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Trump administration reauthorizes lethal cyanide device for predator control as critics continue to advocate for its ban by Rico Moore

boulderganic:

Boulder’s Global Greengrants Fund helps Serbian group fight incinerator by Angela K. Evans

adventure:

First-of-its-kind, all-women climbing film hits the big screen by Emma Athena

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buzz:

Event to highlight the ‘cultural genocide’ happening in China, Kashmir and India by Angela K. Evans

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Gustav Hoyer on his new album, his deepest regret and bringing classical music to the masses by Caitlin Rockett

Dry, day-old bread stars as toasts, croutons, French toast and puddings by John Lehndorff

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community table:

Laying eggs at the top of Boulder County by Matt Cortina

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Guest Column: The Polis administration plays pretend on fracking The Anderson Files: History has never mattered more Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Arts & Culture: Takács Quartet features Mendelssohn siblings Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘Reflections on Baking’ by Virginia Schultz Film: China’s legacy looms large in ‘One Child Nation’ Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Requiem for a brewery: Wild Woods Brewing Company Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Quickies Weed Between the Lines: When it comes to pot, Tucker rhymes with... Cannabis Corner: More whoopee (and babies) follow medical marijuana... and other stories

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Publisher, Fran Zankowski Editor, Joel Dyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Athena Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Coordinator, Corey Basciano Bookkeeper, Regina Campanella Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Cover photo, courtesy Never Not Collective, featuring Colette McInerney climbing in Spain January 9, 2020 Volume XXVII, Number 21 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2020 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

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welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

The Polis administration plays pretend on fracking by Phillip Doe

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s children, we liked to pretend to be adults, usually our parents, but sometimes great athletes and screen idols. My dad was a railroader. My brothers and I often played with his lantern, which was used as a signal light for communication between trainmen at the front and backend of the train. This was in the days before radio communications were common. We could, with limited instruction, give the highball sign to set an imaginary train rolling on down the line. Dad kept the railroader’s bible, a complete list of all train schedules, called a timetable, in his bib overalls. He sometimes kept a half pint of Four Roses in there too. To me the timetable seemed so complicated that only he I

and other strangely educated men in bib overalls secreting half-pints could understand it. I never cared for bib overalls, and not much for Four Roses. That’s where imitation ended. The 1-year-old Polis administration is playing at being adults, too. They have a timetable for implementing the state’s new law, SB 181 — the law that promised to protect people and the environment against the unfettered designs of the oil and gas industry. But Polis’ implementation timetable only makes sense if you have a clock that keeps geologic time and have a remaining life expectancy of 20 years or more. For example, a couple of weeks ago, after 8 months of meeting with stakeholders, a truly fascistic term, the administration finalized the first rule. Twelve have been proposed. More will be needed, but are yet unscheduled. JANUARY 9, 2020

This first of the promised many had been advertised as potentially a great breakthrough on the road to public probity. The issue was flow lines, the small, 2- to 3-inch lines that carry oil product and waste from the wellhead to collection facilities, usually within the well site itself. They are a very minor part in the massive framework of an oil and gas infrastructure that can kill, maim and destroy. Yet, it was an abandoned flow line that caused the death of two people and severely burned another recently. Not much imagination is needed to understand the mayhem and destruction the big pieces of the industry’s killing machine have and will continue to have on all planetary life. It was Erin Martinez who had been severely burned, her husband and brother killed, when her home in Firestone exploded from a gas buildup from a supposedly abandoned flow line. Courageously, she came before the Colorado Oil and Gas see GUEST COLUMN Page 6

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GUEST COLUMN from Page 5

Conservation Commission, the state regulatory agency in charge of making oil and gas rulings for the Polis administration. She asked that all flow lines be removed once the well they served has been abandoned and the lines are no longer used. Martinez’s logic is impeccable. If the flow lines are removed, they can’t kill. But the Polis people consulted a higher authority, the industry itself. They decided that removal should be situational, exceptions should be considered. For example, the industry argued that removal might damage wildlife habitat. Damage doesn’t occur in the doing apparently, only in the undoing. Some environmentalists clucked knowingly in agreement. What is the real reason for the exceptions that will become the rule? It’s too costly for the industry to remove the lines. There are reportedly enough buried flow lines to crisscross the state three times. Much of the industry is near bankruptcy. The Polis administration silently made a decision that the public can better bear the cost, and that the Martinez tragedy was an anomaly. That is the kindest reading one can give to the new rule. The industry also convinced the Polis administration that the identification of these tiny flow lines shouldn’t be too precisely reported because precise identification creates an uncontrollable urge to pyromania for the thousands of Muslim and dark-skinned terrorists that have scaled Trump’s wall. It was the criminal carelessness of Anadarko Oil and Gas that killed members of Ms. Martinez’s family. And it will be industry carelessness or neglect that kills again, and already has. The western landscape is scarred with oil and gas lines, some of them 3 feet in diameter. Studies show that line explosions usually occur from worker error or lax pipeline maintenance. It was the latter that killed eight people in San Bruno, California, a few years back. Terrorism wasn’t a reportable factor in the study results. Fresh with the flush of success from their flow-line rulemaking, the Polis administration quickly unveiled another rule right before the holidays. The agency in charge of this effort was the Colorado Air Quality Control Division (AQCD). They have the responsibility for monitoring the state’s air quality and issuing pollution permits under the federal Clean Air Act. The oil industry 6

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is a big part of their business. SB 181 charged this state agency with the single most important directive in that law, the continuous monitoring of all large emitters. Oddly, and I’m sure a surprise to most, the state of Colorado has no established real-time measurement of pollution from individual emitters. They rely on the industry to self-report periodically. The state then takes those readings and converts them, by formula, into an estimated volume of pollution for that facility. So, when the Denver School District restricts kids from going out to play because the ozone readings indicate it would be unsafe to do so, a fairly regular occurrence, incidentally, they are acting on better information than the state has on the actual pollution emanating from individual well pads and facilities such as compressor stations or processing plants. The pollution from these sites is the source for the majority of the gasses that form the Front Range’s serious ozone problem. The schools have actual readings of ozone levels. Whereas the AQCD relies only on what the industry tells them they are polluting, and under the new rule, they will continue to do so. That was what the AQCD rulemaking was about. Asking the industry to report more often on what and how much it is polluting. Is this formulation truly the workings of an adult mind? Most of us will not turn ourselves in if we speed. We are even more unlikely to do so if we speed often. What motivation does the industry have to report accurately? They are not required to do so, because there is no reasonable oversight. The AQCD’s rule also imposed stricter, more frequent site monitoring via the use of the state program dubbed LDAR, leak detection and repair. Chief in the state’s leak detection weaponry is the infrared camera. They are called FLIR cameras. The state reportedly has several of them. They tell whether a site is polluting, but they can’t tell what individual gases are being emitted, nor can they measure the volume. Given the paucity of expensive cameras, the state’s trained smellers and listeners are equally important to the LDAR program. The smellers and listeners are often sent to investigate citizen complaints about smells, noise and odors coming from well sites. These trained people are sent out to smell around and listen JANUARY 9, 2020

for leaks. Raw methane has no smell, though benzene does. So in most cases nothing is found, not because there was nothing, but because the smelling expert, even if doubly armed with a FLIR camera, comes after the fact. In many cases, the incidents occur on weekends when many locals are convinced the industry is venting methane and fellow hitchhikers like benzene since they lose less money by wasting it to the atmosphere than shipping it to a glutted market. Venting is illegal. It is considered a waste of a nonrenewable resource. Methane overproduction is the scourge of the fracking industry. Continuous monitoring as required by SB 181, and as I said earlier, probably its most important single feature, will not come anytime soon. John Putnam, the deputy director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment, within which the AQCD is a division, announced that rulemaking on continuous monitoring would not be taken up until sometime in 2021, fully two years after SB 181 became the law of the state. Until then, we’ll continue to rely on the industry for pollution control and the smellers for the protection of public health. During early hearings on this rulemaking last month, the general concepts of which preceded SB 181, we had recommended the AQCD redirect its attention and implement continuous monitoring immediately so that we could start to better understand fracking’s impact on local populations. We also recommended that flyovers be inaugurated to provide the continual monitoring SB 181 mandates for smaller emitters. Recently, a small plane equipped with chemical detection equipment and a FLIR camera flew over west Texas to measure the extent of emissions in the fracking fields there. In a single aerial pass, dozens of high methane emitters were identified. The company conducting the aerial monitoring is a Colorado company. If both continuous monitoring of large industrial sites and continual aerial flights of the oil patch itself, say biweekly, were employed in Colorado, these coordinated efforts would go a long way toward developing a cumulative air quality database, which is also required by the law. Without comment, both suggestions were ignored. The agency claimed, in weeks following, it didn’t I

have the money to implement these suggestions. This is of course tantamount to saying the state doesn’t have the resources to protect the people. The Polis administration seems satisfied to continue to rely on the industry that’s killing us to protect us. The state collects at least $50 million in severance taxes annually. Presently most of that money goes back to the counties responsible for the pollution as impact fees. Some goes to water projects. The recommended monitoring program would require only a fraction of those dollars to implement. Moreover, the continuous monitoring requirements for large emitters should be a licensing requirement paid for by the industry. A teetering industry is still in charge because the state knows any further costs of operations rightfully transferred from the people to the industry itself will only hasten its collapse. And that is not a bad thing. Worldwide, the fossil fuel industry receives about $400 billion in subsidies annually. Even so, the part of the industry that horizontally drills and fracks tight shale formations such as those in Colorado has never been able to show a profit. The banks are deserting them. We should too. The borrowed money they spend here locally will never equal the cleanup costs and environmental damage they are leaving behind as their legacy. The planet’s diversity is in steep decline, some experts estimate 200 species go extinct each day. The scientific consensus is that continued fossil fuel development will finish the job of mass extinction. This projection appears as sure as death itself. The philosopher observed that the only thing that keeps us sane is not knowing exactly when we are going to die. We know that we are destroying the Earth and that the politicians in both major parties are complicit. Polis for all his political posturing is as guilty as the rest of the political crowd, as the foregoing narrative clearly demonstrates. It’s OK to go insane. It’s the rational thing to do. So is concerted civil disobedience and unremitting outrage. Phillip Doe is a former environmental compliance officer and head of the Reclamation Law Administration for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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he Civil War still haunts us. put together,” Civil War historian In our bloodiest conflict, we Eric Foner told Chris Hayes. “Think were confronted with dilemwhat would happen if you liquidated mas, which persist in today’s the banks, factories and railroads world — the scourge of racwith no compensation.” ism, the conflict between authoritarAbraham Lincoln said he wanted ianism and democracy, and the to preserve the Union even if it debate over inequality. meant that slavery wasn’t abolished. As Trump’s reckless acts propel He was afraid of alienating racist us toward more death and destrucwhite Northerners (which included tion, we should prominent proexamine what Confederate happened in the of con- merchants in 1860s. When the New York City spicuous prosperity and slaveholders who wanted to wealth. But it didn’t trickle continue trading launched their attack on Fort down to the workers. They with the South). Sumter, it is didn’t want started to organize, agitate He unlikely that they the slaveholding and strike. They starter to contemplated how border states to unpredictable join the talk about socialism. This things could get. Confederacy. He freaked out the wealthy President Dwight thought the rebRepublicans. Eisenhower once els were extremsaid that every ists and that war will surprise there were many you. He stressed, loyal moderate “...war is going to planters. He was astonish you in the way it occurred wrong. and the way it is carried out.” The Republican Party was a War should be a last resort in a diverse, big-tent coalition that conflict but it is hard to imagine that included many radical reformers slavery could have been abolished including European immigrants who without a war. We got something had participated in the failed 1848 more — a transformational social democratic rebellions against aristorevolution. The world turned upside cratic autocracies. The United States down. Since the country’s founding, was the world’s only democratic the South had pretty much conrepublic, and Lincoln felt that a trolled the entire federal government Confederate victory would destroy (the presidency, Congress and the it. America was “the last best hope Supreme Court). Most of the richest of Earth.” families in the U.S. were slaveholdHis allies in the fight for democers. racy included socialists in this counRemember that slaves were pritry as well as in Europe. One of his vate property. One out of every three strongest supporters abroad was Karl Southern residents was enslaved. In Marx who wrote regularly for The 1860, slaves represented about 16% New York Tribune, a popular nationof the nation’s total wealth. That is ally distributed newspaper that pro$10 trillion in today’s money. That’s moted the Republican Party and trillion. abolitionism. It was faithfully read “In 1860, slaves as property were by Lincoln. worth more than all the banks, facThe stakes were high. Military tories and railroads in the country see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 8

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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A metaphor

Historically, World War II, “The Last Good War,” was fought to prevent Hitler’s military conquest of Europe and the Soviet Union. Metaphorically, it can be likened to radical chemotherapy aimed at stopping the aggressive spread of Hitler’s White Nationalist elitism. The Nazis were defeated, but the cancer has now metastasized into authoritarian regimes across Europe and into Conservative politics and religion here in the U.S. That the Americas are regarded as God’s gift to the white race, its Manifest Destiny, is the greatest blasphemy of American Christianity. Robert Porath/Boulder

Stand up for truth

It’s difficult to believe that Trump continues to run against Hilary. But there’s his state department, interviewing 130 of her former colleagues, hunting for email dirt. Future administrations, if we have any, may find it impossible to wade through all the inflammatory, cheap, crude Twitter rhetoric spewed by Herr Trump. Are lies and bluster any way to run a country? Difficult to understand is what might [have been] going on as he contacts the NRA amid his Ukraine call angst. Reportedly DJT was looking for donations. What if he instead enabled or encouraged through some code word the near-future “activation” of a kind of grassroots militia to prevent any early end to his term? Don’t tell me it can’t happen here. Nixon almost pulled it off. But too many of his henchmen were lawyers, indoctrinated as officers of the court. The current batch of White House scoundrels and lackeys doesn’t appear to have the same scruples. The real, blatant and continuing DJT misfeasance centers on his repeated proclivity for going around Congress. A dictator may believe he can grab money appropriated by our elected representatives, in order to build a border wall demanded by a small coterie of ideologues and a few hundred thousand barnyard xenophobes. A true President would not, should not, cannot do that. Aghast? Embarrassed? Dismayed? Frightened? Who would have thought we would feel so because of our chief executive? True, few of our presidents have been lily white do-gooders. But 8

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how are you sleeping these days? Are you content that DJT’s trade vendettas have been sapping the strength of our economy, admittedly juiced by the unnecessary accelerant of tax cuts sprayed on an already rising GDP? By the way, how big was your tax cut? Blatant disregard for the rule of law, for the Constitution, and for the equality of three branches of federal government mark DJT as the danger to end all. Impeachment may be a siren to mark a new civil war in America. I think the Supreme Court, populated by two misogynists and a Chief Justice who’s light in a wind, will likely need to weigh in on this mess. Then there’s the military. Consider if (when?) it needs to ignore an unlawful order. What about the opposite? In the case where it is needed to quell a putsch instigated by their putative Commander in Chief, where is the civilian supervision so necessary and implicit in the organization of our armed forces since the days of John Paul Jones? I don’t see Nancy Pelosi in a steel pot and flak vest. It’s true our country squandered its honor in a divisive Southeast Asian war that was lost. After that, our angst over a subversive President never healed, because he didn’t stick around to face justice. Then came the disintegration of our economy in stages: first, the Paul Volcker moonshot interest rates, next a terrorist attack and more interminable “police actions.” Who wouldn’t be weary, full of anything but confidence, tired of struggling to make ends meet when all about seems to conspire to deny our chance? We have, as a nation, endured worse. I clearly remember the 1960s — we came pretty close to disintegrating, and three blatant assassinations didn’t help at all. We need our tried and true, best-effort methods from a long time back to reclaim our heritage and vote to stand up together for truth and a responsible society to which we all give our attention and not only our dismissive derision. I know. I have been a practitioner, too. The media didn’t make us this way; we did. We became preoccupied with our pocketbooks (see above) and forgot that freedom needs us as much as we need it. And we dare not take it for granted. If we do, it will soon be gone. And may God have mercy on us all. Gregory Iwan/Longmont JANUARY 9, 2020

THE ANDERSON FILES from Page 7

necessity would push Lincoln in a revolutionary direction. Meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of slaves were resisting overseers, walking off plantations and escaping to the Union armies. W.E.B. Du Bois called it a “general strike.” Many wanted to be soldiers but at first they were rebuffed by the Union. In the end, 200,000 black soldiers and sailors would play a crucial role in defeating the Confederacy. Thousands of poor whites in the upland South also rebelled against the rich planters. The death of chattel slavery was a huge turning point. The country would not be the same. During Reconstruction, Northern troops prevented the planter class from controlling state and local governments. Freed slaves got the vote and they enthusiastically used it. Black people held positions as judges and in state government. There were 20 black congressmen and two black senators in the U.S. Congress. Public schools were created for the first time in the South for both black and poor white children. In the North and West, the high spirits of the Union victory helped inspire widespread collective action by workers, farmers and women for a more equal society. There would be insurrectionary labor strikes in the North in the 1870s. In the South, the rich whites would fight back by establishing repressive Jim Crow laws and creating the Ku Klux Klan, which terrorized blacks and the whites who I

aided them. But they didn’t kill Reconstruction. Historian Heather Cox Richardson notes: “Reconstruction failed not because Southern whites opposed it — although most of them did — but because Northerners abandoned it. They came to believe that antebellum slaveholders were right in one important way: they had warned that poor workers must not be allowed to vote because, given the chance, they would insist on a redistribution of wealth.” Richardson says “the Civil War created a business boom in the North as industries met military needs.” There was lots of conspicuous prosperity and wealth. But it didn’t trickle down to the workers. They started to organize, agitate and strike. They started to talk about socialism. This freaked out the wealthy Republicans. This would be the beginning of a decades-long “Gilded Age” of exploding economic growth and industrialization combined with grotesque inequality, financial crises, and a concern about monopolies. An enormous number of impoverished people were immigrating to this country which provoked fevered debate about race and national identity. Many commentators have said we live in a new “Gilded Age.” Hopefully we can usher in a new “Progressive Era.” This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. BOULDER WEEKLY


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Trump administration reauthorizes lethal cyanide device for predator control as critics continue to advocate for its ban By Rico Moore

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anyon Mansfield and his dog, Casey, set out from their home in suburban Pocatello, Idaho, one day in 2017. They walked up the hill behind their home where they often went together so Canyon, a teenager, could work on homework and pray. At the top of the hill, Canyon saw something resembling a small pipe sticking out of the ground. As he inspected it, the device popped and blasted a misty orange substance all over him and his dog. He had just enough time to shield his mouth, nose and one of his eyes from what was meant to be a lethal dose (for coyotes) of sodium cyanide. But the boy’s dog, Casey, caught the blast in its face, and immediately went into a seizure, foamed from the mouth, suffered and died. Canyon watched in horror before fleeing for help. He would suffer both the physiological effects of cyanide poisoning as well as the trauma of being in a place sacred to him and unexpectedly having his dog horrifically killed before his eyes. The device, set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Wildlife Services to kill native carnivores like coyotes, is known as an M-44 sodium cyanide ejector. But critics who advocate for the ban of this predator control device via federal legislation refer to it as a cyanide bomb. M-44s are small pipe-like devices resembling sprinkler heads or pistol barrels that are buried in the ground and baited with a scented attractant that, when touched, blast a dose of sodium cyanide powder, which is designed to enter the mouth and nose of an animal, where it is absorbed and reacts with the moisture in the animal’s eyes, mouth, nose and stomach to form hydrogen cyanide gas, which is then meant to chemically asphyxiate the animal. During World War II, the Nazis

JANUARY 9, 2020

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


used hydrogen cyanide gas, under the name of Zyklon B, in their infamous gas chambers. A single dose of sodium cyanide in an M-44 contains enough deadly poison to kill approximately eight adults. In 1996, Colorado voters passed Amendment 14, which banned the use of M-44s and other poisons on public (but not private) lands, along with leghold traps, instant kill body-gripping design traps, and snares, for taking wildlife. However, exemptions were written into this law including those that allowed for many of these banned methods to be used in efforts to kill wildlife for the sake of protecting domestic livestock, as well as to kill native carnivores and omnivores to supposedly increase mule deer populations. M-44s are authorized for use by USDA’s Wildlife Services, as well as by state agencies in Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Wyoming and Colorado. Canyon Mansfield survived the M-44 blast, but experienced symptoms of cyanide poisoning following the incident. He and his family have subsequently become advocates for the ban of M-44s via two pieces of legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate known as Canyon’s Law (HR 2471/SB 1301.) The legislation would ban the use of sodium cyanide as well as sodium flouroacetate (Compound 1080). Following the incident, the Mansfield family successfully sued the federal government and was awarded $150,000. But on Dec. 5 — even with the push to pass Canyon’s Law in Congress and the known risks that come with the use of M-44s — the Trump administration sided with the livestock industry when the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reauthorized the continued use of M-44s with cyanide for use in killing native carnivores, specifically coyotes, in an attempt to reduce attacks on domestic livestock. This despite the opposition of environmental groups. The press release announcing the reauthorization made no mention of Canyon Mansfield. As part of the reauthorization, EPA created a 600-foot setback between where M-44s can be set and residences with an exception for when landowners request or agree to a closer location. The reauthorization also increased the distance between M-44 locations and designated public paths and roads from 100 feet to 300 feet. The reauthorization of the M-44 also now requires that “two elevated warning signs that face the two most likely directions of approach [be placed] within 15 feet of M-44 devices,” according to the EPA. “The EPA restrictions are actually weaker than those that were already in place in Idaho when Canyon Mansfield and his dog were poisoned in 2017,” says Erik Molvar of Western Watersheds Project. “It is absolutely appalling that the livestock industry, which is supposed to be regulated by the EPA, is instead dictating the agency’s policy to BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

extend the use of deadly M-44 cyanide bombs and their lethal effects on native wildlife, families and their pets.” Since its first implementation, the sodium cyanide blaster has injured and killed more than coyotes, including people. Between 2014-2018, Wildlife Services killed 59,595 animals across the country with M-44s, intentionally and unintentionally. And with regard to people, “Despite chronic malfunctions, the biggest problem with CGs was their hazard to humans,” according to a USDA report on M-44s. These known hazards were reported as early as 1958, when MARK MANSFIELD an article in The Denver Post titled “Little-Boy Getters?” examined the use of M-44s, then known as “coyote-getters.” When the Post charged that “even well-marked coyotegetters would still be tripped by children and dogs,” thenExecutive Secretary of the Wool Growers Association, Robert Field, responded, “I have no defense for the fact that children and dogs cannot read, but parents and dog owners have a responsibility (to protect them).” And in response to the ranching industry’s charge that are sportsmen afield must be wary actually weaker than those that of coyote-getters on public lands, the Post responded, were already in place in Idaho “This makes our blood boil. when Canyon Mansfield and his What is obvious about a short dog [above] were poisoned in piece of small pipe protruding from the ground? And why do 2019. It is absolutely appalling sportsmen ‘have to learn?’ Men that the livestock industry ... is learned to avoid such things as dictating the agency’s policy.” booby traps and land mines in the late great conflict [World — Erik Molvar, Western War II], but that was global Watersheds Project war abroad, not recreation on public lands at home.” Presciently, the Post concluded, “If coyote control is necessary, the agencies who want the control had better find a more sensible way to do it. We’re convinced that if they don’t, they may find themselves very hard to live with some day — some day when a coyote-getter becomes a man-getter, or what we fear even more — a little boy-getter. And then it will be too late.” Canyon Mansfield wasn’t the first teenage boy to be injured by a “little boy-getter” — in 1959, only a year after the Post’s article, a 15-year-old boy on a North Dakota farm suffered the loss of an eye due to a [coyote-getter] discharge. In 1966, an oil industry surveyor in Coyanosa

“The EPA restrictions

see M-44s Page 12

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RICO MOORE

IN 2018, Wildlife Services reported killing approximately 2.6 million animals in the U.S. and 38,000 in Colorado.

M-44s from Page 11

Draw, Texas, named Raymond Medford unknowingly a press release in response to the decision in which to every tool they continued to advocate for a national ban on tripped a loaded coyote-getter in a field. The capsule of sodium cyanide blasted deep into his hand. in the toolbox allows our ranch- M-44s via support for the aforementioned legislation, Although he received medical treatment soon after, known as Canyon’s Law. ers to continue to protect the the doctor was unaware that Medford was suffering In response to the interim decision regarding herd — Ethan Lane, from cyanide poisoning and sent him to his hotel M-44 use issued by the EPA in early December, room to rest. Three hours later, Medford was dead. National Cattlemen’s Beef “More than 99.9 percent of people commenting on Between roughly 1984 and 2019, 44 people were the proposal asked the EPA to ban M-44s,” accordAssociation exposed to sodium cyanide from M-44s, according to ing to an analysis by one of the groups. the USDA. Of these incidents, 26 involved Wildlife Services personnel while “If the EPA was really serious about public safety and the likelihood of 18 involved members of the general public. Of these 26, according to a USDA killing non-target animals, they would ban the use of M-44 cyanide bombs report, the majority of incidents “occurred while employees were setting, nationwide,” Molvar says. “This device is completely indiscriminate, killing inspecting, or pulling M-44s.” Regarding the 18 public exposures, the report whatever bumps into it, and as such, cyanide bombs are an enormous risk and claims, “10 were from tampering... five were accidental (stepping on), and four liability that should not be deployed anywhere, on public lands or private.” involved dogs that had been exposed and subsequently the people were However, some within the livestock industry hailed the Trump administraexposed by touching the dog or giving the dog CPR... One of the human tion’s decision, and were even quoted in the EPA’s press release: “We sincerely exposures was not from a [Wildlife Services] set M-44 after investigation, but appreciate USDA and EPA working together to ensure livestock producers an illegally set M-44.” have access to effective predator control, while also increasing public awareness Between 1999 and 2007, Wildlife Services looked at pet dogs killed by and transparency,” said American Sheep Industry Association President Benny M-44s, and found 31 incidents with 34 pet dogs, of which only two survived. Cox. Some of these cases involved a dog owner not having their dog leashed while “In 2018, the average sheep producer lost $6.20 per ewe,” an American on or near areas with signs warning not to enter because of the presence of Sheep Industry Association spokesperson tells Boulder Weekly, “that loss is M-44s. One exposure occurred because a Wildlife Services trapper failed to largely as a result of higher wages for help and losses to predators; every lamb remove all M-44s from a property, leaving two behind. Another incident lost to a predator reflects a full year’s loss of production for that ewe. Like involved a Wildlife Services trapper mistakenly placing M-44s on the wrong everyone, farmers and ranchers are facing increasing input costs, but they have property. a limited influence on the price for the raw commodities they sell, so controlAccording to a USDA report, between 2011 and 2015, 30 dogs were killed ling predator losses is critical to our ability to provide lamb and wool.” by M-44s — some were identified as pets while others were considered feral. The spokesperson added, “Sodium cyanide is the most effective, most tarSo although the M-44 has changed slightly over the years in the method geted and safest predator control method available to livestock producers, of its delivery of cyanide — from a projectile cartridge to a blast of mist — the approved by three successive administrations.” poisoning itself has remained similar over time, along with its threats to nonSimilar support came from Ethan Lane, vice president of government target species, including people and their pets. affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, in a press release where The Trump administration’s recent decision to reauthorize M-44s drew he said, “having access to every tool in the toolbox allows our ranchers to constrong opposition from several environmental and wildlife groups, who issued tinue to protect the herd.”

“[H]aving access

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But not everyone believes that the ranching industry really needs M-44s to protect livestock. Native predators account for a relatively small percentage of cattle losses, according to the USDA. In the most recent available report covering cattle and calf losses from 2010, a total of 3.99 million cattle and calves were estimated to have been lost. Of these, 3.77 million, or 94.5%, were estimated as non-predator losses from causes such as disease, while 220,000, or 5.5%, were estimated as having been lost from predators. In terms of financial losses, nonpredator losses were estimated at $750.65 million, whereas predator losses were estimated as being just $2.43 million. Non-predator losses also outweigh predator losses for goats and sheep, according to a 2010 USDA report, by a margin of roughly 2-to-1. Critics assert predator control is an ineffective way of reducing native carnivore attacks on domestic livestock and may even increase the prevalence of such attacks. “Predator killing in general does nothing to reduce livestock losses, and indeed can increase those losses,” Molvar says. “When coyote or wolf packs break into smaller numbers of animals, they can lose their ability to take native prey animals, which can cause them to switch to docile sheep and cattle that often are allowed to graze deep into backcountry areas.” On Dec. 18, soon after the EPA announced its decision, a coalition of environmental groups joined the First Gentleman of Colorado, Marlon Reis, in calling for a nationwide ban on the use of M-44s. A press release by the coalition and Reis offers support for Canyon’s Law. “In Colorado we value the humane treatment of animals, whether they are in our homes or on our public lands,” Reis stated in the press release. Under pressure from environmental and wildlife groups, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed a state bill banning M-44 use in Oregon in May. Following the incident where Canyon Mansfield was injured, M-44s were banned in Idaho. A reported total of 5,608 coyotes were killed in the U.S. using M-44s in 2018. But M-44s are often triggered by animals without any animal — alive or dead — being found afterward, leaving nothing to record when an animal has likely been killed. “It is believed that 50% of the [sodium cyanide] capsules fired without an animal found... possibly involved take or the animal being taken away by people or a scavenger,” according to the USDA. During 2018, Wildlife Services reported killing approximately 2.6 million animals in the U.S. and close to 38,000 in Colorado. But as large as this number seems, it may represent fewer animals than Wildlife Services actually killed, according to the USDA report and Molvar, who says, “Many of the animals that are killed go unreported, based on statements of former Wildlife Services employees themselves.” The EPA’s recent decision to continue the use of M-44s marks a discouraging new low in the long effort by environmental and wildlife groups to ban the use of these deadly devises. It is an effort that began in earnest in 2007 and has spanned multiple administrations and EPA directors. The last major push by environmentalists came in 2017 when The Center for Biological Diversity submitted yet another petition asking for the discontinued use of M-44s. The EPA denied that petition’s request in late 2018 and in August 2019 promised to reevaluate the use of the devises. It appears the Dec. 5 Trump administration reauthorization is the answer to that reevaluation process, which brings us up to the present day. So, although there is major controversy over whether the killing of native carnivores like coyotes, especially with M-44s, actually decreases the incidence of attacks by those animals on domestic livestock, while M-44s exist on the landscape, it appears they will continue to be a lethal threat, not only to domestic pets and wildlife, but also to people. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Boulder’s Global Greengrants Fund helps Serbian group fight incinerator by Angela K. Evans

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n a world where climate change waste recycling targets and separate regularly makes headlines, news collection targets that it needs to of environmental victories are a reach as part of its succession process welcome relief. For a group of to the EU,” says Pippa Gallop with activists in Belgrade, Serbia, the grassroots CEE Bankwatch funded in part by Boulder-based Network in central and eastern Global Greengrants Fund, a recent Europe, “which was indeed what win could mean cleaner air quality we’ve been saying the whole time.” and the beginnings of a more robust Serbian recycling is rather inforrecycling and waste management mal, including the widespread use of system as the country seeks to join waste pickers — people, mainly of the European marginalized Roma COURTESY OF GLOBAL GREENGRANTS FUND Union in 2020. origin, who rifle For the last year through city trash and a half, the and work at the grassroots organilandfills collecting zation Ne Davimo recyclable materials Beograd (Don’t — making official Drown Belgrade) recycling rates hard has been fighting a to come by. Serbian proposed large officials estimate capacity waste about 10% of incinerator, municipal waste is approved by the currently recycled, city in 2017 as a however, environpublic-private partmental and waste nership with prommanagement groups ised funding from say it’s closer to large development about 3-5%. banks. It’s proposed to be built at Regardless, it’s a far cry from the 65% the current Vinca landfill, which has required by 2025 according to EU been operating for more than 40 standards. years on the shores of the Danube Plus, it’s estimated the proposed River. project will burn 66% of Belgrade’s In late October 2019, the municipal waste (about 340,000 European Investment Bank (EIB) tons) annually. Given that 68% of announced it’s pulling its funding for that waste is considered recyclable, the incinerator after Ne Davimo compostable or preventable according Beograd challenged the project, arguto CEE Bankwatch, opponents are ing that it will only worsen Belgrade’s concerned materials that could actupoor air quality and prevent the city ally be reused or recycled will be from implementing more meaningful burned instead. recycling and waste management “They say they won’t burn things strategies. The support from the that can be recycled, but we have very Global Greengrants Fund helped the big doubts about that,” says Aleksa organization gather research and data Petkovic with Ne Davimo Beograd, to make its case against the incineraadding that the EIB and European tor to send to the banks and create Commission have also expressed simipublic pressure. lar concerns. It’s especially concerning The EIB and European given Serbia’s bid to join the EU, Commission, in a short statement, which is moving away from a more “came to the conclusion that by traditional consumption-based ecoimplementing this project there was a nomic system in favor of a more susdanger that Serbia wouldn’t reach the tainable circular economic system. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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The circular economy concept is an integral part of the European Green Deal, introduced in late 2019, which aims to make Europe the first carbon-neutral continent by 2050. The idea is simple: a circular economy advocates for waste prevention instead of waste management by emulating nature’s more regenerative life cycles. It requires a transition to renewable energy and product design innovation so that things like singleuse plastics are eliminated. It runs counter to the more traditional linear approach of consumption that fueled the industrial revolution — “take, make and dispose” as the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, a major backer of the idea worldwide, describes. The Vinca waste incinerator moves Serbia in the exact opposite direction, its opponents argue. “The plant isn’t committing to be in line to the new standards and [government officials] prioritized it over more environmentally sustainable waste management,” Gallop says. The possibility of increased air pollution produced by the incinerator is also of concern, Petkovic says. Already, Serbia has seen an increase in premature deaths as a result of air pollution, approximately 6,500 a year, according to the latest statistics from the World Health Organization. Ne Davimo Beograd is concerned that the incinerator will just make the problem worse, especially since Serbian air monitoring systems have proven unreliable in the past. The fact that EIB pulled funding for the project is seen as a victory, but with more investors still committed to the project, Ne Davimo Beograd still has a lot of work ahead. Along with CEE BankWatch, the organization has filed an official complaint with European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), which has already approved a loan for the project. Gallop says the organizations are also considering further legal action to prevent construction of the incinerator. Apart from that, Ne Davimo Beograd will also continue educating the public about the proposed project, hoping to sway public officials to cancel its development in favor of a more sustainable waste management approach. JANURY 9, 2020

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ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF NEVER NOT COLLECTIVE

A ‘Pretty Strong’ step First-of-its-kind, all-women climbing film hits the big screen

By Emma Athena

A

few years ago, Julie Ellison stood at HAZEL FINDLAY the base of a climb in Indian Creek. climbs in West Virginia. While waiting for the route to open, she’d gotten her gear ready, and yet Below: Nina Williams she’d been overlooked not once, but climbs in Yosemite. three times by the others at the crag — all climbers, all men — as they repeatedly asked, despite her clear presence and intentions, who was next in line for the climb. It was as if they couldn’t believe it was her. Ellison, Climbing magazine’s editor-in-chief at the time, revisited the experience in a fall 2016 Editor’s Note: pushing past the men to climb the route, she considers “printing out a copy of my climbing resume and handing it out at crags from here on out.” It wasn’t the first time she had to justify her presence, strength and experience as a climber, and she’s never been alone in that affair. That same year, a Climbing poll showed 76% of female climbers reported being “treated as weaker or less experienced by a person of the opposite sex.” Around this time Ellison was deep in conversation with Shelma Jun, founder of the digital platform Flash Foxy and the wildly popular Women’s Climbing Festival. They both saw the truth of rock climbing’s ethos — that its framework, like most of the world, has been constructed by and built for men, despite the longtime participation and ambition of women. For decades, climbing media has fortified this scaffolding of male design. Of the 91 main segments in high-production climbing films produced before 2017, only 11 even showed a woman climbing. Well aware of media’s dexterous power — its ability to simultaneously disassemble and rebuild status quos, and not only celebrate but also legitimize the presence of nonmale, non-white participants — Ellison and Jun agreed on the need for a film about the abundance of badass female climbers. If no existing production company was going to take women as seriously as men, they themselves would have to create, as Ellison put it, “the lady’s REEL ROCK.” The duo quickly onboarded two friends — Colette McInerney, a see ‘PRETTY STRONG’ Page 18

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STAY CONNECTED Check us out on Facebook and Twitter for events, local news, and ticket giveaways. facebook.com/boulderweeklymedia twitter.com/boulderweekly

‘PRETTY STRONG’ from Page 17

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seasoned professional climber and photographer/videographer, and Leslie Hittmeier, a writer and editor. Together, despite zero feature-filmmaking experience between them, the four women founded Never Not Collective, raised nearly $80,000 on Kickstarter, then taught themselves how to make a movie. It was a long road filled with mishaps and laughs, long days and expensive errors, team member changes and creative solutions. But now, three years later, their first project, Pretty Strong, will premiere to a near-sold-out crowd at Boulder Theater on Jan. 10. It’s the first-ever all-female climbing film to hit a big screen. In the climbing world, film occupies its own particularly holy place. “Dosage-style” films have existed since the ’90s, serving stylistic and action-packed clips sewn together, illustrating the cutting-edge climbs and climbers of the given moment, not unlike the best-of highlight reel a high-school parent might send to a faraway college. These films move across the internet like a virus; when REEL ROCK debuts each year, climbers flock to Boulder Theater with religious fervor. Nina Williams, who starred in a 2019 REEL ROCK segment, is one of 10 women featured in Pretty Strong. Others include Boulder’s Isabelle Faus, Hazel Findley, Jessa Goebel and Katie Lambert. Before filming with Never Not Collective, Williams had never before worked with an all-female production team: “Most production teams are mostly or entirely male,” she says. Being a part of Pretty Strong is

ANNA exciting: “It’s a film LIINA climbs that’s long overdue, in Spain. and yet very timely as climbing becomes more and more popular,” she says. “Pretty Strong contributes some of the first high-quality, female-centric storylines to a sport that could use some fresh perspective.” Since 2012, Hilary Oliver, a writer and editor of outdoor media, has been contemplating the ways gender is (and isn’t) portrayed in outdoor industry films, blogs and stories. It’s not hard for her to see the treatment of women in media as an echo of society at large. “Climbing and the outdoor industry are small microcosms that reflect the gender roles, rights, expectations, fears and frustrations of the world in general,” she says. In the last eight years, she’s recognized a slow shift toward more gender inclusivity. “Not enough to provide equal representation, but certainly more than I was seeing seven or eight years ago,” she says. “I still often see stories, films and ad campaigns that make me cringe. Women athletes are often asked questions men never would be asked.” Pretty Strong, for one, won’t be asking questions catered directly toward gender — what’s it like having your period, being a mom, facing sexism, being the only woman, etc. while climbing? — an apolitical decision that’s resonated with some, and infuriated others. After a preview article and the trailer were published, Never Not Collective received comments from several women with concerns that gender-specific issues would not serve as a main focus of

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Pretty Strong. Mélise Edwards, a Ph.D. student and longtime climber, explains that not addressing gender head-on in a female-centric climbing film “reinforces the idea that in order to be taken seriously, women need to abandon the notion that we struggle in unique ways due to our gender and intersecting identities.” “It is necessary to recognize the historical context in which women, notably underrepresented women, were denied rights and opportunities to their white and male peers,” Edwards continues — such rights and opportunities can range from deeply sown access issues to the financial means climbing necessitates, to sponsorships and media coverage. She, as others have echoed, would like to see concepts like these tackled directly. “Recognizing the identities of the women who are flourishing means we recognize the importance of historical context and the incredibly oppressive forces they had to navigate in order to succeed. This is so important.” Ignoring the differences in gender, simply subbing out men and filling in women, continues to uphold the male-centric, white-perpetuated scaffolding, she argues. “Who benefits when we ignore gender and refuse to acknowledge the difference gender may play in our lives?” she asks. “Whose comfort is prioritized and who benefits from this? Who does this serve?” Ellison explains that, from the very beginning, Pretty Strong was intended as a classic dosage-style film, packed with try-hard moments in Rocky Mountain National Park, Yosemite Valley, Mexico, Appalachia and more. Never Not Collective’s July 2017 Kickstarter, which received $79,383 from 1,481 backers, stated outright: “This isn’t a film about gender imbalance or the sexualization of women or what it’s like to have your period at the crag.” Ellison says they chose this style for a number of reasons. Namely, McInerney had 10 years of archival footage documenting the try-hard moments of lady climbers around the globe. And in journalistic form, they elected to “show not tell” different experiences women have at the crag, on big walls, bouldering and generally figuring themselves out while working through difficult moments. If a woman so happened to have her BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ON THE BILL: ‘Pretty Strong,’ 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. Tickets are $21.

period or face sexist comments or work through past trauma, then they were going to document it, but they weren’t going to lengths to bring it up themselves. “We didn’t want to go into some of the gender politics of it,” Ellison says. “We didn’t want to dig into it, we wanted to let these things unfold as they naturally do.” And going back to 2016, the time the Pretty Strong idea formed, Ellison says, “We just needed more representation on the screen. We just needed more numbers. We needed more women out there doing cool stuff ... In that time we’ve seen this evolution of more of the intersectional ideas.” As Edwards continues to push for more representation in climbing media, she wonders how Pretty Strong can be turned into a wider dialogue. “I felt like this film valued the comfort of it’s largely white and male audience (the dominant [identity] in the climbing community) and that this prioritization came at the expense of women and underrepresented groups in the climbing community,” she says. “Claiming to ignore gender and race among many other things usually benefits the most privileged in our society who would rather not confront the ways in which other people struggle, because this would mean confronting the ways in which they have unfairly benefited throughout their entire lives.” After receiving messages from Edwards and others, the women behind Never Not Collective publicly addressed concerns with a letter on their blog. Their original idea of “‘progress’ came from our privileged position as cisgender white women,” they wrote. “Many women have a vastly different experience.” Ellison says, “What we’re really hoping is that this is the first of its kind, so that there are an infinite number of other films and types of content to follow. It can’t be everything to everyone, but it is one small step.” To Oliver, the step feels significant: “For a whole generation of young people to see an entire feature film of women crushing, instead of seeing a token woman shoehorned into a film, will surely be impactful.” I

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The plight of Muslims

Event to highlight the ‘cultural genocide’ happening in China, Kashmir and India

by Angela K. Evans

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ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF HADI ABDULMATIN

hen India-administered Kashmir lost all internet and communication services in early August, Ajaz Siraj had no way of contacting his family, or friends at the Islamic Center of Boulder (ICB). For more than three weeks, he says, he was unable to get word out that he, and his wife, were OK. “There was no way we could contact them, and they were worried here because they had no way of knowing what’s happening back there,” he says. Siraj, a recently retired engineer and Lafayette resident of more than 20 years, was back in Kashmir with his wife in order to begin renovations on a house they own there. But their plans came to a standstill soon after they arrived. The night before the communication blackout began, rumors circulated that the entire region would be shut down for months, that nonKashmiris should leave and residents should stock up on supplies. The couple went out to buy groceries and found “panic on the streets,” Siraj says. “We had no idea what was happening, why this is happening.” Sometime in the night, he says, all cellular service, internet and other communication systems were shut off. Local television stations, dominated by statecontrolled media still worked, however, quickly informing everyone of India’s intentions. The situation in Kashmir has long been contentious, as both Pakistan and India claim sovereignty. India-administered Kashmir has operated under unique partial autonomous status, as the only Muslimmajority state, since the creation of modern India following decolonization. But that all changed on Aug. 5, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) announced they were taking control of the region and cutting off all communications. It’s a move that the U.N. has said deprives Kashmiris “basic freedoms,” and many see as a move to alter the demographics of the region in favor of India’s Hindu majority. “Kashmir has a distinct culture, a distinct language, a distinct way of life that is different from India,” Siraj says. “So that is at a huge risk right now.” Siraj’s story is just one of many that will be discussed at An Evening with Human Rights Activists at the ICB on Friday, Jan. 17. The event will also cover the plight of Muslims in India and Eastern China. “In China and Kashmir and India, they don’t want Muslims to be there at all,” says Tracy Smith, who converted to Islam two years ago and is a member of ICB. It 20

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all amounts to what she calls “cultural genocide,” whereby Muslims’ customs and religion — their complete way of life — are being threatened. “Everything that they do, everything that they believe in is made illegal,” Smith says. “The Chinese government and the Indian government are attempting to eradicate entire Muslim societies.” ICB has 23 different cultures and countries represented within its community, and the event is meant to educate them about the plight of different Muslim groups around the world. But it’s also designed for the larger Boulder County community, and the organizers welcome anyone and everyone to join. “People in Boulder are very educated and aware of the situation in other parts of the world,” says Hadi AbdulMatin from ICB, who is helping organize the event, “but we want them to hear first-hand experience from the people who are actually impacted.” Originally from India, AbdulMatin says his friends and family back home have seen an increase in discrimination since Prime Minister Modi and the BJP took power in 2014. JANUARY 9, 2020

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ON THE BILL: An

Evening with Human Rights Activists. 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17, Islamic Center of Boulder, 5495 Baseline Road, Boulder. Free and open to the public.

“They tell me that the situation compared to five or six years ago is different,” he says. “They are looked at suspiciously. There are also cases of verbal and physical abuse.” In remote villages, he’s even heard of Muslims who have stopped raising cows, an animal sacred to Hindus, for fear of persecution. “So they are changing their business line,” he says. “It’s too risky to have cows because, who knows, they may get attacked.” The situation has escalated in the last month, as India passed the Citizenship Amendment Act, which Modi claims is an effort to combat illegal immigration and provides an easy naturalization process for Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Christians and Zoroastrians from Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Pakistan. Muslims aren’t included in the law, however, even if they are from persecuted minorities in those Muslim majority countries, or, for example, Rohingya refugees from Burma. The law has brought widespread protests across the country since its passing in midDecember, as it is seen to violate an equality provision of the Indian Constitution by using religion as a basis for citizenship. Since protests began, at least five people have been killed with many more arrested and injured. According to The Economic Times, Modi, who has blamed the violence on protesters, has said, “Those creating violence can be identified by their clothes,” for many, a tell-tale sign of his Hindu nationalist agenda. The law is also tied to a country-wide effort to document and register citizens across the country, where the burden of proof is on the individual in a country where error-free documentation is hard to come by. “Basically, there will be millions, possibly tens of millions of Muslims who will not be able to prove their citizenship and they will be removed from citizenship roll and what will happen to them only God knows,” AbdulMatin says. The event at the ICB will also cover the plight of Uighurs in Eastern China, although the woman speaking about that does not want to be identified for fear that the Chinese government could retaliate against her family back home. In well-documented reports from The New York Times and others, Muslim Uighurs have been taken into what the Chinese government calls “re-education centers,” although they are widely believed to be detention camps. Since 2017, an estimated 1 million Uighurs have been interned at approximately 85 camps, where many have claimed they are tortured and held against their will because of their religion. In 2017, China also passed a law prohibiting men from growing long beards and women from wearing veils as is culturally customary BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


for Muslims around the world. AbdulMatin says the situation in China is the most extreme, but “what India is doing in Kashmir is to change the demographics and what India is trying to do in the rest of the country is to marginalize the Muslim population primarily, but other minorities as well,” he says. “It’s very important to allow people the freedom to practice their religion safely and move around the world and have their rights as human beings,” Smith says. “And those rights are being stripped away in violent manners around the world and in small ways, in small units, in Western countries as well.” She sites burqa bans in France, and other policies in Europe targeting Muslim minorities. Even though religious discrimination is illegal, there are plenty of examples of it happening in the U.S. as well, she says. “There’s hate speech, there are shootings, there’s fear. And there’s a lot of misinformation, a lot of misunderstandings, about Muslims,” Smith says. “So we really want to dispel and avoid the narrative that defines Muslims as only terrorists, extremists and separatists, because it can lead to this. I know it seems like a huge leap in this country and these things are extreme, but these things happen all over the world.” In Kashmir, it’s been more than five months since the communication systems were shut off. In light of other world events, “People have already forgotten about what is happening in Kashmir,” Siraj says. “The people of Kashmir are still suffering but that seems to have gotten lost in all this right now.” Businesses have shut down or have become completely cash-based as they need the internet to run credit cards and process payments, Siraj says. People have stopped sending their kids to schools, he adds, for fear of not being able to get ahold of them. There’s no way to contact help in case of an emergency and doctors can’t access health records. “Many people are suffering because of the [lack of] internet,” he says. He returned to Colorado several weeks after it all began, but while he was there, going out during the day was like visiting a ghost town, he says, the streets completely deserted, with the exception of government checkpoints. “Traveling at night was very, very scary, especially because you couldn’t contact anybody if something happened,” he says. Siraj has been able to keep in contact with some of his family through landlines and cellular phone plans. But prepaid cellular service, which comprises the majority of usage in the region, still remains BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

shut down. “The people [are] feeling that India completely ignored our rights,” he says. “They have proven that we are really not part of India. We are occupied by India and they can take our rights away at any time and they can treat us how they’re treating us.” For Siraj, it’s been made worse by the fact that while he was in Kashmir he wasn’t able to pay his U.S. health insurance monthly premium, resulting in the cancellation of his plan, something he’s still trying to rectify.

Siraj hopes to return sometime this year to see family and finish the renovations. But for now, he’s committed to sharing the stories of what’s happening in Kashmir with the community of Boulder County. “Many people think that India is a democracy, a thriving democracy. But we want to [let people know] that the narrative that India is putting out has some holes in there,” he says. “The way it is now is not a democracy. It is majoritarian country. They are passing laws without keeping the minorities in mind.”

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An unexpected path

Gustav Hoyer on his new album, his deepest regret and bringing classical to the masses

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ntil high school, composer Gustav Hoyer had never played an instrument, so he’d certainly never considered a career as a musician. But a class in music theory changed his trajectory. “At the time I was on a math and science journey,” the Denver native says. “I come from a family of scientists and physicians, those sorts. I distinctly remember the moment in class, listening to Beethoven and Mozart, their Minuet and Trio, and that’s a type of music with a specific structure. It’s like being let into the story — if you know a little about a story it’s familiar enough that you can make sense of it, but it brings surprises so it’s delightful. “All long-form classical music was driven by this ebb and flow of dramatic structure, and as I started to understand that it opened my ears to this music. Truthfully I was just riveted. It was life changing.” Today, Hoyer’s brand of classical music can be heard in film and in performances throughout the world. His newly released album, The Gilded Age, is a nine-track homage to two composers who came to prominence during the American era: Antonín Dvořák and Scott Joplin. The Gilded Age opens with Steampunk Serenade, a collection of five original movements, composed for a 40-piece string orchestra, that use Dvořák’s beloved 1875 work Serenade for Strings as inspiration. “What impressed me about [Serenade for Strings] was how compellingly [Dvořák] could take a group of strings, which can sound a little homogenous as an ensemble, and the sheer variety of color and the epic sweep he could make with what seems like a very monochromatic palette,” Hoyer says. Steampunk Serenade, like its inspirational source material, begins with a lively movement, “Steam-Powered Machine,” where violins and cellos introduce a main theme that evokes images of stately aristocratic homes of late 19th century America. Following Dvořák’s pattern, Hoyer next BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ON THE BILL: Gustav Hoyer’s new album, ‘The Gilded Age,’ is now out. Purchase it at gustavhoyer.com/gilded-age

by Caitlin Rockett introduces a lilting waltz (“Slightly Tipsy”), followed by a vigorous scherzo (“Over the Next Ridge”), then a tranquil larghetto (“Sunset Glow in Prairie Grass”) and, finally, a jovial finale (“Games of the Wind”). “It’s a steampunk ethos to say ... what if you took the 1880s and ’90s and projected out a future where that aesthetic prevailed, but 100 years later?” Hoyer explains. “And project out what a Dvořák piece would be in our time, projecting for-

my brother and I were reflecting on our life, my brother said, ‘Dad was a cowboy; he just happened to be an eye surgeon.’ [‘Over the Next Ridge’ represents] everything that means: the Western romanticism, the ethos, the love of the West, the love of America, the ruggedness. “I’m now starting to write pieces for people I love while they are still alive, because that was a real miss that I could never share with my father this testament to a cowboy’s life and then COURTESY GUSTAV HOYER the journey to the next life.” Hoyer knows classical music is a hard sell these days, and much of the work he does — formerly as artistic director for the Los Angeles-based Orchestra Unleashed, and currently as artistic director of NoCo Artists in Fort Collins — revolves around finding ways to get people engaged with a style of music that demands focus. “For classical music, the listener has to bring as much creativity to the process as the proward from that same aesthetic.” ducers of the music because it’s longer Hoyer says a composition instructor in form and it draws you out of the quick, college once compared his approach to McDonald’s bite-sized, highly salty snippets composition to a modern playwright using that our popular media is industrialized to Shakespearean English. “In a lot of ways I felt like that resonated deliver.” Hoyer’s approach has been immersive, with me as an artist, just temperamentally with a steampunk-themed event last year and stylistically,” he says. “That’s where I in Fort Collins, and another coming up in sit.” Los Angeles this spring. He’s hosted active Hoyer brought in his longtime friend, listening events, where participants are pianist Benjamin Harding, to play the final four tracks of the album: a stunning toccata given the chance to hear music free of distraction, and conducted Gustav Holst’s The (a sublime showcase of Harding’s dexteriPlanets at a planetarium. He often arrangty), and three piano rags. es concerts so small audiences can sit While the album pays tribute to composers who’ve inspired Hoyer’s love of clas- close to the performers. “If it’s decent music it will serve as a sical music, it also honors Hoyer’s loved catalyst for that individual listener to have ones. “Over the Next Ridge” is a nod to his father, a physician who grew up riding hors- a very rich aesthetic experience that they are in charge of,” he says. “They are the es on the Eastern plains of Colorado. creative star of that encounter. ... Like I felt “My great grandfather, who I’m named in that classroom when I discovered clasafter, was an Eastern Colorado homesical music, there are a lot of folks who steader, so there’s a little rugged Western could really have their life enriched if they in our lineage,” Hoyer says. “My dad carried that. He grew up spending summers in could discover this music in a way that was inviting them in instead of pushing the dirt, riding horses and being a Western them away.” kid. When he was very ill and dying and I

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Takács Quartet features Mendelssohn siblings in spring concert series

Retiring violist Geraldine Walther will be honored for her years with the quartet

by Peter Alexander

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AMANDA TIPTON PHOTOGRAPHY

rograms featuring string quartets by sister and brother Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (Jan. 12-13) and Felix Mendelssohn (May 3-4) will form the bookends of the spring concert series by the Takács Quartet at the University of Colorado. In between (March 8-9) will be a program ON THE BILL: All per- The last movement is very recognizing the 250th anniformances in Grusin versary of Beethoven’s exciting, in an uplifting, lively, Hall of the Imig Music birth. Other composers on fun sort of way. It’s music that’s Building on the CU campus. For a full the bill over the three provery immediate and speaks schedule and ticket grams will be Mozart, availability, visit takacs- clearly in terms of its emotional Haydn and Brahms. content.” quartet.com The programming of Her Quartet will share the quartets by the siblings January program with two late Mendelssohn comes about works of Mozart, the D-major partly from a planned recording by the String Quartet, K575, and the Clarinet Takács Quartet that will include both piec- Quintet for clarinet and strings, K581. CU es, but it also reflects the music’s history. music faculty member and clarinetist “The Felix Mendelssohn quartet that Daniel Silver will join the Takács for the we’re playing was written just after Fanny quintet. died, and he dedicated it to her,” Edward “The Clarinet Quintet doesn’t come Dusinberre, the quartet’s first violinist, up in our repertoire very frequently,” explains. “It’s also his last quartet, and he Dusinberre says. “It’s an incredible piece, died very soon after that. [clarinetists] are lucky to have that. And “That’s a nice link between the two Dan has a very pure, serene and even pieces, which will form the nucleus of our sound, which is very well suited to this next recording.” piece.” Dusinberre also admits to a personal The second concert of the series reason for choosing Mendelssohn. “One (March 8-9) will open with a quartet by of the great pieces in the violin repertoire Beethoven’s teacher, Haydn’s Quartet in is the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto. I just C major, Op. 54 No. 2, followed by two love Mendelssohn. It’s nice to play some Beethoven’s quartets, the early Op. 18 of his quartets as well.” No. 6, from 1799-1800, and the late Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel was a Quartet in C-sharp minor, Op. 131, writvery talented pianist and composer, but as ten in 1826 and considered one of his a woman in the early 19th century she greatest works. was not able to have a career as performThe Haydn and early Beethoven er or composer. Her father in particular quartets on the program are classicalopposed both. Felix helped her by having style works, lighter in tone than some of her music published under his Romantic works from later in the 19th name, but otherwise most of her music century. Dusinberre particularly likes the was unknown outside family circles. Haydn Op. 54 No. 2, because it has a Dusinberre describes her String Quartet gypsy-styled slow movement that is fun as a “very warm and very Romantic piece. to play. Beethoven’s Op. 18 No. 2, he BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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says, “is very refined, and also has a great sense of humor about it.” Those two works make a strong contrast with Op. 131, which is entirely by design. “I think Op. 131 should really be its own concert,” Dusinberre says. “It’s such a mammoth piece that in terms of balancing the program, you don’t want anything too big before the intermission.” The May 3-4 program opens with another Beethoven, Op. 18 No. 6, followed by Felix Mendelssohn’s Quartet in F minor, Op. 80 — the one dedicated to his sister. “That’s an incredible piece,” Dusinberre says. “It’s very dramatic and stormy, and very virtuosic.” “Mendelssohn was devastated by the loss [of his sister]. It’s a very exciting piece to listen to, and very concise. It packs a lot of material into a short space of time — this piece is like a massive punch.” The final piece on the May program will also be the final piece violist Geraldine Walther will play with the Takács on the CU campus. She will retire from the quartet at the end of May, following performances at the Prague Spring Festival. To honor Walther at her last campus concert as a member of Takács, the quartet has invited another faculty member whom Walther has worked closely with over the years to join in the performance, violist Erika Eckert. Together, they will perform Brahms’ String Quintet in G minor, Op. 111, which calls for string quartet and an extra viola. “It’s an homage to Gerri [Walther] and the wonderful work we’ve done together in the last 15 years,” Dusinberre says. “She and Erika [Eckert] have had a very close relationship, and we’ve played a lot with Erika over the years, so it’s nice for her to celebrate the collaboration that we’ve had over the years. JANUARY 9, 2020

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GUSTER

AN EVENING OF ACOUSTIC MUSIC AND IMPROV TUES. MAR 10 SHE REMEMBERS EVERYTHING

ROSANNE CASH WITH JOHN LEVENTHAL WED. MAR 11 & THUR. MAR 12 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS: NATURAL AFFAIR TOUR 2020

THE GROWLERS SAT. MAR 14 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

LOS LOBOS TUES. MAR 17 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

ANDERS OSBORNE + JACKIE GREENE THUR. MAR 19 DISRAELI GEARS TOUR

THE MUSIC OF CREAM MAR 28 .................................. ROSS MATHEWS “NAME DROP” BOOK TOUR MAR 29 ................................................................. THE DEL MCCOURY BAND APR 5 ............................................................................... PAVLO IN CONCERT APR 11 .............................................. A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN APR 22 ..... TIGRAN HAMASYAN FEAT. ARTHUR HNATEK & EVAN MARIEN

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS: UP AND ROLLING TOUR

NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS FEB 23 .............................................................................................. RAPSODY FEB 27 ................................................................................................ VINCENT FEB 28 ........................................................................................... SON LITTLE FEB 29 .................................................................. G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE MAR 3 ................................................. DURAND JONES & THE INDICATIONS

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JANUARY 9, 2020

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2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


ILENIA TESORO

LIVE ETOWN RADIO SHOW TAPING WITH PATRICK WATSON AND BASIA BULAT. 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 13, eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. Tickets are $38.50. see EVENTS Page 28

VERSATILITY DANCE FESTIVAL.

Jan. 10-12, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

The Versatility Dance 3RD LAW DANCE/THEATER Festival offers three nights of the best in dance film and performance from Colorado and beyond. Friday, Jan. 10 will feature 30 minutes of short dance films followed by a facilitated discussion featuring the artists performing on stage the following night. View some amazing dance film work from film directors hailing from Colorado, Belgium, French Polynesia, Russia and Canada. Then hear from the dance company artists about their performance pieces and their creative processes. (Suggested $10 donation at the door.) Then see that creative process come to life on Jan. 11 and 12 as 3rd Law Dance/Theater from Colorado and REVolutions Dance from Florida perform. They’ll also offer workshops open to the public. The Arts Hub in Lafayette will show the film selections on Jan. 12 at 5 p.m.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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AN EVENING AND AFTERNOON OF IRISH MUSIC. 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 11 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 12, The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-443-7510.

Join Boulder-based duo Adam Agee and Jon Sousa for an enchanted evening of music, dedicated to the spirit and land of Ireland. Agee and Sousa journey through the Irish idiom on fiddle, guitar and tenor banjo, and have been enchanting listeners on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean for more than a decade. Their connection to their instruments and the transcendent energy in their music is guaranteed to captivate and uplift audiences of all ages. Tickets: $15-$26, nomadplayhouse. org/events ASHLI HARA PHOTOGRAPHY

JANUARY 9, 2020

WORK LIKE AN ARTIST: ART INSTALLATION WORKSHOP — WITH WINTER ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE CHELSEA GILMORE. 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15, Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787.

Firehouse Art Center winter artist-in-residence Chelsea Gilmore invites you to participate as she prepares her winter installation at the Longmont gallery. Gilmore, an artist, writer and herbalist living and working in Fort Collins, is inspired by the natural world and communicates this passion through her craft. Combining craft, repetition, material manipulation and narrative, Gilmore weaves threads from her recent writers’ residency at the Wolverine Farm Letterpress, a nonprofit publishing company in Fort Collins. In response to the current environmental and social climate, she feels compelled to create work seeking moments of intimacy, beauty and wonder from industrial waste. The event is free to attend, but registration is recommended: eventbrite.com/e/art-installation-workshop-tickets-84331314231

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LIVE MUSIC!

Ethan Mindlin Jones The Tune Up at Full Cycle Friday, January 10 6:30-8:30 PM - NO COVER Happy Hour till 7pm

1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tuneupboulder.com

arts Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (BMoCA), 1750 13th St., Boulder: Adriana Corral: ‘Unearthed/Desenterrado;’ Gretchen Marie Schaefer: ‘Folding and Thrusting,’ through Jan. 19; Paul Gillis: ‘When Kingship Ascends to Heaven,’ Jan. 14-May 1. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Build a Better Book: Stories for Your Senses,’ Canyon Gallery, through Feb. 2. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder: ‘We Are What We Wear,’ featuring: Jim Ardnt, Erika Diamond, Noah Pica and Winnie van der Riijn, and The Pavlova Project: a brilliantly costumed life, through Jan. 12. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver: ‘Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature,’ through Feb. 2; ‘Shantell Martin: Words and Lines,’ through Jan. 31; ‘The Light Show,’ through May 2020; ‘Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection,’ through January 2020; Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont: ‘Locavore’: Katie Thompson, Paula Fitzgerald and Megan Morgan, opening reception Jan. 10, through Feb. 2. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont: ‘Front Range Rising,’ permanent exhibit

THURSDAY JANUARY 9 7:00 PM

PAUL GILLIS, WHEN KINGSHIP ASCENDS TO HEAVEN (DETAIL), 2018, OIL ON CANVAS, 40 X 40.” COURTESY OF RULE GALLERY.

Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons: ‘40 years/40 artifacts’; ‘All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons’; ‘Lyons Newspapers: A History,’;

‘125 Years of Distinctive Cameras’; ‘Tiny Stories: Art of the Dollhouse’; ‘The Flood of 2013’; ‘Native American Artifacts,’ and more, lyonsredstonemuseum.com MONUMENTAL — coproduced by Black Cube and the Denver Theatre District. Through Jan. 31, 2020. For times and locations, denvertheatredistrict.com/ event/monumental. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Wild: Buffalo in Boulder,’ through Jan. 12; ‘Archive 75: Multilayered Stories Told Through a Boulder Lens,’ through January; ‘Drawing a (Blank) in Boulder, through Jan. 27. Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver: ‘Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation,’ through April 5; ‘Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler: Flora,’ through April 5; ‘Stacey Steers: Edge of Alchemy,’ through April 5.

STAGING COMPLEX scenes using all of human history, from ancient alphabets and imagery such as the Tower of Babel to robotic protagonists and supernatural landscapes, artist Paul Gillis explores the idea that as much as things change in the world, humans remain the same. His chimeras, positioned in surreal situations, tell the familiar story of people seeking their place in the world and with each other. Paul Gillis: ‘When Kingship Ascends to Heaven,’ shows at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art Jan. 14-May 1. NCAR/UCAR Community Art Program, National Center for Atmospheric Research Visitor Center, 1850 Table Mesa Drive: Acrylic on canvas by Monica Tymcio and ‘Chapters,’ fiber art by six artists, through Jan. 25. University of Colorado Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder: ‘Body Language: Picturing People,’ through June 2020; University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado Henderson Building,1035 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Feathers and Flora,’ Henderson Building, through Jan. 31; ‘Fossils: Clues to the Past,’ Paleontology Hall, ongoing exhibit; ‘Ground Level Ozone,’ McKenna Gallery, ongoing exhibit; ‘Life in Colorado’s Freshwater,’ ongoing traveling exhibit; and more.

BEARS AND AURORA OF ALASKA 8:30 PM

LASER STRANGER THINGS FRIDAY JANUARY 10 10:00 PM

LIQUID SKY THE POLICE 11:30 PM

LIQUID SKY THE WALL SATURDAY JANUARY 11 1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: WE ARE STARS & LIFE OF TREES 2:30 PM

STARS AND LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 10:00 PM

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9

Events

Music

Adultology: Coffee, Tea, & Herbal Drinks. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Dada Veda: Yoga Inspired Folk Music. 7:30 p.m. Seventh Circle Music Collective, 2935 W. Seventh Ave., Denver. Dancing, Movement, Music, Community and Chocolate. 7:30 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 608332-4355. Every Thursday. Elsewhere featuring Kendoll. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Girls Night Out the Show. 8 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Honky Tonk Happy Hour — with Adam Lopez Duo. 5:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

LIQUID SKY U2

Open Mic. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

LASER QUEEN

Or yx, Chthonic Deity, Zygrot. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

11:30 PM

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 28

EVENTS from Page 27

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Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Vocal Journeys Student Concert. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. JANUARY 9, 2020

Beth Stelling. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Jan. 11. Boom: Michael Shnayerson in Conversation with Nora Burnett Abrams. 7 p.m. Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. BoulderReads New Tutor Orientation. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Dance For Parkinson’s Program. 11:30 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-506-3568. Also on Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $5. GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Genealogy: Hiding in Plain Databases @ Meadows. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Great Indian Novel. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

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Naughty Pierre Comedy and Burlesque. 8 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Boulder. 7 p.m. 2132 14th St., Boulder. Stock Show Kick-off Parade presented by Arrow Electronics. Noon. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. Tabletop Gaming Club. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. FRIDAY, JANUARY 10 Music Tnertle — with Melody Lines, Telemetr y, Kaptain. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Artist’s Opening Reception: Charles Michael Hickman — with music by Ben Hanna. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Barber Piano Concerto performed by Olga Kern. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Through Jan. 12. Chris Dismuke Band. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


25% OFF

words

Chris Knight, Jamie Lin Wilson. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Citizen Dan: A Steely Dan Experience. 8 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 303-834-9384.

‘THE CREATIVE HEROINE’S PATH’ is a self-help book for creatives who are ready to transform their lives to express their creative genius. Whether you want to leave a creative legacy, or just want to be more creative in your life, following your own creative path is the way to success. Julie Baldwin will speak about and sign her new book, ‘The Creative Heroine’s Path: Live Your Creative Life,’ at Boulder Book Store on Wednesday, Jan. 15 at 7:30 p.m.

Danny Worsnop, STARBENDERS. 6:30 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Deja Blu. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Famous Men. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. The Goonies (’80s Tribute). 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

THURSDAY, JAN. 9

Kate Farmer, Taylor Tuke. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

SUNDAY, JAN. 12

Live Music. 5 p.m. BOCO Cider, 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Unit 14, Boulder, 720-938-7285. Live Music Fridays. 7 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002.

J Shah, MD — Heart Health. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. BAFS ‘Second Sundays’ Poetry Workshop. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder.

TUESDAY, JAN. 14 April Gloom. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Logan Thomas. 5:30 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Lyrics Born. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Mark Diamond & Gar y Witt Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Music & Movement. 10 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. OG Nixin. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Parker McCollum. 8:30 p.m. The Grizzly Rose, 5450 North Valley Highway, Denver, 303-295-2353. Q-Vents Presents: Decade Frequencies. 9 p.m. The Black Box, 314 E. 13th Ave., Denver. Ravin’wolf Live. 7 p.m. Por Wine House, 836 1/2 Main St., Louisville, 720-666-1386. Rei Presents: Pretty Strong. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Stevie Stone. 7 p.m. The Roxy Theater, 2549 Walton St., Denver, 720-242-9782.

2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through Jan. 11. Opening Reception: ‘Locavore’: Katie Thompson, Paula Fitzgerald & Megan Morgan. 6 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Playtime Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Julie Baldwin — The Creative Heroine’s Path. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Beck and Call and Other Dances. 7:30 p.m. The Studio Loft at Denver Performing Arts Complex, 980 14th St., Denver, 303-789-4181. Chandler Holt Trio — with special guest Sugar Moon. 8 p.m. Rogers Hall, 400 High St., Lyons. Colorado Rocky Mountain Fiddle Championships. 9 a.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. I

LAFAYETTE 489 US Highway 287 303.665.5918 LONGMONT Prospect Village 1940 Ionosphere, Ste. D 303.834.8237

GOLDEN on Route 93 303.279.1481 BOULDER at Meadows Shopping Center 303.554.0193

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

SAMANTHA FISH

FEB 06

Defunkt Railroad. 10 p.m. Dark Horse Bar and Grill, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder. The Delta Sonics. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914.

An Evening and Afternoon of Irish Music. 7 p.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-443-7510. Second performance 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 12.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 11

Authentic NYC BAGELS in Colorado

The Oriental Theater

Dave Kellogg, Jesse Voelker, Mississippi Jake. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Volkswagen presents Warren Miller’s ‘Timeless.’ 6 p.m. Stoney’s Bar & Grill, 1111 Lincoln St., Denver, 303-302-6126. The Wheel of Doom Comedy Show. 11 p.m. Dangerous Theatre, 2620 W. Second Ave., Suite 1, Denver, 720-989-1764.

Expires 1/31/20

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15

Espresso! Gypsy Jazz. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Ardalan: Mr. Good Album Release Tour. 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Mrs. Eda Bagel: In Concert... with Herself. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center,

Michael Lerner — Revolutionary Love. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Versatility Dance Festival. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through Jan. 12.

Bottoms up! Comedy Tour 2020. 7 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

Longmont United Hospital Vendor Sale. 7:30 a.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1950 Mountain View Ave., Longmont.

Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

A Concert Featuring National Hammered Dulcimer Champs. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303777-1003.

Music

Jack Box Games. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Ron Meyer and Mark Reeder. 6:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Sing and Play Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

Events

Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

the purchase of a Big Daddy Club Mug, & get FREE COFFEE REFILLS EVERY MONDAY WITH THE MUG

George Nelson Band. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339. High Road Home. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. James Murphy DJ set (LCD Soundsystem/DFA). 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Last Men On Earth. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. see EVENTS Page 30

JANUARY 9, 2020

EL JAVI AND SPINPHONY JAN 24 CHAIN STATION AND TURKEYFOOT BLUEGRASS JAN 31 BEDOUINE FEB 01 For a full list of all upcoming concerts and events, visit swallowhillmusic.org

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FILMS Monroeville, Alabama, 1987: A man is condemned to death for a crime he did not commit. Do you need to know the color of his skin, or can you already guess? He is Walter McMillian (Jamie Foxx), and recent Harvard law graduate Bryan Stevenson (Michael B. Jordan) has come to his defense. But, if the movie’s poster and Stevenson’s legacy of freeing the innocent and representing the underserved exist anywhere in your mind, then you know going in that the true story “Just Mercy” draws from is a hopeful one, albeit slightly bloated in its design. Foxx is a highlight, a man who knows the cards were stacked against him from the deal, and director Destin Daniel Cretton handles courtroom scenes well but resorts to bland visuals elsewhere — except for scenes set in prison, particularly one night on death row. It is both somber and understated and gives humanity and decency to a soul who has to die in a most inhumane way. —MJC

BOULDER:

Boedecker Theater, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., 303-444-7328: ‘63 Up,’ Jan. 8-11. ‘Becoming Nobody,’ Jan. 15-18. ‘Frankie,’ Jan. 15-18. New York International Children’s Film Festival Shorts, Jan. 11-25. ‘Radioflash,’ 8:45 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10. ‘Stuffed,’ Jan. 8-10. ‘Three Christs,’ Jan. 10-13. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., 303-441-3011: Stan Brakhage Local Filmmakers’ Showcase, 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 9. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, 303-441-3100: ‘Dora and the Lost City of Gold,’ 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10

Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., 303-786-7030: ‘Pretty Strong,’ 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10. Century Theatre, 1700 29th St., 303-444-0583: ‘1917’ ‘Bombshell’ ‘Cats’ ‘Ford v Ferrari’ ‘Frozen 2’ ‘The Grudge’ ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ ‘Just Mercy’ ‘Knives Out’ ‘Like a Boss’ ‘Little Women’ ‘Pain and Glory’ ‘Sarileru Neekevvaru,’ (in Telugu with English subtitles), 12:55 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12. ‘Spies in Disguise’ ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ ‘Uncut Gems’ ‘Underwater’

DENVER:

Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., 303-744-9686: ‘Apollo 11: First Steps’ ‘Ford v Ferrari’ Superpower Dogs 3D’ ‘Turtle Odyssey’ Sie Film Center, 2510 E. Colfax Ave., 303-595-3456: ‘Little Women’ ‘Parasite’ ‘Three Christs’ ‘Uncut Gems’

LONGMONT:

Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., 720-494-4673: Free film screening: ‘Paris to Pittsburgh,’ 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 9 Regal Village at the Peaks 12, 1230 S. Hover Road, 844-462-7342: ‘1917’ ‘Frozen 2’

‘The Grudge’ ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ ‘Just Mercy’ ‘Knives Out’ ‘Like a Boss’ ‘Little Women’ ‘Spies in Disguise’ ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ ‘Underwater’ ‘Uncut Gems’ ‘Weathering With You,’ Jan. 15-16.

LOUISVILLE:

Regal Cinebarre Boulder, 1164 W. Dillon Road, 844-462-7342: ‘1917’ ‘Cats’ ‘Frozen 2’ ‘The Grudge’ ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ ‘Just Mercy’ ‘Knives Out’ ‘Like a Boss’ ‘Little Women’ ‘Richard Jewell’ ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ ‘Spies in Disguise’ ‘Uncut Gems’ ‘Underwater’

NEDERLAND:

Backdoor Theater, 243 W. Fourth St., 303-258-0188: ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood’

WESTMINSTER:

Alamo Drafthouse Westminster, 8905 Westminster Boulevard, 303-731-3330: ‘The Big Lebowski,’ 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14. ‘The Biggest Little Farm,’ 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 12. ‘The Cave,’ 3:45 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 11. ‘Edge of Democracy,’ 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10. ‘Hackers,’ 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 15. ‘Knock Down the House,’ 3:45 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 12. ‘Legend,’ 7:45 p.m. Monday, Jan. 13. ‘Maiden,’ 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 11. ‘One Child Nation,’ 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10.

EVENTS from Page 29

Live Music with Ryan Chr ys & The Roughcuts. 8 p.m. The Wild Game Entertainment Experience, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 720-600-4875. Luckys 40th B-Day Bash. 7 p.m. The Roxy Theater, 2549 Walton St., Denver, 720-242-9782. The Moscow Quartet & Friends. 7 p.m. Denver School of the Arts, 7111 Montview Blvd., Denver, 720-253-9048. Open House Auditions. 9 a.m. Colorado Children’s Chorale, 2420 W. 26th Ave., Suite 350-D, Denver. Reckless Kelly. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. The Rock and Roll Playhouse Presents: The Music of The Beatles For Kids. 30

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JANUARY 9, 2020

11:30 a.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 646-560-0065. Scott Russo: The Voice Of Unwritten Law. 9 p.m. Streets Denver, 1501 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-861-9103. Shuli Egar. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Sons & Brothers. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Sullivan King. 9 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. To Be Astronauts, Too Many Humans, Decatur, Star Garbage. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Wild Adriatic, Dream Feed, Native Station. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. I

Wink Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Events 24th Annual Oatmeal Festival and 5K Walk/Run. 7:30 a.m. Pioneer Elementary, Colorado Music Festival & Center for Musicalarts, Lafayette. Comedy Open Mic Saturday Night. 6:30 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Contemporar y Dance Class with 3rd Law Dance/Theater. 5:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. EVENTS from Page 32

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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theater

EVENTS from Page 30

Create a Bouncy Ball. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

PUBLIC DOMAIN PUBLIC WORKS THEATRE COMPANY

THE SONGS OF RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN have become an integral part of everyday life. We sing them anywhere, we dance to them in ballrooms, we hear them on the radio, in clubs and even in elevators. We thrill to see them on the live stage, and we teach them to our children. ‘Some Enchanted Evening’ offers audiences a glorious parade of genuine hits, showing at Longmont Theatre Company Jan. 10-19.

Drop-In Tech Help. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Folkloric Dancers. 3:30 p.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. Ghosts of Christmas Past. 4 p.m. Historic Callahan House, 312 Terry St., Longmont, 720-453-4733. Meatloaf and The Milkman Comedy Show. 7 p.m. Denver’s Dangerous Theatre, 2620 W. 2nd Ave., Denver, 720-989-1764. Mrs. Eda Bagel: In Concert... with Herself. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Tween Time. 11 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Western Views Book Club. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Disney’s Beauty & the Beast (youth production). Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Feb. 16.

Mamma Mia! BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder. Through Feb. 22.

Crushes — with Buntport Theater Company. Su Teatro Cultural and Performing Arts Center, 721 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. Opens Jan. 11. Through Jan. 14. Holiday Inn. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Jan. 19.

Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Music

Events

Bootstrap LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Free Day at Denver Zoo. Denver Zoo, 2300 Steele St., Denver, 720-337-1400.

The Colorado Blues Society: Road to Memphis Fundraiser. 1 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. The Cranberr y Vampire Tour. 6:30 p.m. The Roxy Theater, 2549 Welton St., Denver, 720-242-9782. Crick Wooder. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. DU Lamont Faculty Recital: Joseph Galema, organ. 4:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-871-7720. An Evening and Afternoon of Irish Music. 2 p.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-443-7510. LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. A Night in the Clouds: EP Release Party feat. Lily & Co., Waxcat, More. 8 p.m. Your Mom’s House, 608 E. 13th Ave., Denver, 303-860-4516. Takács Quartet. 4 p.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder. Tyler Adams & Caton Sollenberger. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., I

Jimmy Buffett’s Escape to Margaritaville. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Buell Theatre, 1350 Curtis St., Denver. Through Jan. 5.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 12

Cody Qualls & Stephen Ross. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

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The Addams Family. Jesters Dinner Theater, 224 Main St., Longmont. Opens Jan. 3. Through Jan. 26.

JANUARY 9, 2020

Go Club for Kids & Teens. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. Integrated Dance Workshop with REVolutions Dance. 10 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Science Riot: Science meets Comedy. 7 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075. Scotty Wiese: Mile High Magic. 7 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver, 303-758-4722. MONDAY, JANUARY 13 Music Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623. Head Room Session No. 41 — with Lady Gang and Hound Heart. 6:30 p.m. ReCreative Denver, 765 Santa Fe Drive, Denver.

The Secretary. Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Opens Jan. 11. Through Feb. 22. Some Enchanted Evening. Longmont Theater Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. Opens Jan. 10. Through Jan. 19. Tuck Everlasting. Vintage Theatre Productions, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Jan. 5.

Open Mic. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Takács Quartet. 7:30 p.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder. Events Mis Pininos/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Chess Club. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Denver Magic Show. 7:30 p.m. Patterson Inn, 420 E. 11th Ave., Denver, 303-955-5142. Drop-In Aerial Foundations. 5:45 p.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E. Sterling Circle, Suite 150, Boulder, 303-245-8272. Monday Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

Live eTown Radio Show Taping — with Patrick Watson & Basia Bulat. 7 p.m. eTown, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696.

Spanish/English Stor ytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Motionless In White, Beartooth. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

see EVENTS Page 34

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Friday January 10

TnerTle

w/ Melody lines, TeleMeTry & KapTain

saTurday January 11 sold ouT

JaMes Murphy dJ seT (lCd soundsysTeM / dFa)

Friday January 24

everyone’s dead

w/ Flower in The sun : TribuTe To Janis Joplin

saTurday January 25

everyone orChesTra w/ The eleganT pluMs

Thursday January 30

Friday & saTurday January 10-11

Joey porTer’s shady business FeaT dan sChwindT & naTe edgar

wednesday January 15 re: searCh

5aM Trio, MalaKai & lusid (The rusT showCase)

w/ aCousTiC Mining Co.

Friday January 17

buKu

suMMer CaMp on The road

w/ superTasK + thenewdeal w/ ben silver oF orChard lounge

dual venue!

Maddy o’neal & nobide + the newdeal

Friday January 31

eManCipaTor

w/ blaCKbird blaCKbird, FraMeworKs, Tor, planTrae, ThoMa & il:lo

saTurday February 1

JaCquees

Monday February 3

earThgang

w/ MiCK JenKins, wynne & Jurdan bryanT

Thursday February 6

phora

saTurday February 8

MarCo benevenTo Thursday February 13 re: searCh

goldrooM

w/ Jordan polovina

saTurday February 15

roddy riCh

Monday February 17

speed raCK ChariTy FeMale barTending CoMpeTiTion Thursday February 20 re: searCh

sTeve darKo & worThy w/ luCaTi

w/ ben silver oF orChard lounge

sunday January 19

Joe robinson

w/ JaCKson Cloud odyssey & Trevor Krehel

wednesday January 22 re: searCh

w/ resonanT language

Friday January 24

arlo MCKinley & The lonesoMe sound

w/ exTra gold & shawn nelson band

saTurday January 25

dave waTT’s bday bash

FeaT dave waTTs, Jason hann & ian neville

wednesday January 29

(TribuTe To phish) w/ sqwerv & ruby hill

w/ vCTre & gangus

Mungion & headband iann dior

w/ gianni & Kyle

dual venue!

Thursday MarCh 5 - dual venue

Kbong, MiKe love & gianT panda guerilla dub squad

(phoFFMan & andrers beCK) FeaT williaM aposTol & Todd herringTon

saTurday MarCh 14

ManiC FoCus

w/ sensi Trails

re: searCh

breaK sCienCe

Mile high sound MoveMenT TaKeover FeaT proJeCT aspeCT

Thursday april 9 re: searCh

phuTurepriMiTive w/ eThno

Monday april 20 - aT red roCKs

saTurday February 22

TauK

MarK guiliana

w/ dandu & Chronologue

Friday February 28

dJ Craze & sFaM w/ Jon Casey

saTurday February 29

Kendall sTreeT CoMpany & Cbdb wednesday MarCh 4

raMirez

naughTy proFessor & The burroughs

re: searCh

Tuesday MarCh 17

seCreT headliner Tba w/ arTiFaKTs, swuM, Jordan polovina

wednesday april 29

louis Cole big band Friday May 29

Skating is in partnership with City of Boulder Parks and Recreation

Friday MarCh 6

livwell presenTs iCe Cube x MeThod Man & redMan w/ aCTion bronson Thursday april 23

MISSING THE HOLIDAYS? Stay with us before Feb 2 and receive a 20% discount on a cottage and free ice skating for two with code SKATE

passaFire

w/ proJeCT 432, beTaray & dJ naysayers

sunday February 23

Thursday april 2 - dual venue

Friday MarCh 13

Con brio

GET YOUR TICKETS AND RENTALS AT THE RINK

bbno$

Friday MarCh 20

CiTy Morgue

900 BASELINE ROAD BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666

Monday MarCh 23

sTorMzy sob x rbe TexT CervanTes To 91944 For TiCKeT giveaways, drinK speCials, disCounTed TiCKeT proMoTions & More

@colo_chautauqua coloradochautauqua @colorado_chautauqua

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

PROPULSION GOES GREEN

chautauqua.com

w/ Jon sTiCKley Trio

Friday February 21

w/ aaron KaMM & The one drops

re: searCh

2/24

events calendar, visit:

Thursday February 20

Cris JaCobs band & della Mae

Thursday MarCh 19 w/ daTeless & C.h.a.y.

BOULDER’S EARLY AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

FOR TICKETS & full

saTurday February 15

ThouxanbanFauni x TeeJayx6

w/ supervision, MidiCinal, lwKy & FlaTs sTanlie

ChrisTian MarTin

2/19

Tuesday February 11 Friday February 14

phab4

MEADOW MOUNTAIN

FeaT MeMbers oF TurKuaz & dopapod

Tuesday MarCh 3

Friday MarCh 13 sold ouT

2/15

Friday February 7

MarC e. bassy

proTohype & JanTsen

DAVE SHOWALTER: FREEDOM TO ROAM

w/ lonesoMe days

runaway gin

w/ landon Cube & poorsTaCy

w/ g-spaCe + spiCybois TaKeover FeaT Meso

2/7

w/ lapa & nadasound

Thursday January 30

roberT randolph, MarC brownsTein, aron Magner, allen auCoin, MiKe greenField, JenniFer harTswiCK, naTalie CressMan & JeFF FranCa

re: searCh

MATCHSTICK PRODUCTIONS: “RETURN TO SEND’ER”

re: searCh

eazybaKed

Thursday MarCh 12 - dual venue

2/1

borahM lee, Kevin donohue & Colby buCKler

saTurday February 8

w/ FunKsTaTiK visuals by android Jones

JOE SERTICH: DINOSAURS IN YOUR BACKYARD

universal sigh

w/ Moonradish & The soul Crushers

Friday February 28

russ liquid & Marvel years

1/30

w/ eFFin & dozier

saTurday February 1

danCe parTy TiMe MaChine

AN EVENING WITH BUNTPORT THEATER BY STORIES ON STAGE

Moody good

Thursday February 27

ulTrasloTh (kll sMTh/ duFFrey/biolumigen)

1/24

Thursday January 23

Friday February 21 re: searCh

JAN 23 | COLLECTIVE SPEAKERS SERIES DESSA: SENSELESS LOVE

saTurday January 18

hoT buTTered ruM

alo & Tea leaF green

JAN 16 | EXPLORER SERIES KELLY CORDES: THE STORIES WE TELL

Thursday January 16

FronT CounTry & whiTewaTer raMble

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JANUARY 9, 2020

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EVENTS from Page 32

TUESDAY, JANUARY 14 Music Black Violin. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-6230106. Cody Qually & Stephen Ross ‘By Request Only.’ 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. The Lone Bones Trio & Jonny Woods. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Sleeping With Sirens — The Medicine Tour. 6 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Unplugged Drop-In Acoustic Jam. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Student Recitals: Undergraduate, Master’s and Doctoral musicians. 5 p.m. Imig Music, Music Theatre, Boulder, 303-492-6352.

Weird Wednesday featuring Cricketbows. 9 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Anime Club. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Around the World Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Tuesdays. 12:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Lap Babies. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303441-3100; 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777. Spirit Nia Dance. 9 a.m. Unity of Boulder, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15 Music 2019/20 Youth Concerts: Beethoven’s Birthday. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Bourbon & Blues — with Erik Boa & JANUARY 9, 2020

Miró Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-871-7720. RE:Search featuring 5AM Trio, MALAKAI, Lusid (The Rust Showcase). 8:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

All Ages Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

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Improv Cabaret. 7:30 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver, 303-758-4722. Jazzetry Night! featuring Von Disco. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

PUNKETRY! 7 p.m. Mutiny Information Cafe, 2 S. Broadway, Denver, 201-873-6728.

Events

34

The Constrictors. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

I

Events Adam Cayton-Holland. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Boulder Arts Commission - The Year Ahead. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Code for Boulder. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Colorado Green Building Guild Annual Meeting. 5:30 p.m. Sloan Construction, 1644 Conestoga St., Suite 6, Boulder. Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Flatirons Mineral Club Junior Geologists Group. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Lego Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Musical Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Pages and Paws. 3:45 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Spirit Nia Dance. 9 a.m. Unity of Boulder, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. Wobblers & Walkers. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Work Like An Artist: art installation workshop — with winter artist-inresidence Chelsea Gilmore. 6 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Reflections on Baking by Virginia Schultz Who knew the pecans float to the top of the pie? Who knew — When a knife comes clean it is done?

CHARLOTTE MANNHEIMER/PUBLIC DOMAIN

While I record that the sun is making a sun dog of the scrubbed tea kettle, another heat rises from glowing coils to make it whistle

Shovelers Needed Trident Commercial Snow Removal

As plans radiant in my burnished mind cells, listing my menu of fat, sweet, heat, salt, fiber, roasted roots, fermentation in a glass, where it may be served next to despair and longing on a smoothly worn table, each already consuming the oxygen in the room, devouring a contented future before my eyes

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Until the wind wags her shadow across the stovetop, teases the now whistling tea kettle, and bounces unashamed endurance into my eyes, unboughed patience into my sinews caught roasting in introspection, she smiles at my naivety and whispers, “Get on with it...”

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Who knew the pecans float to the top of the pie? Who knew — When a knife comes clean it is done?

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Virginia Schultz lives in the Ponderosa/Doug Fir forest above the Boulder Valley spinning ideas, associative thinking, writing poems, watching birds and connecting. Reciprocity. When she comes down to town... she runs, plans and makes more connections. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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eCHIEVEMENT AWARD® AND MORE!

MONDAY, JANUARY 13 7:00PM eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce St. Boulder Tix at eTOWN.org JANUARY 9, 2020

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Stressed Out? Think Massage!

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The shame of a nation

China’s legacy looms large in ‘One Child Nation’

by Michael J. Casey

T

ON THE BILL: ‘One he year was 1978, and China’s future did not Child Nation.’ 6 p.m. look promising. The country had survived wars, Friday, Jan. 10, Alamo depression and famine, plus a cultural revolution Drafthouse Westminster, was taxing the nation. Resources were tight, but 8905 Westminster Blvd, 80031, 303-731-330. Also as the population neared 1 billion, things went available to stream on from bad to worse. If Chinese families continued to Amazon Prime. have three children, then there was no telling what might happen. China, it was surmised, would have to resort to cannibalism. At least that’s what one interviewee in Nanfu Wang’s documentary, One Child Nation, thinks. The only way to avert such a dystopia: government-enforced population control. And in 1980, China began enforcing its one-child policy. Born in a rural farming village in 1985 — during the policy’s first wave of family planning — Wang has since emigrated to the U.S. for education and work. But with the birth of her son in 2017, her mind turned back to her family and her past. Needing to know the rest of the story, Wang picked up her camera and returned to discover the legacy of her nation’s atrocity. The stories are barbaric. When Wang sits down with the midwife of her region, she asks: How many babies did you deliver? The midwife has no idea. But she does know that she assisted in the abortion and sterilization of somewhere between 50,000 and 60,000 children and mothers. Her title: family planner. She is only the beginning. Pregnant mothers found in violation of the policy were taken, induced — often in the third trimester — and the fetus was discarded like refuse. For this, family planners were rewarded and recognized in official ceremonies. Wang talks to her mother, who recounts helping a friend discard a child. Wang’s uncle tells of abandoning a baby at the market, hoping someone else would take the child. No one does, and after three days of crying, the child died of exposure. I can’t stand to hear my son cry for a minute, Wang says, how did you manage three days? Her uncle can barely hold back the tears. The uncle and the midwife show remorse — she has since dedicated her life to helping infertile parents as means of atonement — but the rest of Wang’s subjects are unflinching and unapologetic in their actions. They had no choice in the matter. It was policy, nothing more. That policy shifted in the ’90s and early 2000s when news of abandoned babies reached the shores of the United States and Europe. Adoption can often be a labyrinthine process, but when it came to Chinese adoptions, money was enough. Enough to give rise to an unholy and immensely lucrative industry of human trafficking. One Child Nation is both a moving piece of documentary and profoundly unsettling. Wang’s camera holds truth to power in a way that emphasizes the “we” in “we the people.” She spins the political out of the personal; preserving and presenting an atrocity with the hope that empathy might be the only way to move forward in this world. As artist Peng Weng says, “The tragedy of a nation is to have no memory.” Without it, all we are left with is propaganda. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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S I M P L E

|

L O C A L

|

FA R M

T O

TA B L E

EAST COUNTY’S BEST KEPT SECRET! Only 12 miles from Boulder

5 7 8 B r i g g s S t re e t E r i e, C O 8 0 5 1 6 303.828.1392 www.24carrotbistro.com

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BRUNCH

S AT & SU N 9 AM - 2 PM

L U N C H TUE-FRI 11AM-3PM

JANUARY 9, 2020

DINNER

TUE-THR 5PM-9PM

F R I & S AT 5PM-10PM

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S U N D AY 5PM-9PM

BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF Power Greens

Whole Sol 1420 Pearl St., Boulder, wholesol.com

PHOTOS BY STAFF

A

Baja Fish Tacos

Pica’s Taqueria 5360 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, and 901 Front St., Louisville, picascolorado.com

I

f you’re in the mood for fish tacos, there are few places better in Boulder County to get them than Pica’s. We opted for the Baja-style variety (you can also get grilled or shrimp tacos), which features white fish dipped in beer batter, fried and topped with creamy and citrusy cole slaw, chipotle salsa, tomatoes and cilantro. The crust on the fish is thin, nongreasy and crispy and the slaw brings a load of flavor to each bite. Served alongside black beans and rice. $11.50.

fter several weeks of frantically shifting between holiday parties, rarely knowing what day it was and accepting every cocktail that was offered, it felt pretty damn good to enjoy a glass of water (in a stainless steel cup, nonetheless!) and a warm, protein- and antioxidant-filled bowl at Whole Sol Blend Bar. The Power Greens bowl (or bōl, as Whole Sol stylizes it) seemed like just the antidote to an overdose of merriment, with tender shredded kale mixed with tangy sauerkraut, two poached eggs, crunchy hemp seeds, avocado slices and just the right amount of pleasant heat from Dijon dressing. Take the heat and umami up a notch with some hot truffle sauce. This menu — built on superfoods like kale, cacao and acai — is perfect for those with gluten-intolerance or food allergies, but doesn’t forsake flavor in its quest to accommodate dietary restrictions. $10.

Spicy Dirty Chai

Red Rock Coffeehouse 3325 28th St., Boulder, 303-443-1975

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orth Boulder’s Red Rock Coffeehouse has a lot of things going for it: It’s a great place to get some work done, it’s got homemade, fruit-laden quick breads and its coffee, tea and smoothies are well-sourced and –made. We opted for the special spicy dirty chai on a recent visit — ginger-forward Sanctuary chai is combined with your choice of steamed milk before a shot of espresso is added in. It’s a bold, and delicious, way to start your day. $4-$7.

Bibimbap

Wok to Flatirons Deli 2100 Central Ave., Boulder, woktofd.com

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f you work in East Boulder, you’ve likely had a meal or three at Wok to Flatirons Deli, a great spot with friendly staff and a large menu of sandwiches, wraps, salads and daily specials. We stopped by for one such special — the bibimbap, a rice bowl with bulgogi (marinated beef), fried egg, cucumber, zucchini, onion, carrot, lettuce and bean sprouts, all mixed in a spicy sauce. It’s a well-excuted interpretation of the Korean classic, and it both interests the palate and satisfies the belly. Other daily specials, by the way, include a poke bowl, ramen and taco salad. $10.99.

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www.lulus-bbq.com BOULDER WEEKLY

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JANUARY 9, 2020

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SUSAN FRANCE

Bread for the Role

Dry, day-old bread stars as toasts, croutons, French toast and puddings

By JOHN LEHNDORFF

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expensive toast — open-faced and topped with avocado, bean puree or smoked fish, a close relative of bruschetta and crostini appetizers. If you cut the toast up in cubes — ta da! ­— it becomes croutons, which can be tossed in salads or used as a Gruyère cheese-crusted raft atop onion soup. Slightly bigger cubes of toasted, seasoned bread and fresh tomatoes compose the wonderful Italian late summer salad, panzanella. The bread (or cornbread) stuffing traditionally served with holiday turkey is just toasted bread cubes soaked in broth and butter with savory ingredients. “Stuffing” is baked inside the bird; “dressing” is baked in a dish. If nothing else, stale bread can be run through a blender and the crumbs used in meatloaf, meatballs, atop mac-ncheese, and for crusting chicken, salmon and eggplant. Homebrewers take note: Lafayette’s The Post Brewing Company crafts a beer using leftover artisan bread from a

is one of the great magic tricks of modern cookery to transform day-old stale bread into simply decadent sweet and savory dishes. Thus, no single act of kitchen waste seems more idiotic to me than to trash bread heels, loaf ends and crusts cut off sandwiches, even if you compost them. The bread isn’t “bad” unless it’s moldy, but that seldom happens in Colorado unless it’s cheap bread, wrapped in plastic, and forgotten in the back of the fridge. Since many of the best toast treats require bread that has dried out, day-old, marked-down loaves are an incredible bargain. The easiest way to use stale bread slices is in French toast (soaked in a custard of egg and milk). The French version is pain perdu, and we love French toast sandwiches like the croque madame. The hippest menu item at Boulder bistros these days is

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2016

LAFAYETTE

JANUARY 9, 2020

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


local bakery. Day-old loaves have been a prized ingredient since bread was invented, and around the world bread pudding is old bread’s leap to immortality. Mexican sweet-savory capirotada, a bread pudding made with brown sugar, cheese, onions, raisins and spices, dates back to medieval times and was probably introduced to Spain from Northern Africa. Bread pudding is bread soaked in custard (eggs mixed with milk or cream) that’s baked. Myriad variations include sweet versions often served with sugary sauces and savory bread pudding with meaty entrees to sponge up pan sauces and gravy. Bread puddings available locally include Jax Fish House, Petit Fleur (inside Rosetta Hall), Dickens Tavern, and Georgia Boys BBQ. Smokin’ Dave’s BBQ serves Creole Bread Pudding with chocolate and whiskey cream sauce, and Denver’s Inventing Room Dessert Shop dishes Donut Bread Pudding with butterscotch soup and vanilla custard. To experience the joy of making bread pudding, start with any bread, sliced or unsliced, including pannetone, pumpernickel, cornbread or rolls. Challah and other brioche breads are especially good. Gluten-free bread works well in puddings (especially when pre-toasted) as do egg and milk substitutes which makes bread pudding everyone can enjoy. Because bread is an irregular, hard-tomeasure ingredient, pudding recipes are more suggestions than rigid directions. Feel free to tweak the following recipe with more cream, liqueur, butter and extras:

Cut bread in 1/2- inch cubes and put in a buttered 12by 8-inch pan or in a muffin tin. Drizzle liqueur over the bread cubes. In a bowl, mix the eggs, cream, milk, vanilla and salt with optional extras, as desired. Pour the mixture over the bread and let it soak for about 20 minutes. Sprinkle with brown sugar and bake for about 40 minutes in a 350-degree oven. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream or creme fraiche. ORANGE, BLOODY ORANGE If you see “Raspberry Oranges” at Sprouts and other supermarkets, they are simply blood oranges in disguise. Apparently, blood orange growers decided the name was only helpful at Halloween and rebranded/ renamed them as “raspberry oranges.” It’s not that uncommon. In 1959, the Chinese gooseberry became “kiwifruit,” and in 1977 the Patagonian toothfish was renamed for a nonexistent species: “Chilean sea bass.” You can understand why dolphinfish was rebranded as “mahi mahi.” LOCAL FOOD NEWS The oldest craft brewery in Colorado, Boulder Beer Company, will close January 18. … After 14 years in business, Kasa Japanese Grill & Bar has closed at 1468 Pearl St. … The acclaimed Westbound & Down Brewing in Idaho Springs is planning to open a produc-

PETIT FLEUR, tion brewery, restaurant and CHEF and owner backyard space on the hill next to Julia Wirichs covers Lafayette’s Stem Ciders and a cake with frosting Acreage with the same panoramic view. … Peckish has opened at 1320 College Ave., offering wings from five for $6.57 to 200 wings for $230.

TASTE OF THE WEEK Great barbecue joints are popping up all over but there’s a problem. Most of them focus on lunch and run out of meat or aren’t open in the evening. It was great to find Smok at The Source in Denver’s RiNo neighborhood. The barbecue serves first-class burnt ends — the smoky, chewy, porky and best part of the rib — into the late evening hours. They went great with house-made pickles, fresh ginger slaw, and $2 Hamm’s lager. Sides include creamed corn (Mexican street corn with queso fresco and lime) and white cheddar mac-n-cheese. Also on the menu: Nashville hot-style pork chicharron, pecan pie and smoked deviled eggs WORDS TO CHEW ON “Watching David (Bowie) write was inspiring to me. He would strum the 11 strings on his 12-string Harptone guitar and wander to the piano and play a few bars, then off to forage for rice pudding in the kitchen.” — Angela Bowie John Lehndorff is a former prep cook. He hosts Radio Nibbles 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org).

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BOULDER WEEKLY


PHOTOS BY MATT CORTINA

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n the top of Flagstaff Mountain, 100 chickens are living their best lives. A rooster, a handful of show chickens and dozens of egg-layers squawk and dawdle inside a large green coop with circulating humidity-controlled air, heat, running water, lights and a deck with heated coils, all of which overlook a breathtaking vista of mountain peaks and valleys. “We had a smaller coop that we first built and a bear just came and tore the door off the hinges and killed all the chickens,” says the coop’s owner, Andreas, who culls eggs and delivers them to pick-up spots in Boulder under the business name Alpine Eggs. “After that I figured I was going to build myself the Versailles of chicken coops, which is metal-reinforced, so nothing can get in there, ever.” The coop is fully insulated and kept at about 50 degrees, though the chickens are hardy enough to survive cold winters on top of the mountain. Ventilation fans were installed to prevent moisture from accumulating on the chickens, which would then freeze when the chickens walked outside. It’s atypical, but working, Andreas says. “Online it recommends against all this. Don’t heat it, it’s unnatural, they don’t need it, but these are the happiest chickens. They are laying so well,” he says.

‘The Versailles of chicken coops’

Laying eggs at the top of Boulder County

by Matt Cortina

THE CHICKENS at Alpine Eggs are living the life in a modded-out chicken coop.

see EGGS Page 44

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EGGS from Page 43

The chickens have five acres on which to roam. Andreas and his business partner and coop manager, Katie Woodmansee, planted herbs and cultivated soil out of compost in order to grow grass, necessary because much of the land on the property is rock. Letting the chickens roam is important for the quality of the eggs, Andreas says. “The idea is the more natural forage they get, they get that really dark yellow yolk, especially with the more insects they eat,” he says. “They’ll eat anything, they’re omnivores. They’ll eat bugs, grass, seeds. If they catch mice they’ll eat mice.” Woodmansee and Andreas are also sprouting and fermenting grains in a small shed in order to cut the sizable costs of purchasing feed,and to provide better nutrition for the chickens — fermentation helps the chickens digest grain. Also in that shed is the preliminary equipment for a breeding station. The operation feels like a world away; it’s quiet, there’s a green dinosaur sculpture from an old Sinclair gas station, Sherman, the guard dog, bounds around the grounds, and some of the chickens (the cochins) have big furry feet. It took a little while for Andreas to get used to after moving from the East Coast, but he says it’s been a blessing to have the responsibility of managing a coop, forcing him away from his day job he works remotely from the house on property. “I have my office upstairs, and if I don’t make a point of going outside, I could just be upstairs in my office all day. But now I have to get out in the morning, I have to do physical exercise, carry things, you know?” he says. “And it just engages you with the locality a little bit more.” Coincidentally, Andreas has passed that lesson onto his chickens, building a heated “lounge” for them to hang out in so they can get out of the coop every once in a while, even in frigid temperatures. “They can just go out in the middle of winter and go under there when it’s too cold or too windy for them because otherwise if they’re in [the coop] too long, they may beat up on each other or things like that. They get kind of mean to each other,” he says. The eggs that come out of the operation are worth the extra effort. Rich, well-sized and herbal, they come in a variety of hues from blue to red. They’re available for $6 per dozen in a temperature-controlled cooler at the end of the property at 5541 Flagstaff Road or at off-mountain Boulder pickup locations at 1065 Orange Place and 698 Walden Circle. Go to facebook.com/AlpineEggsBoulder for more information. I

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Requiem for a brewery: Wild Woods Brewing Company After seven years in business, Wild Woods prepares to close

by Michael J. Casey

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t’s always sad to see a friend go. Sure, they’re off to do new ON TAP:Wild Woods Brewing things, probably great ones too, but it still stings a bit when Company, 5460 you realize that things won’t be the same. Conestoga And as of Jan. 11, 2020, things won’t be the same at Court, Boulder, 303-484-1465. Boulder’s 5460 Conestoga Court: Wild Woods Brewing Company is closing up shop. “The brewery has been open seven years and in planning for several before that,” co-owner Erin Evans says. “While we’re still passionate about craft beer, we’ve always made a point to reassess things we’d like to do at different points in life. We have a desire for more time to pursue other passions like traveling and the outdoors, and to spend more time with friends and family.” Evans opened Wild Woods with husband Jake and partners Charlie and Kristen Rilling on Sept. 25, 2012. Though Erin and Jake hail from Wisconsin, the great outdoors drew them to Colorado. It was on a camping trip in Crested Butte that the idea for the brewery hatched and SUSAN FRANCE became a two-barrel nanosystem. Two years later, they expanded production to a seven-barrel system and consistently made some of the best beers in the county, from the Nectarine Thyme Saison, which smelled and tasted so much like a blossoming farm in the summertime, you’d forget you were drinking in a parking lot, to Yamtoberfest, an imperial märzen loaded with hickory smoke, maple syrup and roasted sweet potatoes. Though a good deal of ink has been spilled over recent closures in the craft brewing market, Evans is quick to point out that their decision to close Wild Woods isn’t indicative of a larger trend. “The craft beer industry has definitely changed since we opened in 2012,” she says. “While the decision to close was purely personal in our case, I do think there are still many opportunities for growth in craft beer. The market is maturing overall, and there are still a lot of exciting and creative things happening.” One of which will be the new craft brewery coming to fill Wild Wood’s space later this spring. “I think there has been a lot of media coverage lately on ‘over-saturation’ and listkeeping of brewery closures,” Evans says. “While there are definitely some trends happening right now (as there can be with any line of business), I think each business and the people behind it have their own story, reasons and aspirations for opening or closing.” Her advice to fellow brewers: “Beer trends come and go. Stay true to your brand and vision, and the true craft beer drinkers will respect and support you for doing so.” Wild Woods will be running regular operating hours Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Stop by for a pint, pick up some discounted merchandise — if they have any left — and give Erin and Jake a heartfelt thank you for the beer and seven years. It was delicious while it lasted. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: When comedian John Cleese was 61,

his mother died. She was 101. Cleese testifies, “Just towards the end, as she began to run out of energy, she did actually stop trying to tell me what to do most of the time.” I bet you’ll experience a similar phenomenon in 2020 — only bigger and better. Fewer people will try to tell you what to do than at any previous time of your life. As a result, you’ll be freer to be yourself exactly as you want to be. You’ll have unprecedented power to express your uniqueness.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Renowned Taurus philosopher Bertrand Russell was sent to jail in 1918 because of his pacifism and anti-war activism. He liked being there. “I found prison in many ways quite agreeable,” he said. “I had no engagements, no difficult decisions to make, no fear of callers, no interruptions to my work. I read enormously; I wrote a book.” The book he produced, Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, is today regarded as a classic. In 2020, I would love to see you Tauruses cave out an equally luxurious sabbatical without having to go through the inconvenience of being incarcerated. I’m confident you can do this.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: It’s common to feel attracted to people

because of the way they look and dress and carry themselves. But here’s the problem: If you pursue an actual connection with someone whose appearance you like, there’s no guarantee it will turn out to be interesting and meaningful. That’s because the most important factor in becoming close to someone is not their cute face or body or style, but rather their ability to converse with you in ways you find interesting. And that’s a relatively rare phenomenon. As philosopher Mortimer Adler observed, “Love without conversation is impossible.” I bring these thoughts to your attention, Gemini, because I believe that in 2020 you could have some of the best conversations you’ve ever had — and as a result experience the richest intimacy.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: Mystic poet Rumi told us the kind of

person he was attracted to. “I want a trouble-maker for a lover,” he wrote. “Blood spiller, blood drinker, a heart of flame, who quarrels with the sky and fights with fate, who burns like fire on the rushing sea.” In response to that testimony, I say, “Boo! Ugh! Yuck!” I say “To hell with being in an intimate relationship with a troublemaker who fights with fate and quarrels with the sky.” I can’t imagine any bond that would be more unpleasant and serve me worse. What about you, Cancerian? Do you find Rumi’s definition glamorous and romantic? I hope not. If you do, I advise you to consider changing your mind. 2020 will be an excellent time to be precise in articulating the kinds of alliances that are healthy for you. They shouldn’t resemble Rumi’s description. (Rumi translation by Zara Houshmand.)

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: The 18th-century comic novel Tristram

Shandy is still being translated, adapted and published today. Its popularity persists. Likewise, the 18th-century novel Moll Flanders, which features a rowdy, eccentric heroine who was unusual for her era, has had modern incarnations in TV, film and radio. Then there’s the 19th-century satirical novel Vanity Fair. It’s considered a classic even now, and appears on lists of best-loved books. The authors of these three books had one thing in common: They had to pay to have their books published. No authority in the book business had any faith in them. You may have similar challenges in 2020, Leo — and rise to the occasion with equally good results. Believe in yourself!

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: I’ll present two possible scenarios

that could unfold for you in 2020. Which scenario actually occurs will depend on how willing you are to transform yourself. Scenario no. 1. Love is awake, and you’re asleep. Love is ready for you but you’re not

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ready for love. Love is hard to recognize because you think it still looks like it did in the past. Love changed its name, and you didn’t notice. Scenario no. 2. Love is awake and you’re waking up. Love is ready for you and you’re making yourself ready for love. Love is older and wiser now, and you recognize its new guise. Love changed its name, and you found out. (Thanks to Sarah and Phil Kaye for the inspiration for this horoscope.)

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Renowned Greek sculptor Praxiteles

created some famous and beloved statues in the fourth century B.C. One of his pieces, showing the gods Hermes and Dionysus, was displayed inside the Temple of Hera in Olympia. But a few centuries later an earthquake demolished the Temple and buried the statue. There it remained until 1877, when archaeologists dug it out of the rubble. I foresee a metaphorically equivalent recovery in your life, Libra — especially if you’re willing to excavate an old mess or investigate a debris field or explore a faded ruin.

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Over a period of 74 years, the Scorpio philosopher and author Voltaire (1694–1778) wrote so many letters to so many people that they were eventually published in a series of 98 books, plus nine additional volumes of appendixes and indexes. I would love to see you communicate that abundantly and meticulously in 2020, Scorpio. The cosmic rhythms will tend to bring you good fortune if you do.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Picasso was one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. He was also the richest. At the end of his life, experts estimate his worth was as much as $250 million, equivalent to $1.3 billion today. But in his earlier adulthood, while Picasso was turning himself into a genius and creating his early masterpieces, he lived and worked in a small, seedy, unheated room with no running water and a toilet he shared with 20 people. If there will be ever in your life be a semblance of Picasso’s financial transformation, Sagittarius, I’m guessing it would begin this year.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Let’s get 2020 started with a proper

send-off. According to my reading of the astrological omens, the coming months will bring you opportunities to achieve a host of liberations. Among the things from which you could be at least partially emancipated: stale old suffering; shrunken expectations; people who don’t appreciate you for who you really are; and beliefs and theories that don’t serve you any more. (There may be others!) Here’s an inspirational maxim, courtesy of poet Mary Oliver: “Said the river: imagine everything you can imagine, then keep on going.”

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: In a poem titled “The Mess-iah,” spiritual teacher Jeff Foster counsels us, “Fall in love with the mess of your life ... the wild, uncontrollable, unplanned, unexpected moments of existence. Dignify the mess with your loving attention, your gratitude. Because if you love the mess enough, you will become a Mess-iah.” I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because I suspect you’ll have a better chance to ascend to the role of Mess-iah in the coming weeks and months than you have had in many years.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Comedian John Cleese believes that

“sometimes we hang onto people or relationships long after they’ve ceased to be of any use to either of you.” That’s why he has chosen to live in such a way that his web of alliances is constantly evolving. “I’m always meeting new people,” he says, “and my list of friends seems to change quite a bit.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Pisces, 2020 will be a propitious year for you to experiment with Cleese’s approach. You’ll have the chance to meet a greater number of interesting new people in the coming months than you have in a long time. (And don’t be afraid to phase out connections that have become a drain.)

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Dear Dan: I have a question about porn, and I can’t think who else I can ask that will give me an intelligent, educated answer. In modern porn, anal on women is gaining popularity. I’m a fan of anal with my boyfriend. However, in porn, it seems like the gaping asshole is a thing, a sought-after thing, a desired thing. And I guess my boyfriend and I don’t get it. We can get quite vigorous when we have anal sex, but MY butthole never gapes open like that — my boyfriend assures me that when he pulls out, it goes back to its cute little flower-like effect. Why is the gaping asshole so popular? I promise this is not a frivolous question or just for titillation. We really do wonder: What gives? —Gaining Anal Perspective Entails Serious Question

part.) Did I say funny, GAPESQ? I meant predictable. Because a big part of the collective human subconscious is always at work eroticizing our fears, and the gaping-open, just-been-fucked, completely “wrecked” asshole many people feared inevitably became something some people found hot. And as more people began experimenting with anal sex — as anal went mainstream over the last two decades — people realized that the anal sphincter is a muscle and the secret to successful anal intercourse is learning to relax that muscle. Situationally, not permanently. You could relax, get loose, gape after, post the video to a porn tube, and then tighten back up. Now, not everyone thinks a wide-open, gaping asshole is desirable. And not everyone, in the immortal words of Valerie Cherish, needs (or wants) to see that.

Dear GAPESQ: It’s funny how a chief fear about anal sex — that your asshole would gape open afterward and poop would fall out while you walked down the street — became eroticized. (The asshole gaping open part, not the poop falling out

Dear Dan: My significant other wants me to delete any NSFW pictures of my exes, but I don’t feel comfortable with that. I don’t have an emotional attachment to my exes or really look at these photos anymore, but I feel that old pic-

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business. If I were in love, I’d make it public, but that hasn’t happened. I can’t help but feel like this is an addiction, and I’m ashamed of it. I’m sure I’m not the first straight guy who’s into trans women who’s written to you. Where do I go from here? —Straight And Struggling

tures saved on old computers aren’t doing any harm and deleting them won’t fix my partner’s insecurity. —Personal Images Causing Strife Dear PICS: Accommodating a partner’s irrational insecurity is sometimes the price we pay to make an otherwise healthy and functional relationship work, PICS, as I recently told another reader. But one possible workaround — one possible accommodation — is telling your insecure partner what they want to hear even if it isn’t true. Telling a partner who is concerned about safety that you’re using condoms with others when you’re not isn’t OK, of course, just as telling a potential partner you’re single when you’re not isn’t OK. But telling a partner that you deleted photos you never look at on a password-protected computer they can’t look at… yeah, that’s a lie you don’t have to feel too awful about telling.

Dear SAS: While dating someone in secret isn’t impossible, SAS, it rarely leads to long-term love. Being kept hidden because you’re trans (or you’re gay or you’re bi) and the person you’re dating hasn’t gotten over their shame about being attracted to trans people (or members of their own sex or bigger people)… well, it sucks to be someone’s dirty secret. And a healthy trans (or gay or bi) person — the kind of person you might be able to fall in love with — isn’t going to put up with that shit. So it’s a catch-22: So long as you keep the women you date a secret, none of them are going to stay in your life for long. They’ll be either so damaged you want them out of your life or not damaged enough to want you in theirs. Send questions to mail@savagelove. net, follow Dan on Twitter @fakedansavage and visit ITMFA.org.

Dear Dan: I’m a straight guy who loves the female body — the look, touch and smell. I’m in my mid-30s, I’ve never had a serious relationship, and I don’t know if I’m capable of falling in love. I’m exclusively into trans women, and I’ve kept it a secret because it’s nobody’s

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When it comes to pot, Tucker rhymes with... By Seymour

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ucker Carlson is an absolute moron. I know you already knew that so I’ll be more specific; he’s an idiot when it comes to his knowledge about pot. And he recently exhibited his ganja idiocy during an interview that went out over Breitbart’s SiriusXM radio program. First of all, the words “Breitbart’s SiriusXM radio program” kind of makes me throw up a little bit in my mouth

when I think about it. Just knowing that invisible waves from Breitbart carrying Carlson’s words are penetrating my body without my permission even when my radio is off makes me feel violated. We just have to look at what lurks below the MAGA hats to know that Carlson’s words cause permanent brain damage. We can only hope his silent cellinvading waves don’t have the same effect. Did I mention that Tucker rhymes with… But I digress. On said radio program, Tucker called former House Speaker John Boehner, a Republican, a “pig.” If he’d

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stopped there he wouldn’t have gotten much of an argument from the elitist crowd, aka people and other mammals with an IQ over 80. But the reason for Tucker’s attack on poor sprayed-on-tan John was his decision to become a lobbyist for the marijuana industry. He accused Boehner of taking a paycheck in exchange for getting your kids to smoke pot. Got news for you, Tuck (which rhymes with… ) your kids are gonna smoke pot by the pound because their dad helped make Trump president and kept him in office by spewing hateful, racist shit out of his mouth all day long in exchange for a paycheck of his own — and because that bow tie period was pretty embarrassing. Honestly, you looked like a dummy that needed a hand up your back and a pull string for your yap. Carlson also called Boehner “disgusting,” and pondered why Republicans weren’t calling him out on his new career. Tucker’s radio waves claimed that conservatives were acting like going from being Speaker of the House to being a marijuana industry lobbyist was somehow normal. He’s got a point there. Usually GOP elected officials go from public office to being lobbyists for companies that make weapons to kill people or sell chemicals to put on crops that give people cancer or drug manufacturers that make people choose between their life-saving prescriptions or feeding their kids. How dare Boehner not go into one of these Carlson-approved lines of lobbying. How dare he lobby for an industry that is helping to stop children’s siezures, combat post-chemo nausea and hundreds of other now-proven benefits. “Pig,” indeed. Oh, and Tucker, in states with legal marijuana, fewer high-school kids are smoking it than before it was legalized. In other words, when it comes to his knowledge about the marijuana industry, Mr. Carlson is an absolute Tucker.

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More whoopee (and babies) follow medical marijuana... and other stories By Paul Danish

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egalizing medical marijuana leads people to make more whoopee ­— and more babies... Researchers at the Universities of Connecticut and Georgia State did an analysis of survey data on sexual activity and substance use collected between 1997 and 2011, and found that there was a 4.3% increase in the likelihood of having sex once or more “in the past month” after a state legalized medical

marijuana and a 2% hike in births for women of child-rearing age... They also found that along with the increase in whoopee there was a decrease in the use of contraceptives, which they speculated might be due to having sex while high... The study appeared in the Journal of Health Economics… • • • • We don’t need no stinkin’ lab tests, said the Texas Department of Public Safety in so many

words. We know marijuana when we smell it... Your bust doesn’t pass the smell test, said the judge; the lab tests said that was 3,350 pounds of hemp you morons seized... Under both federal and Texas law, the difference between marijuana and hemp is that the THC content of the latter is 0.3% or less… Last month a Texas Department of Public Safety officer arrested 39-year-old Aneudy Gonzalez, a contract driver who was hauling the load of Californiagrown hemp to a buyer in New York state... Gonzalez had a lab report showing that his cargo was hemp… The trooper wasn’t impressed and said that based on his “training and experience,” which included the smell of the cargo, he believed Gonzalez was hauling marijuana... The trooper’s training evidently didn’t include the fact that pot and hemp smell alike... Gonzalez was jailed for a month before a federal lab test confirmed the results of his own lab test... His lawyer smells a big payday... • • • • Speaking of hauling, an Arizona ABCTV station is reporting that running weed across the border is falling out of favor with drug cartels... These days they’re into THC concentrate, the stuff used in vapes... Said Maricopa County Sheriff’s Detective Matthew Shay, “I started to see the people that would usually backpack marijuana through the desert were now backpacking up crude oil…” More like black gold. It takes about 250 pounds of commercial pot with 6% THC to produce a five-gallon bucket of concentrated 80% THC cannabis oil. Each bucket could produce more than $500,000 in vaping cartridges, Shay said...

Continuing the hallowed narc tradition of hyping up the value of drug seizures... The price of the crude concentrate is going to be only a fraction of the street price of the vapes it ends up in... Still cannabis crude oil will be orders of magnitude more pricey than the crude that comes out of a hole in the ground... • • • • This just in: New smuggling routes are opening up across the Great River... That’s the Mississippi, not the Rio Grande... Legal marijuana sales began in Illinois on January 1, and according to KCRG News in Cedar Rapids, Iowans lost no time in driving over to a newly opened dispensary in Milan, Illinois, to (legally) buy marijuana and (illegally) take it home... Dispensary clerks report a lot of the purchasers say they want to use their purchases for medical conditions not recognized under Iowa’s medical marijuana program... Stay tuned for reports from dispensaries on the Land of Lincoln’s borders with Wisconsin, Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana… • • • • Should the “Agony of Defeat” be a qualifying condition for medical marijuana? A long-suffering Ohio football fan thinks so... And, according to the Cincinnati Enquirer, has petitioned the State Medical Board of Ohio to make being “Bengals/ Browns Fans” an official medical marijuana qualifying condition... The NFL Cincinnati Bengals finished the season with a 2-14 record; the Cleveland Browns finished 6-10, including a particularly painful last-game-of-season loss to the Bengals... The Denver Broncos finished 7-9, so Broncos fans should feel their pain, but — since recreational pot is legal in Colorado — probably don’t.

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