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contents NEWS:

Immigration policies spark debate between Colorado state representatives by Ximena Leyte

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....................................................................... NEWS:

Youth case against the COGCC in court, again by Angela K. Evans

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Is the new PUC more favorable to renewable energy? by Christi Turner

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....................................................................... OVERTONES:

An interview with Sam Bush by Sarah Haas

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....................................................................... DEEP DISH:

Riffs Urban Fare puts a spin on classics without losing what makes it classic by Caitlin Rockett

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departments

5 THE HIGHROAD: Hallelujah, Trump rushes to aid the needy! 6 DANISH PLAN: The Oroville Dam: A cautionary tale from 1969 6 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views

27 ARTS & CULTURE: A star-studded week 31 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 37 POETRY: by Jonathan Bracker 38 SCREEN: ‘Rings’ can die in a hole 39 FILM: A personal history of race in ‘I Am Not Your Negro’ 43 CUISINE: The 10 weirdest food pairings you just have to try 48 DRINK: Tour de Brew: Longs Peak Pub & Taphouse 53 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 55 S  AVAGE LOVE: Taking one for the team? 57 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: 1,000 galaxies 59 CANNABIS CORNER: The Rohrabacher Bill: A congressional compromise on pot? 61 IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: An irreverent view of the world Boulder Weekly

February 16, 2017 3


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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Editor, Joel Dyer Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Entertainment Editor, Amanda Moutinho Special Editions Editor, Caitlin Rockett Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley Interns, Billy Singleton, Carolyn Davidson, Preston Bryant, Ayako Itoi, Ximena Leyte SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Senior Account Executive, David Hasson Account Executive, Julian Bourke Inside/Outside Account Executive, Andrea Ralston Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo

February 16, 2017 Volume XXIV, Number 28 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2016 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

the

Highroad Hallelujah, Trump rushes to aid the needy! by Jim Hightower

O

f all the people suffering economic pain today, who should get priority attention from the new president and Congress? Regular folks in our country say that those on the lower rungs of the economic ladder — the poor and downtrodden working class — ought to be the priority. But, then, regular folks don’t run Congress — or Trump’s White House. Boulder Weekly

The Donald’s working-class voters must be stunned to see that his top economic priority is not them, but a tiny group dwelling in luxury at the very tippy-top of the ladder: Wall Street bankers. Rather than pushing an urgently-needed FDR-style jobs program, Trump & Company are rushing to aid the richest Americans at the expense of the working class, actually proposing to unleash the banksters to defraud and gouge workaday people. For example, they want to save the poor financial giants from a consumer protection called the “fiduciary rule.” If you’ve got a 401(k) retirement plan, chances are it’s managed by a firm of financial advisors — so this rule simply requires them to act in your best interest, rather than shifting your money into risky investments that pay them bigger commissions. Prior to the enact-

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

ment of this ethics provision in 2015, many advisors were serving themselves, gleefully ripping off their customers (mostly ordinary working families) to the tune of $17 billion a year! That’s immoral, but it’s real money, so the industry has been lobbying hard — but unsuccessfully — to kill the legal requirement that money advisors deal honestly with clients. Now, however, they’ve got a president who appreciates dishonest business dealings and is going all out to liberate them from the shackles of ethics. “Hallelujah,” shout Wall Street’s bankers. “Free at last, free at last! Thank Donald Almighty, we are free at last”... to gouge consumers. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. February 16, 2017 5


danish plan The Oroville Dam: A cautionary tale from 1969 by Paul Danish

C

urt Gentry was no Nostradamus or Edgar Cayce, but he made a prediction in 1969 that would have done either of them proud — and which for a few hours last Sunday looked like it might come to pass. And it still might. He predicted the collapse of the Oroville Dam. Gentry, who died in 2014, was a San Francisco newspaper man turned author. His best-known book was probably the 1974 best seller Helter Skelter, an account of the Charles Manson case, which he wrote with chief Manson prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi. But in 1969, he wrote a fictional account of the destruction of California by an earthquake and tsunami. That book, The Last Days of the Late, Great State of California, was in the tradition of Edward Bellamy’s novel Looking Backward, in that most of it is devoted to a discussion of California’s post-war cultural and political trends from the perspective of a future historian writing about the lost Golden State. But the climactic chapter is a rattling, good catastrophe yarn in its own right. And the collapse of the Oroville Dam got a prominent billing in it. Last week’s news reports of the damage to the Oroville Dam’s main spillway, the narrowly averted collapse of its emergency spillway, the emergency evacuation of 200,000 people living downstream of the dam, and the continuing potential for catastrophe from further storms and Sierra snowmelt, produced a lot of eerie parallels with Gentry’s fiction. Here are some of the passages regarding the dam from Gentry’s book, starting with his description of conditions at 3:12 p.m. on a Friday in early spring, a minute before the putative quake began: For more than a week the unseasonably warm rain had been melting snow in the high mountains of Northern California, sending torrents of water downhill into the streams... Behind Oroville, the world’s highest earth-filled dam, swirled nearly 3.5 million acre-feet of water ... 3:13 p.m. At this moment buildings were toppling in Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Napa, and even Sacramento — a full 75 miles east of 6 February 16, 2017

the San Andreas Fault. At Oroville, 150 miles away, ominous cracks appeared in the dam ... 4:25 p.m. The whole world is watching Oroville. This small Northern California gold rush town, whose usual population is just under 10,000, is almost completely deserted now, and there is an ominous feeling as you drive down the empty streets ... To the south of here, much of the Sacramento Valley is just a few feet above sea level ... Again, here is the list of cities and towns ordered evacuated because of the flood threat ... Later: Here’s the bulletin we’ve all been waiting for. A spokesman for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has just told newsmen he believes the danger from the Oroville Dam has now passed. “If it was going to break,” he said, “it would probably have done so before this.” This is especially good news because many of the roads are still jammed and large numbers of people ... emergency facilities are being established at ... THE OROVILLE DAM HAS BROKEN! WHAT IS DESCRIBED AS “A MOUNTAIN OF WATER” HAS COMPLETELY OBLITERATED THE CITY OF OROVILLE AND IS NOW MOVING ON GRIDLEY. FOR AN EYEWITESS REPORT WE TAKE YOU TO OUR AIRWATCH HELICOPTER ... It’s terrible, oh, it’s terrible. It’s picking up cars as though they were toys. I can see a farmhouse down there, and people on the roof. Oh, God, now both the house and the peope are gone and it’s crashing on — Highway 70 — jammed with stalled traffic. The people see it now. They’re getting out of their cars and starting to run. Oh, my God. Gone, all gone. It must be ten miles wide now and a hundred, no, two or three hundred feet tall. Nothing stops it ... I’m going to be sick ... ... thought the water would disperse, spreading over a large area, but instead the valley acted as a giant funnel ... it shot through the Suisun Straits into San Francisco Bay with the velocity of a hurricane ... not a trace of the Golden Gate Bridge remains ... Gentry was talking about the sudden collapse of the entire dam, not just the emergency spillway, which is see DANISH PLAN Page 8

letters Longmont a pro-unity, pro-justice city

Thanks to City Council Member Polly Christensen, in December 2016 Longmont joined a host of cities across the United States, such as Eugene, Oregon; Seattle, Washington; and Cincinnati, Ohio, who have passed antihate resolutions. Such action is necessary in light of hate incidents toward racial and ethnic minorities and the LGBT community and even here, with the recent bomb threat to the Jewish Community Center in Boulder. A New York Times article, “U.S. Hate Crimes Surge 6%, Fueled by Attacks on Muslims” (Nov. 14, 2016), reports FBI data showing that attacks on American Muslims surged last year and drove an overall increase in hate crime against all groups. Council Member Christensen’s “Resolution to Reaffirm our Constitutional Rights and Our Community Values” reads (in part) as follows: “The City Council of Longmont, Colorado, resolves to reaffirm our Constitutional rights and the rights of the Amendments to the Constitution. We further resolve to confirm our community values as a safe, healthy, respectful, and welcoming community with fair opportunities for all residents to live, work, and play in Longmont ... The people of Longmont stand together to protect and respect each other, no matter what our differences.” The vote for the resolution was 4-3, with Gabe Santos, Brian Bagley and Bonnie Finley voting against. The Longmont Times Call editorial, “Support Longmont ‘values’ resolution, if we can agree on its meaning” (Dec. 12, 2016),

gave its support to the resolution. Still, surprisingly, I could find no statement of this resolution anywhere on the City of Longmont’s website and no ensuing action. In these days of ICE deportations, this resolution needs to be posted as a “sign on the doorposts of thy house and on thy gates.” And Longmont should consider becoming a “sanctuary city.” Edna Loehman/Longmont

Back to the muni future

I listened to the interview with Boulder Councilman Sam Weaver on KGNU’s Connections show on Friday, Jan. 13. It reminded me why Boulder began exploring municipalization in the first place. It all began several years ago when independent studies by a citizens’ group and by the City determined that we could reduce our carbon pollution emissions by 60 percent without raising rates. We then realized that with a municipal utility we could have local control. We wouldn’t have to go through both Xcel and the Public Utilities Commission to simply get permission for things like buying and selling renewable energy with our neighbors, or enabling high-reliability zones around hospitals or high-tech facilities. With a municipal utility, decisions about our energy future will be made by people we can have lunch with — City Council and Energy Advisory Board members. It has also come to light that a municipal utility could unleash local entrepreneurs in the energy sector. Since that initial realization, the costs of see LETTERS Page 8

Boulder Weekly


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renewables have plunged more rapidly than the original modeling anticipated. Thus the economic outlook for a municipal utility is looking better than ever. I was proud to learn that since the early days of the muni exploration, the City has followed through on its commitment to reducing its contribution to carbon pollution by 34 percent between 2008 and 2015. This is particularly encouraging because focus on local action is more important now than it ever has been. So I agree with what people are saying: It’s time to power forward with Boulder Light and Power. (For those interested in listening to the show in its entirety, it is archived on the KGNU website: kgnu.org/connections). Alishaunia Cox/Boulder

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The Colorado State Senate will soon consider a bill to join the National Popular Vote Agreement. This bill would make Colorado part of a compact of states who agree to send all their electoral votes to the candidate who receives the largest popular vote for president. The compact will go into effect only if states representing a majority of the Electoral College join. We are 61 percent of the way there now, with 11 other states already on board. It’s time for Colorado to step up and join this compact. Right now not every-

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one’s vote is equal in electing a president. That’s why, in 2016, the candidate who won the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes did not become president. It just makes sense that the person who gets the most votes should become president. This is called democracy. It’s a change whose time has come. If the framers of our Constitution were around now they would favor women and people of color’s right to vote, they would oppose slavery and they would support electing our president by majority vote. The Electoral College was a good idea when it was created. But it is no longer necessary. The non-partisan League of Women Voters has studied this issue intensively and strongly supports this compact; believing the Electoral College should be abolished. This week the National Popular Vote Agreement, SB 17-099, will be heard in committee at our State Capitol. Please contact the chair of the State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee, Ray Scott (ray.scott.senate@state.co.us 303-866-3077), to voice your support for democracy. Shari Malloy/Longmont

DANISH PLAN from Page 6

off to a side on a hill. Officials have said that if the emergency spillway failed, a mere 30-foot high wall of water would have gone down the Feather River, not a 300-foot one. These are the same “officials” who said the emergency spillway was designed to accommodate a flow of 250,000 cubic feet a second; a flow of 12,500 cubic feet a second for just a few hours caused enough erosion to bring it to the brink of failure and prompt a mandatory evacuation order for 200,000 people. Not that a 30-foot high wall of water couldn’t do some serious damage. In 1965, a flash flood sent a 6-foot wall of water down Platte River in Denver. It did half a billion dollars in damage ($3.8 billion in today’s dollars). The California authorities who ordered the evacuation lucked out. Had the emergency spillway failed when they thought it would, about an hour-and-ahalf after they ordered the evacuation,

the wall of water would have hit thousands of people on the roads, just as Gentry predicted. There’s a lesson in all this for the City of Boulder and the University of Colorado, which are keen on annexing and developing the land CU owns southwest of U.S. 36 on South Boulder Creek. The property is a mined-out gravel pit situated as much as 35 feet below South Boulder Creek, which is held back by a berm. Upstream is Gross Reservoir, which holds 40,000 acre-feet; the Denver Water Board wants to raise the dam and double its capacity. The lesson is simple: Don’t build in a flood hazard area. Nature is less than impressed by the predictions of hydrologists and the assurances of civil engineers — and can be infinitely creative in finding unexpected ways to destroy your property and drown your kids. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


letters LETTERS from Page 8

felt so satisfying. Which is why I must consult the nearest mirror immediately and decide what I’m willing to sacrifice to fight for what the United States means — because many more, much heavier, well-oiled boots will soon drop. Like others, I naively showed up at the Table Mesa Station just minutes before the bus I was to ride. Seeing the immense, caffeine-pounding crowd ahead of me, I knew I’d never get on. Wearing my backpack of things I wondered if you needed at a demonstration, it also became clear I wouldn’t meet my friends at another stop as we’d planned. I’d probably never make it to Denver. Then, magically, extra buses appeared, coordinated by RTD, and we gratefully climbed on. Like much of the colorful, pussyhat-wearing, sign-bearing, increasingly hopeful crowd meandering through helpful Denver Police Department cordons downtown, I’d never joined a demonstration. And I took pictures. A lot of pictures. As if I’d accomplished something. Maybe the successively larger counts of our numbers encouraged me. Later, eating the meal we self-consciously joked about as “bouge-y,” our group asked ourselves, without clear answers, what’s next? But many U.S. communities don’t have Park-n-Rides. They don’t have buses. And certainly not local governments that will lift a paperclip to help demonstrators, let alone pay RTD drivers overtime to bail us out. And you’ve seen the president’s tweets in response to our protest against his bigotry, misogyny, disrespect for the rule of law and ethical convention, and paltry-orange, fascistic narcissism. That some administration official finally amended the president’s angry, hurt response to our protest against his rhetoric and so-called platform only means that one person near him feels obligated to acknowledge the First Amendment. But what about other Americans, in those other kinds of communities? What about the Department of Justice’s new leadership — how do you think they’ll “encourage” Denver P.D. and other departments through funding (or cuts) to threaten demonstrators? When will we need to commit to actual hardship, to putting our own safety on the line in order to live in a country that doesn’t deport lifelong, taxpaying, hardworking residents? Or register, which is to say, persecute, a particular religion? Or defund public education? The time to answer such questions has come. Darin Graber/Boulder Boulder Weekly

Danish…wrong

Paul Danish missed the point by a wide margin in his column [Re: “Will Trump be the New Lincoln?” Feb. 2]. Mere attribution of statesman-like qualities via some quashed secession scenario hardly burnishes the appeal of the malevolent primate. And, more importantly, Danish barely broaches the question of why California is even considering secession? The third largest state by landmass with the highest gross state product, California is also a bastion of cultural diversity and home to forward-thinking business and tech innovators and entrepreneurs. It’s agricultural output, which depends on a migrant workforce, is a linchpin in our national food supply. Sure, the Calexit idea had traction before Trump was ushered into office with the help of Putin’s hackers and Comey’s strategically timed leaks. But now the “hyperventilating progressives” are even more concerned. California, with its smog and gridlock, has made strenuous and successful efforts over decades to increase fuel efficiency standards and improve air quality. Having endured a drought likely influenced by climate change and perturbations of the jet stream, California continues moving to decarbonize its economy and embrace the renewable energy revolution now underway. Trump, his eyes firmly locked on the rearview mirror while championing his regressive worldview, is a dire threat. With the white-supremacistIslamaphobe Bannon pulling the Donald’s strings, and oilman Tillerson set to guide foreign policy, the shape of things to come is odious. Not to mention climate change skeptic Pruitt who is likely to be named head of the EPA, if it’s not abolished outright. In real terms Trump bears a much greater resemblance to Andrew Jackson than to Lincoln. The slave-owning, Constitution-flouting Jackson was an avowed enemy of indigenous Americans. Do some quick research on our seventh president. You’ll find his ghost, not Lincoln’s, hovering around the Oval Office. Danish closes with a revenge fantasy of Mad Dog Mattison and Trump snarkily crushing “the resistance” with the First Marine Division and a naval blockade. Sorry, Paul! The resistance to Trump and most everything he represents, as evidenced by the popular vote and massive marches from sea to shining sea and around the globe, is not confined to California. It’s in the DNA of patriotic Americans who are not conned by the isolationist avatar of angst, fear and greed. Tim Gale/Boulder

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NEWS

Immigration policies spark debate between Colorado state representatives by Ximena Leyte

A

nimosity against the undocumented immigrant community in the United States has surged since Donald Trump announced his candidacy for the U.S. presidency and if news reports are to be believed, the hate and discrimination has only increased now that he is the 45th President of the United States. On Jan. 25, Trump signed the Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements executive order which does several things. It allows for the hiring of an additional 5,000 Border Patrol agents; the ending of “catch and release” by making detention mandatory; the construction of detention facilities along the southern border; and makes it possible for state and local law enforcement to perform the duties of immigration officers. On Feb. 14, Reuters reported that nearly 700 undocumented immigrants had been arrested around the country in raids said to be aimed at undocumented persons who had committed serious crimes. But as has been widely reported, numerous people whose only crime was the lack of documentation were swept up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers. Even as headlines reporting these so-called “target raids” heighten fears in the undocumented community, states and municipalities are trying to figure out how to respond, and the proposed solutions thus far are anything but consistent. Some lawmakers want to protect those living in the country without proper documentation, while others want to help expose such people. In Colorado, lawmakers are considering two very different bills: one that could provide more protection to undocumented immigrants, the other intended to increase deportation and prevent local and state officials from creating “sanctuaries,” in essence safe zones wherein police and other law enforcement personnel are instructed to ignore a person’s citizenship status. One of the key points in Trump’s executive order regarding border security empowers state and local officials to operate as immigration officers, something numerous municipalities, including Boulder, have said they will defy. But this unwillingness to comply doesn’t sit well with everyone. Colorado Springs Rep. Dave Williams has proposed a bill, titled the Colorado Politicians Accountability Act, that would punish elected officials who create sanctuary jurisdictions. Under Williams’ bill, such officials would be charged with a class 4 felony for “rendering assistance to an illegal alien.” If found to have protected an undocumented immigrant in any manner specified under the bill, officials would be facing two to six years of imprison10 February 16, 2017

ment and a fine ranging from $2,000 to $500,000. The bill would also allow the victim of a crime committed by an undocumented person within the sanctuary jurisdiction to sue officials for nearly $2 million, funds that would be expected to come out of the officials’ own pockets. Only those officials voting in favor of a sanctuary or complying with sanctuary policies without attempting to change those policies would be subject to the law. Williams’ bill also says its provisions override those of the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act, which protects elected officials from lawsuits stemming from their official political actions. According to a number of media reports, Williams has said his motivation for the bill was primarily influenced by a case in California wherein 32-year-old Kate Steinle was killed by an undocumented immi-

grant who had been deported several times prior to the murder, but who had been protected from a sixth deportation by San Francisco’s sanctuary city policies. Williams describes the bill as “a common sense bill” that he says has received positive feedback from voters and constituents in his district. “If everyday Americans have to suffer the good and bad consequences of their actions, their consequences and their behaviors, why should politicians be any different?” Williams says. If the bill passes the judiciary committee, it will move on to the State House of Representatives, where Williams predicts it will be turned down because of the Democratic majority. In an interview with Fox News, Williams stated that he plans to resurrect the bill to the Republican-controlled Senate if it fails in House. The Colorado Politicians Accountability Act would also expect law enforcement who have “reasonable cause” to suspect a person is undocumented to

report that individual to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) — a requirement that resembles a previous Colorado bill, Senate Bill 90. Senate Bill 90 (known as Colorado’s “Show Me Your Papers” law) also required local law enforcement to expose anyone suspected of being undocumented to ICE. But in 2013, Rep. Joseph Salazar (D-Thornton) and Sen. Irene Aguilar (D) effectively repealed the bill by sponsoring the Community and Law Enforcement Trust Act, which dismissed the previous requirement to report and relieved the financial burden that came with playing the role of ICE. The Salazar/Aguilar bill was intended to foster safer interaction between law enforcement and immigrant communities. Now, Salazar is attempting once again to create a safe zone for undocumented immigrants living in Colorado. Last month, the lawmaker presented the Ralph Carr Freedom Defense Act — named after former Colorado governor Ralph Carr, who stood up for the rights of Japanese Americans during their interment in World War II. Salazar and his team are currently finalizing the language of the bill before officially introducing it, but a copy of the draft can be found on the Colorado General Assembly’s website. The bill has four primary avenues to protect minorities in Colorado. It would prohibit a person’s race, ethnicity, national origin, immigration status or religious affiliation from being provided to the federal government for “any legal or unconstitutional purpose.” It would also forbid officials from helping the federal government implement a registry, place a physical or electronic identifier on a person, or place an individual in an internment camp based on his or her race, ethnicity, national origin, immigration status or religious affiliation. Salazar says the Ralph Carr bill would not make Colorado a sanctuary state, but simply allow local government to implement its own regulations regarding its interactions with the immigrant community. He argues the bill would be protected under the 10th Amendment of the United States Constitution, which says any power that is not given to the federal government is given to the people or the states. Salazar also contends that the 10th Amendment would shelter Colorado from Trump’s Executive Order Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States, also signed on Jan. 25. The executive order’s primary goal is to effectively enforce federal immigration laws and to revoke federal grant money from jurisdictions that choose not to comply. While many cities in Colorado have been labeled “sanctuary cities” for refusing to unlawfully detain an individual under suspicion that he or she may be Boulder Weekly


Your Bronzing Paradise | Voted Best of Boulder 7 Years Running! undocumented, Boulder is the first city to officially claim the title. In early January, before Trump’s inauguration, the Boulder City Council unanimously voted to protect the immigration status of its residents. Boulder could lose $8 million or more in federal funding in 2017 for defying Trump’s executive order, and that number could go up if Boulder suffers a natural disaster, such as the flood in 2013. However, Rep. KC Becker (D-Boulder) does not believe Trump’s threat will actually be enforced. “We know that Trump has a volatile personality that makes a lot of threats but that those threats are often not in line with the Constitution or necessarily the will of Congress,” Becker says. “He tries to govern through intimidation and demagoguery, and we’re going to push back against that as much as possible.” Becker supports Salazar’s argument that the Ralph Carr bill would simply allow Colorado to exercise its right to create its own policy regardless of federal law. “We, as a state, have the ability to decide how we’re going to use our own resources and the federal government does not have the power to tell us how to use our resources,” Salazar says. Unlike Rep. Williams, Salazar’s concern lies in how his bill will be approached by the Republicancontrolled Senate. He’s fairly certain it can pass the House. Rep. Williams argues that the residents of Colorado would not accept the Ralph Carr Bill positively. “I think we’d be affected negatively,” Williams says. “I think if Representative Joe Salazar’s sanctuary city bill were to pass, making Colorado a sanctuary state, then the Trump administration would quickly move in and take away federal funding and that’s something that we desperately need in order to fund the operation of our government and make sure Colorado is successful.” Whether Trump can or cannot withhold federal funds from states that seem to operate as sanctuaries has yet to be clarified by his administration or the courts. Although the Ralph Carr Act would also create a shield against a Muslim registry, which has been a hot topic of discussion under Trump’s presidency, it is unknown whether Williams is for or against the shields the act provides outside of those for undocumented immigrant communities. “That’s not the topic of focus,” Williams says. “This is not about supporting a registry or not supporting a registry. What Salazar is doing is he’s trying to flout federal immigration law. I can tell you that no one in the Republican caucus is going to support Boulder Weekly

any registries like that; it’s not what the issue is. The issue here is whether or not we’re going to keep the community of Colorado safe.” In response to Williams’ proposed Colorado Politicians Accountability Act, Salazar is close to certain that the bill will die in the House. “It’s a very infantile and immature bill that [Williams] has brought against communities that have never harmed him at all,” Salazar says. “He’s trying to use victims as his reason to go after immigrant communities.” Salazar highlights that the undocumented community rarely engages in crime in the first place. “Research demonstrates that there is no correlation between someone being undocumented and committing any crimes,” he says. Certainly there are undocumented immigrants that do commit crime, and cases like Kate Steinle’s can prove that, but rates are not as high as they are made to appear. In an interview with 60 Minutes, Trump stated he would prioritize deporting the 2 million undocumented immigrants with criminal records, a number he extracted from a 2013 report by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Yet, the report actually reflected crime committed by both undocumented immigrants and lawful permanent residents, meaning the rate for the undocumented community exclusively is smaller than 2 million. Research from the Migration Policy Institute estimates that from the 1.9 million figure found by the DHS, unauthorized immigrants make up 43 percent (820,000). Extensive research by the American Immigration Council shows that immigrants are less likely to commit a crime than those who are native born. It found that although from 1990 to 2013 the number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. grew from 3.5 million to 11.2 million, FBI data shows a 48 percent decline in crime rates during that same time period. Salazar argues that most immigrants make the decision to leave their home country behind, also often leaving family members, not to disobey the law but to pursue the safety and economic security the United States promises. In a state that has proven to be closely split between the Democratic and Republican parties, it is difficult to predict the future of either the Colorado Politician Accountability Act or the Ralph Carr Freedom Defense Act. There is no clear timeline of when or if either act will become law, but it is certain that the undocumented community in Colorado will be affected regardless.

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ack in November 2013, a group of Boulder-based young people petitioned the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Committee (COGCC) to suspend issuing permits for oil and gas exploration in the state until regulations could be put in place to adequately protect public health and safety and the environment. As part of the youth organization Earth Guardians, the young people asked the Commission to use the best available science to evaluate the impacts of oil and gas extraction, and allow an independent third party to verify annual reports on greenhouse gas emissions from such operations. When the COGCC rejected this request in April 2014, the young people didn’t back down or give up. They’ve now taken their fight all the way to the Colorado Court of Appeals, which will hear oral arguments in their case against the COGCC on Tuesday, Feb. 21 in Denver. “I see the negative impacts that fracking has caused just in the state of Colorado and all over the country really,” says Aerielle Deering, one of the six young plaintiffs in the case. “I really think there needs to be some sort of action to stop it or at least make it more sustainable. And I haven’t seen that on the part of the state or the current administration.” With help from Our Children’s Trust, a legal advocacy organization, the young people are making their argument based on the “public trust doctrine,” which is founded on the principle that natural resources, including the atmosphere, must be preserved for future generations. “On the website, [the COGCC] says that their job is to regulate Colorado oil and gas development in a way that works with public health and safety and the environment, and I don’t see them doing that,” Deering says. “The fact that [the COGCC] dismissed us, it just sort of felt like they’re not in alignment with what they’re job is to do, which is to regulate oil and gas development in a way that is safe.” The COGCC rejected the petition, stating that the its regulations already address the petitioner’s concerns as they work in tandem with the Colorado Department of Health and the Environment when enacting regulations. Moreover, on advice from the state attorney general’s office, the Commission said the public trust doctrine is inapplicable to their rulemaking procedures, regardless of their charge from the state to foster oil and gas development “in a manner consistent with protection of public health, safety, and welfare, including protection of the environment and wildlife resources.” This charge was given to the COGCC as part of the Oil and Gas Conservation Act. The young plaintiffs see a disconnect between the actions of the COGCC and its statemandated mission due to the countless peer-reviewed studies that suggest the adverse effects of oil and gas extraction including fracking on public health and the environment. “It’s super important that the Commission is interpreting its statutory authority and obligations properly and doing enough to protect public health and the environment,” says Nate Bellinger, staff attorney with Our Children’s Trust.

“There’s a lot at stake to make sure that the Commission is doing its job properly.” Although Denver District Court Judge J. Eric Elliff upheld the COGCC’s initial determination last February, the plaintiffs appealed his decision in April 2016 just ahead of the Colorado Supreme Court ruling in May of that year that found local fracking bans and moratoriums were unlawful because they went against the state’s goal of maximizing oil and gas production. While the Supreme Court’s ruling was seen as a major setback for the anti-fracking movement as a whole, it could turn out to actually be helpful to the Earth

Youth case against the COGCC in court, again by Angela K. Evans

Boulder Weekly

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Sea Farm Guardian’s case. “The [state] Supreme Court Six youth activists basically said that they don’t including Itzcuauhtli Martinez, Xiuhtezcatl want a patchwork of oil and gas Martinez and Emma regulations across the state or Bray are challenging the COGCC in court. bans in some places or moratoriums in other places,” Bellinger says. “That is essentially what these youth plaintiffs are seeking is statewide control over oil and gas development.” Plus, the young people have a growing social movement behind them demanding environmental action on the local and state level in the wake of collapsing federal policies under the Trump administration. The day before the hearing, Feb. 20, Our Children’s Trust, Earth Guardians and the youth plaintiffs in the case will be marching at the state capitol to rally support for their cause. “A good amount of people are going to be out there on the streets and showing the wide range of support we have for this in all communities,” Deering says. Our Children’s Trust expect 500 people to show up at the march on Monday, and they hope to carry the momentum into the courtroom the following day. “It’s important that we’re telling the people, the current ruling generation, that we’re not just going to let them take our future away from us,” Deering says, “that we’re going to fight for our future and our children and grandchildren’s future.”

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Is the new PUC more favorable to renewable energy? by Christi Turner

T

he public hearing of the state Public performance methodology behind Xcel’s cost models. first place. Utilities Commission (PUC) started The PUC has no legal obligation to consider the “We now have a PUC that cares about what the promptly at 4 p.m. on a Wednesday evecontents of a public hearing in its decision-making public has to say,” she says. “And as it turns out, the ning to a standing-room only crowd. By all process, but the expertise, depth and alignment of public has a lot to say.” accounts, attendance was impressive. views expressed during this hearing seemed to have an Plus, with Ackermann as chairman, a position he It was the first day of February, and was awarded in January after nearly Wikimedia Commons the first public hearing for Jeff four years as director of the Colorado Ackermann, the newly appointed Energy Office, Glustrom and others chairman of the PUC. Ackermann are expressing hope that this PUC will called the hearing to order, and Steve be more favorable to renewable energy. Szabo, the first in a long list of people First in line to speak, Szabo, of who’d signed up to testify, approached Longmont, highlighted the need for the stand. Over the next two hours, more clean energy in Colorado’s power nearly two dozen citizens — people grid and the economic case to back it. from their 20s into their 70s and from He focused on the price per kilowatt across industry sectors, including a hour — or, the price of consuming farmer, a biologist, engineers, state and 1,000 watts of energy for one hour — federal policy makers, a financial profor renewables versus fossil fuels. fessional, a preacher and more — “In 2015, the combined average would direct their data-heavy, impasprice for subsidized wind and utility sioned, sometimes-philosophical scale solar was about 3 cents per kiloentreaties to the three PUC commiswatt hour for a 20-year power purchase sioners. agreement. The combined average As they took turns at the microprice for subsidized coal and natural phone, a clear, unanimous alignment gas is about 4.7 cents per kilowatt emerged: Every person who spoke hour,” he said, reading from prepared expressed opposition to Xcel Energy’s remarks. “If you look at the unsubsi2016 Electric Resource Plan (ERP). The plan elaboimpact on the commissioners. dized cost of energy, wind and utilityThe Colorado PUC is rates how Xcel, the utility that provides electricity to “I’ve never seen a public hearing scale solar are still the lowest cost... currently evaluating Xcel Energy’s use of renewBoulder and the Denver Metro area, proposes to meet mentioned more than once the following Any Electric Resource Plan that able energy sources as its customers’ electricity needs through 2023 and is doesn’t increase clean energy resources day, and it has never been referred to part of its 2016 Electric Resource Plan. currently undergoing a long evaluation process at the and doesn’t drastically reduce fossil fuel directly as a basis of questioning that I’ve PUC. consumption is not in the best interest ever seen,” says Leslie Glustrom, of the Several key criticisms of the ERP emerged at the of Coloradans.” nonprofit group Clean Energy Action, who also hearing, including: the lack of sufficient proposed Rick Tazelaar, an engineer from Boulder, drilled attended the Xcel proceedings at the PUC the followrenewable energy to be added to the electricity grid, deeper into the economics of renewable energy genering day. Glustrom is a seasoned advocate for renewthe lack of sufficient proposed new energy storage able energy policy at the state and local level, and was See BRIGHT LIGHT Page 16 capacity, and concerns around the complex financial instrumental in calling for the public hearing in the

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ation in Colorado. “Their (Xcel’s) own models show that adding 1,000 megawatts of wind energy during the resource acquisition period can lower present value of revenue requirements by $590 million,” Tazelaar said. In other words, allowing more wind power on the grid will dramatically lower the bill for ratepayers, because ultimately it’s Xcel ratepayers who cover that present value of revenue requirement, or PVRR, when they pay their electric bill. “The existing infrastructure can accommodate even more wind than what is being proposed.” Other commenters referenced the state statutes guiding the PUC process referencing state regulations governing electric resource planning, which include specific language around clean energy. “The Colorado revised statute section 40-2-123 1A and PUC Rule 3601 give you strong guidance, by calling for developing a cost-effective resource portfolio using the fullest possible consideration of clean energy technologies in order to achieve the lowest present value revenue requirement,” said Julie Zahniser, board member for Clean Energy Action. “It’s time to replace expensive, polluting fossil fuels with competitively bid clean energy so the lowest present value of revenue requirement can be achieved.” Building on the economic and legal arguments, Larry Milosevich of Lafayette condemned Xcel’s ERP as “insufficiently forward-looking,” and asked the commissioners to reject it on those grounds. “Xcel’s Electric Resource Plan is essentially a status quo plan, yet it is being offered at a time when ratepayers and forward-thinkers on energy are imploring companies and regulators to accelerate the transition to a 21st century grid, powered by renewable energy,” he said. Currently, renewables comprise just 22 percent of Xcel’s energy generation capacity. “Xcel has chosen not to boldly lead the way toward a clean energy economy, and therefore it falls to the PUC and the legislature to lead.” Macon Cowles, former Boulder representative to Denver Regional Council of Governments and former Boulder City Council member, dove into the complex and somewhat obscure financial equations behind Xcel’s proposal. He addressed the question of Xcel’s “discount rate” — that is, the rate used to determine the future value of assets in present value terms, based on perceived risk. Xcel uses a discount rate of 6.78 percent in its economic projections, which Cowles and others said is too high. “Normally, we’d use a high discount rate on riskier assets, and a lower discount rate on safer assets,” he said. “If you apply a high discount rate it tends to make the appearance a lot cheaper for these fossil fuel plants.” In other words, with a lower discount rate, Cowles, Glustrom and others said, the PUC would see how investing now in renewable energy to avoid billions of dollars of future fossil fuel costs. Cowles implored the PUC to hire an independent economist to assess whether the use of this high discount rate is appropriate. By the end of the public hearing, more philosophical appeals emerged. “Perhaps you’re wishing you could shrink from the truth of what the consequences of your decisions mean, for Colorado and for our future. Perhaps you wish these decisions were not on your shoulders,” said Karen Conduff, a lifelong activist two days short of her 60th birthday, painting a picture of environmental urgency. “I hope that you all realize the gravity of what we are faced with, and choose wisely.” Time will tell. Already about eight months in, the ERP deliberation at the PUC is far from over. Still, advocates are buoyed. “What we did the other night was beyond exceptional,” Glustrom says. “This is a pretty bright light in a pretty damn dark world right now.” Boulder Weekly


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by Tom Winter

T

here’s a saying (Top to bottom) First: A unidenthat, “If you’re tified snowboarder commits to a big line in the West Basin not having fun, venue. you’re not doing Second: Athletes discuss line choices and terrain. it right.” Perhaps Third: Darrell Haggard of bordering on cliché, it actuArapahoe Basin showing how it is done. ally seems to be a fair assessFourth: The party vibe at the ment of the current state of bottom of the venue at Taos Freeride is a throwback to the affairs when it comes to bighotdogging days of the 1970s. mountain ski and snowboarding competitions. These events, also called “freeriding” competitions, harken back to the early days of freestyle skiing — the mogul, big air and ballet disciplines of the 1970s — when the after-the-event parties were half the reason to compete and the larger community of athletes, fans and event organizers were known for not taking things too seriously. While the party and community-oriented atmosphere remains a big part of why Boulder athletes travel to freeriding events in places like Crested Butte and Taos, there’s also a very serious side to these competitions. And yet they’ve managed to retain a unique level of accessibility for athletes and fans, something that the original freestyle movement lost after it was mainstreamed by the Olympics and other high-profile events. The freeride ecosystem has rapidly expanded and evolved over the past five years, with the ultimate goal a spot on the Swatch Freeride World Tour (FWT). This five-event showcase features only the top athletes riding intense mountain faces at venues such as Chamonix, France; Haines, Alaska; and Verbier, Switzerland. “It’s very difficult to qualify for the Swatch Freeride World Tour,” says Federica Castelli, FWT’s communications manager. “Only the top two or three skiers or snowboarders from the Americas region and the same number from the European region get invited each season.” Last year one of these qualifying athletes was Crested Butte, Colorado, local Mark Mikos. Mikos earned his invitation on the 2017 FWT by finishing as one of the top three male skiers in the Americas region, joined by fellow Americans Ryan Faye and Griffon Dunne. He secured his spot based on points earned via competing in Freeride World Tour Qualifying (FWQ) competitions. These events are ranked from 1 to 4 stars (stylized with *) in order of difficulty and points are awarded for top finishes. FWQ events also include junior events for athletes up to the see FREERIDING Page 20

Boulder Weekly

February 16 , 2017 19


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age of 18. This pyramid structure allows for athlete development, advancement and opportunity, and means there is a clear way to progress through the junior ranks all the way up to the big show that is the FWT. “For athletes who are serious,” Castelli says, “the organization, with junior events and freeride coaching and clubs at the entry level all the way up through the different levels of qualifying, create a pathway to the FWT and the opportunity to compete at the professional level.” And with the prize purse at nearly $80,000 for each FWT stop, it’s heady stuff compared to the early days of freeriding events when the winner might walk away with a pair of new skis or a snowboard for their troubles. Even FWQ competitions have more at stake these days. “We have a prize purse of $15,000,” says Taos Ski Valley Events Manager Kaela Gillum of the Taos Freeride event, the longest-running FWQ competition in the Americas and a one-time FWT event for women in 2011. “The level of competition and the ability of the athletes improves each year and with athletes from around the globe competing in our 4-star FWQ event, it’s serious business for the competitors who are trying to qualify for the FWT.” It is serious business, and Colorado skier Mikos rode his second place finish in Taos to the top of the overall Americas FWQ standings for the men skiers last year, earning him a coveted spot on the FWT this season. But what about the rest of the field? The athletes who like to test themselves against their peers but who also know deep down inside that a FWT berth is most likely out of their reach or not something they’re going to focus on? That’s where the fun and the parties come in. As former FWT athlete Hadley Hammer told Powder Magazine, “The real reason why big mountain [freeride] competitions are still relevant — and why they should always stick around — is for the camaraderie found at every level of freeride competitions, from small-scale local events to the world stage of the FWT.” And that’s the real draw for the local athletes who are heading down to Taos at the end of February to compete in Taos Freeride March 1-4 at New Mexico’s biggest — and steepest — ski area. Taos Freeride consists of two events, an entry-level 2-star competition, where athletes can start to earn the points they will need to qualify for both higher level events like the 4-star Taos Freeride event as well as the FWT. But, according to Gillum, most of those who go to Taos do so for fun. “We try to host an athlete-centric event,” she says. “The goal is to give everyone who comes to Taos Freeride a red carpet experience, to make them feel like even if they aren’t on the FWT, that the level of hospitality and organization and attention to the athletes is at the FWT level so that everyone feels like a champion. The spotlight is on them.” “It feels like family,” says Boulder-based athlete and University of Colorado Boulder student Isaac Siegel. “Everyone has each other’s back and people look out for each other.” Siegel, who competes in the Men’s Ski division, heads out to Taos sitting in 33rd overall in the Americas region based on his FWQ points. “It is one of my favorites,” he adds of Taos Freeride. “I think there is more of a buzz surrounding it than the other events. A lot friends will be there.” The vibe is the same for fellow Boulder athlete Jordan Garrett, an Idaho skier who, like Siegel, ended up at CU Boulder and started competing in FWQ events. “It’s a very laid back and supportive community,” Garrett says. “At the top of the venue everyone is excited and nervous and cheering each other on.” For Garrett, who heads to Taos after finishing 14th in a 2-star FWQ competition in Crested Butte earlier this season, events like this are also, “really fun from the social aspect and the opportunity to travel.” “I really like going to all these awesome mountains,” she says. “But the most fun is the rush when I drop into my line, the adrenaline.” Garrett concedes she may never be a world champion on the FWT, but also admits her experiences at the FWQ level have led her to consider taking a year off when she wraps up her degree at CU to compete on the FWQ circuit and, perhaps, make the FWT. And, given her 14th place finish in Crested Butte this year has put her in 66th overall in the Americas after only one event, it’s quite possible Garrett could make it to the FWT level sooner rather than later. Still, for most local skiers and snowboarders heading to compete at Taos Freeride at the end of the month, the focus is on fun. “There are a lot of reasons why I do this,” says another athlete out of Boulder, Austin Kinzer. “The drive to get better, to go to other ski areas, but the major one is that it is the most fun you can have. It’s really just a great atmosphere.” His advice? “Give it a shot. Good things will happen.” Boulder Weekly


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buzz Public Domain

For the sake

of the endeavor

Sarah Haas

Five years of an underground poetry gathering in Boulder by Sarah Haas Poets gather at midnight on Feb. 10, where they have met for the last 63 months under the light of the full moon.

Boulder Weekly

U

nder the dim light of the full moon, a group of poets gathers in a hollow of Pearl Street’s Morrison Alley. Most people come here by rumors carried from one to the next in whispers. Some find it in a drunken wrong turn, stumbling down an alleyway to find a group of madmen howling at the moon. Or maybe it’s a bartender on a lonely cigarette break or lustful lovers who just can’t wait, looking for a moment alone but are thrust into the edges of poetry instead. Suddenly and spontaneously a howl emerges from the edge of the crowd, first gutturally from a lone man, then a full-blown chorus composed of all the standers by. “The moon! The moon!” he yells before falling into a reading of a poem. The Full Moon Reading (as it has come to be called) is a regular but informal occasion of poetry. The gathering was born years ago between the whispers of two friends, Joseph Braun and Matthew Clifford, standing one night outside the back door of the then Boulder Café, a long-time hangout of poets and where Braun worked at the time. “You know when you have a conversation and something comes out and you don’t know where it came from really?” Clifford asks. “I never fully know

what Joseph means, but I remember one of the first things he ever said was, ‘Always digress.’ We would talk to each other like that, sort of tangentially jumping from one thought to the next; it was about having faith in your conversation partner’s mind, knowing you don’t have to affirm the thing that was done, you can just move it forward.” So, somehow, in October 2011, the reading sprung from their minds into existence and there, in the alleyway and under the light of the full moon, it has existed ever since. Like most of the 20 or so poets in attendance at see ENDEAVOR Page 24

February 16, 2017 23


Sarah Haas

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the February gathering, the founders of the midnight poetry reading were brought to Boulder by its Beat A poem, roots. The Beat poets of the 1950s were notable nameperformed from ly for their rejection of poetic and social conventions. the rooftop in Morrisson Alley. Their lifestyles and poetry, often indistinguishable, were experimental, informal, scrawled and performed in formless verses. Like the conversations of Braun and Clifford, they were disinterested in the point of it all, seeking instead to capture the spontaneity of thought and feeling. “When I was thinking of coming [to Boulder] I was like ‘Well if Ginsburg thinks it’s cool...’” Clifford says, with a low chuckle. In its formlessness, the reading is the living lineage of Boulder’s Beat poetics — there is no microphone, no sign-up sheet, no leader and no rules. “You jump in when you feel compelled to. It’s totally informal,” Clifford says. “It’s a loosely regulated space and because of that it has the possibility to be generative and productive.” The Full Moon Reading is also original in its time and place. “It’s unlike anything else going on in the world,” a man leaned over to say at one point in the night. “This isn’t a slam, it’s not a reading, it’s poetry itself.” Set to the sounds of Friday night debauchery and the up-tempo beats of pop music leaking through the walls of the neighboring Biergarten, the poems found a natural rhythm with their surroundings. As their tempos changed, the mood shifted, too. Sometimes poems were spoken softly in a closely huddled group, sometimes they were shouted from the rooftop. Once, in a particularly dramatic moment in a poem, a breeze swirled, sending pages of poetry scattering into the wind. Among it all, one thing became clear: The idea that a poem was meant to live on a page is absurd. Poetry was never meant to be anything but read out loud. “Importantly, this is in public,” Clifford says. “We wanted to think outside the academies or cafés, outside of places you’d expect to hear poetry. “A lot of times we will get people who are just walking by and they come and they all the sudden are listening and they are like, ‘Wait! This is poetry?’ You can see it in their face as they start to realize what’s going on — it looks like fear. I think they’re afraid they won’t get it.” What were the poems about? Well, sometimes the poems were political — about Trump, about what it means to be a neighbor through thin apartment walls, about the annoyance of the red, white and blue. Some were about the power of women, sex or dirty dishes. Some took cues from time and space itself, waxing about favorite restaurants turned into café-banks, the soft moonlight or dimly lit alleyways. But what the poetry was “about” didn’t really matter at all. That night, each poem was a humble offering in itself. “Poetry is probably the oldest art form and people seem to know it’s important — they read it at funerals and weddings, in all the big moments, you know?” Clifford says. “I don’t think people have a lot of confidence in the validity of their experiences and feelings. They’d rather not try than be wrong, but that’s one of the things that’s funny with poetry; it’s not necessarily so tied to success and failure. You can kind of do things for the sake of the endeavor.” Boulder Weekly


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S

am Bush says it starts on the very first downbeat. “It’s that feeling of positive energy, one that starts right away and that one you can’t predict. Music is just a large circle of communication — it starts with us on the stage and it is not a job exactly...” he pauses to look for the right word, “... it is our joy, to get it going amongst all the people in the room. “What does it take to make it happen?” he asks rhetorically, then chuckles. “Well, first you’ve got to be in tune.” Getting in tune means more than just adjusting string tension to find the right pitch. It requires one to be in sync with their context and in Shelley Swanger sympathetic relationship with their collaborators. It’s a process that takes place over a lifetime. Godfather and nonpareil maestro of the newgrass genre, Bush was practically a virtuoso of the mandolin from the very beginning. Born in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 1952, he bought his first mandolin at age 11 and was winning national awards by the time he was a teenager. Now at age 64, the Grammy and International Bluegrass Music Association awardwinning musician admits he never aspired to be on the stage, let alone be king of a genre. “I didn’t start out the lead singer or the emcee, it just got that way because as the bands and the relationships within them would evolve, so would our different roles,” Bush says. “Now I am comfortable [being the lead]. If anything I have to learn how to not talk too much! Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think people come to hear the music.” Bush says music is maybe the only artistic medium capable of actually transferring, in real time, the experience and feelings of the artist to the listener. As is typical of any statement from a master or guru, Bush’s description of his art is as simple as it is profound. Humbly, from his station atop the field of fiddlers, pickers and stringers both living and dead, Bush’s wisdom is that his life is not separate from his music and maybe it never was. In 2016 Bush released his first album in seven years, Storyman, an aptly named record that blends the technical fluency and storytelling of bluegrass with the joyful, groovy and jammy hallmarks of newgrass to tell stories about his life. Many of the songs are real-life stories drawn from the friendships he’s made along the way. Bush co-wrote every track with friends, including the late Guy Clark, Emmylou Harris, Jon Randall Stewart and Jeff Black. One song, “It’s Not What You Think,” he co-wrote with all five members of

the Sam Bush Band, made up of guitarist Stephen Mougin, banjo-playing Scott Vestal, bassist Todd Parks and drummer Chris Brown. “Storyman is the first time the five of us ever wrote a tune together, which is kind of a special feeling,” Bush says. “The kind of friendship we have... it’s the kind where you can not see each other for months and then when you do, you’re right back.” Like last week, after taking the winter off, the band got back together for a rehearsal. “We are right back to the friendship and the love we share, built on a mutual trust,” Bush says. “We trust each other musically as well as personally. I’ve been fortunate to have been playing with these guys a long time and we feel— we know — that when we hit the stage we can succeed.” Loosely, Bush describes success as “that positive feeling,” but there’s also something more to it, although it’s a bit tricky for him to articulate. He says in playing his music, success isn’t knowable until it’s reached; it’s the product of striving and playing, recognized only as it unfolds. The trust the ON THE BILL: Sam band members Bush. 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. have in one 24, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303another is a vital 786-7030. foundation for their work, but on its own it wouldn’t be enough to account for the drive they each have to play day after day. Bush chalks it up to the way they push each other, not overtly and competitively, but unconsciously and collaboratively. “Somebody once told me I should play a solo show,” Bush says. “Well, that doesn’t interest me so much because, like for instance, when I hear Scott [Vestal] play, or any of the guys in the band for that matter, something in it spurs me on to play better. That’s what I feel my own role is — we all play to push each other to play better.” Long ago, Bush stopped taking for granted the joy of getting to play with friends and making new friends along the way, but it would all be for nothing if it weren’t for joy. He almost can’t help himself when it comes to expressing and talking about the jubilance of it all; it’s in him, part and parcel of everything that he does. It can make one wonder, has Sam Bush ever had a bad day? “Of course. We all do,” he says. “But as an old friend, [pianist and songwriter] Leon Russell, once told me, you can’t know the good days without the bad. I guess I’m just more interested in the wisdom of a good day.”

THE WISDOM OF A GOOD DAY

An interview with Sam Bush by Sarah Haas

Mar

25

Radio Show Taping

Dave Alvin

& Jimmie Dale Gilmore

Feb 15

Community event: elephant talk podCast launCh party mar 18 ConCert series: boulder basson Quartet ten year anniversary

WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org 26 February 16, 2017

Boulder Weekly


arts & culture

Heidi Gutman

Deborah Voigt gets personal in her onewoman show Voight Lessons.

A star-studded week at CU

I

t will be a week of superstars in Boulder. First will be famed Wagnerian soprano Deborah Voigt, presenting her one-woman show Voigt Lessons at Macky Auditorium on Saturday. Then the University of Colorado Boulder’s own superstars, the Takács String Quartet, begin a spring series of concerts in Grusin Hall with some of the stars from the CU Boulder music faculty Sunday and Monday. And next Wednesday, Feb. 22, Yo-Yo Ma presents a concert in Macky that, alas for latecomers, has been sold out for months. Voigt’s one-woman show was written for her by Terrence McNally, the Tony-, Obie- and Emmy-award winning playwright, screenwriter and librettist for musicals and operas. A brutally honest retelling of her struggles during her career, the show is, Voigt says, “very much a story about a Midwest girl who turns out to be an international opera diva.” The script includes songs that are especially meaningful to Voigt — most of them not operatic or art songs. “When people come to the theater, they’re not given a list of songs,” she says. “I want them to be surprised.” She does reveal that she opens with a Carpenters song, “because I was a huge Karen Carpenter fan, and that’s the music I listened to. There is an art song and a definite nod to opera, of course.” If you don’t know Voigt’s story, you might remember the “little black dress.” In 2004, Voigt was removed from the cast of Richard Strauss’ Ariadne auf Naxos at London’s Royal Opera House because she could not fit into the costume — the “little black dress” — that the casting director wanted her to wear. Although Voigt did not comment for several months, the story eventually leaked out and became a flash point in battles about female

opera singers’ appearance and weight. Voigt herself has been open about her struggles with weight. After the black dress incident, she had successful gastric bypass surgery and lost more than 100 pounds, which she has discussed publicly. In fact, she wrote frankly about all of her struggles in her 2015 book Call Me Debbie: True Confessions of a Down-To-Earth Diva. The idea for the one-woman show came from Francesca Zambello, Voigt’s friend and an operatic stage director. Voigt was surprised when McNally quickly accepted Zambello’s suggestion that he write the script. “I had been keeping a list of random songs that I happened to like, and I shared that list with Terrence,” she says. “We sat down and talked, and he was able to work these songs into a narrative about my growing up in the Midwest and becoming an opera singer.” Both the book and the show are remarkably frank about Voigt’s problems with weight, addictions and relationships. “I just wanted to be honest about everything that had happened,” she says. “It became a matter of deciding I couldn’t tell this part of the story without telling that part. I knew my family would understand, [because] they were always supportive, and I knew that it would help people who struggle with the same issues.” Today, Voigt is mostly retired from the operatic stage, teaching at the San Francisco Conservatory. “I’ve come to the point in my life where I don’t want to put myself through that any more,” she says of performing around the world. “I’m tired of the constant travel.” She does travel for Voigt Lessons, as a way of reaching people who might not otherwise think much about opera. She’s pretty sure

READY TO REACH OUT! 673 30th St., Boulder Corner of 30th & Baseline in Williams Village Shopping Center (between Moe’s BBQ & Gameforce)

303-440-8515 • theatricalcostumesetc.com

NEW HOURS: 10AM - 7PM DAILY where music comes to play

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Boulder Weekly

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(solo electric) Sat 04.15 Oriental Theater $27 advance

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February 16, 2017 27


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A gathering place for great food, drinks & entertainment Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com Upcoming Events & Entertainment Thursday February 16th

STAR-STUDDED from Page 27

everyone will enjoy the show. “It’s going to be an entertaining places in the U.S. As associate evening,” she says. “There are some laughs, maybe a couple artists of the Wigmore, they Takács Quartet of funny expletives, there’s some drama. It’s a very intimate were invited to perform the full is back with new show.” cycle during the current season. music and a new book. • • • • “If you commit to doing a The Takács Quartet opens its spring series of six concerts Beethoven cycle, that’s a huge performing with percussionist Douglas Walter and clarinetist investment of time and energy, Daniel Silver, both CU faculty members, Sunday and and you don’t want to just do it Monday Feb. 19 and 20. The concert will open with once,” Dusinberre says. “So we offered it in the states, but we Beethoven’s String Quartet in G major, op. 18 no. 2. Walter decided in Boulder that we would try to feature some of the will play Michael Colgrass’ Variations for Four Drums and Beethoven quartets that we haven’t played quite so frequently Viola with Takács member Geraldine Walther, and Silver here, rather than doing the whole cycle.” will join the full quartet for Brahms’ Clarinet Quintet in B The Beethoven performances also tie in to Dusinberre’s minor, op. 115. recently published book, Beethoven for a That pattern of that program — Later Age: Living with the String Quartets. guests from the CU faculty and one A personal recollection of Dusinberre’s ON THE BILL: ON THE BILL: Beethoven quartet — will continue in experiences with the quartets written for Voigt Lessons — Deborah Voigt, the other concerts this spring. “We are so the general public, the book provides soprano. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. grateful to have so many talented artists remarkable insights into the lives of pro18, Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. and wonderful people to collaborate with fessional quartet players. Takács Quartet on the music faculty,” Ed Dusinberre, fans should all take a read of it sometime Takács Quartet. 4 p.m. Sunday, the quartet’s first violinist, says. “This during the spring series. Feb. 19, 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20, Grusin Music Hall, CU Imig year we decided we would, more than The upcoming concerts March 19 Music Building, 1020 18th St., usual, make them a feature of our proand 20 will feature Beethoven’s final Boulder. gramming.” String Quartet in F major, op. 135, and Yo-Yo Ma. SOLD OUT. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22 The collaboration with CU faculty is Haydn’s String Quartet in F major, op. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant important to the quartet, because it gives 77 no. 2. Walther and guests Abigail St., Boulder. them opportunities to perform music Nims, alto, and Margaret McDonald, Tickets to all performances availthat otherwise is difficult for them to put piano, will perform Two Songs for Alto, able at 303-492-8008, tickets. together. “We decided to feature pieces Viola and Piano by Brahms. cupresents.org here (in Boulder) that we wouldn’t so And on April 30 and May 1 the easily be able to do on the road,” quartet will play Beethoven’s String Dusinberre says. Quartet in B-flat major, op. 18 no. 6. “When we’re on the road, there’s not a lot of time to Soprano Jennifer Bird will perform Chausson’s Chanson rehearse. Those (pieces with CU music faculty) are the sorts perpétuelle with the full quartet and Alexandra Nguyen will of pieces that we wouldn’t typically get together on the road.” perform Clara Schumann’s Three Romances, op. 21, with Dusinberre also notes that Boulder audiences are as Dusinberre. That program and the spring concert series important as the quartet’s CU colleagues. “I think audiences will conclude with Schubert’s much-loved “Trout” Quintet, sometimes don’t realize how important they are,” he says. with David Korevaar, piano, and Paul Erhard, double bass. “Just the way an audience listens to a piece of music affects All the programs are presented in pairs at 4 p.m. Sundays [the players]. In a sense, an audience creates a performance.” and 7:30 p.m. Mondays in Grusin Music Hall on the CU The Beethoven quartets on the concerts form a small campus. While most performances eventually sell out, there sample of the full cycle of the composer’s 16 quartets that the are often tickets available for on-stage seating and the Takács are playing at Wigmore Hall in London and various Monday performances. Boulder Weekly

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2/21 Engage Inside Peace 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., 303-444-7328. Inside Peace reflects the regeneration four men experience while incarcerated at a state Jail in San Antonio, Texas — where they enroll in a selfCourtesy of the Dairy improvement class called Peace Class. The documentary echoes the circumstances these men had to endure before finding themselves behind bars and the self-reflection they engage in to better their lives after incarceration. The film has toured the festival circuit and it’s won multiple awards in categories like best documentary and audience choice, along with special category awards for bringing awareness to the benefits of peace education in the incarcerated population. —Ximena Leyte

2/16 Learn City of Jaguar, Chris Fisher 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, 303-442-3282. Courtesy of Chautauqua Dr. Chris Fisher, anthropology professor at Colorado State University, will be discussing the City of Jaguar, where he and a group of American-Honduran archeologists came across more than 200 sculptures from the center of a large earthen bank in Honduras. Although isolated today, the City of Jaguar was believed to be a crucial location for trading and commerce. Fisher’s extensive background in archeology awarded him the Gordon R. Willey Award from the American Anthropological Association and support from the National Science Foundation, National Geographic and the Heinz Foundation along with other agencies. —Ximena Leyte

THE HIP ABDUCTION

W/ MADAILA. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

2/17 Listen The Hip Abduction

SEE FULL EVENT LISTINGS ONLINE. To have an event considered for the calendar, send information to calendar@ boulderweekly. com. Please be sure to include address, date, time and phone number associated with each event. The deadline for consideration is Thursday at noon the week prior to publication. Boulder Weekly does not guarantee the publication of any event.

8:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., 720-645-2467.

Courtesy of the Fox Theatre

Join The Hip Abduction as they stop by the Fox for a night of rockin’ tunes. Inspired by their Florida landscape, The Hip Abduction embraces ocean views and the smell of sunrise. The band mates bonded over an appreciation of West African and Jamaican dub/reggae music, and they utilize the deep roots of those genres in their own indie pop sound. Stop by to hear hits from their latest album For Gold Under the Glow, released last March. They’ll be joined by upbeat pop group Madaila and Colorado-based band Lola Rising.

Boulder Weekly

Thursday, February 16 Music Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-BREW. Jazz Ensemble II and Thompson Jazz Faculty. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423. Old Time Music & Square Dance. 6 p.m. Etown, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Open Mic Night Hosted by Brian Rezac. 6:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Outback Saloon Open Mic Night. 9 p.m. Outback Saloon, 3141 28th St., Boulder, 573-569-0370.

The Prairie Scholars: Dinner Music. 6 p.m. Oskar Blues HML&S, 1555 S. Hover Road, Longmont, 303-485-9400. Reggae Night. 10 p.m. Conor O’neill’s Irish Pub, 1922 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-1922. Savoy. 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Events Adult Acrylics 2. 6:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-5031902. Art & Sip: WIne Glass & Charms. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Aspiring Artists (Ages 13-16). 5 p.m. Tinker

Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Barley Har Har Gone Wild: Character Sets. 7 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Centennial State Ballet Outreach Performance of The Phantom Tollbooth. 2:30 p.m. Flatirons Terrace, 930 28th St., Boulder, 303-939-0594. Clay Class (Ages 5-8). 3:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Colorado Nature Camera Club Meeting. 7 p.m. Frasier Meadows, 350 Ponca Place, Boulder, 303666-7588. see EVENTS Page 32

February 16, 2017 31


READY TO REACH OUT!

events

theater

EVENTS from Page 31

Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452. Getting Started with Google Adwords. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

Courtesy of DCPA/Joan Marcus

Live up the ’60s at DCPA with Motown the Musical, now playing through Feb. 19.

Open Access for Painters and Potters. 6:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Smokes & Jokes. 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884.

673 30th St., Boulder Corner of 30th & Baseline in Williams Village Shopping Center (between Moe’s BBQ & Gameforce)

303-440-8515 • theatricalcostumesetc.com

NEW HOURS: 10AM - 7PM DAILY

Unspoken. 7:30 p.m. Loft Theatre, 1515 Main Campus Mall, Boulder, 303-492-8008.

An Act of God. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through March 12.

Up Down Circus — Juggling & Ground Skills Class. 4 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 N. 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110.

An Iliad — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through Feb. 26.

Views & Brews: Before Sunrise. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374.

The Book of Will. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through Feb. 26.

Friday, February 17

The Christians. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through Feb. 26.

Music Ben Gallagher & Alyssa Overby. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-2046064. Bonnie & The Clydes. 7:30 p.m. Harmony Music House, 2525 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-4447444. David Cole. 6 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910. THURSDAY FEBRUARY 16 7:00 PM

JUNO: MISSION TO JUPITER - DR. FRAN BAGENAL 9:00 PM

LASER FLOYD: THE VISION BELL FRIDAY FEBRUARY 17 7:00 PM

DREAM TO FLY 9:00 PM

LASER: NO DOUBT 10:30 PM

LASER: MILLENNIUM POP 11:59 PM

LASER: TOOL SATURDAY FEBRUARY 18 1:00 PM

PLANETS & LASERS 2:30 PM

BACK TO THE MOON FOR GOOD 7:00 PM

JUNO: MISSION TO JUPITER - DR. FRAN BAGENAL 9:00 PM

LIQUID SKY: MICHAEL JACKSON 10:30 PM

LIQUID SKY: KID CUDI MAN ON THE MOON 11:59 PM

LASER: JIMI HENDRIX SUNDAY FEBRUARY 19 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES / PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 1:30 PM

MOONS & LASERS 3:00 PM

SUPERVOLCANOES

EXPLORE A FISKE MEMBERSHIP BECOME A MEMBER 50% Discount on regular shows 25% Discount on special events 10% Discount on items for purchase, rental fees, annual membership renewal fees, and much more!

Visit www.colorado.edu/fiske for info.

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 32 February 16, 2017

Defunkt Railroad. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. The Hip Abduction with Madaila. 8:30 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-4470095. Keith/Larson Duo Presents New Music-New Horizons. 7 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 303-666-4361. Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Lee Hill), 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Unit 20, Boulder, 303-396-1898. Live Music. 9 p.m. Conor O’neill’s Irish Pub, 1922 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-1922. The Mighty Twisters. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Platt Middle School Presents Vocal Rock Band Face. 6:30 p.m. Platt Middle School, 6096 Baseline Road, Boulder, 720-561-5536. Selasee and the Fafa Family. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-2976397. Events Community Arts Center Grand Opening. 4 p.m. The Collective Community Arts Center, 201 N. Public Road, The Collective Community Arts Center, Lafayette, 303-661-1261. Dance Nia. 6 p.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-774-4800. Dog Dance. 7 p.m. Floorspace, 1510 Zamia Ave., Boulder, 303-718-2212. Friday Art Club (Ages 5-8). 3:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902.

Two Degrees. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through March 12.

King Lear — presented by Upstart Crow. Longmont Performing Arts Center, 513 Main St., Longmont, 303-772-5200. Through Feb. 19.

The Unsinkable Molly Brown. 7:30 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont, 303682-9980. Through April 2.

Motown the Musical. Denver Performing Arts

2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Unspoken. 7:30 p.m. Loft Theatre, 1515 Main Campus Mall, Boulder, 303-492-8008.

Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303441-3100. Events

WordPress One-On-One Consulting. 10 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

Adobe After Effects Hands-On Class. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

Saturday, February 18

Colorado Rocks. 5 p.m. Dabble Paint and Sip Studio, 2330 Main St., Unit E, Longmont, 303-8273523.

Music Davy Allard. 6 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910. DeadSet Colorado. 9:30 p.m. Dark Horse Bar, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-044-8162.

Decorated Letters Calligraphic Art. 10 p.m. pARTiculars Art Gallery and Teaching Studio, 401 S. Public Road, Lafayette, 970-344-5162.

Deborah Voigt. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

Digital Marketing Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

Dennis DeYoung: The Music Of Styx. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-7867030.

Digital Photography Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

The Dress Downs Album Release Party. 7 p.m. Vapor Distillery, 5311 Western Ave., Suite 180, Boulder, 303-997-6134.

New Luncheon Theater Show Opens. 12 a.m. Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 303-786-8727.

Forkroot. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628.

Saturday Afternoon Art Experience (Ages 5-8). 12 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787.

A Funeral for Hopes and Dreams. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-2906064. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339. Hello Dollface. 8 p.m. The Roost, 526 Main St., Longmont, 303-622-5021. Isobar. 8 p.m. KCP Art Bar, 364 Main St., Longmont, 540-239-7861. JK&B = Jason Kelly & Barb Segal in Concert. 7:30 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom, Boulder, 303-443-3934.

Masterpiece Makers (Ages 3-5). 1 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902.

Live Music. 9 p.m. Conor O’neill’s Irish Pub, 1922 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-1922.

Stepping Out 2017. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center,

Thoroughly Modern Millie. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000. Through Feb. 19.

HIR. Miner’s Alley Theatre, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden, 303-935-3044. Through March 5.

Live Performance: Love Letters by A.R. Gurney. 7:30 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 720-333-3499.

SPARK! Tours for Individuals with Memory Loss. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Museum Of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-8654239. Through Feb. 19.

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Stepping Out 2017. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Tinker Time — Drop-In Art Class. 10 a.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Unspoken. 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Loft Theatre, 1515 Main Campus Mall, Boulder, 303-492-8008. Wandering Reel Traveling Film Festival in Boulder! 4 p.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-875-4028.

LVictoria with Dirty Little Rock Band. 9 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Wildlife in Winter Hike. 10 a.m. Caribou Ranch Open Space, Caribou Road, Nederland, 303-6786200.

Sensory Friendly Concert Featuring Boulder Phil String Quartet. 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Boulder

see EVENTS Page 34

Boulder Weekly


Boulder Weekly

February 16, 2017 33


events EVENTS from Page 32

arts

Sunday, February 19 Music dHAPPY HOUR JAZZ. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-447-9772. Hello Dollface. 3 p.m. Mountain Sun Pub and Brewery, 1535 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-546-0886. Lisa Mac. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628. Love Songs to the Heart of the World. 3 p.m. Boulder Community Event Space, 3980 N. Broadway, Suite 201, Boulder, 720-526-9986. Reverend Horton Heat with Jello Biafra & Supersuckers. 8:30 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-4470095.

Art as Medicine: Artists in Recovery. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through Feb. 26. Basquiat Before Basquiat East 12th Street, 1979-1980. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through May 7. Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8300. Through June 24. Bobbie Benson. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through March 31.

Courtesy of NCAR/Matt Angiono

Contemplative Landscapes — Suzanne Frazier. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through Feb. 26.

Events

Double Exposure: An Exhibition of Photography and Video. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720898-7200. Through March 26.

Adult Coloring. 1 p.m. Settembre Cellars, 1501 Lee Hill Road, Suite 16, Boulder, 303-532-1892.

Dylan Gebbia Richards: Eclipse. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 29.

Anime Club. 3 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303651-8470. Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Dance Nia. 11 a.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303774-4800.

Explore the world behind Matt Angiono’s lens at his new exhibit at NCAR, showing through March 31.

Digital Marketing Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. Motown the Musical. 10:45 a.m. Senior Services Center, 103 S. Iowa Ave., Lafayette, 303-6659052. Stepping Out 2017. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. To the Moon & Back. 11 p.m. Dabble Paint and Sip Studio, 2330 Main St., Unit E, Longmont, 303827-3523. Monday, February 20 Music Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing-820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623. Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-BREW. Open Mic Night. 8 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Events Adult Wheel Throwing: Beginners/Intermediate. 6:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Continuing Wheel Throwing (Session A). 5 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902. MindArt: A Mindfulness Based Art Class. 3:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Movie Mondays Tank Girl. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-290-6064. Rare II. 9 a.m. CU Museum of Natural History, 1030 Broadway, Boulder, 303-492-6892. Sharing Our Stories: Mexican Immigrants in Media, Life and Myth. 3:30 p.m. CU Boulder’s Old Main Theater, 1600 Pleasant St., Boulder, 310-489-8372.

34 February 16, 2017

Colorado Lowriders. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Through May 31.

Mark Bueno: Ghost Lights. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through March 24. Mathias Kessler: Artifacts & Other Errors of Perception. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 29.

Matt Angiono. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through March 31. Mi Tierra. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Oct. 22. Ninel Senatorova. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through March 31. Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-2987554. Through Aug. 20. Shockwave. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through May 28. Star Wars and the Power of Costume. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-8655000. Through April 2. Stop/Look/See — James Milmoe. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through March 26. Then, Now, Next. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Aug. 31. Wall Writers: Graffiti in its Innocence. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-2987554. Through May 7.

Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder, 303-4447888.

Drawing “What You see” Art class. 2 p.m. pARTiculars Art Gallery and Teaching Studio, 401 S. Public Road, Unit 1, Louisville, 720-890-7888.

Unspoken. 2 p.m. Loft Theatre, 1515 Main Campus Mall, Boulder, 303-492-8008.

IMPROV Round 2. 12 a.m. South Building, Congregation Har HaShem, 3950 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-499-7077.

Tuesday, February 21 Music Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898. More Choices for Voters — Part 2. 6 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

Smokes & Jokes. 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Wheel Throwing 1 (Session A) (Ages 8-13). 3:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Wednesday, February 22 Music

Open Mic with The Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698.

Aya Maguire... Special Wednesday Night Treat. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Third Tuesday Lunchtime Concert Series Presents: Pelta-Tiller Duo. 12 p.m. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303441-3100.

Billy Strings + The Lil’ Smokies. 8 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Salsa Level 1. 6 p.m. Art Underground, 901 Front St., Louisville, 720-675-9656.

Jack Hadley. 7 p.m. Rosalee’s Pizzeria, 461 Main St., Longmont, 303-485-5020.

Events

Open Mic Night. 7 p.m. Sanitas Brewing Company, 3550 Frontier Ave., Unit 1, Boulder, 303-442-4130.

Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849.

see EVENTS Page 36

Boulder Weekly


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Boulder Weekly

February 16, 2017 35


2/22

events

words Courtesy of Chautauqua

Boulder author Erika Krouse visits to Chautauqua on Feb. 22 to talk about her best-selling novel Contenders.

Thursday, Feb. 16 Bahriye Goren-Gulek — Be. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074. Dusty Stray. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-4953303. Friday, Feb. 17 Benjamin Bentele. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-4953303. Monday, Feb. 20 “So, You’re a Poet” Open Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628. Tuesday, Feb. 21 Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Wednesday, Feb. 22 CU MFA Showcase: Kailey Tucker. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303.

Time For Three

FEBRUARY

Mozart and Stravinsky Conducted by deRidder FEB 17-18

MASTERWORKS

FRI-SAT 7:30

Andre deRidder, conductor Nadia Sirota, viola MOZART Symphony No. 34 in C major, K 338 NICO MUHLY Viola Concerto STRAVINSKY Pétrouchka

Stewart Copeland with the Colorado Symphony FEB 25

Brett Mitchell, conductor Stewart Copeland, drum set STRAVINSKY Suite from Pulcinella JOHN ADAMS The Chairman Dances STEWART COPELAND Tyrant’s Crush RAVEL La Valse

MAR 19

MAR 9

MASTERWORKS

INSIDE THE SCORE

SUN 1:00

Christopher Dragon, conductor

Symphonic Tribute To Comic Con: The Tetralogy

GEEK

MAR 24-25 FRI-SAT 7:30 MASTERWORKS

FRI-SAT 7:30 Q SUN 1:00

Christopher Dragon, conductor Jeffrey Kahane, piano Colorado Symphony Chorus, Duain Wolfe, director/conductor Nänie for Chorus and Orchestra, Op. 82 BRAHMS SCHUMANN Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 BRAHMS Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90

Pokémon Symphonic Evolutions

Reggae Night. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-997-4108.

Marcelo Lehninger, conductor Vadim Gluzman, violin TCHAIKOVSKY Marche Slave, Op. 31 PROKOFIEV Violin Concerto No. 2 in G minor, Op. 63 TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36

Inside Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4

MARCH MAR 3-5

EVENTS from Page 34

MAR 17-18 FRI-SAT 7:30 SPECIAL

GEEK

THU 7:30

Concert performance includes screening of game sequences from your favorite Pokémon Games ©2016 Pokémon. ©1995–2016 Nintendo/Creatures Inc./GAME FREAK inc. TM, ®, and character names are trademarks of Nintendo.

Christopher Dragon, conductor Colorado Symphony Chorus, Taylor Martin, assistant director

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coloradosymphony.org T 303.623.7876

box office 1000 14th St., No. 15, Denver, CO 80202 Boettcher Concert Hall at the Denver Performing Arts Complex

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presenting sponsor

36 February 16, 2017

Erika Krouse — Contenders. Chautauqua, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-3282.

SAT 7:30

Christopher Dragon, conductor Charles Yang, violin Nick Kendall, violin Ranaan Meyer, double bass

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4

SAT 7:30

Brahms Conducted by the Dragon

MAR 11

POPS

colorado symphony proudly supported by

SPHERE — A Vibrant String Orchestra with No Conductor. 2 p.m. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

Boulder, 303-503-1902. Adult Intro to Acrylics. 6:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902.

Teen Salsa Dance Class. 7 p.m. Art Underground, 901 Front St., Louisville, 720-675-9656.

Continuing Wheel Throwing (Session B). 3:30 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902.

Unplugged Drop-In Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Continuing Wheel Throwing (Session C). 5 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B, Boulder, 303-503-1902.

Yo-Yo Ma. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

Homeschool Art Exploration. 10 a.m. City of Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374.

Events Acrylics: All About Color! (Ages 9-13). 5 p.m. Tinker Art Studio, 1300 Yellow Pine Ave., Unit B,

2/20

Hoo Are You? 6 p.m. Dabble Paint and Sip Studio, 2330 Main St., Unit E, Longmont, 303-827-3523.

listen up!

Sharing Our Stories: Mexican Immigrants in Life, Media and Myth 3:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20, Old Main Theatre, 1600 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-440-3682. Citizens of the United States know it is important to hold the president accountable for the policies he puts into place — especially if those policies affect a specific sect of people. If you are in aberrance about the new political situation — and the immigrants it is affecting — then stop by Old Main on Feb. 20. At Sharing Our Stories, documented and undocumented immigrants will talk about how Trump’s policies have affected them on a personal level, and how it will inevitably impact the lives of generations to come. If you want to understand the immigration policies on a deeper level, this event is for you. — Preston Bryant Boulder Weekly


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February 16, 2017 37


screen Oh well
 Friday February 17

Sammy adamS

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Saturday aPril 15

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Friday aPril 7

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‘Rings’ can die in a hole by Ryan Syrek

W

ith the Trump administration playing a nonstop game of “hide and go seek your civil rights,” scary movies have to try harder to achieve even the same basic level of terror as a casual scroll through Twitter. Sadly, Rings doesn’t try. Like, at all. A disjointed retread of the The Ring co-written by the mastermind behind Batman & Robin, this half sequel/half remake is all kinds of stupid and boring. The cleverest thing it does is name its tiny-nippled, brotastic, generic white male lead “Holt.” Odds are that somewhere in the South, there’s probably a whole fraternity in which every single dude is named Holt. These are the sort of thoughts you have time to think while waiting for Rings to end. The female lead is a nondescript, personality-free, human-shaped creature named Julia, played by Matilda Anna This lifeless retread could have been Ingrid Lutz. It’s important to know that great if it used the concept of a viral video to update the “watch it Lutz is an Italian actress, because not and die” premise of the video from knowing that means you spend the whole the original film. Instead, the movie is content to bore, showing more of Rings trying to decide if she has an sex dungeons and wasting a accent or if you’ve become so bored that all creepy potential killer cameo. words suddenly sound strange when people say them out loud. Holt (Alex Roe) presumably takes time off from flexing in the mirror and posting his thoughts about feminism in online comments sections to go to college, where his professor is the guy from The Big Bang Theory ( Johnny Galecki). He’s probably not playing the same character as in the CBS sitcom, but it’s far more entertaining to believe he is. The Big Bang oaf shows some students the video of Samara, the emo water ghost who lives in a well and crawls out of electronic screens seven days after you watch the French student film she made. You may remember that they already wrapped up her story in a previous movie, but you may also remember lots of things while watching Rings. Things like how it felt to be alive or what being entertained felt like. Julia and Holt, who seems destined to sexually disappoint women and hold political office, soon find themselves in a small town trying to escape what feels like a particularly bad episode of the CW’s Supernatural. A revisiting of The Ring actually made some measure of sense in an era of viral videos. A bit of creativity could have crafted a kitschy metaphor about the toxic danger of our ignorant media consumption, some kind of spooky meditation on our unwillingness to think before we consume. But nah, this is a movie that just wants to chain more women inside sex dungeon basements. The horror genre may not technically glamorize the practice of torturing ladies, but its incessant, uninspired, gross use of the trope sure does desensitize it. So, basically, everything sucks. The end. With everyone pissed off and profoundly fatigued about the state of affairs in America, our entertainment should, at worst, be a much-needed distraction and, at best, serve as an educational and empathetic experience. Rings is neither: It’s a dank turd floating at the bottom of a well. This review previously appeared in The Reader of Omaha, Nebraska.

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Boulder Weekly


film Baldwin blues

A personal history of race in ‘I Am Not Your Negro’ by Michael J. Casey

ON THE BILL: I Am Not Your Negro. Century Boulder, 1700 29th St., Boulder, 303-4440583, cinemark.com. Tickets start at $7.65. Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures/Bob Adelman

“The story of the Negro in America is the story of America. It is not a pretty story.” — James Baldwin

B

y the time James Baldwin penned those words in 1979, the revolution had been lost. Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, all had been murdered. All gunned down before the age of 40. Nearly four decades and six presidents later, those words — read by Samuel L. Jackson in Raoul Peck’s scintillating film I Am Not Your Negro — take on a new poignancy. As the saying goes, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” The beauty of I Am Not Your Negro, which is nominated for the Academy Award for best documentary feature, is its ability to Using archival footage and the words bring to life Baldwin’s words and illustrate his of the late James Baldwin, Raoul Peck examines race in America in I theories. The tragedy of I Am Not Your Negro Am Not Your Negro. is that Baldwin’s words speak as clearly to 2017 as they do to civil-rights era, a correlation that Peck, a Haitian filmmaker, understands intrinsically and displays brilliantly. Images of a white mob in 1957 Charlotte, North Carolina, screaming at a 15-yearold black girl bump up against footage from the Ferguson unrest of 2014. Images of black men hanging from trees while their white executioners half-smile below play against the cell phone footage of Eric Garner being choked to death in broad daylight. Baldwin was right. It’s not a pretty story. And through all of this horror, Baldwin speaks. Calm, controlled, articulate. Be it in the footage of Baldwin on The Dick Cavett Show or in a debate with William F. Buckley in 1965. And in the recitation by Jackson, Baldwin’s words confront and illuminate. Yes, the world may be awful but it can also be understood. Understanding a social consciousness seems to be Baldwin’s overarching theme. His attraction to movies was strong and through that passion Baldwin discovered that the American entertainment machine was not so much concerned with elaborating on who we are as it was with distracting us from our truer selves and reassuring that “we are who we wish to be.” Baldwin saw first-hand that nothing could be further from the truth and in 1979 he undertook a book project to explore the story of America through the murders of three of his friends, Evars, X and King, called Remember This House. Baldwin never got past page 30. In 1987, Baldwin died from stomach cancer. He was 63. But the life of a writer is never truly dead and Peck magnificently resurrects Baldwin through his image and words to speak, once again, about the social injustices that we just can’t seem to shake. With I Am Not Your Negro, Peck and Jackson help finish Remember This House as a 90-minute visual essay. It also features one of Jackson’s best performances in years, as he doesn’t recite Baldwin’s words in either his signature cadence or Baldwin’s but something in between. Those words are simultaneously his and not his. As Baldwin wrote: “I am speaking as a member of a certain democracy in a very complex country which insists on being very narrow-minded.” I Am Not Your Negro is not narrow-minded. It is broad, complex, assertive and absolutely essential. Boulder Weekly

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February 16, 2017 39


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deep dish BY CAITLIN ROCKETT Caitlin Rockett

C

hef John Platt likes to fish. When asked to describe his perfect day for a brochure called Boulder Sliced and Diced: A Chef ’s Guide for Visitors, the chef and proprietor of Riffs Urban Fare said he loved to make the “40-minute drive to the Big Thompson River for a day of matching wits and reflexes with wily rainbows and browns.” He also, for the record, mentions a passion for gardening and drinking craft beer. These are things you want a chef to be interested in. It stands to reason that any chef who loves to fish also knows how to craft an exquisite fish-based dish, a theory easily tested at Platt’s Pearl Street eatery. Riffs defines itself through the very definition of the word: “riff (n): a memorable refrain, variation on a theme, a fresh version of an established thought or action; (v): improvise, create a new version, modify, stylize, blend, personalize, participate, make one’s own.” The physical space at Riffs strikes a balance between contemporary and traditional styles, offering clean lines and spaciousness without forsaking warmth.

Balancing act

Riffs Urban Fare puts a spin on classics without losing what makes it classic As for the food, expect more of this delicate balancing act. With Riffs, Platt builds on the reputation he made at Q’s (the restaurant that once resided in the Hotel Boulderado) for visually stunning cuisine that incorporates clever ingredient combinations for inspired results. Those new to Riffs should go in search of fare that explores the space between tried-and-true classics and innovative, “nouvelle” creations. And with a chef who loves to fish for tout, what better dish to try than Riffs’ applewood smoked red trout? The menu offers more of an outline of the dish than a fully fleshed out narrative: the trout comes with fennel slaw, pickled mustard seeds, mustard oil, vinegar chips and chives... but in what configuration? The resulting dish is far from a slab of fish paired with a scoop of slaw and a handful of crisps (though that wouldn’t have been disappointing either, and Riffs offers a more traditional grilled trout lunch plate with gold potato hash, greens and bacon and lemon caper butter). The applewood smoked trout arrives as an artful pile of fish, skin removed and sliced thinly like lox, set atop a bed of crunchy, tart slaw with a couple of hand-cut

waffle crisps crowning the tower. The mustard — both the pickled seeds and the oil, which delivers a sweet taste reminiscent of a light honey Dijon — are used to stimulate both gustatory and visual perceptions. It is a work of art that, much like the physical atmosphere of Riffs, does not sacrifice flavor for style. This dish is more of a nosh than a meal, something to be used as a bridge between lunch and dinner, a perfect choice for folks gathering together to gab on a Sunday afternoon over glasses of wine or finely crafted cocktails. It’s great to share with friends along with some of Riffs’ other small plate offerings such as flashcooked Brussels sprouts, warmed burrata or poke style ahi tartare. Platt’s zeal for life is evident in every aspect of Riffs, from the atmosphere to the food. This is a chef who loves to comfort his guests as much as he loves to dazzle them. So don’t be afraid to let him guide you through that space between classic and creative — you won’t be disappointed. Riffs Urban Fare. 1115 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-6699.

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Boulder Weekly


cuisine

The 10

weirdest food pairings you just have to try By Anita George

1. Ginger and milk chocolate Chocolate pretty much goes with anything. It pairs well with both sweet and savory flavors, which is why you’ll find it in everything from a spice rub for a pork loin to your favorite ice cream sundae. Ginger is just as versatile. You’ll find it fresh in curries and powdered in desserts, like gingerbread. The bitter notes in chocolate (even milk chocolate) nicely complement the slight peppery heat from ginger. And that same peppery flavor highlights and provides an interesting contrast to the sweet creaminess of milk chocolate. Bitter, slightly acidic dark chocolate would probably be too harsh, but the almost caramel-like sweetness from the milk chocolate helps balance out the heat from the ginger. Rather than trying this combination using fresh ginger or powdered ginger, why not start out with a milder middle ground? Candied ginger. And one way you can experience this particular flavor combination using candied ginger is trying Dagoba’s chai-flavored organic chocolate bar. In addition to spices you’d find in a chai latte, this candy bar contains milk chocolate and chunks of candied ginger.

2. Jalapeño and strawberries The combination of the acidic and peppery notes from jalapeños with sweet strawberries has recently popped up in all sorts of recipes. Do a quick search online and you’ll see this popular pairing in recipes for cocktails, salsas, salads and even ice cream. see PAIRINGS Page 44

Boulder Weekly

February 16, 2017 43


PAIRINGS from Page 43

3. Watermelon and black pepper This flavor combination is often seen in salads, as well it should: It tastes like a particularly light yet incredibly flavorful vinaigrette. It’s peppery, savory, sweet and it finishes with a slightly smoky, spicy kick. Its refreshing mouth feel is best paired with a hot summer day.

4. Mango and Sriracha It’s fast becoming a popular flavor combination for cocktails. Whether you grab a drink at Momofuku’s Ssam Bar or San Antonio’s Cha-Chas restaurants, the sweet floral notes of ripe mangos pair well with the sweet heat of Sriracha chili sauce.

5. Chili powder and vanilla ice cream Chili powder has been used in desserts before, but even then, it’s usually mixed with chocolate and cinnamon. With vanilla ice cream, the bitterness of the chili powder seems to disappear. The heat and smokiness of the chili powder heighten the vanilla flavor and the overall sweetness of the ice cream. The taste is like vanilla set on fire, like putting hot sauce on it and getting all of the heat and none of the vinegary zing. The easiest way to try this flavor pairing is to just top a scoop of vanilla bean ice cream with a few teaspoons of chili powder. Depending on how much ice cream you’re using you may need to increase the amount of powder in order to really taste the combination.

6. Bacon and pistachios Don’t let that delicate green color fool you. Combined with bacon, pistachios take on an intensely heavy meaty flavor and lend a sort of nuttiness to the bacon’s smoky flavor. Whatever slight sweetness pistachios do have pretty much disappears in this combination. It just tastes like a particularly salty, smoky peanut butter. Though this combination has a savory meat-andpotatoes quality, there’s a way to sweeten and class it up a bit.

7. Avocado and coffee There are a ton of blended drinks out there. But why not venture out of see WEIRD Page 46

44 February 16, 2017

Boulder Weekly


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PAIRINGS from Page 44

the mocha/strawberry/vanilla Starbucks standard and try something new? Why not travel to a different country via your blender and try something Indonesian? Es Alpukat is a coffee avocado milkshake from Indonesia. It combines the creamy richness of avocado with the sweetness of condensed milk and vanilla and the slight bitterness of coffee. And avocado milkshakes aren’t totally out of the ordinary. Recently dubbed a superfood, avocados have also made their way into sandwiches, fries and ice cream. And many Taiwanese bakeries and coffee shops right here in America have avocado shakes on their menus.

8. Strawberries and fava beans A nice Chianti isn’t the only thing that goes well with fava beans. Strawberries do too. The most popular form in which this pairing is featured is in a strawberry and fava bean salad with Pecorino. The sweetness and slight acidity of the strawberries is a nice contrast to the savory fava beans.

9. Mushrooms and apricots When it comes to hearty meals, a sweet and savory combination can’t be beat. There’s something totally satisfying about combining the two flavors. Peach-braised ribs. Pork tenderloin with a brown sugar and Sriracha rub. And now you can add mushrooms and apricots to that list. The sweetness of the apricots acts as fruity glaze for savory, meaty mushrooms.

10. Chocolate and fried onions Everything tastes better fried, so if you’re worried about trying chocolate and onions together for the first time, frying the onions first would be a good start. And cooking the onions would help to bring out its natural sweetness while reducing the intensity of its tearjerker peppery kick. Topping the fried onions with melted chocolate should only enhance the sweetness of the onions and the bitter tones and creaminess of the chocolate should help highlight the brightness of the onions. The peppery tones of the onions should help intensify the more savory side of the chocolate’s flavor. Try this recipe for fried onion strings and then top a batch of it with melted chocolate. This article first appeared in Paste Magazine. Boulder Weekly


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Tour de brew: Longs Peak Pub & Taphouse Stout Month rolls into Longmont by Michael J. Casey

W

e’re two full weeks into Mountain Sun’s Stout Month and the beers ON TAP: Longs Peak aren’t getting any lighter. Southern Pub & Taphouse. 600 Longs Peak Ave., Sun recently rolled out their Girl Longmont, Scout Stout (5.9% ABV), a stout 303-651-7886. served with crushed Thin Mints on the rim, mint mountainsunpub.com on the nose with fizzy chocolate in the mouth. It’s an easy drinker with a huge following and the hoards of stout devotees are putting it back with vim and vigor. Last I checked, the Girl Scout Stout was only pouring at Southern Sun but that is sure to change. I recently spoke with John Fiorilli, Mountain Sun’s director of brewery operations, and he explained that there really isn’t a committed timetable to how the stouts roll out to the five pubs. That means intrepid drinkers and completists can bounce back and forth between Mountain Sun’s five brewpubs and Susan France encounter something different with each visit. And that means it’s high time to bounce over to the newest addition to the Mountain Sun family: Longs Peak Pub & Taphouse in Longmont. Located just north of downtown and east of Roosevelt Park, Longs Peak Pub & Taphouse opened its doors on Sept. 29, Blake McNeece works the bar at Longs Peak Pub & Taphouse in Longmont. 2014, and might be one of Longmont’s best-kept secrets. While Boulder’s Mountain, Southern and Under the Sun(s) are bursting at the seams with thirsty patrons, Longs Peak is still in its infancy and an open table is still to be found, a treat that probably won’t last long. But until that day of standing room only comes, my better half and I will enjoy the respite from the chaos and clamor of Mountain Sun’s other outposts. Here, we can sit in quiet contemplation with pints of Thunderhead Stout (7.5%) and baskets of French fries. The Thunderhead has been a Mountain Sun staple for years, and for good reason; the body is round, the mouth is full and the carbonation delivers oats and roasted malts with a touch of spice. Thunderhead is the ideal beer for Sunday-afternoon drinking. It bridges the gap between the sun slipping behind the mountains and the creatures of the night emerging. Once that transformation is complete, heavy artillery is needed. That’s where the Bourbon Barrel-Aged Oatimus Prime Imperial Oatmeal Stout comes in. Weighing in at 10.7%, Oatimus offers up wafts of Woodford Reserve bourbon for the nose and vanilla, chewy tobacco and boozy sweetness for the mouth. It’s a thick and brawny brew, so much so that when you tip Oatimus back, the head sluggishly chases the liquid down the glass. But where does one go after they’ve been to Oatimus and back? Nowhere but nitro. And as my wife will attest, I am a man of compliance. The Coconut Cream Stout (6.3%) benefits greatly from a healthy dose of nitrogen that gives the beverage a silky smooth texture with plenty of chewy coconut and milk sugar. It’s a playful brew and an enlightening one to boot. Halfway down the glass, a Zen-like calmness descends. The mind relaxes, the body sinks deeper into the chair, the eyes open and suddenly it dawns on you: This is what you came for. Boulder Weekly


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boulder marketplace SUSHI TORA – SERVERS/HOSTESSES WANTED

Sushi Tora in Downtown Boulder is looking to hire professional servers. 2+ years working in the restaurant industry is required. Past experience with Japanese cuisine is preferred but not necessary. If hired, this position could lead to a management position seeing that you are the right candidate for the job. We are also looking to hire multiple hostesses as well. To be considered for an interview please send your resume and cover letter to sushitoraz@gmail.com attn: Yumi, or feel free to stop by our location and fill out an application. We are located at 2014 10th St. Boulder, CO 80302.

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astrology Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

ARIES

sovereignty or evoke a well-deserved reversal or express your unconquerable spirit.

Aries are in unusually good moods. The world seems friendlier, more cooperative. Fifty-six percent of you feel more in love with life than you have in a long time. You may even imagine that the birds and trees and stars are flirting with you. I’m also guessing that 14 percent of you are weaving in and out of being absurdly, deliriously happy, sometimes without any apparent explanation. As a result of your generosity of spirit, you may be the recipient of seemingly impossible rewards like free money or toasted ice cream or unconditional tenderness. And I bet that at least 10 percent of you are experiencing all of the above.

LIBRA

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: By my estimates, 72 percent of you

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: I am launching a campaign to undo

obsolete stereotypes about you Bulls. There are still backwards astrologers out there who perpetrate the lie that many of you are stingy, stolid, stubborn slowpokes. As an antidote, I plan to heighten everyone’s awareness of your sensual, soulful sweetness, and your tastefully pragmatic sensitivity, and your diligent, dynamic productivity. That should be easy in the coming weeks, since you’ll be at the height of your ability to express those superpowers. Luckily, people will also have an enhanced capacity to appreciate you for who you really are. It will be a favorable time to clarify and strengthen your reputation.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Will Giovanni surreptitiously replace

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: The ancient Roman rhetorician

Quintilian authored a 12-volume textbook on the art of oratory. As ample as it was, it could have been longer. “Erasure is as important as writing,” he said. According to my reading of the astrological omens, that counsel should be a rewarding and even exciting theme for you in the coming weeks. For the long-term health of your labor of love or your masterpiece, you should focus for a while on what to edit out of it. How could you improve it by making it shorter and more concise?

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Do you know about the long-running kids’ show Sesame Street? Are you familiar with Big Bird, the talking eight-feet-tall yellow canary who’s one of the main characters? I hope so, because your horoscope is built around them. In the Sesame Street episode called “Don’t Eat the Pictures,” Big Bird solves a riddle that frees a 4,000-year-old Egyptian prince from an ancient curse. I think this vignette can serve as a model for your own liberation. How? You can finally outwit and outmaneuver a very old problem with the help of some playful, even child-like energy. Don’t assume that you’ve got to be relentlessly serious and dour in order to shed the ancient burden. In fact, just the opposite is true. Trust blithe and rowdy spirits.

SAGITTARIUS

Allesandra’s birth control pills with placebos? Will Camille take a hidden crowbar to her rendezvous with the blackmailer? Will Josie steal Jose’s diary and sell it on eBay? Given the current astrological omens, you may have an unconscious attraction to soap opera-type events like those. The glamour of melodrama is tempting you. But I’m hoping and predicting that you will express the cosmic currents in less toxic ways. Maybe you’ll hear a searing but healing confession after midnight in the pouring rain, for instance. Perhaps you’ll break an outworn taboo with ingenious grace, or forge a fertile link with a reformed rascal, or recover a lost memory in a dusty basement.

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Your lessons in communication are reaching a climax. Here are five tips to help you do well on your “final exam.” 1. Focus more on listening for what you need to know rather than on expressing what you already know. 2. Keep white lies and convenient deceptions to a bare minimum. 3. Tell the truth as strong and free as you dare, but always — if possible — with shrewd kindness. 4. You are more likely to help your cause if you spread bright, shiny gossip instead of the grubby kind. 5. Experiment with being unpredictable; try to infuse your transmissions with unexpected information and turns of phrase.

CANCER

CAPRICORN

on earth is composed of 92 basic elements arranged in various combinations. Since some of these appear in trace amounts, they took a long time for humans to discover. In the 18th and 19th centuries, chemists were exuberant when they tracked down seven of the 92 in a single location: an underground mine on the Swedish island of Ytterby. That small place was a mother lode. I’m predicting a metaphorically similar experience for you, Cancerian: new access to a concentrated source that will yield much illumination.

crambe repetita is “cabbage reheated, twice-cooked.” I urge you to avoid partaking of such a dish in the coming weeks, both literally and figuratively. If you’re truly hungry for cooked cabbage, eat it fresh. Likewise, if you have a ravenous appetite for stories, revelations, entertainment and information — which I suspect you will — don’t accept the warmed-over, recycled variety. Insist on the brisk, crisp stuff that excites your curiosity and appeals to your sense of wonder.

JUNE 21-JULY 22: All naturally-occurring matter

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: The next four weeks will be an

excellent time to upgrade your understanding of the important characters in your life. In fact, I suspect you will generate good fortune and meaningful synchronicities whenever you seek greater insight into anyone who affects you. Get to know people better, Leo! If there are intriguing acquaintances who pique your curiosity, find out more about them. Study the oddballs you’re allergic to with the intention to discern their hidden workings. In general, practice being objective as you improve your skill at reading human nature.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: In 1787, English captain Arthur

Phillip led an eight-month naval expedition to the southeastern part of the continent now known as Australia. Upon arrival, he claimed the land for England, despite the fact that 250,000 Aboriginal people were living there, just as their ancestors had for 2,000 generations. Two hundred years later, an Aboriginal activist named Burnum Burnum planted the Aboriginal flag on the White Cliffs of Dover, claiming England for his people. I encourage you to make a comparably artful or symbolic act like Burnum’s sometime soon, Virgo — a ritual or gesture to assert your

Boulder Weekly

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: The meaning of the Latin phrase

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Here’s your mantra for the next three

weeks: “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Say this out loud 11 times right after you wake up each morning, and 11 more times before lunch, and 11 more times at bedtime. “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Whenever you do this little chant, summon an upflow of smiling confidence — a serene certainty that no matter how long the magic might take, it will ultimately work. “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Don’t let any little voice in your head undermine your link to this simple truth. Lift your heart to the highest source of vitality you can imagine.

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PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: “We cannot simply sit and stare

at our wounds forever,” writes Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. “We must stand up and move on to the next action.” That’s your slightly scolding but ultimately inspirational advice, Pisces. According to my astrological analysis, you have done heroic work to identify and investigate your suffering. You have summoned a tremendous amount of intelligence in order to understand it and further the healing. But right now it’s time to turn your focus to other matters. Like what? How about rebirth?

February 16 , 2017 53


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Dear Dan: I’ve been reading your advice column in the Coast in Halifax for a while, and it seems that most solutions to relationship problems revolve around sex. Everyone wants it or needs it, we should fuck before dinner, or we can spice up our sex life in this certain way to be happy. What about someone who doesn’t want to have sex, ever? I’ve asked other people for advice, and the answer is usually “take one for the team,” have sex to keep them happy. Is that the only way I could find happiness in a relationship? It’s not © Rachel Robinson something I want to do — but at this point, I don’t see any other options. — All Alone Ace Dear AAA: I’m a sexadvice columnist. Consequently, AAA, people tend to write me when sex (needing it, wanting it, getting it but not the kind you want, etc.) is the problem, and sex (in some new and improved form) is often-but-not-always the solution. I also get and respond to questions from asexuals, and I’ve urged sexuals not to regard asexuals as defective — or, for that matter, to view committed-butsexless relationships as defective. So long as both people in the relationship

Boulder Weekly

SAVAGE

Love

by Dan Savage

are content and happy, it’s a good and healthy and functional relationship, whether the sex is vanilla or spicy or nonexistent. Strictly companionate marriages can be good marriages. As for “taking one for the team,” that’s not advice given only to asexuals. A woman who’s married to a foot fetishist, for instance, may be advised to “take one for the team” and let her husband perv on her feet. A vanilla guy married to a woman corrupted by Fifty Shades of Grey (it’s baaaaaack) may be advised to “take one for the team” and tie the wife up once in a while. And while there are certainly lots of asexuals out there taking one for the team — having sex to please/keep/shut up their partners (or allowing their partners to seek sex elsewhere) — you know who doesn’t have to take one for the team, ever? Asexuals with other asexuals. Dating another asexual is the other option, the obvious option, and may be

the best option for you, AAA. (Don’t want to take one for the team, ever? Don’t draft anyone onto your team who wants one, ever.) A quick Google search brings up several asexual dating sites: Asexualitic.com, AsexualMatch.com, Ace-Book.net, AsexualPals.com. You can also choose to identify as asexual — and search for other asexuals — on mainstream dating sites like OkCupid and Match. I can already hear you composing your response, AAA: Asexuals are just 1 percent of the population. There are 400,000 people in Halifax, which means there are 3,999 other asexuals. Sounds like a lot, but most will be too young, too old, or unappealing for political or personal reasons (loves Kevin O’Leary, hasn’t seen Moonlight, picks their nose with an oyster fork). And a significant chunk of that number may not be aware — yet — that they’re asexual. So realistically, AAA, your local dating pool is much smaller than 3,999. But! Good news! There are 7.5 billion people on the planet! And 75 million of them are asexual!

I have a good friend with a unique array of kinks — a crazy, specific, and rare constellation of kinks — and he cast a wide net on kink dating apps. After he met someone on the other side of the world with all the same kinks and they hit it off via Skype and the guy provided my friend with references (put my friend in touch with friends who could vouch for him), my friend flew to the other side of the world to go on a first date. Two months later, he went back, stayed for a few months, and then moved abroad to be with Mr. Kink Match On The Other Side Of The World. My friend did things people are typically advised against — who gets on a 12-hour flight to go on a first date? — because he knew there weren’t many lids out there for his particular pot. Asexuality isn’t a kink, I realize, but you can and should cast a wide net, AAA, like my kinky expat friend. Don’t let geography limit you in your search. You may not be able to afford to do what my friend did — fly halfway around the world for a first date — but you can get your ass to the next province over if you hit it off with an asexual in New Brunswick or Quebec. Good luck. Send questions to mail@savagelove.net and follow @fakedansavage on Twitter.

February 16, 2017 55


EEDBETWEENTHELINES

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lose your eyes,” Daniel McQueen urges a crowd of more than 500 people at the Boulder Theater at the second annual Psychedelic Shine conference. “Imagine you are sitting on top of a rocket, shuttling into space.” There is a long-standing comparison between deep space exploration of our outer and inner worlds: Just as astronauts exceed the boundaries of common knowledge by stepping into Sarah Haas the unknown, so do psychonauts break the limits of conscious experience on their more inward trips. Coincidentally or not, expeditions into both frontiers have been suppressed since the early 1970s. In 1971 President Nixon took steps to wind down the Apollo missions (manned missions to the moon) and also put the kibosh on drugs, declaring them “public enemy number one” and waging “an all out offensive.” The fear surrounding these by Sarah Haas respective expeditions is understandable: They are inherently risky. But, as NASA writes on their website: “Humans are driven to explore the unknown, discover new worlds, push the boundaries of our scientific and technical limits, and then push further. The intangible desire to explore and challenge the boundaries of what we know and where we have been has provided benefits to our society for centuries.” This rings especially true within the sun-filled Boulder Valley, where space and consciousness expeditions flourish despite low federal funding for space

exploration and ongoing drug prohibition. “Just like a rocket is a tool to take you beyond the Earth, a psychedelic is a tool to take you into the mind or soul,” McQueen says. “Psychedelics have a tendency to disrupt our homeostasis. They will blow our normal way of being out of the water and will replace it with clear seeing, seeing things as they really are and so that allows us to question deeply held assumptions. On a neurological level, there is some good evidence that it is rewiring our brain so that these deeply imposed beliefs are literally broken and repaired into a permanent understanding or awareness.” Psychedelics can be broken down into four main categories: classic (“true”) or serotonergic psychedelics like LSD or psilocybin, empathogen-entactogens like MDMA, dissociatives like ketamine and cannabinoids like THC. The effects of the family of drugs are more or less the same, described as an expansion of consciousness, heightened cognition or thinking, and hallucinations. Both chemically and physiologically, cannabis lies on the edges of the psychedelic family. It’s different enough to evade the wrath of prohibition and pave significant inroads in legalization, breaking down long-standing stigma along the way. But it’s similar enough that McQueen is hopeful cannabis can serve as a bridge in ongoing and future efforts to legalize and destigmatize psychedelics. Already, McQueen attributes the current (albeit anecdotal) resurgence in psychedelic interest to the

1,000 galaxies

Boulder Weekly

by Sarah Haas

path that cannabis has paved. Although there aren’t any numbers to reliably quantify psychedelic use in the black market, there is a verifiable spike in privately funded psychedelic research from organizations like the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, the Beckley Foundation and Heffter Research Institute. Although sample sizes are chronically too small, research in psychedelics is showing promise in alleviating some conditions that have proven hardest to treat, like addiction, obsessive compulsive disorder, end-oflife anxiety and, in some cases, depression. The consistently strong results are increasing interest, funding and, with it, study size. Dennis McKenna, keynote speaker at Psychedelic Shine and preeminent researcher of classic psychedelics, is not surprised that our ability to quantify and describe psychedelics lags behind our experience of them. Just like the astronauts have trouble articulating the discovery of such phenomenon like a black hole or synchronicity across vast space, he says, we can likewise expect language to break at the edges of consciousness. We may well be experiencing a renaissance in our understanding of the universe and our place within it. But if history is any lesson, reaching such heights in understanding is met with resistance and opposition. In 1967, there was the Summer of Love, and in 1971, the war on drugs was declared. In 1969, we landed the first man on the moon and only two years later, Nixon ended manned missions into space. At last week’s swearing-in ceremony for Attorney General Jeff Sessions, President Trump said that drug cartels are “destroying the blood of our youth.” In the same week, he also issued three executive orders on crime and public safety, vowed to be “ruthless” against drug trafficking and made other statements signaling that he’s planning to ramp up the drug war. Trump’s views on the future of deep space exploration remain a matter of conjecture. But next time you look up at the stars and remark at their awesomeness, remember the words of Dennis McKenna: “There are 100 to 500 trillion connections in the human brain ... The Milky Way Galaxy contains about 100 billion stars. If each synapse in our brain is equated to a star, our brains are equivalent to 1,000 galaxies.”

February 16, 2017 57


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cannabis corner

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The Rohrabacher Bill: A congressional compromise on pot?

C

alifornia Republican Congressman Dana “It’s like talking to a freaking wall,” he said. Rohrabacher introduced a bill last week that Still, there are a lot of political reasons why could get a lot of his fellow Republicans, Rohrabacher’s bill has a better chance of getting including the president, off the hook insofar through the House than the conventional wisdom as marijuana legalization is concerned, if might suppose. they have the wit to pass it. For openers, the bill doesn’t require any changes The title of Rohrabacher’s bill, which lists Boulder in existing policy toward pot at the federal level. Congressman Jared The bill doesn’t ask Polis as a co-sponsor, Wikimedia Commons/ United States Congress Congress to alter the is the Respect State insane Schedule I Marijuana Laws Act. Controlled It would explicitly Substance status of exempt persons commarijuana under plying with their federal law, somestate’s marijuana laws thing the members “relating to the proclearly don’t have duction, possession, the balls to do, even though most of distribution, dispensathem know the tion, administration, Schedule I status or delivery of marimakes a mockery of huana” from federal both science and prosecution. justice. Currently, the feds All it does is ask refrain from busting Congress to respect people and businesses states’ rights, somein states that have thing Republicans legalized pot under a have talked a pretty policy laid out by the good game about Obama Justice Department, but which could be swept away with a over the years but California Republican Constroke of Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ pen. rarely delivered on. gressman Dana Rohrabacher’s Rohrabacher’s bill would turn that policy into Showing that new bill could help to uphold states’ marijuana policies. federal law and make it more explicit as well. Congressional OK, trying to get Congress to lighten up on Republicans are premarijuana is like the old joke about the guy who pared to show a went to the Western Wall in Jerusalem every day for decent respect for states’ rights on an issue a lot of 50 years to pray for peace in the Middle East. Finally them disagree with would give Republicans in someone asked him what it was like praying for Congress some much-needed credibility. peace in the Middle East every day for 50 years. Respecting states’ rights on an issue Congress

should have dealt with directly years ago isn’t much different than kicking the can down the road, which is something the last few Congresses have gotten really good at. Respecting states’ rights on marijuana has another attraction as well: The concept is highly popular with the American people — it tallies 60 to 70 percent support in polls — so there isn’t much political downside in voting for them. Passing the Rohrabacher bill lets Congress off the hook on pot for the duration of the session — and probably keeps marijuana legalization from turning into an issue in the 2018 elections — when congressional drug war dead-enders might have to answer to increasingly pro-legalization constituents. This is particularly true in red and purple states like Florida, Ohio and North Dakota that have voted to legalize medical marijuana and would resent the feds second-guessing them. Passing the Rohrabacher bill also lets Jeff Sessions off the hook; Congress would have given him clear guidance as to where he can and cannot use the Justice Department’s limited enforcement resources. This would likely be a relief to Sessions, who obviously knows that his views on marijuana and those of the American people are increasingly diverging. Someone ought to ask Sessions what he thinks of the Rohrabacher bill. He might surprise you. Passage of the Rohrabacher bill would also let Trump off the hook regarding his campaign promise to support states’ rights with regard to marijuana. It would allow him to fulfill the promise without lifting a finger, except to sign the bill. Rohrabacher, BTW, was a vocal Trump supporter during the campaign. Marijuana legalization is an issue he feels strongly about, and Trump may feel he owes him one. Let’s hope so.

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WE OWE YOU ONE, OPRAH, AND THAT LADY IN THE WIG TOO

As if we hadn’t already gone way too far when it comes to blending our political system with entertainment, we went still further this week. The difference this time around is we weren’t using celebrity to get elected or appointed, we were using celebrity to thwart the same. It unfolded like this: A crass little man who made gazillions of dollars by abusing fast-food workers was nominated to be Secretary of Labor by a crass big man who made gazillions of dollars by abusing everything and everyone he ever met... except Vladimir Putin. Go figure. Well anyway, the crass little man, Andrew Puzder, top dog at the parent company for Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr., had a few skeletons in his closet. Not the labor secretary kind of skeletons like when he made employees clock-out and go sit in their cars without pay when the restaurants got slow or when he made commercials with mostly naked women

icumi

of her TV shows dedicated to abused women of (IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) An irreverent and status. On that show, Puzder’s ex-wife appeared not always accurate view of the world in disguise and told about her alleged abuse at her eating burgers in slow motion as the husbands hands and “special sauce” dripped down their chin. claimed she was in disguise because he Hell, that last one is probably what put had vowed revenge if she ratted him him on Donald’s radar in the first place. out. No, the skeleton that cost Puzder his Moral of story: never send 100,000 new job in the Trump low-income, mostly people of color to administration is com- do a job that one rich white lady can do pliments of his former all by herself…errr, with Oprah’s help. wife who claimed he Thanks, Puzder’s ex-wife and abused her. Oprah, from all of us who labor for a Funny that no one living. cared when 100,000 fast-food employees THE BIRDS AND THE BEES claimed the guy had Reckitt Benckiser, the British comabused them, but we pany that makes Durex condoms, digress. recently agreed to buy Mead Johnson So Puzder — why Nutrition, maker of Enfamil baby fordoes Trump have an mula. Cue the onslaught of jokes about infatuation with men Durex covering its bases and saving whose last names start money on quality control. (Side note: with Pu? — was still Reckitt Benckiser manufactures other heading for congressional acceptance healthcare products, like Nurofen brand despite his former wife’s claims because ibuprofen, Scholl and a bunch of cleanshe had withdrawn the allegations during products, so the company’s CEO ing the money-phase of the couple’s says the $16.6 billion deal is just anothdivorce. But then a funny thing haper addition to Reckitt Benckiser’s conpened on his way to conformation. sumer health portfolio.) Oprah found a 1990 taping of one But Durex doesn’t have to buy cut-

rate latex or forego quality assurance testing on its rubbers to bolster sales for its newly acquired baby food product, because people around the world have absolutely no clue how to use condoms. A 2012 review of 50 studies about condom-use errors from around the world took a look at the common mistakes and how frequently those occurred. These mistakes include: Late application, early removal (easy there, stallion), completely unrolling a condom before putting it on (remember the banana demonstration from high school), failing to unroll the condom all the way (again, remember the banana), leaving no space at the tip, failing to remove air, putting the condom on inside-out (and then flipping it around the other way), exposing the condom to sharp objects (don’t use scissors to open the package), not checking for damage, using no lubrication (friction wasn’t just a chapter in your high school physics book), using the wrong lubrication (water-based, never oil-based), incorrect withdrawal (get out of there quickly — and properly!), condom reuse (seriously), incorrect storage (stop putting it in your wallet), breakage, slippage and leakage. Unfortunately for Rickitt Benckiser, on both fronts, surveys find that millennials are having less sex than any generation in 60 years.

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Boulder Weekly


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BUY ANY GRAM OF SHATTER, WAX, OR SUGAR, GET THE 2ND GRAM

50% OFF LIMIT 1 PER CUSTOMER EXPIRES 3/15/17

15% OFF

SELECT NUGS OF FLOWER LIMIT 1 PER CUSTOMER EXPIRES 3/15/17

FOLLOW US FOR DETAILS AND SPECIALS @thehoneycellar

5290 ARAPAHOE AVE. SUITE J, BOULDER, CO


Happy 6PM-10PM EVERY DAY $70 1/2oz FLOWER MIX & M AT C H

CONCENTRATES

¢

PURCHASE A CANNASAP AND GET A PEN FOR A PENNY Select feature strains only. While supplies last.

N AT I V E R O OTS D I S P E N S A RY. C O M

¢


Medical and Rec Specials!

last word

Divine Resonance Massage & Skin Care

Please see ad on page 49. Now offering acne treatments. www.divineresonance.com www.bouldermassageandskincare.com 720-432-1108

Met Your Soul Drum Yet? HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES.

The Drum Shop • 3070 28th St., Boulder

303-402-0122

RECREATIONAL: 25% OFF All Mahatma Clear Products 20% OFF Craft Trim Shatter & Viola Concentrates

20% OFF All Edibles MEDICAL: 20% OFF All Craft Wax & Sap 20% OFF All Edibles MUST MENTION THIS AD FOR SPECIALS LISTED ABOVE Valid- 2.16.17 - 3.1.17

5420 Arapahoe • Unit F • Boulder, CO 303.442.2565 www.boulderwc.com

2801 Iris Ave., Boulder, CO

Colorado’s #1 Source for Boulder – 1144 Pearl St. 303-443-PIPE Westminster – 3001 W. 74th Ave. 303-426-6343 Highlands Ranch – 7130 E. County Line Rd. 303-740-5713 Denver – 2046 Arapahoe in LoDo 303-295-PIPE

& Oregon’s Only #4 Soil.

Guaranteed lowest price! Wholesale Pricing & Free Delivery for Qualifying Commercial Accounts! 1387 E South Boulder Rd., Louisville, CO

303.66.HYDRO (664.9376) victoryhydro.com

21+ Counter Now Open

“Weed Between the Lines” on pageDOWNLOAD 57. THE

TERRAPIN APP, ORDER AHEAD, SKIP THE WAIT!

happy hour

14er Chill Pills are Finally Back!

FLOWER

2897 Mapleton Ave Ste 800 303.539.6525 @14erBoulder

$62.5

1/2oz Mix & Match

$24

VO

NON-MEMBERS | 1 PER CUSTOMER TE

D BEST

per gram | up to 7g MEMBERS

per gram | up to 7g

Early Bird Special* Shop 8-10 am Mon - Fri, 9-10 am Sat, get 15% off your entire purchase! *Not to be combined w/other discounts (except $100 Half Oz) $100 HALF OZ Strains** Blue Dream, Durban Berry, Rocky Mountain Blueberry, Soma Sour Diesel, Gorilla Glue, Whiteout **Strains rotate each week. Strain of the Week† Afghani - 20% off all quantities † Not to be combined w/other discounts Best Selection of Concentrates in Boulder! CONCENTRATE FLIGHT: Buy 4 grams, get 20% off each. Buy 8 grams, get 25% off each. Viola Extracts, Essential Extracts, The Lab, Craft, Olio, Spherex, Bolder Extracts, Hummingbird Brand CO2 Cannabis Nectar All deals while supplies last. Some exclusions may apply.

Craft Cannabis

NON-MEMBERS

IT’S IN OUR NATURE!

28th & Iris • www.thefarmco.com

EVERYDAY

O

303.440.1323

6PM-10 PM

BOULDER

$99 for 3 hours

$19

MEMBERS

F

Home or Office Cleaning

1/2oz Mix & Match

ROW!

2897 Mapleton Ave Ste 800 303.539.6525 @14erBoulder

$55

A

*Full Menu and Specials Now now on Weedmaps* 21+ Counter Open

CONCENTRATES

For CO medical marijuana patients only.

845 walnut st.| 9am-10pm

7

Taste the Difference, Love the Price!

www.terrapincarestation.com See our ad below

See our full-page ad on PG 62. Voted Boulder’s Best Recreational Dispensary 2015 & 2016! *Open daily until 9:45pm Save Time, Skip the Line! Order online from your desktop/cell. Same day pickup. Express Service now available every day from open to 9pm.

For registered Colorado medical marijuana patients only. Select feature strains only. While supplies last.

YEARS IN

Under new ownership. Check out our expanded selection of edibles. 21+

720-314-4989 THEMAGICFAIRYCLEANING.COM

Holos Health Best of Boulder MMJ Evaluation Services IF YOU HAVE A QUALIFYING CONDITION IT IS BEST TO HAVE A MEDICAL CARD

Advantages include: • Price • Selection • Medicinal Strains •Legal Coverage

1534 55th St., Boulder (303) 444-0861

8AM to 7PM • MONDAY - SUNDAY

www.elementsboulder.com...COMING SOON

Boulderlamp, Inc. 555 Aspen Ridge Drive, Unit D, Lafayette, CO 80026 303-444-4852 www.boulderlamp.com

Production x 60%

Journey2Life Best of Boulder Alternative Health Care Provider

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC DISEASE • FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE Specializing in hormone balance and auto-immune disease • WOMEN’S HEALTH • PAIN MANAGEMENT & ADDICTION

3000 Center Green Dr., Suite 210, Boulder • By appointment only M-F • Online appointments at www.holoshealth.org or call 720.273.3568


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