMONT CO 80501

720-600-4875

TheWildGameLongmont.com 34 September 13 , 2018

Thursday, Sept. 13 William Powers — Dispatches from the Sweet Life. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Brigitte Mars — The Natural First Aid Handbook. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Friday, Sept. 14 Paige Williams — The Dinosaur Artist. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Book Battles Trivia Night. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Game of Thrones Live Concert Experience. 8 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

Saturday, Sept. 15

HomeSlice Band. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

9/29 RYAN CHRYS & THE ROUGHCUTS

Mimi Hayes’ memoir ‘I’ll Be OK, It’s Just a Hole in My Head: A Memoir on Heartbreak and Head Trauma’ is a humorous and thoughtful cross between Jill Bolte Taylor’s ‘My Stroke of Insight’ and Jenny Lawson’s ‘Furiously Happy.’ Shocking and funny, Hayes’ memoir shares the true story of a sudden brain hemorrhage at the age of 22 — and the heartache and strength that it took to overcome it. Hayes will speak about the book at Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 18.

Fusion Dance Party. The Speakeasy, 301 Main St., Longmont, 720-684-4728.

Grandoozy Denver Music Festival featuring Kendrick Lamar, Florence + The Machine, Stevie Wonder and more. Overland Pond Park, 955 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 720-913-1311. Through Sunday, Sept. 16.

9/22 THE WELL INTENTIONED

words

EVENTS from Page 32

Jeremy Dion. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Michael Henchman and Bittersweet Highway. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Miriam McQueen. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Maia Toll — The Illustrated Herbiary. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver. Monday, Sept. 17 So, You’re a Poet. 9 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder. Tuesday, Sept. 18 Tattered Tales Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Mimi Hayes — l’ll Be OK, It’s Just a Hole in My Head: A Memoir on Heartbreak and Head Trauma. 5 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Celia Brooks — Super Veg. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Tattered Tales Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver.

Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Minor Disturbance Weekly Workshop + Open Mic. 1 p.m. Prodigy Coffeehouse, 3801 E. 40th Ave., Denver.

Great American Read Viewing Party — Who Am I?. 7 p.m. Sie FilmCenter, 2510 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Peter Eichstaedt — Napa Noir. 2 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Gregg Eisenberg — Letting Go Is All We Have to Hold Onto. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Sunday, Sept. 16 Donna M. Lucey — Sargent’s Women. 2 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Scott Westerfeld — Impostors. 2 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Open Mic Fridays with Leon. 7 p.m. Vision Quest Brewing Co., 2510 47th St., Suite A2, Boulder, 720-446-9387.

Wednesday, Sept. 19 John Holl — Drink Beer, Think Beer. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Heather Hansen — Wildfire. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Rachmaninoff Symphony No. 2 — Conducted by Brett Mitchell. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Boulder Fall Festival. 5 p.m. Pearl Street between 10th and 15th streets, Boulder. Starts at 10 a.m. on Sept. 15 and 16.

Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org.

Seeing Stars. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733.

Conversaciones en español. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Rigid Heddle Weavers Meet-Up. 11 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Conversations in English Fridays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema 15th Annual Premiere. 7 p.m. Roser ATLAS Center, Black Box Theatre, 1125 18th St., Boulder, 303-735-4577.

Silent Bear Solo. 5:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Spinphony. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. The Symbols. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

An Evening at the Museum. 7 p.m. Nederland Mining Museum, 200 N. Bridge St., Nederland, 303-258-7332.

Taking Flight: A Hopelight Benefit Concert and Auction. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-776-7117.

Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

Tangled Senses. 10 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons, 303-823-6685.

Fun on the Farm: Seed Stars. 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Agricultural Heritage Center, 8348 Ute Highway 66, Longmont, 303-776-8688.

Yacht Rock Revue. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Events The Art Market @ Art Night Out. 5 p.m. Old Town, Public Road, Lafayette, 720-295-0085.

Movies @ Meadows: Wonder. 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. 8:45 p.m.

Sing and Play Storytime Bees. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Saturday, September 15 Music The Alcapones. 7 p.m. Gunbarrel Brewing Company, 7088 Winchester Circle, Boulder, 800-803-5732. ArtWalk Longmont 2018. 4 p.m. Downtown Longmont, Fourth Street between Main and Emery streets, Longmont. see EVENTS Page 36

Boulder Weekly


S AT U R D AY, S E P T E M B E R 1 5 BOULDER JCC TO B E F E AT U R E D A S A D E S I G N E R O R B U Y T I C K E T S , V I S I T B I T LY. C O M / C O N D O M C O U T U R E 1 8 PRESENTED BY

Boulder Weekly

WITH SPECIAL THANKS TO

September 13 , 2018 35


events events

arts

Jim Miller/NCAR

Jim Miller is a passionate astro-photographer, specializing in long exposure images of deep sky objects such as galaxies, nebula and star clusters. The process includes imaging through telescopes and monochromatic CCD cameras specially designed for astronomy. See Miller’s photography at NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory now through Nov. 3.

Anthrome: A Survey of Jason DeMarte’s Work. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Nov. 18.

Fragments of Places — by Yuge Zhou. Dairy Arts Center, McMahon Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 7.

Art in Action: The Process of Design. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through September.

Ganesha: The Playful Protector. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through October.

Daisy Patton: This Is Not Goodbye. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through Nov. 17.

Highlights from the Collection. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver. Through Sept. 19.

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2019.

Hungry Birds: The Photography of David Leatherman. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, 15th and Broadway Boulder. Through Dec. 1.

Elements of Peace — by Marlene Siff. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 7. Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway Boulder. Ongoing exhibit.

A collection of early newspapers, restored cameras, artifacts and old-time commerce. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Mai Wyn Schantz: Magnetic North. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through Oct. 21.

New Paintings — by Sue Hammond West. Naropa University Nalanda Campus, White Cube Gallery, 6287 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Oct. 12. New Territory: Landscape Photography Today. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 16. Oil Paintings By Nickie Barbee. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through Nov. 3.

Processing — by Roberto Juarez. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 16. REMBRANDT: Painter as Printmaker. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Opens Sept. 16. Through Jan. 6, 2019. Small Wood Sculptures — by Charles Counter. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through Jan. 6. Strong Women in Bloom — by Stephen Parlato. Naropa University, Arapahoe Campus, Lincoln Gallery, 2130 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Dec. 15. What’s Wrong With Our Country? — by Deborah Nehmad. Dairy Arts Center, MacMillan & Hand-Rudy Galleries, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 7.

EVENTS from Page 34

Bluez House. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Colorado Brazil Fest: Choro Das 3 Concert. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Mennonite Church, 3910 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-960-8972. Crone’s Eye View, Art and Music Event. 6:30 p.m. East Simpson Coffee, 414 E. Simpson St., Lafayette, 720-502-7010. Dave Fulker Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Eddie Turner & Trouble. 6:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont, 303-485-9400. Flamingosis. 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. George Nelson Quartet. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339. Interstate Stash Express. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Laura Ingalls Wilder Day. 2 p.m. Old Mill Park, 237 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-776-1870. Mad Dog Blues Band. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Marco Benevento — with Special Guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

36 September 13 , 2018

Michael Peery Herrick: A Work In Progress. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Michelle Roderick Music. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. Midnight Growlers, Michael Morrow and the Culprits. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 303-834-9384. The Mighty Twisters. 10:15 p.m. The Dark Horse, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-8162. Sphere Ensemble Season Opening Concert. 7:30 p.m. First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St., Boulder, 720-663-8367. Wendy Woo Band. 8 p.m. Wild Game Longmont, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 720-600-4875. The Zoo: Hosted by The ZooKeepers. 8 p.m. DV8 Distillery, 2480 49th St., Boulder, 973-787-4276.

Chloé Besson. 6 p.m. The AKA Gallery, 2500 47th St., Boulder. Homecoming Carnival. 11 a.m. Longmont High School, 1040 Sunset St., Longmont, 303-776-6014. Invaders from Planet 9. Noon. Chautauqua Picnic Shelter, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. More show times at chautauqua.com. Learning Dog Dance: A Dance Workshop. 1 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 N. 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110. OmFest. 9 a.m. Stapleton, 2900 Roslyn St., Denver. Prepare dness Fair of Boulder County 2018. 9 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-651-8438. Rattlesnake Hike. 10 a.m. Ron Stewart Preserve at Rabbit Mountain, Lyons.

Art Stop. 10 a.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema 15th Annual Premiere. 7 p.m. Roser ATLAS Center, Black Box Theatre, 1125 18th St., Boulder, 303-735-4577.

Boulder Comedy Show (2 shows). 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863.

Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Boulder Film and Brew Festival. 11 a.m. Element Bistro, 6315 Lookout Road, Boulder, 646-391-0876.

Yoga Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Lee Camp from ‘Redacted Tonight’: Live Stand Up Comedy Event. 7 p.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-443-7510.

Music

Events

Sunday, September 16 A-Mac & The Height, The Ries Brothers. 8 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Boulder Weekly


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September 13 , 2018 37


events

Saturday September 15

muzzy bearr

Friday September 21

GravitaS recordinGS ShowcaSe

Feat pSymbionic & au5 w/ SuperSillyuS, edamame & baSSline driFt Saturday September 22 dual venue!

level 1 – ziG zaG wedneSday September 26

the Garcia project Friday September 28 dual venue!

color red launch party: matador Soul SoundS Feat memberS oF the new maSterSoundS, Soulive, pimpS oF joytime & orGone w/ Quantic dj Set, analoG Son (album releaSe), conGo Sanchez, color red all StarS, nobide dj Set, receSS dj Set & on the patio: Freebear

Saturday September 29

chelSea wolFe & ruSSian circleS Sunday September 30

mod Sun

w/ caSkey, chxpo, jimmy bennett, loStinveGaS, ForGetbrennan, pdF & dallaS Garcia

monday october 1

denzel currey w/ kid trunkS

tueSday october 2

reGGae tueSdayS

Feat SenSamotion & ital vibeS

thurSday october 4

the deer & pickin on ween (late Set)

w/ charlie roSe (oF elephant revival)

Friday & Saturday october 5-6

jeFF auStin band

10/5: dead winter carpenterS 10/6: pickin’ on dead phiSh Feat jeFF auStin & memberS oF deadphiSh orcheStra (late Set)

Friday october 12

eprom

w/ zeke beatS

Saturday october 13

lonG beach dub all StarS

w/ project 432, raStaSauruS & write minded

tueSday october 16

For peace band thurSday october 18

thurSday September 13

monophonicS & eurForQueStra

on the patio: michelle Sarah band Feat dj williamS (kdtu), dan aFricano (john brown’S body), chriS beck (jaden carlSon band) & eric imbroSciano (jaden carlSon band)

Friday September 14

the conGreSS

w/ jonah wiSneSki (Feat memberS oF other worldS)

Saturday September 15

marco benevento w/ Soul rebelS

Sunday September 16

iSrael vibration & rootS radicS

w/ rebelde, one drum & bloodpreShah

tueSday September 18

reGGae tueSdayS

denver reGGae Social club Feat memberS oF john brown’S body, the motet, odeSza, dopapod, jyemo club, euForQueStra, dubSkin, raStaSauruS, mama maGnolia, Green buddha & collierad (patio)

wedneSday September 19 re: Search

Feat Sumthin Sumthin

w/ partywave, thouGht proceSS, mikey thunder & jordan polovina

monday october 22

Sob x rbe

w/ Quando rondo

tueSday october 23

azizi GibSon Friday october 26

niGhtmareS on wax live band Saturday october 27

halloween on the rockS machine Gun kelly x juice wrld w/ they., dj eSco, london richardS & reo craGun @ red rockS amphitheatre

Saturday october 27

diGable planetS Saturday october 27 @ 1St bank center

tatanka

w/ project 432, Fayuca, oF Good nature (patio) & Selecta razja

tueSday September 25

michael chriStmaS & Sylvan lacue

Saturday november 3

The Kentucky Cycle. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Oct. 21. Lungs. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through Oct. 14.

Pride and Prejudice — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company. Dairy Arts Center, Grace Gamm Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 7. The Producers. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Sept. 30. Vietgone. Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Ricketson Theatre, 1400 Curtis St., Denver. Through Sept. 30. You Can’t Take It With You — presented by Lowry’s Spotlight Theater. The John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through Sept. 29.

thurSday September 27

hoodie allen

w/ Gianni & kyle on the patio: kbonG w/ kaSh’d out & red SaGe

EVENTS from Page 36

Bonnie Lowdermilk and Friends. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327.

Cézanne: Portraits of a Life. 1 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org.

Church and Community Picnic. 11:30 a.m. Heart of Longmont, 350 11th Ave., Longmont, 303-776-3523.

Chili Bowl 2018. Noon. Studio Arts Boulder, 1010 Aurora Ave., Boulder, 720-379-6033.

wedneSday october 3 re: Search

Concert Series Presents: Matthew Dane and Friends. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Colorado Coffee Expo and Festival. 9 a.m. Space Gallery, 400 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, 720-904-1088.

w/ mikey thunder & jordan polovina

Dave Tamkin. 7 p.m. Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Boulder, 303-443-6461.

Essential Cinema: Monsoon Wedding. 4:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

Saturday September 29

lyricS born doja cat

w/ weS period

Feat Soohan & oF the treeS thurSday october 4

FrameworkS live band

w/ amani (deSert dwellerS), koreSma b2b Feverkin & andrew rothSchild

Friday october 5

jay rock

w/ trouble & reaSon

Saturday october 6

SonGS in the key oF G:

celebratinG tori pater’S 50th* birthday GeorGia Style Sunday october 7

money man

w/ dj tiGG, dj certiFied, dj Style, dj blaze1, dj domino & hoSted by eclaSSerrwerr & inFamouz aGe

meG myerS

Saturday october 13

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38 September 13 , 2018

Don’t Dress for Dinner. The Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. Through Sept. 23.

Oh my God! — presented by Theatre Or. Mizel Arts and Culture Center at the JCC, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Opens Sept. 14. Through Sept. 30.

Feat om unit

w/ adam joneS

alo & tea leaF Green

Charlie & the Chocolate Factory. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Oct. 13.

w/ moreSoundS, mikey thunder & jordan polovina

Soja x iration

w/ bitter end

Oklahoma! Denver Center for Performing Arts, Stage Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Opens Sept. 14. Through Oct. 14.

wedneSday September 26 re: Search

wedneSday october 31

GhoStemane

The Cake. Curious Theatre Company, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through Oct. 31.

w/ khary, vintaGe lee, treazon & otiS

tueSday october 9

w/ collie buddz

Mary Poppins. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Nov. 11.

Friday September 21

tueSday october 2

Saturday october 20

Broken Bone Bathtub. The Lakewood Glens, Denver. Location provided to ticketholders on day of show. Through Sept. 23.

The Improvised Shakespeare Company. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Garner Galleria Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through Sept. 30.

w/ the copper children; on the patio: lyle divinSky (the motet) & dane FarnSworth (minGo FiShtrap)

Friday october 19

Start makinG SenSe

Mamma Mia! Arvada Center for the Performing Arts, Main Stage Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through Sept. 30.

minGo FiShtrap

thurSday September 20 GraSS For that aSS preSentS

w/ indiGenouS peopleS & aG Flux

(ultimate talkinG headS tribute) w/ ruby dear

Annie — presented by Performance Now Theatre Company. Lakewood Cultural Center, 470 S. Allison Parkway, Lakewood. Through Sept. 23.

I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Opens Sept. 15. Through Nov. 3.

the del mccoury band wookieFoot

theater

Zack DeZon

Siobhan O’Loughlin’s ‘Broken Bone Bathtub’ is an awardwinning immersive piece of theater taking place inside a bathtub — in an actual private residence. The audience (10 to 18 people) takes on the role of Siobhan’s close friends — listening, sharing and assisting the cast-clad artist at bath time. Now playing at The Enchantment Society in The Lakewood Glens through Sept. 23. See a review of the show on page 29.

Eli Pafumi. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Marcus King Band. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Molly Kollier. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Pacific Dub. 8:30 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 716-785-7655. Rachmaninoff Symphony No. 2 Conducted by Brett Mitchell. 1 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Traditional Irish Music. 7:30 p.m. Boulderado Hotel License No. 1, 2115 13th St. (13th & Spruce St.), Boulder, 303-440-7578. Events Bears in Our Backyard. 10 a.m. Heil Valley Ranch, Boulder.

Go Club for Kids and Teens. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Film Screening: The Human Element. 5 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church of Boulder, 5001 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-494-0195. Meadows Teen Advisory Group (M-TAB). 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Music Together® Demo Class. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Old Fashioned Playdate. 10 a.m. Walker Ranch Homestead, 8999 Flagstaff Mountain Road, Boulder. The Unruly Mystic: Saint Hildegard. 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org. Boulder Weekly


events Yarn-fiti Knit-in. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

The Land of Deborah. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Monday, September 17

Orgy. 8 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030.

Music Avon Dale. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Brodie Kinder. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Jazz Jam at the Muse. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 East South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. Jeff Crosby. 7 p.m. Southern Sun Brewery, Boulder, 303-543-0886. 2018 FOD: Tee Time. 11:30 a.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599. Vocal Play Group. 6 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 26th St., Boulder. Events “Cheers to Beers” Episode Screening. 5 p.m. Blue Moon Brewing Company, 3750 Chestnut Place, Denver, 303-620-5748. Mis Pininos/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Aerial Day Off Camp. 9 a.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E. Sterling Circle, Suite 150, Boulder, 303-245-8272. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Events Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Geologic History of Boulder County. 6 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Wednesday, September 19 Music Jazzetry Night! featuring Von Disco. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Motion & Stillness. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Raekwon, GZA, Killah Priest, Young Dirty, DJ. 8:30 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Reed Mathis & Electric Beethoven, Mike Dillon Band. 8 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Events

Modern Physics Book Discussions. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Boulder Arts Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Monday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

BTAB. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-3798299.

Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Pollinator All Ages Storytime: Honeybee Waggle Dance. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-4413100.

Far From the Tree. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org.

Boulder Rights of Nature Film Series. 5:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. VIVA Theater at the Library. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Young Artists at Work: School Day-Off Camp. 9 a.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. Younger Toddler Time. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-4413100. Tuesday, September 18 Music Third Tuesday Lunchtime Concert Series: Latin Afternoon of Song and Dance. Noon. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Cat Dail. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. dodie. 8 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. Boulder Weekly

Flatirons Mineral Club. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Hix ‘n’ Chix Square Dance Clug. 6 p.m. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak, Longmont, 303-678-7711. Musical Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Pages and Paws. 3:45 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Red Bull Media House: The Dawn Wall. 7 p.m. Crossroads Mall Movie Theater, 1700 29th St., Boulder. Teen Game Night. 6 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. What Will People Say. 4:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Wobblers & Walkers. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-4413100.

September 13 , 2018 39


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hen one considers the history Perfection. Mayan Theater, 110 Broadway, and scope of cinema, rarely do Denver, 303-744-6799, “how to” instruction videos landmarktheatres.com/ come to mind. But there they denver/mayan-theatre are, hours upon hours of stepby-step techniques recorded for posterity: How to dance, how to cook, how to play tennis and, yes, even, how to make a movie. What then is John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection? It’s a magnificent “how to see” presented with analytical relish; a documentary directed by Julien Faraut about Gil de Kermadec, a filmmaker fascinated by tennis, specifically the tennis player John McEnroe. In 1966, de Kermadec, the first national technical director of tennis in France, produced a series of how-to-play-tennis industrials. These instructional movies — filmed in black and white with performers following prescribed and simple steps — break down each serve, forehand and backhand into simple mechanics. It’s as boring as you think it is. Faraut opens John McEnroe with this footage, showing us why de Kermadec was so dissatisfied with the results. What de Kermadec sought was an analysis of tennis in motion, not a construction of mechanics. His answer? Film the French Open. Using multiple cameras, de Kermadec turned his lens on the famous clay courts of Roland Garros, using the tournament to analyze what made each player unique. Fast forward to 1984, and de Kermadec finally finds the subject he’s been waiting for: a 26-year-old lefthanded McEnroe. Using three cameras, all of them trained on McEnroe — and only McEnroe — de Kermadec filmed every point, win and outburst. Thirty-odd years later, Faraut found the footage and finished de Kermadec’s seminal work. Faraut’s fascination with de Kermadec’s study, de Kermadec’s obsession with McEnroe and McEnroe’s relentless pursuit of perfection synthesize into one of the most original documentaries of the year. As mentioned above, de Kermadec did not film the matches; he filmed McEnroe. He filmed a man playing not against an opponent but himself. As McEnroe glides along the clay to strike a forehand, he pauses, runs to the net, then back to deliver the drop shot. We do not see the return volley, the other player or the emotional swing of the match; we just see McEnroe. Naturally, there is no way to discuss McEnroe without discussing his temper, his on-court tantrums and what they might signify. Faraut wonders if they were not a part of the McEnroe performance, even drawing a connection between McEnroe’s antics and Robert de Niro’s intimidating acting style. But with recent events at the U.S. Open, one cannot help but see the disparity between how McEnroe was lauded for his ability to draw on his emotion while Serena Williams was penalized for it. And yet there is an endless fascination with watching McEnroe on the court, outburst or not. For McEnroe, every point was a battle he refused to concede. It didn’t matter if it was Björn Borg, Jimmy Connors or Ivan Lendl standing on the opposite baseline, McEnroe’s greatest opponent would always be John McEnroe. What perfection Faraut and de Kermadec managed in bringing that eternal match to fruition. Boulder Weekly

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Four courses to try in and around Boulder County this week

menu THE TASTING

Trainwreck Pizza Infinitus Pizza Pie 145 Nickel St., Broomfield, infinituspie.com

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he folks at Infinitus Pizza Pie (locations Photos by staff in Broomfield, Wheat Ridge and downtown Denver, plus a food truck) know how to make artisan personal pizzas. Founded by a father-daughter duo who have a love for dough, sauce and cheese combinations, the shop has no shortage of pizza varieties to choose from. We bet on the Trainwreck, a classic combination of pepperoni, fresh sausage, mushroom, red onion and green pepper. The red sauce was rich in herbal flavors but not overdone. The toppings were ample, providing a nice combination of flavors in each bite. It was easy to down the entire pie, leaving us satisfied yet not overly stuffed afterwards. $7.50.

Pancita Burrito

Chicken Biscuit Sandwich

Tierra Y Fuego Taqueria at The Diaz Farm 2818 Jay Road, Boulder, thediazfarm.com

The West End Tavern 926 Pearl St., Boulder, thewestendtavern.com

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here is so much good happening at The Diaz Farm in North Boulder. What started as a one-acre urban farm has turned into a full-fledged food revelation, with a variety of quality produce, killer homemade breads and pastries, and now the Tierra Y Fuego food truck parked on-site. Open on weekends and Tuesdays, the food truck marries homemade tortillas with vegetables picked steps away. Choose from a selection of tacos, gorditas and burritos and a variety of veggies and meats. We opted for the smoked pork belly pancita burrito, which is moist and umami rich. The burrito is rolled with black beans and fresh greens, which are so flavorful it makes the burrito sing. $5.50.

he West End has elevated bar food to its highest level in a number of dishes, but their take on a chicken biscuit sandwich is sublime. A meaty, juicy chicken breast is brined in sweet tea — yes, sweet tea — then lightly fried, smothered in gravy and placed between two buttery biscuits. The sweet tea brings a little sweetness, sure, but it also provides a depth of flavor that you don’t get out of other pieces of fried chicken. The biscuit itself stands up to the challenge of reigning all that goodness in. Served with sweet potato fries, it’s a dish where comfort food meets just the right amount of refinement. $13.

Pumpkin Spice Latte Beer Spice Trade Brewing 7803 Ralston Road, Denver, spicetradebrewing.com

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eah, we admit it: We’re on the pumpkin spice/pumpkin beer trend. Deal with it. Spice Trade’s take on the seasonal brew is concocted with real pumpkin, spices, lactose, vanilla and freshly roasted Novo coffee beans. What it creates is a beer with a delightfully creamy mouthfeel, just the right amount of spice and a rich kick from the coffee. The ample pumpkin flavor mellows it all out. Try at the brewery while supplies last or in cans available throughout Boulder County. Prices vary.

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Boulder Weekly


Susan France

nibbles BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

CULTURED REVOLUTION

At harvest time, a Longmont farmer/ chef bottles ‘alive’ pepper sauces

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arcus McCauley doesn’t produce pickles, kimchi and hot sauce as an artisan hobby. The organic farmer and chef is a virtual fermentation evangelist on a mission to save the soil and our guts. To accomplish both goals in the future, we need to go back to our culinary past. “Our food is dead and full of preservatives. Our ancestors ate living foods — bread, cheese, wine, beer and pickles and grew organically. It was a healthier way to live and the food tasted better,” McCauley says. When the McCauley family sold their farm in

Boulder Weekly

Oklahoma and bought one halfway between Boulder and Longmont six years ago, pickling and fermenting were always part of the plan. “We had the farmer’s age-old dilemmas: Finding income for the winter and using food we grow that we couldn’t sell. I looked to my background in the kitchen to create products,” McCauley says. McCauley Family Farm grows dozens of organic produce items for a CSA, restaurants, farmers markets and stores. “The name of our business is Foremother Foods to honor my Mom and Grandma and the other women who passed along the skills to the next generation,” McCauley says.

One part of the company bottles several dozen varieties of pickled local vegetables, including Sweet Bread & Butter Pickles and Giardiniera. McCauley’s most popular items are the yellow Lemon Cucumber Pickles and Dilly Beans. “We will probably pickle 1,600 jars of green beans,” he says. Those are available on the shelf at farmers markets, Lucky’s Market and other stores. Meanwhile, the McCauley Ferments items including kimchi and tangy, crispy Farm Kraut are only available refrigerated. “Those are alive foods,” he says. see NIBBLES Page 46

September 13 , 2018 45


NIBBLES from Page 45 Susan France

McCauley’s variations on a kimchi theme include Radish Root Chi, Daikon Root Chi and Beet Green Chi. “The nutritious beet greens would have become compost. We rescued them to ferment,” he says. McCauley supports his fellow local farmers by having them grow the vegetables for pickles beyond what the crew can produce on his family farm. Then there is McCauley’s miraculous probiotic Picaflor Live Culture hot sauces, which are now available refrigerated in 12 states. “It gets its richness from natural fermentation. We make umami by the barrel. The peppers from our farm just sing; they are really amazing and sweet,” McCauley says. The farm saves Colorado-seasoned seeds for planting the following year. He bottles Picaflor Live Culture’s three varieties in a Boulder commercial kitchen. The yellow Boulder Sol sauce includes organic criolla sella peppers, garlic and cantaloupe. The red Srirawcha sauce is made with organic cayenne and Portugal peppers and local honey. The green Vida Verde sauce features organic jalapenos and garlic with Colorado applesauce for sweetness and texture. Instead of composting the residual chile seeds and skins, they are dehydrated and offered as fermented hot pepper flakes for use on pizzas and everything else edible. “Regenerative farming practices really matter. We are always working to return carbon into the soil and you can taste the result in the produce. It has an ecological and economic impact. Food preservation completes the loop by using everything the soil produces,” McCauley says. McCauley wants you to follow in his pickled footsteps as a gut-health alternative to probiotic supplements.

has closed at 1207 Pearl St. after only a year in business. ... Boulder-based Big Red F will open Jax Fish House and Post Brewing outposts in the terminal at Denver International Airport in 2019. By the way, TSA rules allow you to have fried chicken in your checked or carry-on bag but not gravy. ... Masonville Orchards grows more than 200 varieties of apples and pears that are available at local farmers markets, but the Ault-based farm also has a U-pick orchard open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. masonvilleorchard.com. ... Plan ahead: First Bite Restaurants, Boulder County’s restaurant week, offers three-course, $34 meals Nov. 9-17 at notable local eateries. firstbiteboulder.com. “Fermentation is safe and easy, and I really encourage everyone to try it at home. Go ahead and experiment with different vegetables. It gives you a living, breathing colony of microorganisms that produce great flavors. You can even use our hot sauce to inoculate your pickles,” he says. How to Re-pickle: Don’t toss that leftover pickle juice once you eat the last gherkin! Garden & Gun magazine suggests using the juice in the jar in dirty martinis, as a chicken marinade, in making mayo, in dressings instead of vinegar, as a tasty shot for alleviating muscle cramps and for cleaning the surface of a grill. I add various par-cooked veggies to the juice and end up with a jar of tastiness in the fridge.

Local food news

Boulder Food Rescue hosts its sixth annual Feast Fundraiser Sept. 14 at the Boulder JCC featuring Indian fare plus appetizers and desserts created from some of the 1,600 pounds of fresh produce that the non-profit saves every day and distributes by bicycle-pulled trailers. boulderfoodrescue.org ... The French Quarter Brasserie

Taste of the week

I’ve loved pickled beets since I was a kid. McCauley Family Farms produces perfectly simple pickled red beets that are less sweet, firmer and far more flavorful than commercial beet brands. The magenta roots are grown locally by Aspen Moon Farm. The break-out star of the farm’s lineup is Picaflor Live Culture Srirawcha Hot Sauce. The bright red refrigerated sauce includes organic cayenne and Portugal peppers grown on the McCauley farm and local Highland Honey. The taste is rich and nuanced, not harshly hot or acidic, with an appealingly smooth texture. It’s highly recommended.

Words to chew on

“Salt is one of our greatest culinary gifts, an incomparable condiment, an everyday necessity, and perhaps the most precious and invaluable of our kitchen staples. It goes into all our foods, even desserts, for a pinch in a cake batter, a pie crust, or the poaching syrup for fruit adds immeasurably to the finished product.” — James Beard John Lehndorff is a prep cook. Listen to Radio Nibbles podcasts: news.kgnu.org/category/radio-nibbles.

Oktoberfest at Redgarden: September 24 thru 29 Enjoy a special menu of authentic German food from our German Chef Marcus

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September 13 , 2018 47


community

ALl photos courtesy of Roam Cone

TABLE

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wo torn labrums in my hips,” says Emily Morris of the injury that led her to create a mobile ice cream operation. She’d just returned from a yearlong trip to New Zealand, where she fell in love with the Kiwi take on ice cream, and her entrepreneurial drive was locked in fifth gear while she rehabilitated. “Getting injured ... led me to having more time to delve into that idea of owning my own business,” Morris says. “I called the City of

Via ice cream

says. “It is a machine that they’ve been using in New Zealand for the past 30 years, and it basically has a drill bit on it, like an augur, and so you end up putting vanilla ice cream and frozen fruit into a funnel and then the drill blends it into a completely smooth soft serve,” Morris says. “It creates a really unique texture. It kind of whips it.” Morris says the ice cream is popular in the northern part of the South Island and the southern part of the North Island of New Zealand. It’s sold mostly in brick-andmortar shops, unlike her cart, Roam Cone. If you’ve never heard of New Zealand-style ice cream, you’re not alone; people from the island nation have been fooled by the moniker, too. “The second day I was in business I had a New Zealander say that she heard a rumor about Kiwis and ice cream and (when she tried the Roam Cone ice cream) she said, ‘I thought this was regular ice cream, I didn’t know it was special. Now that I think about it, I’ve never seen it in this country.’ She got really excited that she got to experience something from her childhood,”

Emily Morris of Roam Cone on using ice cream from New Zealand to tackle larger pursuits by Matt Cortina Boulder to see what it would be like to get a permit to make this ice cream business a reality, not really serious about it, but it turns out there was an opportunity.” And so Morris took the plunge in April this year. She used a degree in architecture to build a cart, used a background in freelance graphic design to develop a brand, and bought a unique machine that makes New Zealand-style ice cream. “It takes the idea of combining power tools with ice cream to make it even better,” she 48 September 13 , 2018

Morris says. The drilling whips Emily Morris built the the ice cream and fruit Roam Cone food truck from scratch, attaching mixture into a fluffy, a unique drill-like ice almost mousse-like cream maker that gives New Zealand-style ice texture, and the heapcream its characteristic ing doses of water and texture. fruit help to keep it light like sorbet. So far, Morris has been making products with commonly frozen fruit — berries, cherries, mangos, pineapples, etc. People can mix and match, and she often recommends adding in fresh banana for its texture and sweetness. Morris says she’s been playing with the idea of freezing her own fruit to expand flavor options, a list that already extends past what she had in New Zealand. Procuring fruit from local farmers markets is on the top of her to-do list. Launching a food truck business is not easy work, even though it’s — in theory — one of the more common ways for food professionals to own their first businesses. The realities of building a business, and a truck from scratch, presented immediate issues for Morris. “I kind of got to combine my skills of architecture and marketing and design and ice cream, but, you know, just because I have a degree in architecture doesn’t mean I have construction experience; the cart was much more complicated than I had intended,” Morris says. Boulder Weekly


Morris currently posts up at two locations in Boulder.

Opening day (just a few weeks ago) included a situation where her freezer stopped working, which is generally bad for ice cream businesses. She ripped her extension cord in half driving away when she forgot to unplug it. And she also learned the hard way that, in building the truck, design is different than execution. “On the way to (the opening site), my tire started smoking on the road because it was rubbing up against the wood part of the trailer,” Morris says. “But I did get open. Nothing too horrible as far as opening a business goes.” In fact, Morris says despite the initial frustration, it was the process of opening a business and scratching that entrepreneurial itch that she found she loved. As it turns out, ice cream is her first step in tackling much larger goals. “I think the biggest reason I wanted to do this is not necessarily because my dream is to own an ice cream trailer specifically, but my dream is to never stop learning and growing,” Morris says. “I purposely put myself in these situations just to see what I’d learn from it, and I know I’m sort of intentionally bringing myself to change my life path. I know doing that I’ll end up meeting a lot of people I otherwise wouldn’t have ever met.” Because ice cream (and food trucks in general) can be seasonal in Colorado, Morris says she’ll be using the winter and her experience this summer to address a bigger idea — a fund that would help entrepreneurs like herself attend shorter-term educational opportunities like trade classes, apprenticeships, boot camps, etc. It’s a work-around, she says, to the current educational system, which prevents people from getting the knowledge necessary to pursue their dreams of creation. “I have so many friends personally who are in the 20s age bracket, where they got their degree and they’re kind of lost still,” she says. “You don’t need to go to grad school and take out more loans to figure out the next step. If they had the same opportunity to take a couple months, financially and pressure free, learning a bunch of skills, they would all be much more [productive].” Morris says she would’ve benefited from a financial program like that, but bootstrapping Roam Cone herself has so far been a success, entrepreneurially and in the culinary sphere. Where next she’ll roam, and when, is to be determined — a freedom she’s glad to keep alive via a mobile operation. “We’ll start with ice cream and see what comes of it.” Find Morris and Roam Cone at 11th and Canyon or 1056 Boulder Canyon Drive, depending on the day. Check roamcone.com for more details. Boulder Weekly

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Boulder Weekly


drink

@boulderbeerco

Ray Sawhill/Wikimedia Commons

ON TAP: Backcountry

Pizza & Tap House. 2319 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder, 303-449-4285, backcountrypizzaandtaphouse.info

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here are more than 6,300 breweries in the U.S., according to the Brewers Association, a nonprofit that counts and supports craft breweries. And while we’d like to sample the brews at every single one, that’s simply not possible. For that, we welcome with open arms well-curated tap houses and the always-exciting Great American Beer Festival. Inspired by the Great British Beer Festival (established in 1977 and held every August), GABF was founded in 1982 by Boulder’s biggest beer champion, Charlie Papazian. Twenty-four breweries attended the inaugural event at Harvest House Hotel, a proverbial drop in the bucket compared to this year’s total of over 800 breweries pouring 3,800-plus beers at the Denver Convention Center.

Tour de brew: Backcountry Pizza & Tap House Ring in GABF with Annual Sour Sunday by Michael J. Casey That popularity has spread into an entire week of GABF goodies with just about every brewery and bar getting in on the fun. Special releases, theme days and deep discounts abound. And for Boulder County drinkers, the only place to start is at Backcountry Pizza & Tap House. With over 60 beers on draught and 300 more in the bottle, Backcountry is already the premiere tap house in the area. But on Sunday, Sept. 16, Backcountry ups the ante with their Annual Sour Sunday. Starting at 11 a.m., Backcountry will tap over 40 sour beers, most of them impossible to find on draught. From California’s Russian River Brewing Company, the brewery behind Pliny the Elder, to Texas’s Jester King Brewery, the Lone Star State’s answer to Belgium lambics; from a Berliner Weisse by Stone Brewing in Escondido, California, to a Berliner Weisse by August Schell Brewing Company in New Ulm, Minnesota. The Centennial state is also well represented in this embarrassment of riches, and if you’ve never tried a brew from Casey Brewing and Blending, here is your chance. Located in Glenwood Springs and founded by Troy Casey (no relation) in 2013, Casey Brewing and Blending focuses on Old World techniques in a New World setting. The ingredients are almost entirely local, fermented and aged in oak barrels and completely bottle conditioned. At last year’s Annual Sour Sunday, Backcountry poured the Funky Blender Saison Side A and Side B. These two Farmhouse variants showed off the range of the brewery’s blending technique, with Side A having a tarter, Champagne-like yeasty quality while Side B favored the grain bill in the blend. Apart, each beer was delicious; side-by-side, they were remarkable. And with Backcountry offering short pours, you can easily taste your way through a slew of sours you won’t find anywhere else. That includes Lagunitas Brewing Company’s Aunt Sally (a dry-hopped sweet tart sour mash ale) barrel-aged with Gewürztraminer grapes (an off-dry white wine grape that can exhibit a good deal of spice). There are plenty of boring beers in the world, but you won’t find them here. Let the festivities begin. Boulder Weekly

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ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Author Anne Carson describes

part of her creative process in this way: “Sometimes I dream a sentence and write it down. It’s usually nonsense, but sometimes it seems a key to another world.” I suspect you might be able to benefit from using a comparable trick in the coming days. That’s why you should monitor any odd dreams, seemingly irrational impulses or weird fantasies that arise in you. Although they may not be of any practical value in themselves, they could spur a train of thought that leads you to interesting breakthroughs.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: “The idea of liberation through

the suppression of desire is the greatest foolishness ever conceived by the human mind,” wrote philosopher E. M. Cioran. I agree that trying to deny or stifle or ignore our desires can’t emancipate us. In fact, I’m inclined to believe that freedom is only possible if we celebrate and honor our desires, marvel at their enigmas and respect their power. Only then can we hope to refine them. Only then can we craft them into beautiful, useful forces that serve us rather than confuse and undermine us. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to engage in this spiritual practice, Taurus.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: “Remember that sometimes not get-

ting what you want is a wonderful stroke of luck,” says the Dalai Lama. Ain’t that the truth! When I was 22 years old, there were two different women I desperately yearned for as if they were the Muse Queens of Heaven who would transform me into a great artist and quench my infinite passion. Fortunately, they both rejected me. They decisively set me free of my bondage to them. Later, when I was older and wiser, I realized that blending my fortunes with either of them would have led me away from my true destiny. I got lucky! In a similar but less melodramatic way, Gemini, I suspect you will also get lucky sometime soon.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: Don’ts for Boys or Errors of Conduct

Corrected was an advice book for boys published in 1902. Among many other strictures and warnings, it offered this advice: “Don’t giggle. For the love of decency, never

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astrology

giggle.” There was addifloat through her awaretional counsel in the same ness. Here’s one of her bulvein: “Don’t be noisy. letins: “Stage 1. me: I’m the The guffaw evinces less cutest thing in the world. enjoyment than the quiet Stage 2. me, two seconds smile.” Another exhorlater: no, I’m a freaking Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob tation: “Don’t tease. Be goblin. Stage 3. me, two Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES witty, but impersonal.” seconds after that: I’m the and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio In accordance with astrocutest goblin in the world.” horoscopes are also available by phone at logical omens, I hereby I’m guessing that many of 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. proclaim that all those you Libras have reached instructions are utterly the end of your own perwrong for you right now. sonal version of Stage 2. To sweetly align yourself with cosmic rhythms, you should You’ve either already slipped into Stage 3, or soon will. No giggle and guffaw and tease freely. If you’re witty — and later than October 1, you’ll be preparing to glide back into I hope you will be — it’ll serve you well to be affectionate Stage 1 again. and personable.

LEO

SCORPIO

obvious and adding the meaningful,” writes designer John Maeda. “The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak up,” says artist Hans Hofmann. “Simplicity strips away the superfluous to reveal the essence,” declares a blogger named Cheo. I hope these quotes provide you with helpful pointers, Leo. You now have the opportunity to cultivate a masterful version of simplicity.

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: “There’s no such thing as love,” said Scorpio painter Pablo Picasso, “there are only proofs of love.” I’m tempted to believe that’s true, especially as I contemplate the current chapter of your life story. The evidence seems clear: you will thrive by engaging in practical demonstrations of how much you care. You’ll be wise to tangibly help and support and encourage and inspire everyone and everything you love. To do so will make you eligible for blessings that are, as of this moment, still hidden or unavailable.

VIRGO

SAGITTARIUS

JULY 23-AUG. 22: “Simplicity is about subtracting the

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Your keynote is the Japanese word shizuka. According to photographer Masao Yamamoto, it means “cleansed, pure, clear and untainted.” One of his artistic practices is to wander around forests looking in the soil for “treasures” that emanate shizuka. So in his definition, the term isn’t about being scrubbed or sanitized. Rather, he’s interested in pristine natural phenomena that are unspoiled by civilization. He regards them as food for his soul. I mention this, Virgo, because now is an excellent time for you to get big doses of people and places and things that are cleansed, pure, clear and untainted.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Libran blogger Ana-Sofia Cardelle

writes candidly about her relationship with herself. She keeps us up to date with the ever-shifting self-images that

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: According to a Pew Research Study,

nearly 75 percent of Americans say they talk to God, but only 30 percent get a reply. I’m guessing the latter figure will rise dramatically for Sagittarian Americans in the next three weeks, however. Why? Because the astrological indicators suggest that authorities of all kinds will be more responsive than usual to Sagittarians of all nationalities. Help from higher powers is likely to be both more palpable and more forthcoming. Any communications you initiate with honchos, directors and leaders have a better-thannormal chance of being well-received.

brag. In fact, she drew on this constant turmoil to fuel her substantial output of creative writing. But the fact is that not all of us thrive on such ongoing uproar. As perversely glamorous and appealing as it might seem to certain people, many of us can do fine without it. According to my analysis, that will be true for you in the coming weeks. If you have a diary, you might justifiably write, “Hallelujah! I am not a battlefield of emotions right now!”

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Anthropologist Margaret Mead had

definite ideas about “the ways to get insight.” She named them as follows: “to study infants; to study animals; to study indigenous people; to be psychoanalyzed; to have a religious conversion and get over it; to have a psychotic episode and get over it.” I have my own list of ways to spur insight and inspiration, which includes: to do walking meditations in the woods on a regular basis, no matter what the weather; to engage in long, slow sex with a person you love; to spend a few hours reviewing in detail your entire life history; to dance to music you adore for as long as you can before you collapse from delighted exhaustion. What about you, Aquarius? What are your reliable ways to get insight? I suggest you engage in some of them, and also discover a new one. You’re in the Flood of Radical Fresh Insights Phase of your astrological cycle.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Stanley Kubrick made masterful films, but most of them bore me. I regard John Ashbery as a clever and innovative poet, but I’ve never been excited by his work. As for painter Mark Rothko, I recognize his talent and intelligence, but his art leaves me empty. The music of Nora Jones is pretty and technically impeccable, but it doesn’t move me. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I invite you to make the kinds of fine distinctions I’m describing here. It will be important for you to be faithful to your subjective responses to things, even as you maintain an objective perspective about them and treat them with respect.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: One day in October 1926, author Virginia Woolf inscribed in her diary, “I am the usual battlefield of emotions.” It was a complaint, but also a

September 13 , 2018 55


Dear Dan: I’m a 40-something gay male. I’m single and cannot get a date or even a hookup. I’m short, overweight, average-looking and bald. I see others, gay and straight, having long-term relationships, getting engaged, getting married, and it makes me sad and jealous. Some of them are jerks — and if them, why not me? Here’s the part that’s hard to admit: I know something is wrong with me, but I don’t know what it is or how to fix it. I’m alone and I’m lonely. I know your advice can be brutal, Dan, but what do I have to lose? —Alone And Fading Dear AAF: “AAF said to be brutal, so I’m going to start there: You might not ever meet anyone,” said Michael Hobbes, a HuffPost reporter who recently wrote a lengthy piece about gay lonliness. “At every age, in every study, gay men are less likely to be partnered, cohabiting or married than our straight and lesbian counterparts. Maybe we’re damaged, maybe we’re all saving ourselves for a Hemsworth, but spending our adult lives and twilight years without a romantic partner is a real possibility. It just is.” And it’s not just gay men. In Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone, sociologist Eric Klinenberg unpacked this remarkable statistic: More than 50 percent of adult

Boulder Weekly

SAVAGE by Dan Savage

Americans are single and live alone, up from 22 percent in 1950. Some are unhappy about living alone, but it seemed that most — at least according to Klinenberg’s research — are content. “Maybe there is something wrong with AAF, but maybe he’s just on the unlucky side of the statistics,” said Hobbes. “Finding a soul mate is largely out of our control. Whether you allow your lack of a soul mate to make you bitter, desperate or contemptuous is. So be happy for the young jerks coupling up and settling down. Learn to take rejection gracefully — the way you want it from the dudes you’re turning down — and when you go on a date, start with the specificity of the person sitting across from you, not what you need from him. He could be your Disney prince, sure. But he could also be your museum buddy or your podcast cohost or your afternoon 69er or something you haven’t even thought of yet.” Dear Dan: I am a 55-year-old gay male. I am hugely overweight and have

Love

not had much experience with men. I go on a variety of websites trying to make contact with people. However, if anyone says anything remotely complimentary about me, I panic and run. A compliment about my physical appearance? I shut down the profile. I don’t like being like this. I just believe in being honest. And if I’m honest, I’m ugly. The face, even behind a big-ass beard, is just not acceptable. I have tried therapy, and it does nothing. How do I get past being ugly and go out and get laid? —Unappealing Giant Loser Yearns Dear UGLY: You say you’re ugly, UGLY, but there are some people who disagree with you — the people who compliment you on your appearance, for instance. “I’m not sure I even believe in the word ‘ugly’ anymore,” said Hobbes. “No matter what you look like, some percentage of the population will be attracted to you. Maybe it’s 95 percent or maybe it’s 5 percent, but they are out there. When you find them, do

two things: First, believe them. Second, shut up about it.” In other words: Just because you wouldn’t want to sleep with you, UGLY, that doesn’t mean no one wants to sleep with you. “I remember reading an interview with Stephen Fry, where he said that when he first started out as an actor, people would come up to him and say, ‘You were so great in that play!’ and his first response would be, ‘No, I was terrible,’” said Hobbes. “He thought he was being modest, but what he was really doing, he realized later, was being argumentative. Eventually, he started to just say ‘Thank you.’” Hobbes thinks you should try to be like Fry, a big dude with a cute husband: “The next time someone tells him they’re into big dudes with beards, don’t argue, don’t panic and don’t hesitate. Just say ‘Thank you’ and let the conversation move on.” Follow Michael Hobbes on Twitter @RottenInDenmark and listen to his podcast You’re Wrong About..., available on iTunes. Send questions to mail@savagelove. net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visit ITMFA.org.

September 13, 2018 57


weed between the lines

by Sidni West

Baby Boomers smoking more

G Public domain

Boulder Weekly

etting old is exhausting, amirite? After destroying the planet and electing a 70-year-old predator who wholeheartedly believes that people are impressed by fake tanner, Baby Boomers are ready to chill out. They’re exiting the workforce, cashing in on the decades of equity they’ve amassed from their homes and moving to Florida so they can blow all of your inheritance money on Disney cruises and expensive tech gadgets that confuse them. As retirees, they can finally focus on their favorite hobbies like golf, calling you twice a week to ask why you haven’t given them any grandchildren yet, and now apparently, getting stoned. According to a study by researchers at NYU School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR), cannabis use is becoming more prevalent among older people: Nine percent of adults aged 50-64 said they’d used marijuana in the past year, which is double the number in the same age group in 2006. Nearly 55 percent said they’d tried it at least once in their lives. Three percent of adults 65 and older said they were current cannabis users and 22 percent said they’d tried it at least once. Baby Boomers are generally defined as people born between 1946 and 1964. First, let me add that I do hold a lot of respect for older people and it would be incredibly naive to think that I, at 27, have somehow surpassed those who have seen and experienced much more history and time on this planet than I have. Boomers should be proud their legacy includes the Civil Rights Movement and Woodstock, which I can

respect because fighting for equality and eating hallucinogenic drugs at music festivals are some of my highest values. Although cannabis users are more likely to be young adults, Baby Boomers were the first generation to experiment with more recreational drugs than their parents. Their formative years happened during the ’60s and ’70s, when America was so high on weed and all that post-war prosperity that we just started sending people to the moon. Then came the ’80s, when they sold-out and bought-in. They got jobs and food processors and traded in smoking joints for taking coke bumps off bathroom mirrors. But now they’re going back to the green. Since we live in a time where attitudes around weed are progressing, stigma is declining and access to the plant improves, Americans of all ages seem to be giving cannabis a try, for either recreational or medicinal purposes. Boomers with prior cannabis experience see this and are now reliving their glory days by increasingly using it. In the study, researchers analyzed responses from 17,608 adults aged 50 and older from the 2015-2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Participants were asked about marijuana use, including when they first used it and whether they used it in the past year. Most seniors who currently use cannabis first used it as teens when it initially surged in popularity during the 1960s and 1970s. This doesn’t mean they’ve been smoking for all these years, but most current users are by no means new to it. In addition, some adults who used marijuana in the past year (15 percent of users aged 50-64 and 22.9 percent of those 65 and older) reported that a doctor had recommended it to them, reflecting the substantial use of marijuana for medical purposes. However, Boomers with prior experience shouldn’t just swing by the dispensary to start toking up like they did when they were younger. The potency is much higher in today’s strains, so a smaller amount will have a much bigger effect. Also, the ability to metabolize the drug changes with age. The generational grass is always greener, so even though they fuelled the war on drugs and of course, in a final fuck-you attempt to dissolve the world on their way out, elected Donald Trump as the last Boomer president, at least some of them are chill. So the next time an old person launches into the theory that Millennials are lazy and we can’t afford houses because we spend all of our money on avocado toast, just correct them: “Actually, it’s cause we spend all our money on weed,” and pass them a blunt.

September 13, 2018 59


cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

Marijuana heats up Texas Senate race

M

Gage Skidmore

arijuana and drug legalization is turning into a red-hot issue in Texas’s red-hot U.S. Senate race between incumbent Republican Senator Ted Cruz and his Democratic challenger Congressman Beto O’Rourke. A piece on the Marijuana Moment website by Kyle Jaeger sketches out how pot (and other drug) legalization is increasingly shaping the race. O’Rourke has made marijuana legalization a major plank in his campaign platform. He wants to end marijuana prohibition at the federal level. He also supports expunging the criminal records of people who have been convicted of non-violent marijuana offenses. And as a Congressman he has supported several proposed marijuana reform bills in the House, including measures that would expand marijuana research, increase access to medical marijuana for veterans, and prevent federal interference in states that have legalized recreational or medical pot. He was the lead sponsor of a bill that would repeal a law that reduces highway funding for states that don’t automatically suspend driver’s licenses for people convicted of drug offenses. For his part, Cruz has been on record since 2016 as supporting the right of the states to decide on whether marijuana should be legal without federal interference. However he also says he wouldn’t personally vote in favor of legalization in a state referendum. While campaigning in Colorado for the Republican presidential nomination in April 2016, he said: “The people of Colorado have made a different decision. I respect that decision.” “It is an opportunity for the rest of the country to see what happens here in Colorado, what happens in Washington state, see the states implement the policies,” he added. “If it works well, other states may choose to follow. If it doesn’t work well, other states

Boulder Weekly

Public Domain

“I knew we were addressing a taboo topic, one that conventional wisdom dictated that only potheads, hard-core libertarians and political suicides ever brought up,” he continued. “But I also knew that Juarez (the city across the border from El Paso) had gone beyond the pale and it was time to place all options on the table, even those that had been unthinkable, for me as well as others, just a year ago.” Polling has shown the race between Cruz and O’Rourke to be close, with O’Rourke trailing Cruz by four points in an average of polls. The race could well be decided by Hispanic voters, who usually trend Democratic. But many Hispanic voters are also socially conservative, and Cruz received substantial Hispanic support six years ago. As is the case nationally, those arrested for marijuana offenses in Texas are disproportionately Hispanic (and black), so O’Rourke’s call for expunging the criminal records of non-violent pot offenders is probably resonating in those communities. Cruz’s attempt to characterize O’Rourke as personally favoring legalization of all drugs is probably intended at least in part to shore up his support among socially conservative Hispanics. A 2018 Quinnipiac University survey found that 61 percent of Texas voters favored ending federal marijuana prohibition. Earlier surveys have found majorities of Texans favor legalizing recreational marijuana in the state. (Texas doesn’t allow citizen initiatives, but the Texas legislature presumably could put the issue on the ballot.) Marijuana isn’t the centerpiece of the campaign, but it could be the issue that decides a close election. And, conceivably, which party will control the U.S. Senate. Marijuana and drug policy in general may be a deciding factor in the Texas U.S. Senate race.

may choose not to follow.” While he has taken a federalist approach to marijuana, he hasn’t signed onto Colorado Senator Cory Gardner’s bill to keep the federal government from enforcing the anti-pot provisions of the Controlled Substances Act in states that have legalized recreational or medical pot. Cruz is also running an attack ad accusing O’Rourke of favoring the legalization of all drugs. “With opioids ravaging so many American communities, Congressman Beto O’Rourke’s radical resolution to legalize all narcotics — including heroin and other deadly opioids — is looking worse and worse all the time,” Cruz tweeted. Cruz’s charge stems from an amendment to a 2009 El Paso City Council resolution on curbing violence near the U.S./Mexico border that O’Rourke had sponsored while he was a council member. The amendment called for considering an end to drug prohibition as one of the options for curbing the violence. O’Rourke’s supporters counter that calling for consideration of ending drug prohibition is not the same as supporting it. In his 2011 book Dealing Death and Drugs, O’Rourke wrote that the amendment was “artless, and even inaccurate” but that “it got the point across.”

September 13 , 2018 61


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9.13.18 Boulder Weekly  
9.13.18 Boulder Weekly