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June 23–July 6, 2014

PANORAMA The Official Guide to Boston

E v e n t s | s i g h t s | s h o p p i n g | m a p s | d i n i n g | n i g h t l i f e | C u lt u r e

Revolutionary Boston

Explore the Roots of our Freedoms at the Museum of Fine Arts Exhibit Magna Carta: Cornerstone of Liberty

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波 士 顿 欢 迎 您 bostonguide.com

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The official guide to boston

June 23–July 6, 2014 Volume 64 • No. 3

contents Features The Freedom Trail by the Numbers

11 ANO’s Guide to Boston 12 PRevolutionary Ten sites critical to the birth of the U.S.A.

14 City of Firsts

Boston’s revolutionary innovations

Departments 6

HUBBUB

10

Calendar

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A Peek at the Past

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Boston’s Official Guide

The Magna Carta at the MFA, the Pops Fireworks Spectacular and more

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12

The Old State House

16 Current Events 23 On Exhibit 28 Shopping 35 Cambridge 39 Maps 45 Neighborhoods 52 Sightseeing 61 Beyond Boston: Provincetown 62 Freedom Trail 64 Dining

78 B  oston Accent

The USS Constitution Museum’s Anne Grimes Rand ON THE COVER: John Singleton Copley (American, 1738–1815), Samuel Adams (detail), about 1772, oil on canvas. Deposited by the City of Boston.

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top photo: The Phantom of the opera by Matthew Murphy; middle photo: Old North Bridge by Kindra Clineff/Mass. Office of Travel & Tourism; bottom photo: Boston Common BOSTONGUIDE.COM

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The official guide to boston bostonguide.com

June 23–July 6, 2014 Volume 64 • Number 3 Tim Montgomery • President/Publisher

Scott Roberto • Art Director John Herron Gendreau • Associate Art Director Samantha DiMauro • Editorial Assistant Melanie Potter • Editorial Intern

service with sarcasm!

Lizz Scannell • Photography Intern

Rita A. Fucillo • Vice President, Publishing Jacolyn Ann Firestone • Vice President, Advertising

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Faneuil Hall Marketplace Quincy Market Building Boston, MA 02109 617-267-8080

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Tiffany Carnuccio • Account Executive

Tyler J. Montgomery • Vice President, Operations Melissa J. O’Reilly • Business Manager Niki Lamparelli • Operations Assistant Panorama is published bi-weekly by New Venture Media Group LLC. Editorial and advertising offices at 560 Harrison Ave., Suite 412, Boston, MA 02118. Telephone (617) 423-3400. Printed in the U.S.A. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reprinted or otherwise reproduced without written permission of the publisher. Panorama is a member of the Massachusetts Lodging Association, The Back Bay Association, The Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau, Cambridge Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Boston Concierge Association, the Harvard Square Business Association, the Newbury Street League, the South End Business Alliance, the Downtown Crossing Association, the Kendall Square Association and the Central Square Business Association. a

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The Art of Freedom

It’s probably no coincidence that the Museum of Fine Arts (refer to listing, page 24) is hosting the exhibit Magna Carta: Cornerstone of Liberty right around the Fourth of July holiday, as many are celebrating the origins of America’s independence. At this new show debuting July 2, visitors can learn about some of the ideas that influenced our revered Founding Fathers. The centerpiece of this inspiring display is one of only four existing copies of England’s original Magna Carta of 1215, a seminal compact that spelled out many of the freedoms that were incorporated into the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Also on view are two manuscript copies of the Declaration of Independence on loan from the Massachusetts Historical Society, as well as Paul Revere’s Sons of Liberty Bowl (above), John Singleton Copley’s portrait of Samuel Adams and many other works of art and documents relating to the founding of the United States of America from the MFA’s own collection. —Scott Roberto

What Boston’s buzzing about

6.23.14

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Music for the people

Celebrating its 41st year, the Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular (refer to listing, page 16) is more explosive and remarkable than ever. Having recently won a New England Emmy Award, the Fireworks Spectacular continues to entertain hundreds of thousands each year. With more than 20,000 pounds of pyrotechnics, the Boston Pops orchestra and the scenic Charles River, the Hatch Shell on the Charles River Esplanade is one of the best places to celebrate the Fourth of July. Led by conductor Keith Lockhart (pictured), the Pops fill the air with patriotic tunes, while the firework extravaganza lights up the sky in a grand finale. This fun, free way to celebrate our nation’s independence is incredibly popular, so get there early and stake out your spot. —Melanie Potter top: Paul REvere, Sons of Liberty Bowl, 1768; Bottom PHoto: Stu Rosner


A Historic Celebration

Step back in time to the days of the American Revolution from July 2–6 by celebrating our nation’s independence at the 33rd annual Harborfest (refer to listing, page 20). With more than 200 activities spanning the five-day festival, there is no lack of fun things to do. Tours run throughout the festival at many Freedom Trail sites and other historic locales like the Otis House and Fort Independence, and cruises of Boston Harbor are available as well. Also take part in the Revelry on Griffin’s Wharf at the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum on July 2, 3 and 5. With reenactments by colonialcostumed interpreters, tours of the replica ships and a chance to throw tea into the harbor, you’ll feel like you’re back in 1773. —Melanie Potter

A new Masquerade

Premiering in the U.K. in 2012, super-producer Cameron Mackintosh’s new version of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera (refer to listing, page 22) was, as expected, a record-breaking hit. Now that the blockbuster musical has embarked on a U.S. tour, it was inevitable that it would stop at Boston’s own lush and lavish Opera House in the Theatre District. Beginning June 26 and running until July 20, this re-tooled production still tells the story of Gaston Leroux’s tragic anti-hero and his obsession with the beautiful soprano Christine, yet it has been updated with new sets, lighting design, staging and choreography. Witness for yourself why this show is the most successful and acclaimed stage extravaganza in history. —Scott Roberto

Supply and demand

What if your button-down regulated your body temperature? Your socks were “robotically knit” for supreme comfort? Your pants water repellent—and dashing to boot? Bostonbased menswear line Ministry of Supply is injecting the city’s fashion scene with space-age style at its experimental pop-up concept shop Ministry of Supply H1 on Newbury Street. Over a period of six months, the minds behind the mechanisms analyzed and dissected everything from entrance ways to the way people browse sales racks to create an interactive, high-tech take on the traditional retail experience, inspired by MIT architecture and science museum displays. H1 is at 299 Newbury St. from June until August. Go to h-1.squarespace.com for more details. —Samantha DiMauro above middle photo: Matthew Murphy

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Boston Harbor

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Acorn Street on Beacon Hill

Paul Revere Statue/ Old North Church

波士顿欢迎您 作为美国最古老的城市之一,波 士顿被许多人认为是解放和自由的发 源地。踏着自由经去追寻美国历史人 物的同时,参观者还能享受超级豪华 的购物和美食。 后湾可能是您在波士顿探险的最 佳起点。纽伯里街上的高档精品店有 Lux Bond and Green、Max Mara 和 Giorgio Armani,另外科普利广场和 保诚中心也有不少奢侈品店。坐电梯 到保诚大厦顶端的空中漫步天文台, 在那儿您能看到此城市的最佳景色。 波士顿广场是美国最古老的公园,田 园般的恬静驱走了城市的喧嚣,历史 悠久的教堂如圣三一教堂和灵光堂, 能让您沉浸在宁静的反思中。 黄金圆顶的马萨诸塞州议会大厦 是笔架山兴起的标志,四周迷人的环 境更因其维式褐石和曲径通幽的街道 而著名。古玩店、温馨的餐厅和服装 精品店集中在笔架山商业中心的查尔 斯街上。风景如画的橡子街则是拍照 的好去处。 8

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波士顿最古老的街区北端以意大 利美食著名,无论是比萨饼、意大利 面还是糕点。品尝美食之余,可别错 过参观临近的老北教堂。不远处,您 还可登船游览海港,或去长码头出海 观鲸。自1742开始就成为集市的法 纳尔大厅,历史悠久,是购物和餐饮 的好去处。 波士顿唐人街大门两侧各有一个 传统的狮子,是波士顿人口最密集区 域之一,在美国的唐人街里排名第 三,这里是人们品尝亚洲食品的好去 处。 波士顿与红袜队是无法分开的, 这就是为什么芬威公园是如此受欢 迎,即使在非赛季节。该公园全年开 放给游客参观,公园附近有城里的最 好的艺术博物馆,如美术博物馆和伊 莎贝拉·斯图尔特·加德纳博物馆。 蜿蜒的查尔斯河对岸是剑桥市, 那里有著名的哈佛大学和麻省理工学 院,游客可以参观两所大学的校园和 各类博物馆。


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A two-week primer on Boston’s best events

June 27

More than 30 years after the release of their first album, the original members of Bostonbred R&B group New Edition return to the Hub for a show at Boston University’s Agganis Arena. Groove to chart-topping classics like “Candy Girl,” “Cool It Now” and “Stand The Rain” along with brand-new material. Refer to listing, page 19.

Calendar

6.23.14–7.6.14

Through June 28

Fans of Twilight and “True Blood” should flock to OperaHub’s updated revival of Heinrich Marschner’s 1820 gothic opera Der Vampyr. This free production, complete with modernday references to popular vampire fiction, takes place at the Boston Center for the Arts’ Plaza Theatre in the South End. Refer to listing, page 20.

Through June 29

Lyric Stage Company in the Back Bay has a hit on its hands with its production of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s Into the Woods, which has already been extended twice. This fractured fairy tale, a mash-up of several familiar Brothers Grimm stories, has been hailed by critics and audiences alike. Refer to listing, page 22.

July 2

Grammy Award-winning songwriter/producer/ pop superstar Bruno Mars brings his Moonshine Jungle tour to TD Garden. With his retro style and charismatic showmanship, Mars has been playing to sold-out houses all over North America, so get your tickets now if you don’t want to be “Locked Out of Heaven.” Refer to listing, page 20.

Through July 6

Catch Cirque du Soleil’s Amaluna at the Marine Industrial Park on the South Boston waterfront before it’s gone. Directed by Diane Paulus, the show, based on Shakespeare’s The Tempest, tells the story of Prospera and her daughter Miranda as they deal with the presence of a group of shipwrecked men on their goddessworshipping island. Refer to listing, page 20.

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photos (third from top to bottom): Mark S. Howard, LAURA RAMOOOS, Bob Perachio


The Freedom Trail by the Numbers

By Scott Roberto

16 3.2 million 2015 1951 2.5 23 70 1958 44 2,300 1,000 Number of official sites on the Freedom Trail.

Approximate number of people who visit the Freedom Trail annually.

Year the Freedom Trail was established.

Length, in miles, of the Freedom Trail.

Number of karats in the gold leaf on the State House dome.

Year when a three-year restoration of the USS Constitution is scheduled to begin.

Approximate number of crew members of the USS Constitution.

Total acres of Boston Common.

Year the red line was added.

Number of grave markers at the Old Granary Burying Ground.

Approximate number of free African Americans from the nearby “New Guinea” community who are thought to be buried in unmarked graves at Copp’s Hill Burying Ground.

5,000+ 1964 217 191 342 Estimated number of Bostonians buried at the Old Granary Burying Ground.

Year the non-profit Freedom Trail Foundation was established to help market and preserve the Freedom Trail.

$0

Height, in feet, of the Park Street Church steeple.

Cost of admission to 13 of the 16 Freedom Trail sites.

top right photo: Della Huff; bottom photo: Allie Felt

Height, in feet, of the Old North Church steeple.

Number of crates of tea colonists destroyed at the Boston Tea Party after departing from a gathering at the Old South Meeting House on December 16, 1773.

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PANORAMA’s GUIDE to

Revolutionary Boston Step back in time by visiting the Boston area sites most closely associated with the birth of the United States of America By SCott Roberto

Minute Man National Historical Park

The “shot heard round the world” was fired near the Old North Bridge (above) at the Battles of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775, and this 967-acre site sprawled across three towns 15 miles northwest of Boston preserves the fields on which this confrontation took place. Minute Man Visitor Center: 250 North Great Road, Lincoln; North Bridge Visitor Center: 174 Liberty St., Concord; 978-369-6993, nps.gov/mima

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Boston Massacre Site

A key incident that inflamed colonists toward rebellion occurred here on March 5, 1770. As a jeering, unruly crowd hurled snowballs and rocks at unwelcome British soldiers, the redcoats opened fire, killing five people. State Street, outside the Old State House, 206 Washington St.

Old North Church

The steeple of this 1723 edifice served as a signal tower to messenger Paul Revere, warning him that British soldiers were departing to capture the minutemen’s ammunition stockpile in Concord on the night of April 18, 1775. 193 Salem St., 617-523-6676, oldnorth.org

Top photo: Tim Grafft/Mass. Office of Travel & tourism; bottom right photo: Allie Felt; bottom left photo: Lizz Scannell


Old South Meeting House

This is where the Boston Tea Party began in 1773, when more than 5,000 colonists gathered here to listen to a speech by Samuel Adams that served as a signal to the Sons of Liberty to march to the waterfront and dump unfairly taxed tea into Boston Harbor. 310 Washington St., 617-482-6439, osmh.org

Dorchester Heights

The monument on this hill in South Boston marks the spot where George Washington and the Continental Army placed 59 cannons to aim at the British troops below, eventually driving them out of the city on March 17, 1776. Thomas Park, nps.gov/bost

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

Located on the Fort Point Channel near the original Griffin’s Wharf site where the pivotal protest took place on December 16, 1773, this institution reenacts the infamous tea-toss on a daily basis to the delight of history aficionados young and old. 306 Congress St., 617-338-1773, bostonteapartyship.com

Longfellow House

The former home of poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, this 1759 Georgian mansion served as George Washington’s headquarters during the Siege of Boston from July 1775–April 1776. 105 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617-876-4491, nps.gov/long

Bunker Hill Monument

Although the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775 was a loss for the colonists, it exacted a steep toll on British troops. The granite obelisk to mark the site was completed in 1843. Breed’s Hill, Charlestown, 617-2427511, nps.gov/bost

Faneuil Hall Boston Common

Both British and colonial troops mustered on America’s first public park during the Revolutionary War. The starting point of the Freedom Trail, Boston Common is also home to the Central Burying Ground (above), where British soldiers are buried alongside participants of the Boston Tea Party and patriots who died during the Battle of Bunker Hill. Visitor Information Center: 139 Tremont St., 617-635-4505 top left photo: Derek Kouyoumjian; top right photo: Michael Blanchard; middle center photo: Kate Fraiman; Middle left photo: Ethan Benjamin Backer; bottom right photo: Allie Felt

This bustling marketplace, built in 1742 by wealthy merchant Peter Faneuil, also served as the location for fiery speeches by the likes of Samuel Adams—whose statue sits in the plaza out front—that inspired patriots to break from Great Britain. Merchants Row and Faneuil Hall Square, 617-242-5689, nps.gov/bost BOSTONGUIDE.COM

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Cy Young Statue

Boston Public Garden

Boston Public Library

City of Firsts even prior to former Boston Mayor tom menino dubbing the south Boston waterfront the Innovation District, the Hub was a center of progressive ideas. Innovation has long been a part of the city’s fabric dating back to its very beginnings. Here’s just a small sampling of sites associated with some of the more prominent Boston firsts. By Scott roberto Boston Common: Delineated in 1634, Boston Common was America’s first public park. It was established as community grazing land for cattle, a practice which ceased in 1830. Original site of Boston Latin School (School Street): The site of the first public school in America—established in 1635—is commemorated by a plaque along the famed Freedom Trail. African Meeting House (46 Joy St., 617725-2991): The first church for African Americans was established on Beacon Hill in 1806. It is now home to the Museum of African American History. Boston Public Garden: America’s first public botanical garden was instituted in 1837 adjacent to Boston Common, although many of the features with which we are familiar today didn’t take shape until decades later. Ether Dome (Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St., Bulfinch Building, 4th Floor, 617-726-2000): In 1846, William T.G. Morton performed the first public surgery using an anesthetic at Mass. General’s surgical amphitheater. Open to the general public Monday–Friday from 9 a.m.–5 p.m., it houses a small collection of artifacts, as well as an Egyptian mummy. 14

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Boylston Station (corner of Tremont and Boylston streets): This stop on the MBTA’s Green Line was the first subway station in the United States when it debuted in 1897. Historic trolley cars can be seen here on a defunct track parallel to the one in active use. Boston Public Library (700 Boylston St., 617-536-5400): The first free municipal library in the country when it was created in 1848, the Boston Public Library moved into its stately Copley Square location in 1895. Birthplace of the Telephone (outside the John F. Kennedy Building, Cambridge Street): The building where Alexander Graham Bell first successfully sent sound over a wire may be gone, but a plaque commemorating the 1875 event stands near the original site. Cy Young Statue (Behind Northeastern University’s Cabot Center, 400 Huntington Ave.): The first Major League Baseball World Series— between eventual victors the Boston Red Sox (then the Americans) of the two-year-old American League and the Pittsburgh Pirates of the elder National League—was held here at the former site of the Huntington Avenue Grounds in 1903. A statue of legendary Boston hurler Cy Young stands in a Northeastern University quad to mark the spot of the pitcher’s mound. above left photo: Kate Fraiman; above center photo: Alexandra Molnar/Mass. Office of Travel & Tourism


a peek at the past

Taking the Mystery Out of Boston History

Old State House A

s the oldest surviving public building in Boston, the Old State House has seen a remarkable amount of history since its creation in 1713. Over the past 300 years, the Old State House, or “Towne House” as it is sometimes called, has been home to some of Boston’s biggest historical moments, including the Boston Massacre. On March 5, 1770, British soldiers killed five colonists as a result of growing tensions over the enforcement of heavy taxation. To memorialize the five who died, a circle of cobblestones just outside the Old State House marks where the massacre occurred. The “Towne House” was also home to the Royal Governor until our nation’s independence in 1776. Thomas Gage was the province’s final royal governor; his position was recalled after the rebels gained control of the colony. On July 18, 1776, citizens gathered in the street in front of the Old State House to hear the Declaration of Independence read from the building’s balcony, the first public reading in Massachusetts. After the Massachusetts Constitution went into effect in 1780, John Hancock was elected the Commonwealth’s first Governor. Massachusetts’ government resided here until the new State House was built on Beacon Hill in 1798. This historic building was nearly demolished in the late 1800s to allow more space for the expanding Financial District, yet was fortunately saved by the Bos-

above pHOto: Della Huff

tonian Society. From 1881 to the present, the Society has restored the Old State House and run it as a historical museum. Having just celebrated the building’s tercentennial, the museum continues to provide a window into Boston’s rich history. One can discover artifacts from the past and literally walk in the footsteps of key players of the American Revolution, including John Adams, John Hancock and Samuel Adams. —Melanie Potter

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current events PANO PICK

SMART PEOPLE

Four Harvard intellectuals—a doctor, an actress, a psychologist and a neurobiologist studying the human brain’s response to race—search for love, success and identity in a complex world in this new drama by Lydia R. Diamond (Stick Fly). Huntington Theatre Company, Wimberly Theatre, Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts, 527 Tremont St., 617-933-8600. Through July 6. $15–80.

Classical Boston pops Fireworks spectacular DCR Hatch Shell on the Charles River Inside Tip: The cannons, Esplanade. Free and fireworks and bells open to the public; during the 1812 visit july4th.org for Overture were full event information. added in 1974. July 4 from 7–10 p.m. Celebrate America’s birthday with America’s premier Independence Day celebration. The concert features conductor Keith Lockhart and the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra performing contemporary and classical patriotic favorites at the historic Hatch Shell before the sky lights up with dazzling pyrotechnics that climb up to 1,500 feet. Preview concert—July 3 at 7:30 p.m., free.

Comedy Dick Doherty’s Comedy Den Below Howl at the moon 184 High St., 800-401-2221, dickdoherty. com. Shows Thu–Sat. $15 & 20. National 16

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headliners with a Boston connection and local comedians are joined by Boston’s next superstars. Improv Asylum 216 Hanover St., 617-263-6887, improv asylum.com. $5–25, dinner packages available. Some of Boston’s top improvisational comics perform uproarious and creative shows at this theater in Boston’s North End. Laugh boston Westin Seaport Waterfront Hotel, 425 Summer St., 617-725-2844, laughboston.com. Boston’s newest comedy club, the standup sibling to Improv Asylum, features premier stand-up comedy, including a weekly show called Legends of Boston Comedy, as well as national acts. June 26 & 27 at 7:30 p.m., June 28 at 7:30 and 10 p.m.— Rich Vos, $20 & 25; July 3 at 8 p.m., July 5 at 8 and 10:15 p.m.—Jimmy Dunn, $20 & 25; July 10 & 11 at 8 p.m., July 12 at 8 and 10:15 p.m.—Adrienne Iapalucci, $20 & 25; July 17 & 18 at 8 p.m., July 19 at 8 and 10:15 p.m.— Bill Burr Presents: The All In Comedy Tour, $20 & 25; July 17 & 18 at 10:15 p.m.—Jordan Carlos & Friends, $20.


cameron mackintosh ’s spectacular new production of

andrew lloyd webber ’s

JUNE 26 - JULY 20 BOSTON OPERA HOUSE 800-982-2787

| BroadwayInBoston.com

GROUPS (15+) SAVE! CALL: 617-482-8616

by arrangement with the really useful group


current events Nick’s Comedy Stop 100 Warrenton St., 617-438-1068, nicks comedystop.com. Nick’s is the city’s longest-running comedy club. June 27 & 28 at 8 p.m.—John Porch, $20; July 11 & 12 at 8 p.m.—Dan Crohn, $20; July 18 & 19 at 8 p.m.—Dan Boulger, $20. Wilbur Theatre 246 Tremont St., 617-248-9700, thewilbur theatre.com. This venue hosts comedic headliners as well as national musical talent. July 19 at 7 p.m.—Lil Duval, $22.50.

$8.25. This beloved theater shows art house, independent, classic and international films, including midnight movies.

MUGAR OMNI THEATER

This IMAX theater presents larger-than-life images on a five-story high domed screen. Now showing: Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk; Jerusalem; Journey to the South Pacific; Pandas: The Journey Home (pictured). Museum of Science, 617-723-2500 or 617-333FILM, mos.org. $10; seniors $9; children (3–11) $8. Discounted admission after 6 p.m.

Film Bright Family Screening Room Paramount Center, 559 Washington St., 617-824-8400. $10. Visit artsemerson .org for full schedule. Emerson College’s state-of-the-art screening room features a variety of classic films. Coolidge Corner Theatre 290 Harvard St., Brookline, 617-734-2500, coolidge.org. Call for showtimes and full schedule. $10.25; students, seniors, children (under 12) & matinees (before 5 p.m.)

Simons IMAX Theatre New England Aquarium, Central Wharf, 866-815-4629, neaq.org. Open daily at 9:30 a.m. $9.95; seniors & children (3–11) $7.95. Visit the first large-format theater

IN BOSTON LOGAN AIRPORT 300 TERMINAL C

617-847-4047

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above photo: Yang Dan


in Boston to have 3-D viewing capability. Now showing: Island of Lemurs: Madagascar 3-D; Journey to the South Pacific 3-D; Great White Shark 3-D.

Live Music Agganis Arena Boston University, 925 Commonwealth Ave., 800-745-3000, agganisarena.com. This venue on the BU campus is a state-ofthe-art entertainment center. June 27 at 8 p.m.—New Edition, $48–98. Berklee Performance Center 136 Massachusetts Ave., 617-747-2261, berkleebpc.com. The primary concert hall for Berklee College’s performances also hosts visiting artists and community organizations. July 8 at 7:30 p.m.—Tommy Emmanuel, $36.50. Blue Hills Bank Pavilion 290 Northern Ave., 617-728-1600, livenation.com. See the world’s biggest acts on a spectacular harborside stage. June 24 & 25 at 7 p.m.—OneRepublic, $29–79.50; July 1 at 7:30 p.m.—Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo,

Shop

$29.50–65; July 2 at 7 p.m.—Counting Crows with Toad The Wet Sprocket, $35– 65; July 8 at 8 p.m.—Yes, $25–75; July 9 at 7:30 p.m.—American Idol Live!, $30.50– 66; July 10 at 6:30 p.m.—O.A.R. and Phillip Phillips, $35–75; July 11 at 7 p.m.—Peter Frampton and The Doobie Brothers, $35– 65; July 12 at 7:30 p.m.—Maxwell, $39.50– 95; July 15 at 7:30 p.m.—Sara Bareilles, $35 & 55; July 16 at 7:30 p.m.—John Fogerty, $39.50–65; July 17 at 7:30 p.m.—311, $29.50–49.50; July 18 at 7:30 p.m.—Michael Franti & Spearhead, $29.50–49.50; July 19 at 8 p.m.—Sarah McLachlan, $35–79.50. House of Blues 15 Lansdowne St., 888-693-BLUE, hob.com/ boston. This club, concert hall and restaurant across from Fenway Park welcomes top rock, blues and pop acts. June 25 at 7 p.m.—Andy Grammer, $20 & 35; June 29 at 6 p.m.—Say Anything, $20 & 35; July 8 at 7 p.m.—Neon Trees, $22. Paradise Rock Club 967 Commonwealth Ave., 617-562-8800, thedise.com. An intimate setting with big sound, the Paradise is one of Boston’s

Dine

Experience

America’s First Open Marketplace

FaneuilHallMarketplace.com BOSTONGUIDE.COM

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current events favorite rock clubs. June 27 at 7 p.m.— Logic, $20; July 4 at 8 p.m.—Chronixx, $25; July 8 at 7 p.m.—The Kills, $25; July 10 at 7 p.m.—Nightmares On Wax, $20; July 14 at 7 p.m.—The Paper Kites, $15; July 15 at 7 p.m.—Turnpike Troubadours, $15; July 17 at 8 p.m.—De La Soul, $25; July 19 at 8 p.m.— Matthew Sweet, $20; July 20 at 7 p.m.— Camera Obscura, $20. Scullers Jazz Club DoubleTree Guest Suites Hotel, 400 Soldiers Field Road, 617-562-4111, scullersjazz. com. This Boston club is known for featuring the biggest names in Latin and contemporary jazz, blues, soul, R&B, cabaret and world music. June 27 & 28 at 8 and 10 p.m.—Fourplay, $40. TD Garden TD Garden, 100 Legends Way, 617-6242327, tdgarden.com. Home to the Boston Celtics and Bruins, this arena also hosts some of the biggest acts in music. June 30 at 7:30 p.m.—Lady Gaga, $37.50–202.50; July 2 at 8 p.m.—Bruno Mars, $42.50– 127.50; July 10 at 8 p.m.—Justin Timberlake, $49.50–175.

Top of the Hub

Enjoy food, drinks and the best view in Boston as you swing to live jazz and classics from the Great American Songbook. Prudential Tower, 52nd floor, 617-536-1775, topofthehub.net. Sun & Mon from 8 p.m.–midnight, Tue–Thu from 8:30 p.m.–12:30 a.m., Fri & Sat from 9 p.m.–1 a.m.

Wang Theatre Citi Performing Arts Center, 270 Tremont St., 617-482-9393, citicenter.org. Citi Performing Arts Center is one of the nation’s premier nonprofit performing arts institutions. July 16 at 8 p.m.—Natalie Merchant, $40–80. Wilbur Theatre 246 Tremont St., 617-248-9700, thewilbur theatre.com. Hosting comedic headliners 20

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as well as national musical talent. June 27 at 8 p.m.—Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes, $35–65; June 28 at 8 p.m.—Get the Led Out, $25 & 35; June 29 at 7 p.m.— Ginger Baker, $25–55.

Opera DER VAMPYR OperaHub, Plaza Theatre, Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St. Through June 28. Free. This new adaptation of Heinrich Marschner’s 1828 gothic opera tells the story of Lord Ruthven, who has been charged by the other vampires in his coven with taking three virgins by the end of the third day or he will perish. This adaptation features a tighter plot and broadens the scope of the story to include contemporary pop-culture vampire references.

Special Events Bastille Day Party 2014 Marlborough Street (between Berkeley and Clarendon), 617-912-0400. July 11 from 6–11 p.m. $28. The French Cultural Center in Back Bay hosts its 39th Bastille Day street party, presenting live music from the African-born, Montreal-based a cappella group H’Sao and world music duo Joe Driscoll & Sekou Kouyate. Enjoy French food and drink from area eateries. The streets are closed off to offer a block party feel that will have you thinking you’re along the Champs-Elysees. boston harborfest 617-227-1528. July 2–6. Over half of the events are free; others cost $1–10. For a complete schedule, visit bostonharborfest. com. This city-wide, star-spangled celebration honoring Independence Day features more than 200 scheduled events and attracts more than 2.5 million people. Festivities include walking tours, concerts, Revolutionary War-era historical reenactments and more. July 2 from noon–12:30 p.m.—Opening Ceremony; July 4 from 11 a.m.–1 p.m.—Watch “Old Ironsides,” the USS Constitution, sail on a turnaround cruise. Cirque du soleil: Amaluna Boston Marine Industrial Park, 6 Tide St., 800-450-1480, cirquedusoleil.com. Through July 6. $30–275. Visit a mysterious island where the queen, Prospera,


deals with the changes brought on when a group of young men lands on the island, triggering an epic, emotional story of love between Prospera’s daughter and a brave young suitor. An Evening With Al Pacino The Wang Theatre, Citi Performing Arts Center, 270 Tremont St., 617-482-9393, Inside Tip: citicenter.org. June 27 Al Pacino made at 8 p.m. $73.25–183.25. many of his early professional stage This special presentaappearances at tion celebrates one of Boston’s Charles the most acclaimed Playhouse. careers in acting history in an intimate setting, with the actor himself, as he shares his passion for acting and directing. The evening explores his time Off-Broadway in the ’60s right up to the present day, and includes some never-before-heard stories and never-before-seen clips. North End Feasts And Processions Boston’s “Little Italy” honors patron saints and the neighborhood’s culture with weekend festivals featuring Italian delicacies, streetside bands playing Old World melodies and vendors offering authentic wares on the cobblestoned streets dressed with garlands. July 13—Madonna delle Grazie Procession; July 20—St. Rocco Procession.

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WWE Money in the Bank TD Garden, 100 Legends Way, 617-6242327, tdgarden.com. June 29 at 7:30 p.m. $30–275. A new WWE World Heavyweight Champion is set to be crowned in this everdangerous, multi-superstar ladder match. Featured performers include Alberto Del Rio and Randy Orton.

Sports BOSTON CANNONS/MLL Harvard Stadium, 95 N. Harvard St., Allston, 617-746-9933, bostoncannons.com. July 19 at 6 p.m. vs. New York Lizards Boston REd Sox/MLB Fenway Park, 4 Yawkey Way, 617-4824SOX, redsox.com. June 30 at 7:10 p.m. vs. Chicago Cubs July 1 & 2 at 7:10 p.m. vs. Chicago Cubs July 4 & 6 at 1:35 p.m. vs. Baltimore Orioles July 5 at 7:15 p.m. vs. Baltimore Orioles BOSTONGUIDE.COM

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current events July 7–9 at 7:10 p.m. vs. July 10 at 4:05 p.m. vs. July 18 & 19 at 7:10 p.m. vs. July 20 at 1:35 p.m. vs.

Chicago White Sox Chicago White Sox Kansas City Royals Kansas City Royals

New England Revolution/MLS 1 Patriot Place, Foxborough, 877-GET-REVS, revolutionsoccer.net June 28 at 7:30 p.m. vs. Philadelphia Union July 12 at 7:30 p.m. vs. Chicago Fire

Theater ASTRO BOY AND THE GOD OF COMICS Company One, Plaza Theatre, Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St., 617933-8600. Beginning July 18. $20. In this innovative play that combines animation, interactive video and a 1960s dream of the future, Astro Boy—a crimefighting, sweet-faced robot—and his creator, Osamu Tezuka—the real-life Father of Manga and “Walt Disney of Japan”—explore the intersections of science, art and family. Blue Man Group Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton St., 800-BLUE-MAN, blueman.com. Ongoing. $55 & 105. This giddily subversive off-Broadway hit serves up outrageous and inventive theater where three muted, blue-painted performers spoof both contemporary art and modern technology. Wry commentary and bemusing antics are matched only by the ingenious ways in which music and sound are created. The show has recently been updated with new performance pieces and music. BROTHERS OF THE KNIGHT Cutler Majestic Theatre at Emerson College, 219 Tremont St., 617-824-8000. June 27–29. $25–110. A hip, rejuvenated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm tale The Twelve Dancing Princesses, this blend of music, dance and comedy created by Broadway legend Debbie Allen and Grammy Awardwinner James Ingram recounts the adventures of the youthful Knight brothers who, forbidden by their father to dance, sneak out every night to dance the night away in the Big-Bad Ballroom. Into the woods Lyric Stage Company, 140 Clarendon St., 617-585-5678. Through June 29. $25–64. When a baker and his wife learn they’ve been cursed by a witch, they embark on a 22

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quest to reverse the spell. Along the way they encounter an ambivalent Cinderella, an aggressive Red Riding Hood, a rebellious Rapunzel, a too-trusting Jack and a couple of not-so-princely princes in Stephen Sondheim’s musical fairy tale mash-up. THE LITTLE MERMAID North Shore Music Theatre, 62 Dunham Road, Beverly, 978-232-7200. Beginning July 8. $50–75. In this musical based on the 1989 Disney film and one of Hans Christian Andersen’s most beloved stories, the beautiful young mermaid Ariel longs to leave her ocean home—and her fins—behind and live in the world above. But first, she’ll have to defy her father King Triton, make a deal with the evil sea witch Ursula and convince the handsome Prince Eric that she’s the girl whose enchanting voice he’s been seeking. THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Boston Opera House, 539 Washington St., 866-523-7469. June 26–July 20. $30–225. Cameron Mackintosh’s spectacular new production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s phenomenal musical success makes its Boston debut. Hailed by critics as “bigger and better than ever before,” this production boasts many exciting special effects, including the show’s legendary chandelier, new scenic and lighting designs, new staging and choreography.

Shear Madness

It’s a day like any other at the Shear Madness salon, when suddenly the lady upstairs gets knocked off. Whodunnit? Join the fun as the audience matches wits with the suspects to catch the killer at this wildly popular comedy. Shear Madness has audiences laughing around the world. Boston is the original. Charles Playhouse Stage II, 74 Warrenton St., 617-4265225, shearmadness.com. Ongoing. $50.

Tickets Bostix Faneuil Hall Marketplace and Copley Square. Tue–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sun 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Information and tickets, including half-price seats on day of event, for the best performing arts around Boston. Log on to bostix.org to purchase discounted tickets and receive special e-mail updates. All ticket offers subject to availability.


on exhibit PANO PICK

The Mary Baker Eddy Library

The Library explores the life and achievements of Mary Baker Eddy, a New England woman who defied conventional 19th-century thinking to become an influential religious leader, publisher, teacher and businesswoman. The museum also houses the famous Mapparium—a three-story stained-glass globe, opened in 1935, which allows visitors to stand in the center, giving them a unique look at how ideas can inspire individuals and change the world. 200 Massachusetts Ave., 617-450-7000, marybakereddylibrary.org. Tue–Sun 10 a.m.– 4 p.m. Admission: $6; seniors, students & youth (6–17) $4; children (under 6) free.

Boston BODY WORLDS: VITAL Faneuil Hall Marketplace, 200 Faneuil Hall Square, bodyworldsboston.com. $15.50– 22.50. This eye-opening exhibit celebrates the potential of the active and actualizing human body. Featuring authentic human bodies, the exhibition includes cautionary displays about distress and disease, and inspirational insights about the virtuosity and resilience of humans.

tary $22; children $15. Journey back in time on this all-encompassing, multi-sensory interactive tour. Explore authentically restored tea ships, see historic artifacts and learn about the people, events and consequences that led up to the American Revolution as they occurred 240 years ago.

Boston Children’s Museum Museum Wharf, 308 Congress St., 617-4266500, bostonkids.org. Sat–Thu 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Fri ’til 9 p.m. Admission: $14; children (under 1) free; Sat–Thu 4–5 p.m. $7; Fri 5–9 p.m. (Family Night) $1. This popular museum for kids of all ages features a plethora of interactive exhibits that allow children to learn about science, history and culture firsthand.

Institute of Contemporary Art 100 Northern Ave., 617-478-3100, icaboston .org. Sat, Sun, Tue & Wed 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Thu & Fri ’til 9 p.m. Admission: $15; seniors $13; students $10; children (under 17) free. Free to all Thu 5–9 p.m. This state-of-theart, gleaming structure on the South Boston waterfront presents installations of contemporary paintings, sculptures and photographs, as well as cutting-edge live dance and musical performances. Special exhibits: Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take; through July 6—Multiple Occupancy: Eleanor Antin’s “Selves”; Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg: A World of Glass.

Boston TEA Party Ships & Museum 306 Congress St., 617-338-1773, bostontea partyship.com. Mon–Sun 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Admission: $25; seniors/students/mili-

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum 280 The Fenway, 617-566-1401. Wed–Mon 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Thu ’til 9 p.m. Admission: $15; seniors $12; college students $5; children BOSTONGUIDE.COM

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on exhibit (under 18) free. Visitors named Isabella are also admitted free. Commissioned by Boston aristocrat Isabella Stewart Gardner and modeled after a 15th-century Venetian palace, the museum exhibits 2,500 objects, including works by Rembrandt, Botticelli, Raphael, Titian and Matisse. Special exhibit: Carla Fernández: The Barefoot Designer. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum Columbia Point off Morrissey Boulevard, inside Tip: next to UMass BosThe JFK Library was initially meant to ton, Dorchester, 866be established at 535-1960, jfklibrary. Harvard University. org. Daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $14; seniors & students $12; children (13–17) $10; children (12 and under) free; library forums free. This museum portrays the life, leadership and legacy of John F. Kennedy and members of his illustrious family in 21 exhibits, three theaters, 20 video presentations and more. Special exhibits: Superman’s Mission for President Kennedy; To the Brink: JFK and the Cuban Missile Crisis; In Her Voice: Jacqueline Kennedy, The White House Years; Freedom 7 Space Capsule. MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS 465 Huntington Ave., 617-267-9300, mfa. org. Sat–Tue 10 a.m.–4:45 p.m., Wed–Fri ’til 9:45 p.m. Admission (includes two visits in a 10-day period): $25; seniors & students $23; Wed after 4 p.m., pay as you wish; children (7–17) $10 on weekdays before 3 p.m., free at all other times; children (6 and under) free. The museum houses an outstanding collection of paintings, prints, sculptures, furnishings and other artwork from ancient times through the present, as well as the most comprehensive collection of Asiatic art in the world and a four-floor Art of the Americas wing. Special exhibits: Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art; Fired Earth, Woven Bamboo: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics and Bamboo Art; Quilts and Color: The Pilgrim/Roy Collection; through July 6—Return of the Dragon: Shohaku’s Dragon and Clouds; Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography; Drawn to Daily Life: Dutch Drawings from the Maida and George Abrams Collection; beginning July 2—Magna Carta: Cornerstone of Liberty; beginning July 8—Jasper Johns: Picture Puzzles; beginning July 16—Jamie Wyeth. 24

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The Museum of African American History African Meeting House, 46 Joy St. (corner of Smith Court), Beacon Hill, 617-725-2991, afroammuseum.org. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Admission: $5; seniors & children (13– 17) $3; children (12 & under) free. Explore the history of Boston’s 19th-century African-American community at the African Meeting House, the oldest African-American church still standing in the United States. In addition, there are tour maps available for the Black Heritage Trail. Museum of Science Science Park, 617-723-2500, mos.org. Sat– Thu 9 a.m.–7 p.m., Fri ’til 9 p.m. Admission: $23; seniors $21; children (3–11) $20; children (under 3) free. Planetarium and Omni theater tickets: $10; seniors $9; children (3–11) $8. Combination ticket prices and evening discounts available. This popular museum for all ages boasts interactive science exhibits, as well as laser and astronomy shows in the Charles Hayden Planetarium. Special exhibits: 2theXtreme: MathAlive!; Grossology: The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body; Animals Without Passports. Planetarium shows: Moons: Worlds of Mystery; Explore: The Universe; Magic Tree House: Space Mission; through July 4—We Are Aliens!; beginning July 5— Wonders of the Night Sky. Old State House Museum 206 Washington St., 617-720-1713, boston history.org. Daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Tickets: $10; seniors & students $8.50; children (18 and under), military & veterans free. At the site of the Boston Massacre and the first reading of the Declaration of Independence in Boston, explore exhibits on the American Revolution, Boston’s maritime history and the Boston Massacre, and take themed tours of the city. The Sports Museum 5th and 6th floor premium seating levels, TD Garden, Causeway Street, 617-624-1234, sportsmuseum.org. Daily 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Hours altered during TD Garden events, call ahead. Admission: $10; seniors & children (10–18) $5; children (under 10) & military free. The Sports Museum showcases New England’s rich sports heritage through an unparalleled collection of artifacts, multimedia and artwork. Items on exhibit include the Boston Bruins Hall of Fame portraits,


the Boston Garden Penalty Box, Teddy Ballgame and the Summer of ’41, The Evolution of Women’s Basketball, The Ball that Changed History and The Original Bruin. USS constitution Museum Charlestown Navy Yard, Charles­town, 617-426-1812, ussconstitutionmuseum.org. Daily 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Free admission. The museum preserves the treasures of “Old Ironsides,” the U.S. Navy’s flagship and the world’s oldest commissioned warship. View weap­ons, documents, journals and more, learn to load and fire a cannon, try out a sailor’s sleeping quarters and virtually command the Constitution in battle.

Beyond Boston Concord Museum 200 Lexington Road, Concord, 978-3699763, concordmuseum.org. Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. Admission: $10; seniors & students $8; children (6–17) $5; children (under 6) free. Ample free parking on Cambridge Turnpike. Relive Concord’s history, from Native American habitation and European settlement to the days of Emerson, Thoreau, the Alcotts and Hawthorne. Special exhibit: The Shot Heard Round the World: April 19, 1775.

Fine Vintage Posters

DeCordova Sculpture Park and Museum

Tour one of the largest contemporary art museums and the only permanent public sculpture park in New England. Special exhibits: Red, Yellow and Blue; Ian Hamilton Finlay: Arcadian Revolutionary and Avant-Gardener; Lesley Dill; Platform 13: Roberley Bell, The Shape of the Afternoon; Platform 14: Alix Pearlstein, The Park; beginning June 28—The Fruit of Our Labors. 51 Sandy Pond Road, Lincoln, 781-259-8355, decordova.org. Daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $14; seniors $12; students $10; children (12 and under) free. Sculpture Park: open sunrise to sunset, admission charged during museum operating hours only.

Fitchburg Art Museum 25 Merriam Parkway, Fitchburg, 978-3454207, fitchburgartmuseum.org. Wed– Fri noon–4 p.m., Sat & Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $9; seniors, students & children (13–18) $5; military & children (under above photo: Kindra Clineff/MAss. Office of Travel & Tourism

205 Newbury Street

Open Daily, Parking Available

www.internationalposter.com

617-375-0076

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on exhibit 13) free. This museum displays contemporary art alongside art and artifacts from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, as well as pre-Columbian North and South America. Special exhibits: Building a Collection: Photography at the Fitchburg Art Museum; UFOs: Unidentified Fascinating Objects; 79th Regional Exhibition of Art & Craft. Griffin Museum of Photography 67 Shore Road, Winchester, 781-729-1158, inside Tip: griffinmuseum.org. The Griffin Museum houses three Tue–Thu 11 a.m.–5 p.m., galleries, and Fri ’til 4 p.m., Sat & Sun has four satellite noon–4 p.m. Admisgalleries in the Boston area. sion: $7; seniors $3; children (under 12) free. Free to all Thu 2–4 p.m. Named for the Massachusettsborn photographer for publications like Life and Time, the Griffin Museum boasts three galleries dedicated to the promotion and appreciation of photographic art. PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM East India Square, Salem, 866-745-1876, pem.org. Tue–Sun 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $18; seniors $15; students $10; children (16 and under) free. The nation’s oldest continually operating museum boasts a collection showcasing African, Asian, Pacific Island and American folk and decorative art, a maritime collection and the first collection of Native American art in the hemisphere. Special exhibits: Beyond Human: Artist– Animal Collaborations; Raven’s Many Gifts: Native Art of the Northwest Coast; Turner & the Sea; through July 6—California Design, 1930–1965: Living in a Modern Way. Salem Witch Museum 191 ⁄2 Washington Square North, Salem, 978744-1692, salemwitchmuseum.com. Daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $9.50; seniors $8; children (6–14) $6.50. Life-size stage settings and historically accurate narration recreate the hysteria of the Salem Witch Trials and executions of 1692. Translations available in Japanese, French, German, Italian and Spanish.

Galleries Barbara Krakow Gallery 10 Newbury St., 617-262-4490, barbara krakowgallery.com. Tue–Sat 10 a.m.–5:30 26

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p.m. The Barbara Krakow Gallery attracts top contemporary artists from around the world, showcasing work that focuses on minimalism and conceptualism. Special exhibits: Apparent Forms; Print Publishers Spotlight: Poligrafa. Boston Sculptors Gallery 486 Harrison Ave., 617-482-7781, boston sculptors.com. Wed–Sun noon–6 p.m. A sculptors’ cooperative that has served as an alternative venue for innovative solo sculpture exhibitions since 1992. Special exhibit: beginning June 25—Ovid’s Girls— Overlaps & Undercurrents: Boston/Berlin. Bromfield Art Gallery 450 Harrison Ave., 617-451-3605, bromfield gallery.com. Wed–Sun noon–5 p.m. Boston’s oldest artist-run gallery features shows by members of the cooperative, while exhibitions by visiting artists are selected by current members. Special exhibits: through June 29—UMass Dartmouth MFA Thesis Exhibition; beginning July 2—Black/White. Chase Young Gallery 450 Harrison Ave., 617-859-7222, chaseyoung gallery.com. Wed–Sat 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–4 p.m. One of the city’s top galleries for the exhibition of contemporary artists, both representational and abstract. Special exhibits: through June 29—Tom Chambers; beginning July 2—Summer Group Show. Copley Society of Art 158 Newbury St., 617-536-5049, copley society.org. Tue–Sat 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. The oldest non-profit art association in the U.S. represents more than 500 living artists and hosts between 15–20 exhibitions each year by contemporary painters, photographers, sculptors and printmakers. Special exhibits: beginning July 5—Shimmer: Summer Members’ Show; Pippip Ferner. International Poster Gallery 205 Newbury St., 617375-0076, international inside Tip: This gallery features poster.com. Mon–Sat 10 more than 10,000 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–6 original vintage p.m. The acclaimed fine posters for sale. art poster gallery displays original vintage works from the 1890s through post-World War II modern masters. Special exhibit: through June 30—Tour de Force.


L’attitude Gallery 211 Newbury St., 617-927-4400, lattitude gallery.com. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. Contemporary sculpture, crafts and art for the home, garden and commercial environments. Special exhibit: through July 13—Bending Metal. Miller Yezerski Gallery 460 Harrison Ave., 617-262-0550, howard yezerskigallery.com. Tue–Sat 11 a.m.–5:30 p.m. This South End gallery features a wide array of work from contemporary artists, ranging in media from photography to painting. Special exhibits: through July 1— Holly Lynton and Yana Payusova; beginning July 11—Summer Group Show.

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Mills Gallery Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St., 617-426-8835, bcaonline.org. Sun & Wed noon–5 p.m., Thu–Sat ’til 9 p.m. The BCA presents exciting contemp­orary works by established and emerging local, regional, national and international visual artists, mounting approx­imately six largescale exhibitions in the Mills Gallery each year. Special exhibit: through June 29— Jordan Eagles: Blood Dust. newbury fine arts Ad_Panorama_2014.indd 29 Newbury St., 617-536-0210, newburyfine arts.com. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. Founded in 1984, Newbury Fine Arts has been a strong presence on Boston’s historic Newbury Street and has continued to showcase a unique assemblage of contemporary artists.

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SOCIETY OF ARTS AND CRAFTS

The oldest non-profit crafts organization in the country specializes in contemporary American crafts. Jewelry, furniture, glass and ceramics range from cutting-edge to traditional, from functional to sculptural. Special exhibit: through July 19—SAC Artists Awards Exhibition. 175 Newbury St., 617-266-1810, societyofcrafts.org. Tue–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

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shopping PANO PICK

John Lewis, Inc.

John Lewis has created jewelry of imaginative design in Boston for more than 30 years. Using only solid precious metals and natural stones, Lewis aims “to make jewelry at a reasonable price of excellent workmanship and uncommon beauty.” 97 Newbury St., 617-266-6665. Tue–Sat 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Art & Antiques International Poster Gallery 205 Newbury St., 617-375-0076, inter nationalposter.com. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. This acclaimed fine art poster gallery displays original vintage works from the 1890s through post-World War II modern masters. L’attitude Gallery 211 Newbury St., 617-927-4400. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. This gallery boasts contemporary sculpture, crafts and art for the home and garden.

Audio/Video Bang & Olufsen 141 Newbury St., 617-262-4949, bangolufsen.com. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. Known for cutting edge home systems for the last 85 years, Bang & Olufsen continues that tradition with Beoplay, a new brand representing the same highquality philosophy of Bang & Olufsen but with a more playful plug-and-play attitude. From iPad docks, to Airplay Music Systems, 28

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to a revolutionary iPad near-field experience, B&O brings the quality back to your music and video content.

Boots & Shoes Helen’s Leather 110 Charles St., 617inside Tip: Helen’s carries 742-2077. Mon, Wed, leather goods Fri & Sat 10 a.m.–6 made from such p.m., Thu ’til 8 p.m., exotic skins as Sun noon–6 p.m. For snake, crocodile and ostrich. 40 years, Helen’s Leather has supplied New Englanders with quality Western boots by makers like Lucchese, Tony Lama, Justin, Nocona and Frye. In addition, Helen’s sells Western belts, buckles, shirts and Stetson hats, as well as leather jackets and bags. the tannery 400 Boylston St., 617-267-0899. Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.–7 p.m. The Tannery aims to tell the story of brand name designer shoes like Dr. Martens, Minnetonka and Tory Burch season-to-season. In above photo: Scott Roberto


addition to footwear, you’ll find cuttingedge athletic equipment, apparel, accessories and outerwear. Rockport 218 Newbury St., 617-859-3127. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. This shoe company brings innovation to footwear by combining contemporary style and engineered comfort. In addition to men’s and women’s shoes, the store carries bags, belts and wallets.

Clothing Ball and Buck 144 Newbury St., 617 262 1776. Open daily 11 a.m.–8 p.m. With an eye toward American history, this menswear store carries classic clothing and accessories for the sporting gentleman. From versatile cotton button-downs to branded camo Croakies, the selection is unapologetically all-American. Chanel 6 Newbury St., 617-859-0055. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Modeled after Coco Cha-

nel’s Paris apartment, the 10,000-squarefoot, two-story Chanel boutique features a series of rooms where shoppers can browse the House’s iconic handbags, jewelry and accessories. Upstairs, you’ll find ready-to-wear and shoes along with luxe fitting rooms and a suite. Flock 274 Shawmut Ave., 617-391-0222. Tue–Sat 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. A slice of West Coast style in Boston’s South End, the selection at this modern bohemian clothing boutique is colorful, funky and free-spirited. Ibex Boston 303 Newbury St., 857-277-1932. Mon–Sat 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun ’til 6 p.m. Ibex offers highend natural fiber wool garments—durable, evolving, active and modern tops, bottoms and accessories for men and women. Johnny Cupcakes 279 Newbury St., 617-375-0100. Mon–Thu 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Fri ’til 8 p.m., Sat & Sun 10 a.m.–7 p.m. This kitschy national chain dispenses unique, limited edition graphic

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Newbury Street

Newbury Street is a world-famous destination. Lined with 19th century brownstones housing fabulous boutiques, spas and restaurants, you’ll find both high-end and reasonably priced establishments. Warmer days draw visitors and locals here to shop, dine or enjoy a leisurely stroll. In the evening, Newbury Street greets a chic nightlife crowd with energetic bars and stylish lounges.

Find your family story with NEHGS. Imagine what you’ll discover! Save $5 right now. 99 Newbury St. americanancestors.org

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John Lewis

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Sumptuous, breathtaking jewelry designed and hand-made by John Lewis. 97 Newbury St. 800-266-4101 johnlewisinc.com

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unch

Lunch,Dinner,Br Custom-made smoothies, healthy muffins, breads, snacks and supplements.

269 Newbury St. 840 plates, 617-267-0 Specializing in small

Fine contemporary indoor akiboston ramen, sushi, sake, Japanese .com and outdoor sculpture in www.itad beers and whiskeys. an array of styles.

314 Newbury St. 617-236-4443 smoothieking.com

269 Newbury St. 617-267-0840 itadakiboston.com

211 Newbury St. 617-927-4400 lattitudegallery.com

OUR 3 HEARTS & SOLES

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Boston’s finest retail and exhibition galleries for contemporary craft.

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shopping T-shirts and other street-wise apparel and accessories featuring the beloved cupcake. Known for its daring designs, funky décor and fashionable yet functional look, Johnny Cupcakes serves up the very sweetest in high-style duds. Life Is Good 285 Newbury St., 617-262-5068. Daily 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Brothers Bert and John Jacobs are spreading their infectious optimism with Life Is Good, which carries everything from apparel for men, women and kids, to Frisbees, beach towels, jewelry and even accessories for pets emblazoned with LIG’s distinctive stick figures. Louis 60 Northern Ave., 617-262-6100. Mon–Wed 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Thu–Sat ’til 7 p.m., Sun 11:30 a.m.–5 p.m. This Boston institution brings high fashion to the Seaport District, offering upscale men’s and women’s clothing, bed and bath items and fine home accessories. marshalls 500 Boylston St., 617262-6066: Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun inside Tip: Based in the Boston 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; 350 area, Marshalls Washington St., Downwas founded in town Crossing, 617the 1950s and now boasts more than 338-6205: Mon–Sat 9 900 stores in the a.m.–8:30 p.m., Sun 11 U.S. and Canada. a.m.–8 p.m. With its mantra “Brand-name clothing for less,” this discount retailer is a bargain hunter’s dream. From Ralph Lauren to Calvin Klein, Marshalls features designer duds for men, women and children. Mint Julep 1302 Beacon St., 617-232-3600: Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun ’til 6 p.m.; 6 Church St., Cambridge, 617-576-6468: Mon–Wed 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Thu–Sat ’til 8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. This popular women’s boutique stocks local and international clothing and accessories at an affordable pricepoint. serenella 134 Newbury St., 617-262-5568. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m. A sharp, sophisticated and selective array of fashion’s current trends and influences. Find designers like Balmain, Emilio Pucci, Rochas and Vionnet. 32

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Uniform 511 Tremont St., 617-247-2360. Tue & Wed 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Thu–Sat ’til 8 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. One of the best shops in the city for contemporary, casual menswear. Find cutting edge fashions from such distributors as Penguin, Converse and Ben Sherman, as well as a range of skin care accessories, all at this South End staple.

Gifts & Souvenirs Newbury Comics 332 Newbury St., 617-236-4930. Mon–Thu 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 11 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; 36 JFK St. (Garage Mall), Cambridge, 617-491-0337; North Market Building, Faneuil Hall Marketplace, 617-2489992. You’ll have a “wicked good time” at this upstart local chain, which carries import, indie and major label releases, as well as T-shirts, comics and other pop culture kitsch items. Teddy Ballgame’s 1 South Station, 617-330-1230. Located at the South Station concierge desk, Teddy Ballgame’s offers tours of Boston that leave from South Station, a wide variety of Red Sox souvenirs, T-shirts and books about the history of Boston.

Gourmet Food & Beverage Bee’s knees Supply Co. 12 Farnsworth St., 617-292-BEES. Mon–Fri 8 a.m.–9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun ’til 6 p.m. Located in South Boston’s Fort Point neighborhood, this gourmet market includes a cafe, chocolate shop, wine and beer shop, floral center, housewares and more. Boston Olive Oil Company 262 Newbury St., 857277-0007. Sun–Fri 11 inside Tip: a.m.–6 p.m., Sat ’til 7 This family-owned shop is Boston’s p.m. Sample more than first balsamic 50 varieties of the finvinegar and extra est extra virgin olive virgin olive oil oils grown and pressed tasting bar. by small artisans and farmers from around the world, and balsamic vinegars harvested and imported from Modena, Italy at this Back Bay store’s unique Tasting Bar.


FORMAGGIO KITCHEN

You’ll find produce and menus reflecting the changing New England seasons at this gourmand’s paradise. Browse unique wines, fresh truffles and, at the Cambridge location, the infamous cheese caves. 268 Shawmut Ave., 617-350-6996; 244 Huron Ave., Cambridge, 617-354-4750. Mon–Fri 9 a.m.–7 p.m., Sat ’til 6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Smoothie King 314 Newbury St., 617-236-4443. Mon–Sat 7 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.–7 p.m. Find nutritional smoothies custom-made with the finest natural fruits, fruit juices, proteins and vitamins, as well as healthy muffins, breads, snacks and supplements.

Health & Beauty Follain 53 Dartmouth St., 857-284-7078. Tue–Sat 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. Located just a few blocks from Back Bay Station, this cozy cosmetics company specializes in all-natural (and often local) products from brands like Farmaesthetics, Baudelaire and Jamela.

Feed your fashion! Corner it!

Eat, shop & be happy! The Corner Mall Food Court is your go-to place for a tasty bite where you can get in and out quickly. There’s something for everyone – from Bourbon Street Café, Sarku Japan and Salsa’s Mexican Grill to McDonald’s, Dunkin’ Donuts and Subway… and lots more! Plus, tons of great shopping possibilities. Corner it at The Corner Mall. In the heart of Boston at the corner of Winter & Washington Streets.

thecornermall.com

Home Goods Acquire Boutique 61 Salem St., 617-362-7380. Mon 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Tue–Fri ’til 7 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. Tucked among the Italian restaurants of the North End, Acquire is a haven for design aficionados, offering everything from repurposed antique furniture to handcrafted jewelry and delicate glassware. Hudson 12 Union Park St., 617-292-0900. Mon– Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m. This beloved South End boutique carries furniture, accessories, textiles and more that blend the best of classic New England style with laid-back California cool. Twelve Chairs 581 Tremont St., 617-982-6136. Tue–Fri 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat noon–6 p.m. Run by above photo: Derek Kouyoumjian

Located in South Station

T-Shirts/Souvenirs/Trolley Tours

617-330-1230

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shopping interior designers, this well-edited shop focuses on sustainable, beautiful products that tell a story.

Jewelry/Accessories Lux Bond & Green 416 Boylston St., 617-266-4747. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat ’til 5 p.m. Since 1898, Lux Bond & Green has provided its customers with diamonds, gold jewelry, watches and giftware from around the world. The store offers a corporate gift division, bridal and gift registry, a full-service repair department, gift certificates and gift wrapping. Sidney Thomas Jewelers The Shops at Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617-262-0925. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; The Mall at Chestnut Hill, 617-965-5300. Sat 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. A thrilling experience in luxury awaits at Sidney Thomas Jewelers, which offers the world’s most beautiful jewelry and watches, coveted designer brands and magnificent one-ofa-kind pieces along with world-renowned, impeccable service and presentation.

Malls/Shopping Centers Copley Place Copley Square, 617-262-6600. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. This shopping mecca features more than 100 upscale stores, including Neiman Marcus, Tiffany & Co., Armani and Williams-Sonoma, and fine restaurants like Legal Sea Foods that offer shoppers numerous dining options. To receive a free Ultimate Shopping Excursions card, stop by one of the customer service kiosks.

The Corner Mall

In step with your lifestyle and just steps away, this shopping center boasts more than 20 stores and eateries—including favorites like Skechers USA, Champs, Bath & Body Works, plus an international food court with Thai Accent, Salsa’s Mexican Grill, Dunkin’ Donuts and more. Easily reached by the MBTA or commuter rail. Corner of Winter and Washington streets.

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Faneuil Hall Marketplace 617-523-1300, faneuilhallmarketplace.com. Walk through history and experience New England’s premier visitor destination. Shop more than 75 locally loved boutiques and specialty pushcarts, taste wonderfully diverse ethnic foods in the Quincy Market Colonnade or dine in one of 13 full-service restaurants. The Shops at Prudential Center 800 Boylston St., 800-SHOP-PRU. Mon– Sat 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. The Shops at Prudential Center features more than 75 stores and restaurants including The Cheesecake Factory, Saks Fifth Avenue, Ann Taylor and Barnes & Noble. It’s also a launch spot for the city’s renowned tourist attraction, the Boston Duck Tours. Terminal C Shops at Boston Logan Boston Logan International Airport, Terminal C, East Boston. Whether you are grabbing a quick bite before a flight, doing some shopping or catching up with friends over dinner, Boston Logan Terminal C has everything you need for an enjoyable airport experience. Award-winning restaurants, cafes, quick service establishments and lots of local flavor make Boston Logan Terminal C the perfect place for a meal before or after a flight. Also find newsstands selling a variety of sundries and souvenirs, as well as unique specialty shops with gifts you won’t find anywhere else.

Sporting Goods City Sports 1035 Commonwealth Ave., 617-782-5121; 11 Bromfield St., 617-423-2015; 480 Boylston St., 617-267-3900; 44 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617-492-6000; other locations. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–9:30 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; hours vary by location. City Sports sells athletic apparel by top brands like Nike, Adidas and Puma, as well as sporting equipment for all interests, and footwear from Saucony, Reebok and others. Nike Boston 200 Newbury St., 617-267-3400. Mon– Sat 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–7 p.m. This recently renovated temple to the Nike franchise proffers all things Nike, including footwear, apparel, equipment and accessories. above photo: Derek Kouyoumjian


cambridge PANO PICK

Mount Auburn Cemetery

Founded in 1831 by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mount Auburn was the first landscaped cemetery in the country. Many prominent Americans are buried here, including Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Isabella Stewart Gardner and Winslow Homer. The cemetery is also an arboretum, sculpture garden and wildlife sanctuary. 580 Mount Auburn St., 617-547-7105, mountauburn.org. Daily 8 a.m.–7 p.m.

Sights of Interest Cambridge Common/ Old Burying Ground Massachusetts Avenue and Garden Street. A grazing pasture and cemetery for Puritan Newtowne, as well as a favorite meeting spot for public figures and a tent site for the Continental Army. Early college presidents and town residents were buried in “God’s Acre” across from the Common.

University, historic buildings, cafes, restaurants and shops. Tory Row (Brattle Street) One of the nation’s most beautiful residential streets, Tory Row is the site of Loyalist mansions and their elegant neighbors from nearly every period of early American architecture.

Entertainment

Christ Church Zero Garden St., 617-876-0200, cccam bridge.org. Offices open Mon–Fri 9 a.m.– 4 p.m. Call for services. This 1761 Tory house of worship was utilized as a Colonial barracks during the American Revolution.

The Brattle Theatre 40 Brattle St., Harvard Square, 617-8766837, brattlefilm.org. $9.75; students & matinees $7.75; seniors & children (under 12) $6.75. Classic, cutting-edge and world cinema with double features almost every day.

Harvard and Radcliffe Yards Located within Harvard Campus. The centers of two institutions that have played major educational roles since Harvard’s founding in 1636.

Club Passim 47 Palmer St., Harvard Square, 617-4927679, passim.org. Call for full schedule. June 25 at 7 p.m.—Jonah Tolchin, $15; June 26 at 8 p.m.—Caitlin Canty, $15; June 28 at 3:30, 7 and 10 p.m.—Ellis Paul, $15 & 35; June 29 at 8 p.m.—Anne Heaton, $20; July 7 at 8 p.m.—The Murphy Beds, $15; July 12 at 8 p.m.—Jon Butcher, $25.

Harvard Square/Old Cambridge The center of Cambridge activity since the 17th century, the square is home to Harvard

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cambridge The Comedy Studio at the Hong Kong 1238 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, 617-661-6507, thecomedystudio.com. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.; shows begin at 8 p.m. $10 & 12. Located on the third floor of the Hong Kong restaurant, The Comedy Studio hosts cutting-edge headliners and up-andcoming comedians. ImprovBoston 40 Prospect St., Central Square, 617-5761253, improvboston.com. Performances: Wed–Sun. $5–18. Enjoy improv sketch comedy, stand-up shows, original music and audience participation for all ages. The Middle East 472 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, 617-864-EAST, mideastclub.com. Whether Upstairs, Downstairs or in the Corner, this club showcases the best in alternative and indie rock bands. July 3 at 8 p.m.—The American Symphony of Soul, $10; July 10 at 7 p.m.—Moufy, $15; July 11 at 9:30 p.m.— Township, $10; July 18 at 8 p.m.—The Timberfakes (Boston’s Justin Timberlake Tribute), $15. Regattabar Third floor of The Charles Hotel, 1 Bennett St., 617-661-5000, regattabarjazz.com. Regattabar is the leading jazz club in New England, showcasing performers rarely seen in the Hub. June 25 at 7:30 p.m.—Human Feel, $25; June 26 at 7:30 p.m.—Sadao Watanabe, $30; June 27 at 7:30 p.m.— Lookie Lookie, $18; July 2 at 7:30 p.m.— Mario Castro Quintet, $15; July 9 at 7:30 p.m.—Youngjoo Song, $20; July 11 at 7:30 and 10 p.m.—Paquito D’Rivera, $25; July 18 at 7:30 p.m.—Scott Feiner & Pandeiro, $16; July 19 at 7:30 and 10 p.m.—NRBQ, $25. T.T. the Bear’s Place 10 Brookline St., Central Square. 617-492BEAR, ttthebears.com. Cover: $8–15. The nightclub features national and local bands seven nights a week. June 27 at 8:30 p.m.— Walter Sickert & theArmy of Broken Toys, $10; July 13 at 8:30 p.m.—Twin Forks (featuring Chris Carrabba), $15.

Theater CASSANDRA SPEAKS The Nora Theatre Company, Central Square Theater, 450 Massachusetts Ave., Cam36

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bridge, 866-811-4111. Through June 29. $15–42. In June 1943, amidst last minute wedding-day preparations, Dorothy Thompson—a groundbreaking journalist recognized by Time magazine in 1938 as the most influential woman in America after Eleanor Roosevelt—reflects on her triumphs and failures. Acclaimed actress Tod Randolph portrays the journalistic icon in this passionate and funny play by Norman Plotkin. The Donkey Show American Repertory Theater, Oberon, 2 Arrow St., 617-495-2668, cluboberon.com. Ongoing. Performances: Sat at 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. $25 & 45. Bringing the ultimate disco experience to Boston, this crazy circus of mirrorballs, feathered divas, roller skaters and hustlers tells the story of A Midsummer Night’s Dream through great ’70s club anthems.

Museums & Galleries Harvard Museum of Natural History 26 Oxford St., 617-495-3045, hmnh.harvard. edu. Daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $12; seniors & students $10; children (3–18) $8. As Harvard’s most visited attraction, the museum features exhibits ranging from mammals, fish and dinosaurs to minerals, gems and meteorites. Special exhibits: Final Flight: The Extinction of the Passenger Pigeon; Mollusks: Shelled Masters of the Marine Realm; Thoreau’s Maine Woods: A Journey in Photographs with Scot Miller. MIT List Visual Arts Center 20 Ames St., 617-253-4680, listart.mit.edu. Tue, Wed & Fri–Sun noon–6 p.m., Thu noon– 8 p.m. Free admission. One of the area’s premier showcases for contemporary art, the List Center presents works from the world’s leading contemporary artists through their changing exhibitions. Special exhibits: through July 13—9 Artists; beginning July 15—List Projects: Sergei Tcherepnin. The MIT Museum 265 Massachusetts Ave., 617-253-5927, web.mit.edu/museum. Daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $8.50; children, seniors & students $4; children (under 5) free. Exhibits welcome visitors into the world of MIT to discover the potential of science and technology. Special exhibits: 5,000 Moving Parts; Inventions: 2014 Student Showcase;


Daguerre’s American Legacy: Photographic Portraits (1840–1900) from the Wm. B. Becker Collection. Peabody museum of Archaeology and ethnology 11 Divinity Ave., 617-496-1027, peabody. harvard.edu. Daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $12; seniors & students $10; children (3–18) $8. From towering Native American totem poles and large Mayan sculptures to precious artifacts of the ancient world, the Peabody Museum is among the oldest archaeological and ethnographic museums in the world.

There’s something for everyone! • Greek specialties • Breakfast is served all day! MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 7:30 AM TO 10:00 PM SUNDAY 8:00 AM TO 9:00 PM

1105 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge • 617-495-0055

Dining Refer to Dining, page 64, for key to restaurant symbols.

THE ASGARD IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT

Communal tables and a variety of cool, comfortable places to sit— along with an extensive menu, a large craft beer selection, outdoor patio, live music, trivia nights, DJs and no cover charge—make the Asgard a perfect spot for a pint and a meal. 350 Massachusetts Ave., Central Square, 617-577-9100, classicirish. com. Sat & SB. L, D, C. $

Unbeatable Harvard clothing and gift selection. Four floors of books for all ages. 1400 Massachusetts Ave. 617-499-2000 www.thecoop.com

Dante Royal Sonesta, 40 Edwin H. Land Blvd., 617-497-4200, restaurantdante.com. Dante de Magistris serves playful, rich Mediterranean-influenced fare as diners savor great views of the Charles River and the Boston skyline. B, L, D, Sat & SB. $$$$ Dolphin Seafood 1105 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, 617-661-2937, dolphinseafood.com. This neighborhood stalwart serves up fresh and delicious fried seafood platters as well as healthier options like swordfish and all varieties of shellfish. L, D. $$ the friendly toast 1 Kendall Square b3101, 617-621-1200, the friendlytoast.com. Dig in to an all-day brunch menu at this retro-inspired, cozy, kitschy Cambridge joint. Heavy on the friendly, they commit to sourcing from local above photo: Derek Kouyoumjian

Get Social with Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Facebook.com/PanoramaMagazineBoston Twitter.com/PanoramaBoston

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cambridge farms and offer plenty of vegetarian and vegan dining options. B, L, D. BR, SB, C $$ Henrietta’s Table The Charles Hotel, One Bennett St., Harvard Square, 617-661-5005, henriettastable.com. Locally grown and organic produce is used to create a lively, textured menu of reinterpreted New England classics. Private dining room available. B, L, D, Sat & SB. $$$ Hong Kong 1238 Massachusetts Ave., Harvard Square, 617-864-5311, hongkongharvard.com. A local favorite for more than five decades, this eatery serves a full array of classic Chinese dishes and exotic drinks, including its world-renowned scorpion bowl. Perfect for a meal with friends, late-night snacks or dancing on the weekends. $ Hungry Mother 233 Cardinal Medeiros Ave., 617-499-0090, hungrymothercambridge.com. Chef Barry Maiden churns out Southern-inspired cuisine at this Kendall Square favorite. The menu changes daily, with specials like cornmeal-crusted catfish and boiled Virginia peanuts. D, C. $$ Nubar Sheraton Commander Hotel, 16 Garden St., Harvard Square, 617-234-1365, nubarcam bridge.com. This restaurant and lounge offers New England-style cuisine in a fresh, modern setting and casual atmosphere. B, L, D, SB. $$$ Rialto Charles Hotel, One Bennett St, Harvard Square, 617-661-5050, rialto-restaurant. com. James Beard Award-winning chef Jody Adams explores the flavors of Italy, France and Spain at this highly acclaimed Harvard Square restaurant. Stop by on Monday nights for dollar oysters. D. $$$$ Russell House Tavern 14 JFK St., Harvard Square, 617-500-3055, russellhousecambridge.com. Executive Chef Thomas Borgia’s menu is seasonally inspired, interpreting American classics with a modern flair. The bar serves all-American wines, local crafts beers and hand-crafted cocktails. L, D, SB, LS, C. $$$ Zephyr on the Charles Hyatt Regency Cambridge, Kendall Square, 575 Memorial Drive, 617-441-6510. This res38

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taurant serves a traditional menu of local favorites—including seared scallops and Maine lobster—loaded with flavor and flair. B, L, D, C. $$ Zoe’s 1105 Massachusetts Inside Tip: Ave., Harvard Square, Try Zoe’s 617-495-0055, zoesdelicious Frozen Hot Chocolate. cambridge.com. This ’50s style diner offers a menu of delicious homemade Greek and American food. Serving breakfast all day, Zoe’s is a popular destination for the weekend brunch crowd. B, L, D, SB. $

Shopping Black Ink 5 Brattle St., Harvard Square, 617-4971221, blackinkboston.squarespace.com; 101 Charles St., Boston, 617-723-3883. Mon– Sat 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Funky knick-knacks and novelties ranging from sock puppets to space food can be found at this quirky shop. CambridgeSide Galleria 100 CambridgeSide Place, Lechmere Square, 617-621-8666, cambridgesidegalleria. com. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun noon– 7 p.m. This three-level mall features department stores such as Macy’s, as well as more than 100 other stores and specialty shops, including Gap, J. Crew, Aldo and more. The Garment District 200 Broadway, 617-876-5230, garmentdistrict .com. Sun–Fri 11 a.m.–8 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m. A vintage lover’s paradise, this two-level thrift warehouse sells everything from timehonored Levi’s to ’70s go-go boots. Also sift through heaping piles of By-the-Pound clothing, available for $1.50 per pound. The Harvard Coop 1400 MassachuInside Tip: setts Ave., 617-499The Coop was 2000, store.thecoop. founded by Harvard com. Mon–Sat 9 a.m.– students in 1882. 10 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.–9 p.m. America’s largest college bookstore, located in Harvard Square, offers a wide selection of official Harvard clothing, gifts and souvenirs, and four floors of books for all ages.


Map index Points of Interest African Meeting House F10 G9 Arlington Street Church Back Bay Station H8 H14 Bank of America Pavilion TD Garden D11 Berklee College of Music H7 H7 Berklee Performance Center Black Falcon Cruise Port I15 Black Heritage Trail F10 Boston Center for the Arts I9 Boston City Hall F11 Boston Common G10 Boston Convention & Exhibition Ctr. I13 Boston Design Center I15 Boston Massacre Site F11 Boston Public Library H8 Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum G12 Boston University H4 Bunker Hill Monument B11 (Charlestown map) Bunker Hill Pavilion B11 (Charlestown map) Central Burying Ground G10 Charles Playhouse H10 Charlestown Navy Yard C12 (Charlestown map) G9 Cheers Bar Children’s Museum G12 I7 Christian Science Plaza Christopher Columbus Park F12 Citgo Sign H5 Citi Performing Arts Center H10 Colonial Theatre G10 Conference Center at J2 Harvard Medical Copley Place H8 Copley Square H8 Copp’s Hill Burying Ground D12 Custom House Tower F12 Cutler Majestic Theatre G10 Downtown Crossing G11 Emerald Necklace J1–J11 Emerson College G10 Emmanuel College J4 Exchange Conference Ctr. G14 Faneuil Hall F11 Fenway Park H5 Freedom Trail - - - - - F10 Government Center F11 F11 Granary Burial Ground Harvard Stadium D1 F9 Hatch Memorial Shell Haymarket (Open-air market) E11 Horticultural Hall I7 Huntington Theatre Co./BU Theatre J7 Hynes Convention Center H7 Information Centers: Boston Common F10 Prudential Center H8 National Park Service F11 Logan Airport E16, F16 (Terminals A & E) G13 Institute of Contemporary Art International Place F12 Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum J5 JFK Federal Building E11 John Hancock Tower H9 Jordan Hall I7 Jorge Hernandez Cultural Center J8 Joseph Moakley Courthouse G13 Kenmore Square H5 Kings Chapel & Burial Ground F11 Lansdowne Street H5 Louisburg Square F9

Mary Baker Eddy Library I7 J5 Mass. College of Art Museum of African-American History F10 J6 Museum of Fine Arts Museum of Science D9 F12 New England Aquarium New England Conservatory of Music I7 H8 New Old South Church D10 North Station Northeastern University J6 Old City Hall F11 Old Corner Bookstore F11 Old North Church D12 Old South Meeting House F11 Old State House F11 The Opera House G10 Park Street Church F11 Park Street Station F11 Paul Revere House E12 Paul Revere Mall E12 Post Office Square F12 Prudential Center H8 The Public Garden (Swan Boats) G9 Quincy Market F12 Robert Gould Shaw Memorial F10 Rose Kennedy Greenway E11–E12 Rowes Wharf F12 Shubert Theatre H10 Sightseeing boats F12 Simmons College J5 South Station Information Center G12 F10 State House Suffolk University F10 I7 Symphony Hall Tip O’Neill Building D11 G10 Transportation Building Trinity Church H9 USS Constitution (Charlestown map) C12 USS Constitution Museum C12 (Charlestown map) Water Transportation Terminal G12 Wheelock College I4 G10 Wilbur Theatre World Trade Center G14

cambridge MAp Cambridge City Hall CambridgeSide Galleria Harvard Art Museum-Sackler Harvard Museum of Natural History Harvard Square Harvard University MIT

D5 D8 B3 B3 C2 B2 F6

healthcare Beth Israel Deaconess Med. Ctr. Boston Medical Center Brigham & Women’s Hosp. Children’s Hospital Dana Farber Cancer Institute Harvard School of Public Health Joslin Diabetes Center Longwood Medical area Mass. Eye & Ear Infirmary Mass. General Hospital Tufts Medical Ctr. Spaulding Rehabilitation Hosp.

J4 J9 J5 J4 J4 J5 I4 J4 E9 E9 H10 D10

Boston Marriott/Long Wharf Boston Park Plaza The Boxer Boston Charlesmark Hotel Club Quarters The Colonnade Copley Square Hotel Courtyard Boston Downtown Doubletree Club Hotel Boston Downtown Doubletree Guest Suites Eliot Suite Hotel The Fairmont Battery Wharf The Fairmont Copley Plaza XV Beacon Four Seasons Hotel Hampton Inn, Crosstown Center The Harborside Inn Hilton Boston Back Bay Hilton Boston/Financial District Holiday Inn Express & Suites Holiday Inn/Brookline Holiday Inn/Somerville Hotel Buckminster Hotel Commonwealth Hyatt Regency Boston, Financial District InterContinental Boston Hotel John Hancock Conference Center Langham Hotel, Boston Liberty Hotel Lenox Hotel Loews Boston Hotel Mandarin Oriental Boston Marriott’s Custom House The Midtown Hotel Millennium Bostonian Hotel Milner Hotel NINE ZERO Hotel Omni Parker House Onyx Hotel Revere Hotel Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel Residence Inn by Marriott on Tudor Wharf Ritz Carlton Boston Common Seaport Hotel Sheraton Boston Taj Boston W Hotel Boston Westin Hotel/Copley Place Westin Waterfront Hotel Wyndham Boston Beacon Hill

F12 G9 D10 H8 F11 H8 H8 H10 G11 E2 H6 D12 H8 F10 G10 J9 F12 H7 F12 E11 I2 B7 H5 H5 G11 G12 H9 F12 E10 H8 H9 H7 F12 I7 E11 H10 F11 F11 E11 H10 G12 C11 G10 G14 H7 G9 G10 H8 I13 E10

Cambridge Lodging Charles Hotel B1 C8 Hampton Inn/Cambridge Harvard Square Hotel C2 Hotel Marlowe C8 Hyatt Regency/Cambridge G4 Marriott/Cambridge Center E7 Radisson Hotel/Cambridge F3 Residence Inn by Marriott/Cambridge E7 Royal Sonesta D9 Sheraton Commander B2

Boston Lodging Ames Hotel Best Western Boston Best Western Roundhouse Suites Boston Harbor Hotel Boston Marriott/Copley Place

F11 I4 J9 F12 H8

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MBTA map

Fares & Passes* The MBTA offers a reusable “Charlie Card” on which riders can store value by using cash or a debit/credit card through kiosks available in all MBTA stations. A Charlie Card, which presently can only be used on the Subway and Bus lines, offers a discounted fare. Riders may also purchase single-ride Charlie Tickets and Day/Week Link Passes at these same kiosks.

Subway Fares

Commuter Rail

Day/Week LinkPass

$2.10 Charlie Card $2.65 Charlie Ticket Plus FREE subway and local bus transfers

$2.10–11.50 Price depends on distance traveled. When purchasing a ticket on a train you may be subject to a $2 surcharge during peak hours, if that station has a ticket office or contracted vendor. 

$12 for 1 day $19 for 7 days Unlimited travel on Subway, Local Bus, Inner Harbor Ferry and Commuter Rail Zone 1A. 7-Day Pass valid for 7 days from the date and time of purchase.

Bus Fares $1.60 Charlie Card Plus FREE bus transfers $3.65 Inner Express $5.25 Outer Express $2.10 Charlie Ticket $4.75 Inner Express $6.80 Outer Express 44

Panorama

Boat Fares $3.25 Inner harbor ferry $8.50 Hingham/Hull $13.75 Cross-Harbor $17 Logan Airport

MBTA Customer Support: 617-222-3200 or visit mbta.com

*rates reflect 5% fare increase effective July 1


neighborhoods Massachusetts State House

beacon hill An old-world feeling awaits you in this quaint part of the city

S

trolling along Beacon Hill’s picturesque gas-lit streets, brick sidewalks and Federal-style row houses, it’s not uncommon to feel as though you’ve travelled back in time. Both eminently posh and utterly accommodating, this area has borne witness to much of the city’s storied past. The State House—with its gleaming gold dome—sits on the peak of the hill where the beacon for which the district was named used to reside. In this neighborhood, visitors can also find the African Meeting House, which holds the Museum of African-American History, as well as the Bull and Finch Pub, the inspiration for the popular TV show, “Cheers.” Charles Street, located at the flat of the hill, is lined with boutiques, restaurants, cafes and charming hotels. Locals descend the hill daily to enjoy all that Charles Street has to offer, adding to the feeling of small-town charm.

Don’t miss • Wish wishboston.com • Figs toddenglish.com • Helen’s Leather helensleather.com • The Hungry i hungryiboston.com • Clink libertyhotel.com

ON THE Green Line to Park St. Red Line to Park St., Charles St. Blue Line to Bowdoin

COWBOY BOOTS MEN ◆ WOMEN ◆ KIDS

Lucchese ◆ Justin ◆ Nocona ◆ Tony Lama ◆ Dan Post ◆ Frye ◆ Liberty

STETSON HATS

Shirts ◆ Belts ◆ Buckles ◆ Bolo Ties Navajo Jewelry

HELEN’S LEATHER

110 Charles St., Boston, MA 617.742.2077 BOSTONGUIDE.COM

45


neighborhoods

The Back Bay skyline at night

Back Bay This famous neighborhood is truly the hub of the Hub

E

xquisite architecture and world-class retailers are plentiful in Boston’s most well-known neighborhood. The Victorian brick and brownstone residences that line the streets are not only beautiful, they’re widely regarded as the best-preserved examples of 19th-century urban design in the United States. Newbury and Boylston streets, where luxury shops vie for space amidst outstanding restaurants, welcome visitors and residents alike. Back Bay is also home to the iconic Prudential Tower, Trinity Church, Boston Public Library, the John Hancock Tower and two sprawling shopping malls connected by a climate-controlled bridge. You’ll also find standout salons, spas, antique shops and galleries throughout. Nightlife thrives in Back Bay as well, where chic hotel bars, world-class restaurants and swanky lounges abound.

46

Panorama

Don’t miss •J  asper White’s Summer Shack summershack restaurant.com • Top of the Hub topofthehub.net • Kings kingsbowlamerica. com

ON THE Orange Line to Back Bay Green Line to Arlington, Copley or Hynes Convention Center


any size cone or cup

December 31, 2014

3 BOSTON LOCATIONS 174 Newbury St. 617-536-5456 Shops at the Prudential Ctr. 617-266-0767 20 Park Plaza 617-426-0890 HARVARD SQUARE IN THE GARAGE 36 J.F.K. St. 617-864-2828

welcome ctr qtr page psa:Layout 1

11/18

what to do where to go what to see

presented by

Adjacent to the Skybridge connecting to The Westin Hotel BOSTONGUIDE.COM

47


neighborhoods

Old North Church

NORTH END

Fabulous cuisine, shopping and history are abundant in Boston’s Little Italy

I

talian culture reigns in the North End, Boston’s oldest and busiest neighborhood. The sweet scent of fresh cannoli rises from countless Italian bakeries that populate this district’s narrow cobblestone streets, while the veritable buffet of dining choices will have you wishing there were more than three meals to enjoy in a day. Recently, clothing and home decor boutiques have been setting up shop here, making the North End an even more diverse and desirable destination. Don’t even try to find a parking space—it’s best to hop on the T or walk. If you happen to be strolling The Freedom Trail, you’ll discover three of the North End’s most important historical sites: The Paul Revere House, Copp’s Hill Burying Ground and the Old North Church. Summertime brings people into the streets to celebrate various Italian feasts with music, socializing and, of course, sensational food.

48

Panorama

Don’t miss •C  antina Italiana cantinaitaliana.com • Lucca luccaboston.com • Massimino’s massiminosboston. com • Terramia terramiaristorante. com • Ristorante Fiore ristorantefiore.com

ON THE Orange Line or Green Line to Haymarket

Above photo: Spirit of America/Shutterstock


NORTH END Shopping

Boston’s Most Traditional Italian

Antico Forno

Once known strictly for its assortment of Italian restaurants and bakeries, the North End has leapt boldly into the 21st century as one of the city’s up-and-coming retail districts. MICHELE TOPOR/ NORTH END MARKET TOUR Take a culinary tour into the food traditions of Boston’s “Little Italy.” Learn cooking secrets, benchmark flavors and how to select authentic ingredients. bostonfood tours.com

BOSTON OS O TOURS OU S

93 Salem St., North End 617-723-6733 www.AnticoFornoBoston.com

BOSTON’S BEST ITALIAN

The Godfather’s 1939 Cadillac 8 passenger Limousine

See Boston up close and personal, while our drivers narrate Boston’s history, as we drive down Boston’s narrow side streets.Tours range from 11/2 to 21/2 hours. Prices as low as $30. FREE BOSTON AREA PICK UP AND DROP OFF!

www.Antique-Limousine.com

617-309-6414 Above photo: Margarita Polivtseva

98 Salem St., North End 617-523-3112 www.TerramiaRistorante.com BOSTONGUIDE.COM

49


neighborhoods

Downtown’s Theatre District has transformed into a vibrant shopping, dining and nightlife destination

Downtown City life at its best, where everything is within walking distance

I

n the heart of Boston, Downtown is where it’s happening. Both a local and international hub, Downtown Boston boasts a wide range of attractions, hotels, historic architecture, residential living, unique retail shops and cultural, dining and entertainment options, all within a half-mile radius. Downtown intersects with the historic Theatre District, in which award-winning architectural treasures were restored to their original glory. The Ladder District is a growing entertainment hub known for its popular restaurants and nightlife. Downtown Crossing is the area’s retail center, with an eclectic mix of shopping options, including New England’s largest Jewelers District and Macy’s Boston flagship store. The popular Freedom Trail courses through the area, while the Financial District, an economic engine for the city, showcases a wealth of modern architecture, as well as the acclaimed Post Office Square Park.

Don’t miss •T  en Thousand Villages boston.tenthousand villages.com • The Oceanaire theoceanaire.com • Salvatore’s Theatre District salvatores restaurants.com

ON THE Orange Line or Red Line to Downtown Crossing Green Line or Red Line to Park St.

BOSTONGUIDE.COM

51


sightseeing PANO PICK

Boston AthenÆum

One of the oldest and most distinguished private libraries in the United States, the Athenæum was founded in 1807. For nearly half a century, it was the unchallenged center of intellectual life in Boston, and by 1851 it had become one of the five largest libraries in the country. Special exhibit: Collecting for the Boston Athenæum in the 21st Century: Rare Books and Manuscripts 10½ Beacon St., 617-227-0270. Mon–Wed 9 a.m.–8 p.m., Thu & Fri ’til 5:30 p.m., Sat ’til 4 p.m. Art & Architecture tours: Tue & Thu at 3 p.m. Reservations required.

Cruises Boston Harbor Cruises Depart from Long Wharf, 617-227-4321. Call or visit bostonharborcruises.com for full schedule and ticket prices. A fixture on Boston Harbor since 1926, this operator offers a variety of tours and ferry services, including sunset and historic sightseeing cruises and trips to Salem and the Boston Harbor Islands. charles riverboat company Depart from Lechmere Canal Park at CambridgeSide Galleria, Cambridge, 617-6213001. Call or visit charlesriverboat.com for full schedule and ticket prices. Enjoy 60-minute sightseeing tours of Boston and Cambridge along the Charles River, or venture out into Boston Harbor for a view of the city. Private charters also available. Massachusetts Bay Lines Depart from Rowes Wharf, 617-542-8000. Call or visit massbaylines.com for full schedule and ticket prices. Take in the Boston skyline and such historic sights as the Charlestown Navy Yard and the USS Con52

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sitution while on a 50-minute sightseeing tour of Boston Harbor. Specialty cruises and private charters are also available.

Sights of Interest Arnold Arboretum 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, 617-524-1718. Grounds open year-round from sunrise to sunset. Free admission. Visitor Center open Thu–Tue 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Horticultural Library open Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–3:45 p.m. This 265acre tree sanctuary designed by Emerald Necklace architect Frederick Law Olmsted opened in 1872. Now a National Historic Landmark, the arboretum and its gardens contain more than 7,000 varieties of trees, shrubs and flowers for your perusal. Boston Harbor Islands 617-223-8666, bostonharborislands.org; ferry tickets: bostonharborcruises.com. Islands accessible by daily ferries: Georges, Spectacle, Peddocks, Bumpkin, Grape and Lovells. The Boston Harbor Islands National Park area features 34 islands encompassing 1,600 acres and 35 miles of coastline all within 10 miles of downtown Boston. Hiking


sightseeing trails, beaches, ranger-led tours, camping, kayaking, nature walks, historic sites and free daily programs are just minutes away by ferry. Explore the beauty, tranquility, history and outdoor activities that await you. Boston Public Garden Bordered by Arlington, Charles, Beacon and Boylston streets. Open daily dawn to dusk. Established in 1837, the Public Garden is the nation’s first public botanical garden. Its 24 acres are filled with scenic and diverse greenery, as well as sculptures, including one that commemorates the popular children’s book Make Way for Ducklings. Other fixtures include the Lagoon—home to the famed Swan Boats from April through September—and the world’s smallest suspension bridge. Boston Public Library 700 Boylston St., Copley Square, 617-5365400. Mon–Thu 9 a.m.–9 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 5 p.m., Sun 1–5 p.m. Free admission. Art & Architecture tours: Mon at 2:30 p.m.; Tue & Thu at 6 p.m.; Wed, Fri & Sat at 11 a.m. The first publicly supported municipal library in the world hosts one million visitors a year, who come to view this architectural masterpiece and its collection of more than five million books. Film festivals, exhibits and children’s programs run throughout the year. Special exhibits: City of Neighborhoods: The Changing Face of Boston; The Soul of a Man: Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Slave Revolt. Boston Tea party ships & Museum Congress Street Bridge, 855-832-1773, bostonteapartyship.com. Daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $25; seniors, students & military $22; children (4–12) $15; children (3 and under) free. The Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum is dedicated to accurately reliving the famous event of December 16, 1773. With a new state-of-the-art museum and authentic replica ships (the Beaver and the Eleanor), the attraction invites visitors to travel back in time to learn and experience the courageous acts of those who forever shaped the course of history. The First Church of Christ, Scientist 210 Massachusetts Ave., 617-450-2000. Free tours of The Mother Church Tue noon–4 p.m., Wed 1–4 p.m., Thu–Sat noon–5 p.m. and Sun 11 a.m.–3 p.m., every half hour. 54

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Services: Sun at 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. The original Mother Church built in 1894 is at the heart of the Christian Science Center, situated on 14 acres in the Back Bay. The Romanesque structure is made from New Hampshire granite with stained glass windows illustrating Biblical events. Forest Hills Cemetery 95 Forest Hills Ave., Jamaica Plain, 617-5240128. Open daily from dawn to dusk. Created in 1848, this cemetery serves as the final resting place of Eugene O’Neill, Anne Sexton, e.e. cummings, William Lloyd Garrison and former Boston Celtic Reggie Lewis. The 275 acres also contain sculptural treasures, an arboretum and an openair museum. New England Historic Genealogical Society 99 Newbury St., 888296-3447, american inside Tip: The NEHGS, ancestors.org. Tue founded in 1848, & Thu–Sat 9 a.m.–5 boasts an eightp.m., Wed ’til 9 p.m. story library and Non-member admisarchive. sion: $15. NEHGS is the country’s leading resource for family history research. They provide knowledge, skills and understanding for anyone interested in learning about their family and its place in history. New England Holocaust Memorial Carmen Park, Congress Street near Faneuil Hall, 617-457-8755. Tours available upon request. This haunting memorial features six luminous glass towers etched with the six million prisoner numbers of those who perished in the Holocaust. Visitors can walk under the towers and read the dramatic stories of the victims and heroes of this tremendous human tragedy. Otis House Museum 141 Cambridge St., 617-994-5920. Wed–Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m., tours every half hour. Last tour at 4:30 p.m. Admission: $8; seniors $7; students & children (5–18) $4; children (under 5), Historic New England members and Boston residents free; $24 maximum per family. Built in 1796 for Harrison Gray Otis and his wife, this grand mansion is an example of high-style Federal elegance. Tours offer insight into the social, business and family life of the post-Revolution American elite.


The Skywalk Observatory at the Prudential Center 800 Boylston St., Prudential Tower, 50th floor, 617-859-0648. Daily 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Admission (including a headset audio tour of points of interest): $16; seniors & students (with college ID) $13; children (under 12) $11. Observatory may be closed due to weather conditions; please call ahead. New England’s premier observatory offers spectacular 360-degree panoramic views of the city. This unique experience is a must for all

Swan Boats

One of Boston’s oldest and most treasured traditions, these pedalpowered boats glide around the Public Garden and under the smallest suspension bridge in the world. Public Garden Lagoon, 617522-1966. Rides: Daily 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tickets: $3; seniors $2.50; children (2–15) $1.50.

Boston visitors, and boasts an audio tour, multimedia theater, the Dreams of Freedom Immigration Museum and much more. Trinity Church 206 Clarendon St., Copley Square, 617inside Tip: Trinity Church 536-0944. Sun 7 architect H.H. a.m.–7 p.m., Mon, Fri & Richardson was Sat 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Tue, born in Louisiana in 1838. Wed & Thu ’til 6 p.m. Worship services: Sun 7:45, 9 and 11:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Guided tours: $7; seniors & students (with ID) $5; children (under 16) free with an adult; call for times. Self-guided tours available Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m., Sat 9 p.m.–4 p.m., Sun 1–5 p.m. Built in 1877, this house of worship is a combination of Victorian, Gothic and French Romanesque styles and is one of the great masterpieces of American church architecture.

Tours and Trails Antique Limousine 617-309-6414. bostontours-antiquelimo. com. Tours by appointment only. Enjoy

The

first place to see

Boston See Boston like you’ve never seen it, at the Skywalk Observatory. Interesting displays including “Dreams of Freedom,” featuring the Boston immigrant experience. Informative audio tour and a theater featuring “ Wings Over Boston.” Located at The Prudential Center, 800 Boylston Street, Boston | 617-859-0648

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sightseeing historic Freedom Trail tours in a 1939 Cadillac eight-passenger limousine, just like the Godfather’s car. Get close to the sights where the trolleys and duck tours can’t. The drivers dress, speak and act the part—just don’t mess with them or you might be riding in the trunk! They’ll make you an offer you can’t refuse. Ask about their specials. Black Heritage Trail 46 Joy St., 617-725-5415. Free tours by appointment only. Call at least 24 hours in advance for reservations. Visit afroam museum.org for site descriptions. A guided tour through the north side of Beacon Hill, including the homes of politicians and entrepreneurs; the African Meeting House, built in 1806; the oldest standing house built by an African-American (1797); and the home of Lewis and Harriet Hayden, who harbored runaway slaves. Maps are available at the Museum of African-American History. Boston By Foot 617-367-2345, bostonbyfoot.org. Tickets: $12; children (6–12) $8, unless noted. Call for tour locations and times. Enjoy guided 90-minute tours highlighting the rich architecture and history of the city, led by trained volunteers. Regular tours include Heart of the Freedom Trail, Boston by Little Feet, Beacon Hill, Literary Landmarks, Road to Revolution, The Dark Side of Boston, The North End: Gateway to Boston, Victorian Back Bay and The Tipsy Tour: Dram Shops and Drunken Sailors. Special events: June 29 at 2 p.m.—Art Deco in Boston’s Financial District Tour, $15; July 3 at 6 p.m.—Adams Family in Boston Tour; July 4 at 3 p.m., July 6 at 11 a.m.—Ben Franklin: Son of Boston Tour; July 4 at 9 a.m.—Footloose on the Freedom Trail Tour (three hours), $20; July 5 at 2 p.m.—Charlestown: Where Boston Began Tour; July 5 at 11 a.m.—Johnny Tremain’s Boston Tour, $10; July 12 at 2 p.m.—Harvard Yard Tour, $15; July 17 at 6 p.m.—Brahmins of the Back Bay: Notable and Notorious Tour, $15. Boston Irish Heritage Trail Various sites Downtown and in the Back Bay, 617-696-9880, irishheritagetrail.com. Maps available at Boston Common and Prudential Center Visitor Information Centers. This self-guided, three-mile walking tour covers 300 years of history, 56

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taking you through Boston’s downtown, North End, Beacon Hill and Back Bay neighborhoods. Learn about famous politicians, artists and war heroes, and the Boston Irish’s rich tradition of rebellion, leadership and triumph. Boston Upper Deck Trolley Tours 617-742-1440. Tours depart daily from 9 a.m.–5 p.m. approximately every 15 minutes; schedule is subject to change, visit bostonupperdecktrolleytours.com or call ahead for availability. Tickets can be purchased aboard trolleys or at various locations throughout the city. One-Day Tickets (Boston Loop Only): $29.52; seniors & students $23.81; children (3–11) $14.29; children (under 3) free; Premium value tickets: $39.05; military, seniors & students $35.24; children (3–11) $20; children (under 3) free. Boston’s upper deck “Green” and eco-conscious trolley fleet provides superior views as you tour Boston’s historic sights in comfort. This 2.5 hour loop covers more than 100 points of interest, including the North End, the USS Constitution, Back Bay and Boston Common. As a bonus for premium value ticket holders, connect with Super Tours’ Cambridge loop, which takes visitors to Harvard and Central squares. All of this, plus a free second day on the trolley, a free Super Duck Harbor Splash Tour and your choice of free admission to a Charles Riverboat Cruise, the Old South Meeting House, Harvard Museum of Natural History, MIT Museum or Institute of Contemporary Art makes this comprehensive tour one of Boston’s best values for visitors. Custom House Tower 3 McKinley Square, 617-310-6300. Obserinside Tip: vation deck tours daily, The Custom House Tower was the except Fri, at 2 p.m.; tallest building tickets: $3. Tours may in Boston until be cancelled due to its height was exceeded by that weather conditions; of the Prudential call ahead. Boston’s Tower in 1964. first skyscraper stands high over Boston Harbor as one of the city’s most impressive landmarks. Crowned by its distinctive clock tower and restored with modern luxuries, the building (operated by the Marriott Corporation) epitomizes the preservation of Boston’s historic architecture.


Fenway Park Tours

This tour offers an inside look at America’s oldest active Major League ballpark, including a visit to the top of the famed “Green Monster” and stories from Red Sox history. 4 Yawkey Way, 617-226-6666. Tours leave daily, every hour on the hour, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Tickets: $17; seniors $14; children (3–15), students & military personnel $12. Tours originate at the Souvenir Store located on Yawkey Way across from Service Gate D, rain or shine.

The Freedom Trail Foundation’s Freedom Trail Players 617-357-8300. Tours depart hourly from 11 a.m.–noon. Tickets: $13; seniors & students $11; children (12 and under) $7; call for private tours. Explore the Freedom Trail with costumed actors portraying famous patriots such as James Otis, Abigail Adams and William Dawes in this 90-minute tour. Stops include Park Street Church, the Boston Massacre Site, the Old State House and Faneuil Hall.

Historic Pub Crawl BosTix Booth, Faneuil Hall, 617-357-8300. Reservations required. Tue at 5:30 p.m. Tickets: $43. The Freedom Trail Foundation’s 18th-century costumed guide takes you on a tour of Boston’s historic pubs where treasonous events were hatched more than 250 years ago. Enjoy plenty of beer and light fare along the way. The Kennedy Tour of Boston 617-710-0603, inside Tip: departing from Boston The tour pays Common. Wed–Sat at homage to Rose 11:30 a.m. Tickets: $12; Kennedy who was seniors, military & stumother to three U.S. Senators, dents $10, children (12 two war heroes, and under) free. Visit an Ambassador the Boston sites and to Ireland, a U.S. Attorney General landmarks that played and a President of a significant role in the United States. John F. Kennedy’s rise to political power, including: the Omni Parker House, where JFK announced his bid for Congress and proposed to Jacqueline Bouvier; the JFK statue on the State House lawn; and JFK’s Senate headquarters on Kilby Street.

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sightseeing North End Market Tour 617-523-6032. Three-hour tours: Wed & Sat at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., Fri at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Reservations required. Custom tours for groups available. Tickets: $54. Michele Topor, an authority on Italian cuisine and culture, hosts walking tours through one of the nation’s oldest Italian-American communities. Old Boston Tours 800-989-3370. Visit oldbostontours.com for full schedule. Reservations required. Tickets: $18. Learn about Boston while seeing sights both famous and obscure as you walk the North End Secret Tour. Tours are led by local historians and reveal things you never imagined about the Hub. Old Town Trolley Tours of Boston 617-221-7616. Tours depart daily every 20 minutes from 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Tickets: $65.95; seniors & students $60.85; children (4–12) $34.95; children (3 and under) free. With 16 stops throughout the city, including the New England Aquarium, Fenway Park, USS Consti­tution Museum and the Trolley Stop Store at South Charles and Boylston streets, patrons enjoy a 110-minute, fully narrated sightseeing tour of more than 100 points of interest aboard the orange-andgreen, all-weather trolley. On Location Tours 866-982-2114. Visit onlocationtours.com for online booking. Experience the city of Boston the way Tinseltown has through such films as The Town, Good Will Hunting, The Departed and others. The 180-minute Lights Camera Boston! Bus Tour (Sat & Sun

Samuel Adams Brewery Tour: Drink in a Little History

Learn about the art of brewing beer and taste rich malts and spicy hops on this tour of the original Samuel Adams brewery. 30 Germania St., Jamaica Plain, 617368-5080. Tours begin approximately every 45 minutes, Mon–Thu & Sat 10 a.m.–3 p.m., Fri ’til 5:30 p.m. One-hour tours include samples (ID required). Tickets: $2 donation to a local charity. Call for special events and closings.

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at 11 a.m.; tickets: $40) take cinema buffs to television and movie filming locations in Boston and Cambridge, sharing trivia about Hollywood. SOUTH STATION TOURS Summer Street and Atlantic Avenue. Onehour tours every Thu and the first Sat of every month at 1 p.m. Free admission. This free tour of Boston’s South Station focuses on its colorful history and impressive architecture. No pre-registration required. Meet at the station’s concierge desk. super Duck tours Departing from Charlestown Navy inside Tip: Yard, 877-34-DUCKS, This is the only bostonsupertours. amphibious tour in Boston that goes com. Tours: Daily at into Boston Harbor. 1 and 3 p.m. Tickets: $33.33; seniors & students $29.52; children (3–11) $21.90; children (under 3) $11.43. This 90-minute tour departs from Charlestown Navy Yard, and offers a free shuttle to and from the New England Aquarium area. Boston’s newest amphibious tour takes visitors on a narrated waterfront journey through the streets of Boston, which suddenly turns into a nautical adventure when the bus becomes a boat and plunges boldly into Boston Harbor. urban adventours 103 Atlantic Ave., 800-979-3370, urbanadventours.com. Mon–Sat at 10 a.m. Offering guided bicycle tours and bike rentals, Urban AdvenTours gives visitors a range of ways to explore Boston on two wheels, including the basic City View tour.

Wildlife Franklin Park Zoo One Franklin Park Road, Franklin Park, 617541-LION. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–5 p.m, Sat & Sun ’til 6 p.m. Admission: $17.95; seniors $14.95; children (2–12) $11.95; military personnel with ID half-price; $11.95 for all from 10 a.m.– noon the first Sat of each month. Home to more than 210 species, many of them endangered. Roam the Australian Outback Trail with kangaroos, visit the gorillas in the Tropical Forest, marvel at the lion at Kalahari Kingdom and see zebras, ostriches and wildebeests at Serengeti Crossing. above photo: Derek Kouyoumjian


New England Aquarium Dedicated to advancing knowledge of the world of water, this aquatic zoo features a Giant Ocean Tank containing a Caribbean coral reef with sea turtles, moray eels and other aquatic life; a popular penguin habitat; Northern fur seals in the Marine Mammal Center; a shark and ray touch tank; and the Simons 3D IMAX Theater. Central Wharf, 617-973-5206. Mon–Fri 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat & Sun ’til 6 p.m.; beginning July 1—Sun–Thu 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 7 p.m. Admission: $24.95; seniors (60+) $22.95; children (3–11) $17.95; children (under 3) free. Refer to Current Events section under Film for IMAX theater listings. Combination ticket prices available.

Stone Zoo 149 Pond St., Stoneham, 781-438-5100. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–5 p.m, Sat & Sun ’til 6 p.m. Admission: $8.95; seniors $7.95; children (2–12) $6.95; military personnel with ID half-price; $6.95 for all from 10 a.m.–noon the first Sat of each month. Highlights include Mexican gray wolves, meerkats, snow leopards, jaguars, black bears, whitecheeked gibbons and the new American alligator exhibit. Special event: daily at 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m.—Masters of Flight: Birds of Prey.

Whale Watches New England Aquarium Central Wharf, 617-227-4321. Mon–Fri at 9 and 10 a.m., noon and 1:30 p.m., Sat & Sun at 9 and 10 a.m., noon, 1:30, 3 and 5:30 p.m. $47; seniors $42; children (3–11) $36; children (2 and under) $16. Cruise on highspeed catamarans to Stellwagen Bank, the East Coast’s most famous destination for whale watching. Catch sight of humpback, finback and minke whales from the deck or from the comfort of a fully modernized cabin boasting snack and beverage services.

Beyond Boston Adams National Historical Park 1250 Hancock St., Quincy, 617-770-1175. Take the “T” to the Quincy Center stop on the Red Line. Visitor Center open daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Tickets: $5; children (under 16) free. This historical gem offers insight into the lives of U.S. presidents John Adams above photo: K. ellenbogen

and son John Quincy Adams. See the birthplaces of both presidents, as well as “The Old House,” which was home to five generations of the Adams family. The Berkshires These mountains located roughly three hours west of Boston are part of the Appalachian Trail, and are considered a top cultural resort location, home to numerous antique shops, art galleries, spas, spots for boating, scenic biking, skiing and hiking, as well as Tanglewood, the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s summer home. Blue Hills Reservation Reservation Headquarters, 695 Hillside St., Milton, 617-698-1802. Covering more than 7,000 acres in the suburbs of Boston, Blue Hills Reservation a number of fun seasonal activities, including camping, fishing, hiking and mountain biking, as well as scenic views and more than 125 miles of trails for any outdoor enthusiast. Cape Ann Visitors will be mesmerized by this charming region’s combination of sprawling waterfront vistas, sleepy harbors and quaint New England architecture. Just an hour north by train or I-95/Rte. 128, you’ll find whale watches, lighthouses, superb antique shops, countless galleries and museums, as well as top-notch theater venues and warm bed and breakfasts. Cape Cod and the Islands One of the nation’s most beloved tourist destinations, Cape Cod has 559.6 miles of coastline for swimming, kayaking, sailing and snorkling. There’s also the uber-wealthy islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, which provide the perfect balance of ritzy indulgence and traditional old New England whaling and merchant culture. 5W!ts 202 Patriot Place, North Marketplace, Two Patriot Place, Foxboro, 508-698-1600. Sun– Thu 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 10 p.m. Tickets: $18; children (12 and under) $14. 5W!ts provides visitors with action-packed interactive game-play and puzzle-solving activities. The state-of-the-art facility at Patriot Place features two exciting attractions: Espionage, which turns players into secret agents whose mission involves cracking safes, hacking BOSTONGUIDE.COM

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sightseeing computers and dodging lasers; and 20,000 Leagues, which takes players on a journey to the bottom of the sea aboard Captain Nemo’s sub, the Nautilus. Minute Man National Historical Park 978-369-6993, Concord and Lexington (North Bridge Visitor Center, 174 Liberty St., Concord). Park grounds open sunrise to sunset. Created in 1959 to preserve the sites associated with the opening battles of the American Revolution, Minute Man Park consists of more than 900 acres of land along original segments of the Battles of Lexington and Concord, including Lexington Green and Concord’s North Bridge, as well as The Wayside, the 19th-century home of literary greats Nathaniel Hawthorne and Louisa May Alcott. Old Sturbridge Village 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, 508inside Tip: 347-3362. Daily 9:30 The village was a.m.–5 p.m. Tickets: created with 40 $24; seniors $22; chiloriginal buildings from towns dren (3–17) $8; (under throughout New 3) free. Take a trip England, helping it back in time at this come to 1830s life. recreation of an early 19th-century New England village where costumed educators give visitors a glimpse of life in America’s early days. Visit a tin shop, a cider mill and a blacksmith, ride the old-fashioned stagecoach and tour restorations of period New England homes. Plimoth Plantation 137 Warren Ave., Plymouth, 508-746-1622. Daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Tickets: $35; seniors $31.50; students $29.50; children (6–12) $21. When the Pilgrims landed in America during the 17th century, they landed at Plymouth Rock. They built their settlement three miles south of the rock and named it Plimoth Plantation. Today, visitors can tour the Plantation and see how the Pilgrims went about their daily lives, hunting, gathering and making crafts. Plymouth The site of the Pilgrims’ 1620 landing is still marked by Plymouth Rock, and the surrounding area is dotted by historical museums that celebrate the town’s origins. 60

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Plimoth Plantation offers visitors a chance to step into a Pilgrim village from 1627 and explore the Mayflower II, a replica of the ship that dropped anchor in Plymouth Harbor nearly four centuries ago. Other favorite stops for history buffs include the 1749 Court House & Museum and Pilgrim Hall Museum. Plymouth’s coastal location also provides it with some lovely seashore spots, such as White Horse and Nelson beaches. Provincetown Located on the tip of Cape Cod, Provinceinside Tip: town marches to its The Provincetown own beat. This New Art Association and Museum England fishing village (PAAM), founded in and prominent art col1914, was the first ony is home to a thrivLEED (leadership in energy and ing gay community, environmental and is also where playdesign) certified wright Eugene O’Neill museum in the U.S. penned some of his best work and Thoreau completed his walk around the Cape. Provincetown boasts miles of beaches, a charming and eclectic shopping district, trails for hiking and biking, and whale watches for those looking to escape the busy city. Salem This North Shore town will always be known for the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, but Salem also boasts a bustling wharf with many bars and restaurants, and is regarded as an up-and-coming enclave for the young and trendy. Fans of spooky stuff can visit the New England Pirate Museum to see what life was like when Blackbeard roamed the high seas, or tiptoe through the Salem Witch Museum or Witch Dungeon Museum. On Halloween, the city transforms into one giant party for ghosts and ghouls, but 365 days a year, Salem is a charming place to explore and enjoy. Yankee Candle Factory 25 Greenfield Road, South Deerfield, 877636-7707. Tue–Wed 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Fri–Sun ’til 8 p.m. The Yankee Candle Factory is one part of a larger complex devoted to the company. It includes a museum, a candle store and the Bavarian Christmas Village. Visitors are able to dip their own creations at this one-of-a-kind must-see for fans of the popular scented candles.


Beyond Boston

Provincetown

r’s Best Beach Town, Fodo

“Top Ten Small Towns in America” Smithsonian Magazine

“Top Ten Best Small Cultural Towns in America”

. . Y A D E OC ME FOFORRTTHHE NIGHT! STAY rovincetown, or “Ptown” as it’s more affectionately known, has been a popular destination for longer than most people imagine. When the Pilgrims first landed here on the Mayflower in 1620 prior to their more famous landing in Plymouth, they stayed for five weeks before moving on to form a more permanent settlement across Massachusetts Bay. If only we all had five weeks to explore this historic and culturally rich seaside haven! Provincetown not only boasts the aforementioned historical significance, commemorated by the 252 foot-tall Pilgrim Monument (pictured above in the background), but also several pristine beaches, loads of eclectic shopping, sightseeing and whale-watching boat tours, diverse dining options and the status as America’s oldest continuous arts colony. And speaking of the arts, Provincetown is home to galleries, museums, a thriving theater scene and an active writers colony—in fact, famed writers and former residents Norman Mailer and Eugene O’Neill had long associations with the area. Provincetown is also renowned for its flourishing gay and lesbian community that contributes greatly to the town’s vibrance and vitality. So don’t be jealous of the Pilgrims—even if you don’t have five weeks to explore it, Provincetown is still a more than worthy destination.

Provincetown

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How to get there: By car: From Boston, take Route 93 South to Route 3 South to Route 6 East. By water: High-speed ferry service from Boston on Bay State Cruise Company (provincetownfastferry.com) or Boston Harbor Cruises (bostonharborcruises.com). By bus: Plymouth & Brockton bus line from South Station (p-b. com). By air: Cape Air from Logan Airport (capeair. com). By train: CapeFlyer from South Station to Hyannis (capeflyer.com), then bus (see above) to Provincetown. above photo: Tim Grafft/Mass. Office of Travel & tourism

AOL Travel

“World’s Sexiest Beaches”

Drive Fly Ferry Bus

America’s First Destination Facebook: Provincetown Twitter: @Ptowntourism

iPtown

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9 Old State House

10 Boston Mas-

Corner of Washington and State streets, 617-720-1713. Daily 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Admission: $10; seniors & students $8.50; children, military & veterans free. Built in 1713, this seat of Colonial government was the center of activity for such patriots as John Hancock and Samuel and John Adams. It was here that the Declaration of Independence was first read in Boston.

sacre Site State Street in front of the Old State House. At the next intersection below the State House, a ring of cobblestones marks the site of the clash between a jeering Boston crowd and a British guard of nine soldiers on March 5, 1770.

11 Faneuil Hall

12 Paul Revere

Merchants Row and Faneuil Hall Square, 617-242-5689. Daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Historical talks given every half hour from 9:30 a.m.– 4:30 p.m., when hall is not in use. “The Cradle of Liberty” combines a marketplace on the first floor with the town meeting hall upstairs, the site of fiery revolutionary debate.

House 19 North Square, North Street, 617523-2338. Daily 9:30 a.m.–5:15 p.m. Admis­sion: $3.50; seniors & students $3; children (5–17) $1. The oldest home in Boston (built c. 1680), occupied by silversmith and patriot Paul Revere from 1770 to 1800.

13

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Old North Church 193 Salem St., 617523-6676. Daily 9 a.m.– 6 p.m. Services: Sun at 9 and 11 a.m. Known as Christ Church and erected in 1723, this is Boston’s oldest standing church. Two lanterns were hung here on April 18, 1775, signaling the Redcoats’ departure by sea for Lexington and Concord.

Copp’s Hill Burying Ground Hull Street. Daily 9 a.m.– 5 p.m. Set out in 1659, Copp’s Hill was Boston’s second cemetery. Many remarkable people are interred here, including the Mather family of ministers and Edmund Hartt, builder of the USS Constitution.

15 Bunker Hill

16 USS Constitution

Monument Breed’s Hill, Charlestown, 617-2427511. Daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m., last climb at 4:30 p.m.; beginning July 1—’til 6 p.m., last climb at 5:30 p.m. The site of the historic battle of June 17, 1775.

Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, 617-2425670. Tue–Sun 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Tours every half-hour 10:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. This 44-gun frigate is the world’s oldest commissioned warship, christened “Old Ironsides” during the War of 1812 when cannonballs literally bounced off her triple hull.

Red Hot.

Timeless Tuesdays Bite Thursdays Play Fridays Flaunt Saturdays

The Langham, Boston 250 Franklin St., Boston 617.956.8765 bondboston.com BOSTONGUIDE.COM

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dining PANO PICK

Legal Sea Foods

This Boston tradition features more than 40 varieties of fresh fish and shellfish as well as a lengthy wine list. Named “Boston’s Most Popular Restaurant” by Zagat. L & D. $$$ 558 Washington St. (Legal Crossing, pictured), 617-692-8888; 26 Park Plaza, Park Square Motor Mart, 617-426-4444; 255 State St., Long Wharf, 617-742-5300; Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617-266-6800; 270 Northern Ave., Liberty Wharf, 617-477-2900; other locations, legalseafoods.com.

Allston/Brighton

a.m., Thu–Sat ’til 2 a.m. Private parties a specialty. L, D, LS, Sat & SB. $

eagle’s deli 1918 Beacon St., Brighton, 617-731-3232 eaglesdeli.com. Once featured on the Travel Channel’s “Man vs. Food,” this family-owned casual burger and breakfast joint is known for piling the Angus high. If you’re feeling brave, take on the infamous “Eagle’s Challenge”: five pounds of burger, 20 pieces of bacon, 20 pieces of American cheese, five pounds of fries and a deli pickle. B, L, D, BR. $

shanghai social club 1277 Commonwealth Ave., Allston, 617-2088909, shanghaisocialclub.com. Dine alongside Buddha in this dark and moody addition to Allston’s bar scene. A step through the door is a step into pre-Prohibition Shanghai, where Chef Bob Botchie cooks up a mix of dishes inspired by Shanghai street food and classic Chinese-American dishes. L, D, LS, C. $$

The Sunset Grill & Tap patron’s mexican kitchen and 130 Brighton Ave. (corner of Harvard and watering hole Brighton avenues), Allston, 617-254-1331, 138 Brighton Ave., Allston, 617-782-2020, allstons Scan this code for KEY AVERAGE PRICE OF finest.com. Patron’s (forexpanded Panorama DINNER ENTREES B Breakfast dining listings merly Big City) offers $ Most less than $12 L Lunch Mexican-inspired food, $$ $12–18 D Dinner $$$ $19–25 BR Brunch new signature items, a $$$$ Most more than $25 SB Sunday Brunch mezcal and tequilaria Many restaurants offer a wide C Cocktails range of entrees and prices; with more than 80 cerveLS Late Supper the classifications are only (serving after 10 p.m.) zas, along with fireplaces, approximations. VP Valet Parking pool tables, foosball, HD NC Credit Cards Not or visit Refer to Cuisine Index, Accepted flat screen TVs and cool bostonguide.com page 76. * Entertainment tunes. Kitchen open ’til 1 64

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allstonsfinest.com. This popular Allston hangout features Boston’s biggest beer selection, with more than 112 beers on tap and 380 craft brews and imports in bottles as well as award-winning steam beer burgers and famous curly fries. L, D, C, LS, SB. $

Back Bay ASTA 47 Massachusetts Ave., 617-585-9575, astaboston.com. Earthy, mysterious and minimal, Asta offers a prix fixe tasting menu-only experience. An open kitchen invites you to get up close and personal with the menu of your choice: three, five or eight courses. D. $$$$ Bar 10 Westin Copley Place, 10 Huntington Ave., 617-424-7446, bar10boston.com. Bar 10 mixes signature martinis and lighter, modern American fare with a vibrant setting and an array of shareable dishes, including salads, flatbread pizzas and more. Voted Best Hotel Bar by Boston magazine and Best Civilized Nightcap by The Improper Bostonian. L, D, C, SB. $$ Ben & Jerry’s 174 Newbury St., 617-536-5456; 20 Park Plaza, Ste. 14, 617-426-0890; 36 JFK St., Cambridge, 617-864-2828. The Vermontbased premium ice cream purveyors offer favorite flavors like Chunky Monkey, Phish Food and Cherry Garcia, as well as cookies, brownies and refreshing fruit smoothies. $ Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse 75 Arlington St., 617-357-4810, davios.com. Davio’s spacious, relaxed dining room serves as the perfect stage for its signature dishes, including a selection of homemade pastas and Brandt meats as well as a selection of fresh seafood. Additional flair is provided by the open kitchen layout. L, D, VP, C. $$$ Fogo de Chao 200 Dartmouth St., 617-585-3600, fogo dechao.com. Enjoy a taste of Brazil at this churrascaria, where roaming gaucho chefs offer 16 different cuts of fire-roasted meat for an all-you-can-eat experience. For veggie fans, there’s a salad bar featuring more than 30 items. L, D, C. $$$

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dining Forum Bar & Restaurant 755 Boylston St., 857-991-1831, forumboston. com. Newly renovated and boasting a brandnew menu, Forum offers two distinct floors, two bars, an outdoor patio, cafe space and private dining. L, D, LS, C, Sat & SB, VP. $$$ Jasper White’s Summer Shack 50 Dalton St., 617-867-9955, 149 Alewife Brook Parkway, Cambridge, 617-520-9500, summershackrestaurant.com. Top-notch seafood such as pan-roasted lobster, award-winning fried chicken and an impressive raw bar in a casual setting. L, D. $$$ *Kings 50 Dalton St., 617-266-2695, kingsbackbay. com. Kings isn’t your parents’ bowling alley. Executive chef Andre has crafted a versatile American menu highlighted by delectable appetizers, house-smoked ribs, marinated steak tips, hand-tossed pizzas and inventive homemade entrees. Come for the bowling, come back for the food. L, D, LS, C. $$ L’Espalier Mandarin Oriental Boston, 774 Boylston St., 617-262-3023, lespalier.com. This sophisticated French classic, consistently named as one of Boston’s top eateries, is a favorite of both power brokers and couples out for a romantic evening. L, D. $$$$

Catch up with friends Mix & Mingle Enjoy a first date Have a quick bite At the Westin Copley Place 10 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02116 66

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OAK Long Bar + Kitchen Fairmont Copley Plaza, 138 St James Ave., 617-585-7222, oaklongbarkitchen.com. This brasserie-style spot features a menu of inventive American dishes. The namesake Long Bar winds more than 80 feet through the restaurant, offering a central meeting place for everyone from young professionals and tourists to execs. B, L, D, LS, C, SB. $$$$ Stephanie’s on Newbury 190 Newbury St., 617-236-0990, stephanies onnewbury.com. Chef/owner Stephanie Sokolove’s eatery showcases sophisticated cooking and classic comfort food. Casual elegance at its best with a sidewalk cafe, club-like bar and skylit dining space. L, D, SB. $$$ *The Taj Boston 15 Arlington St., 617-536-5700, tajhotels. com. This 1927 landmark offers award-winning contemporary French cuisine, as well as a historic dining room for special events.


Cafe: B, L, D, Sat & SB. Lounge: L, D, C, LS. Bar: L, D, C, LS. $$$$ Tapeo 266 Newbury St., 617-267-4799, tapeo. com. This popular Back Bay cousin to Dali in Somerville offers delectable, authentic tapas in a glorious Newbury Street setting, complete with seasonal patio dining for prime people-watching as you enjoy your scallops in saffron cream, lobster ravioli and sangria. D, C, L Sat & Sun. $$ *Top of the Hub 800 Boylston St., Prudential Center, 617-536-1775, topofthe hub.net. Sit 52 stories above Boston for great dining and a spectacular view of the city. Live jazz seven nights a week. L, D, SB, LS, C. $$$$

Inside Tip: Top of the Hub won Wine Spectator magazine’s Award of Excellence from 1998–2011.

TOWNE STOVE AND SPIRITS 900 Boylston St., 617-247-0400, towne boston.com. The melting pot of cuisines at

this favored eatery within the Hynes Convention Center draws inspiration from numerous sources. New Executive Chef and Culinary Director Mark Allen blends home-style, gastropub fare with refined presentations and contemporary influences, creating a dining experience with something for everyone. L, D, Sat & SB, C. $$$$

Beacon Hill Antonio’s 288 Cambridge St., 617-367-3310, antonios ofbeaconhill.com. One of Boston’s finest Italian restaurants, Antonio’s serves traditional Italian food with nightly specials and a lengthy wine list. Specialties include homemade fusilli and shrimp margarita. L, D. $$ *Cheers 84 Beacon St., 617-227-9605; Faneuil Hall Marketplace, 617-227-0150, cheersboston.com. Both the original Beacon Hill pub and its spin-off offer tasty traditional fare and an abundant beverage selection. Live entertainment Thu–Sat. L, D, C, LS. $

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dining Clink The Liberty Hotel, 215 Charles St., 617-2244004, libertyhotel.com/clink. Artfully marrying European culinary tradition with contemporary American innovation, Clink’s dining room features elements of the original cells from its earlier life as the Charles Street Jail. Clink’s lobby bar draws trendy urbanites with its energetic nightlife scene. B, L, C. $$$ The Hungry i 71½ Charles St., 617-227-3524, hungryi boston.com. In a two-story townhouse with three working fireplaces and an outdoor patio, chef Peter Ballarin serves signature dishes, including venison au poivre. L Thu & Fri, D, SB, C. $$$ mooo 15 Beacon St., 617-670-2515, mooo restaurant.com. Chef David Hutton offers modern steakhouse fare adjacent to XV Beacon Hotel. Mooo features a la carte steaks ranging from 14-ounce Prime New York sirloin to Japanese-grade Wagyu beef served with roasted garlic and bone marrow butter. B, L, D, SB, C. $$$$

The Paramount 44 Charles St., 617-720-1152, paramount boston.com. A Boston staple since 1937, The Paramount often finds itself at the top of many “best of” lists. Excellent American cuisine, hearty portions and an active atmosphere make it a favorite. B, L, D. $$ Scollay Square 21 Beacon St., 617-742-4900, scollaysquare. com. A warm, inviting environment serving American comfort food at a reasonable price with a sophisticated cocktail list. This neighborhood bistro-style restaurant is a great meeting place for friends and small groups to eat, drink and socialize. L, D, SB, C. $$$

Downtown Back Deck 2 West St., 617-670-0320, backdeckboston. com. With three deck spaces and a menu of grill-focused favorites, Back Deck invites everyone to gather around patio tables and chairs for a charcoal-cooked meal and backyard-inspired cocktails. The restaurant brings the outdoors inside with floorto-ceiling windows, carriage lighting, lush

Where the North End meets the Back Bay!

Wine Spectator Awards of Excellence Boston’s Back Bay 116 Huntington Avenue 617-247-2400 Open nightly until 1am

Boston’s North End 226 Hanover Street 617-742-9200 Nightly until 12:15am www.luccaboston.com

Fine Northern Italian cuisine, Boston style! 68

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green planters, glazed brick and an open kitchen. L, D, Sat & SB, C. $$ *Bond Langham Hotel Boston, 250 Franklin St., 617-956-8765, bondboston.com. This swanky restaurant and lounge boasts a diverse cocktail and wine menu to accompany its array of exotic international cuisine. L, D, C. $$$ *Cafe Fleuri Langham Hotel Boston, 250 Franklin St., 617-451-1900, boston.langhamhotels. com. Enjoy one of Boston’s top Sunday brunches, or sample contemporary New England fare and desserts within a sunlit garden atrium. B, L, SB. $$

*Howl at the moon 184 High St., 617-292-4695, howlatthemoon. com. A high-energy, clapping, stomping, dancing, rock ’n’ roll dueling piano show. Part bar, part sing-along, the Howl at the Moon experience is centered around two baby grand pianos and audience participation. Also boasts supersized 86-ounce cocktails and a full menu of appetizers, sandwiches, pizza and more. Live music nightly. D, C. $ *The Kinsale Irish Pub & Restaurant 2 Center Plaza (Cambridge Street), 617742-5577, classicirish.com. Hand-crafted in Ireland and shipped to Boston, this classic pub features a cozy interior with beautiful Celtic motifs and traditional Irish fare with 20+ beers on tap, 100-seat seasonal patio, live music and trivia on Wed. Sat & SB. L, D, C. $$

Fajitas & ’Ritas 25 West St., 617-426-1222, fajitasandritas. com. Established in 1989, Fajitas & ’Ritas Meritage features fresh, healthy Texan and barbeBoston Harbor Hotel at Rowes Wharf, 617cue cuisine at bargain prices. A fun place 439-3995, bhh.com. Fresh, seasonal cuisine to eat, drink and hang out, the walls are is carefully matched to an appropriate vindecorated with colorful murals and the bar tageAM from Page the 12,000-bottle wine collecboasts some of Boston’s best—and sturdiPanorama 4.625x3.75 1/15/14 10:48 1 tion. D & LS. $$$$ est—margaritas. L, D, C. $

Welcome To America’s Oldest Restaurant A National Historic Landmark

On The Freedom Trail One Block From Historic Faneuil Hall

Specializing In Hearty Portions Of Yankee Style Seafood, Fresh New England Lobster And Grilled Meats 41 Union Street • 617-227-2750 Sunday-Thursday 11 am -9:30 pm • Friday & Saturday 11 am -10 pm • Union Bar til -Midnight Functions • Validated Parking • All Major Credit Cards Honored • Reservations Recommended Visit Our Website • www.unionoysterhouse.com BOSTONGUIDE.COM

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DINING NEBO 520 Atlantic Ave., INSIDE TIP: 617-723-6326, nebo Nebo stands for “North End, restaurant.com. This Boston,” the upscale pizzeria and original home of enoteca with a familial this waterfront vibe offers up a pleaseatery. ing menu of antipasti, homemade pastas and 30 varieties of Neapolitan-style pizza, all served in a stylish environment featuring natural wood, vaulted brick ceilings, Venetian plaster walls and marble counter tops. D. $$$ O YA 9 East St., 617-654-9900, oyarestaurant boston.com. This contemporary and edgy sushi eatery, crowned Boston’s best restaurant of 2009 by Boston magazine, boasts a simple, natural decor that perfectly complements the exquisitely created dishes. The intimate seating capacity of 37 diners makes reservations a must. D, C, VP. $$$ PARKER’S RESTAURANT Omni Parker House, 60 School St., 617227-8600. Enjoy nostalgic cuisine with a contemporary flair in the stately dining room where Boston cream pie and the Parker House roll were first served. B, L, D. $$$$ SAM LaGRASSA’S 44 Province St., 617-357-6861, samlagrassas. com. Only open during lunch hours on weekdays, Sam has dished out the “World’s No. 1 Sandwiches” since 1968. The menu features daily specials along with staple signatures and specialty sandwiches like the new Pastrami Diablo. L. $$

social urban food & drink

AT T H E L I B E R T Y H O T E L

215

70

C HAR LE S ST / B O STO N , MA TEL 617. 224 . 4 0 0 4

PANORAMA

02114

TRADE 540 Atlantic Ave., 617-451-1234, tradeboston.com. James Beard Award-winning chef Jody Adams serves delectable fusion dishes inspired by her world travels in an elegant, modern interior. L, D, SB. $$$ YE OLDE UNION OYSTER HOUSE 41 Union St., 617-227-2750, unionoyster house.com. America’s oldest restaurant, now celebrating 186 years, serves Yankee-style seafood, beef and chicken, and is famed for the oyster bar where Daniel Webster dined daily. Specialties include clam chowder and fresh lobster. L, D, VP. $$$


Faneuil Hall Marketplace *Clarke’s at Faneuil Hall 21 Merchants Row, 617-227-7800, clarkes boston.com. This Boston fixture next to historic Faneuil Hall features great music, fantastic people and a friendly atmosphere along with an extensive menu that includes mouth-watering burgers, salads, seafood, kabobs, wraps, soups, sandwiches and more. Also enjoy 41 HD TVs, trivia nights and DJs. L, D, SB, BR, C. $ *Dick’s Last Resort Faneuil Hall Marketplace, Quincy Market, 617-267-8080, dickslastresort.com. Enjoy the outrageous antics of Dick’s sassy staff as they serve up ribs, succulent crab, juicy steaks, sandwiches, burgers and salads. Live music every night. L, D, C. $$ *Durgin-Park 340 Faneuil Hall Marketplace, 617-2272038, durgin-park.com. For more than a century, Durgin-Park has catered to the hearty appetites of locals and visitors alike. Step into one of the oldest continuously running restaurants in the country and choose from a wide selection of comfort

food and classic New England fare, including clam chowder and the signature prime rib. L, D, C. $$ *Hard Rock Cafe 2–24 Clinton St., 617-424-7625, hardrock. com. Offering classic American cuisine served with a healthy dose of rock ’n’ roll. After you eat, take in the massive collection of authentic music memorabilia or enjoy live music from hot local and national acts. L, D, C, LS. $

Fenway/Kenmore Square *Audubon Boston 838 Beacon St., 617-421-1910, audubon boston.com. Since 1996, Audubon Boston caters to the tastes of the Fenway area— whether you’re in the mood for an upscale alternative to the Fenway Frank or a late night hot spot on the weekends. D, SB, C. $$ Bleacher Bar 82A Lansdowne St., 617-262-2424, bleacher barboston.com. Inside Fenway Park, underneath the bleachers, take in center field views of America’s most beloved ballpark.

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dining With the feel of a neighborhood pub and featuring a deli-style menu and cold beer, Bleacher Bar is open all year round. L, D, C. $

ket dressed in a variety of hot sauces with refreshing cocktails served in mason jars. L, D, LS, C. $$$

Eastern Standard Hotel Commonwealth, 528 Commonwealth Ave., 617-532-9100, easternstandardboston .com. This Kenmore Square brasserie resembles an old hotel dining room and attracts a diverse crowd, from businessmen to Red Sox fans seeking a pre-game bite. B, L, D. $$

North End

Game On! 82 Lansdowne St., 617-351-7001, gameon boston.com. This sports bar/restaurant/ nightclub built inside Fenway Park, a star of Boston’s nightlife scene, offers a sleek spot in which to sample a full menu and watch sporting events on a number of big-screen TVs. L, D. $$ sweet cheeks 1381 Boylston St., 617-266-1300, sweetcheeksq. com. Sweet Cheeks brings a taste of Texas barbecue to Boston using local, responsibly sourced and all-natural meats. Indulge in Berkshire pork belly or great northern bris-

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Antico Forno 93 Salem St., 617-723-6733, anticoforno boston.com. Featuring brick-oven classics such as roasted chicken with garlic and herbs; pizza with artichoke hearts, porcini and buffalo mozzarella; and linguini with clams, mussels, calamari and shrimp. L, D. $$ Aragosta Bar & Bistro 3 Battery Wharf, 617-994-9001, aragosta bistro.com. Aragosta offers a warm, social atmosphere and contemporary Italian cuisine in a stunning waterfront setting that features an open kitchen with a chef’s counter and an outdoor terrace with views of Boston Harbor. B, L, D, BR, C. $$$ AssaGgio 25–29 Prince St., 617-227-7380, assaggio boston.com. This wine bar and bistro offers nightly specials from its mesquite-wood grill, as well as some of the best traditional


Italian cuisine. Complement your dinner with one of 110 wines or an international beer or micro brews. L, D, LS. $$

rella and black olives, among numerous other delights. L, D, LS, C. $

Caffe Pompei 280 Hanover St., 617-227-1562. Pompei features a wide assortment of coffees, 160 wines by the glass, Italian cordials and sandwiches, pizza, homemade cannoli and ice cream imported from Italy. Open daily. B, L, LS. $ Lucca Restaurant & Bar 226 Hanover St., 617-742-9200; 116 Huntington Ave., 617-247-2400, luccaboston. com. This North End eatery (with a second location in the Back Bay) racks up accolades for its regional Italian cuisine, lively bar and elegant atmosphere. D, C, Valet Parking. $$$ Massimino’s Cucina Italiana 207 Endicott St., 617-523-5959, massiminos boston.com. Owner/chef Massimino— former head chef of Naples’ Hotel Astoria and Switzer­land’s Metropolitan Hotel— offers specialties like veal chop stuffed with arugula, prosciutto, smoked mozza-

Neptune Oyster 63 Salem St., 617-742-3474, neptuneoyster. com. This outstanding raw bar offers an enormous selection of seafood, often cooked with a hint of Italian flair. The menu features 12 varieties of oysters, a renowned New England lobster roll, oyster minestrone and lobster scampi. L & D. $$$ Regina Pizzeria 111 ⁄2 Thacher St., 617Inside Tip: 227-0765, regina Many Regina pizzeria.com; also: locations offer online ordering, including Quincy Market, Faneuil the original one in Hall Marketplace; The the North End. Shops at Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617-424-1115; South Station, Atlantic Ave. and Summer Street; 353 Cambridge St., Allston, 617-783-2300; 1330 Boylston St., 617-266-9210. Since 1926, patrons have been indulging in delicious, award-winning homemade pizza at Boston’s oldest brickoven pizzeria. Delivery and curbside-to-go takeout available. C in Allston. L & D daily. $

F

or well over a century, Durgin-Park has catered to the hearty appetites of straw hatted, whiteaproned, market men and local characters. Take part in Boston history as you step into one of the oldest continuously running establishments in the country. Choose from a wide selection of comfort food and classic New England Fare such as Clam Chowder or the signature Prime Rib.

AT DURGIN-PARK, WE SERVE HISTORY. facebook.com/DurginParkBoston @Durgin_Park

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dining Ristorante Bella Vista 288 Hanover St., 617-367-4999. This casual yet elegant family-style restaurant offers authentic Italian cuisine, from escarole soup to lobster fra diavolo. L & D. $$ Ristorante Saraceno 286 Hanover St., 617-227-5888, saracenos. com. Neapolitan cuisine served in an intimate atmosphere complete with charming, beautifully decorated exposed brick walls. Reservations recommended. L, D, VP, C. $$ Terramia Ristorante 98 Salem St., 617-523-3112, terramiaristorante. com. Specializing in creative interpretations of Italian classics, Terramia offers seasonally based dishes and an extensive wine list in a cozy, rustic atmosphere. D. $$

South End *The Beehive 541 Tremont St., 617-423-0069, beehive boston.com. Hailed as a must-see Boston venue by Travel + Leisure, Zagat and The New York Times, this popular Bohemian eatery and bar features world-class live

music as well as generous food and drink. D, Sat & SB. $$ boston chops 1375 Washington St., 617-227-5011, boston chops.com. An urban steak bistro, Boston Chops is a casual yet refined twist on steakhouse splendor. In addition to mouthwatering prime cuts and a 2,000-bottle wine room, the menu features a surprising list of rarely celebrated delicacies like roasted bone marrow and grilled herb marinated beef heart. D, LS, C, Sat & SB. $$$$ COPPA 253 Shawmut Ave., 617-391-0902, coppa boston.com. This enoteca from legendary restaurateur Ken Oringer and chef Jamie Bissonnette serves a variety of wood-fired pizza and pasta, as well as modern charcuterie dishes and small tapas-sized delicacies like salt cod crostini and marinated mushrooms. L, D, SB. $$$ Gaslight 560 Harrison Ave., 617-422-0224, gaslight 560.com. Critics and locals alike are drawn to this acclaimed French brasserie featuring

25 West Sreet by Boston Common 617-426-1222 25 West Street near Boston Common www.fajitasandritas.com

617.426.1222 www.fajitasandritas.com

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top-notch fare and a young, energetic atmosphere. SB, L, D. $$$

the excellent brunch featuring homemade Pop Tarts. D, Sat & SB. $$

Hamersley’s Bistro 553 Tremont St., 617-423-2700, hamersleys bistro.com. This pioneering French-American classic, helmed by husband-and-wife team Gordon and Fiona Hamersley, puts South End dining on the map. Inspired the bistros of France, the menu revels in hearty, rustic dishes which draw from the diversity of seasonal, local New England ingredients. D. $$$$

Union Bar and Grille 1357 Washington St., 617-423-0555, union restaurant.com. This sleek, upscale American bistro in the SoWa District features everything from gourmet comfort food like the Reuben sandwich and a beef-and-sausage burger to the award-winning 10K tuna in a roasted tomato vinaigrette. D, C, LS, SB. $$$

Toro 1704 Washington St., 617-536-4300, tororestaurant.com. Chef Ken Oringer’s popular Spanish restaurant features seating at a series of communal tables and small, perfect-for-sharing tapas dishes—such as salt cod fritters, crispy pork belly and glazed beef short ribs—that blend a variety of vibrant styles and flavors. L, D, SB, C. $$$

Theatre District Avenue One Restaurant Hyatt Regency, One Avenue de Lafayette, 617-422-5579, regencyboston.hyatt. com. Newly renovated, this restaurant and lounge serves contemporary New England cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere. Enjoy a refreshing cocktail, three-course prix fixe dinner or a delectable dessert. Discounted parking available. B, L, D, C, VP. $$$

Tremont 647 647 Tremont St., 617-266-4600, tremont CityPlace 647.com. Chef Andy Husbands’ inspired On Stuart Street between American constant crowds to Panoramafusion Ads draws May 2014:Duck Mag2/17.05 4/4/14 3:22 PM Tremont Page 2 and S. Charles streets in the State Transportation this South End staple. Make sure to catch

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dining Cuisine Index American

Ristorante Saraceno 74 Sportello 77 Eastern Standard 72 Terramia Ristorante 74 Gaslight 74 Hamersley’s Bistro 75 Japanese/Sushi L’Espalier 66 O Ya 70 No. 9 Park 53

French/French65 American

Asta Audubon Boston 71 Back Deck 68 Bar 10 65 The Beehive 74 Ben & Jerry’s 65 Bleacher Bar 71 Cheers 67 Clarke’s at Faneuil Hall 71 Clink 68 Dick’s Last Resort 71 Eagle’s Deli 64 Finale 76 Forum Bar & Restaurant 66 The Friendly Toast 37 Game On! 72 Hard Rock Cafe 71 Howl at the Moon 69 Hungry Mother 38 Jerry Remy’s Sports Bar & Grill 77 Kings 66 Oak Long Bar + 66 Kitchen Meritage 69 The Paramount 68 Parker’s Restaurant 70 Russell House Tavern 38 Sam LaGrassa’s 70 Scollay Square 68 Stephanie’s on Newbury 66 The Sunset Grill & Tap 64 Sweet Cheeks 72 Tavern Road 77 Top of the Hub 67 Tremont 647 75 Union Bar and Grille 75

French Country The Hungry i 68

Mediterranean Dante

37

Mexican/ Greek/Greek-American Southwestern 38 Fajitas & ’Ritas 69 Patron’s Mexican Kitchen and International Watering Hole 64 Bond 69 CityPlace 75 New England Jacob Wirth 76 Avenue One 75 Menton 77 Cafe Fleuri 69 The Taj Boston 66 Durgin-Park 71 Towne Stove Henrietta’s Table 38 and Spirits 67 Nubar 38 Trade 70 Zephyr on the Charles 38 Zoe’s

Irish

Seafood

The Asgard Irish Pub & Restaurant 37 The Barking Crab 76 Dolphin Seafood 37 The Kinsale Irish Pub & Restaurant 69 Jasper White’s Summer Shack 66 Legal Sea Foods 64 Italian Antico Forno 72 Neptune Oyster 73 Antonio’s 67 Ye Olde Union Oyster House 70 Aragosta Bar & Bistro 72 Assaggio 72 Spanish/Tapas Caffe Pompei 73 Tapeo 67 Coppa 74 Toro 75 Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse 65 Lucca Restaurant Steakhouses & Bar 73 Boston Chops 74 Massimino’s Davio’s Northern Cucina Italiana 73 Italian Steakhouse 65 Asian 70 Del Frisco’s Double Nebo Blue Dragon 77 Regina Pizzeria 73 Eagle Steak House 77 Hong Kong 38 38 Fogo de Chao 65 Rialto Shanghai Mooo 68 Social Club 64 Ristorante Bella Vista 74

Finale

This standout for sweets offers a wide array of specialty dessert creations, savory fare, coffees, wine and cocktails. One Columbus Ave., 617-4233184; 30 Dunster St., Harvard Sq., Cambridge, 617441-9797; finaledesserts.com. L, D, LS, C. $$

Bldg., cityplaceboston.com. Enjoy everything from handcrafted beers at Rock Bottom Brewery, delicious treats from Panera Bread and gourmet Chinese at P.F. Chang’s as well as flatbread sandwiches, specialty pizzas, custom burritos and more in the Food Court. B, L, D, C. $–$$$ *Jacob Wirth 31–37 Stuart St., 617-338-8586, jacobwirth. com. Opened in 1868, Jacob Wirth is the city’s second-oldest restaurant, serving traditional German fare like wiener schnitzel, sauerbraten and a great selection of German beers. L, D, C, LS. $$

Seaport/ Innovation District The Barking Crab 88 Sleeper St., 617-426-CRAB, barkingcrab. com. No frills at this ramshackle little clam shack that’s a Boston dining institution. Pluck mussels and steamers from plastic buckets and drink wine out of styrofoam cups under an outdoor tent brimming with communal-style picnic tables. L & D. $$

Get Social with Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Facebook.com/PanoramaMagazineBoston Twitter.com/PanoramaBoston

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blue dragon 324 A St., 617-338Inside Tip: 8585, ming.com/ Chef Tsai’s cooking blue-dragon. Named show “Simply Ming” has been on one of the best new public television restaurants of 2013 by since 2003. Esquire, Ming Tsai’s 80-seat gastropub is a relaxed, Asian-fusion neighborhood hangout with a tapas-style menu. L, D, LS, C. $$ Del Frisco’s DoublE Eagle Steak House 250 Northern Ave., Suite 200, 617-951-1368, delfriscos.com. Located at Liberty Wharf, Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House offers guests prime steaks, chops and fresh seafood. Boasting an award-winning, 1,200+ wine list, spectacular harbor views and unparalleled hospitality, Del Frisco’s represents an exciting new destination in Boston dining. L, D, C, LS, VP. $$$$ JERRY REMY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL 250 Northern Ave, 617-856-7369; 1265 Boylston St., 617-236-7369, jerryremys.com. Jerry Remy, the local sports icon, brings

comfort food to Boston with his eponymous sports bar. The extensive drink list offers everything from beer to single malt scotches, while the menu features casual yet tasty treats such as house-smoked barbecue. L, D, C, LS. $$ Menton 354 Congress St., 617-737-0099, menton boston.com. This famed restaurant by James Beard Award-winning chef Barbara Lynch combines meticulous French technique with a passionate Italian sensibility in a luxurious atmosphere. D. $$$$ Sportello 348 Congress St., 617-737-1234, sportello boston.com. Celebrity chef Barbara Lynch provides her interpretation of a classic diner, serving up impeccable trattoria-inspired Italian dishes and a new wine bar. L, D, SB. $$$ tavern road 343 Congress St., 617-790-0808, tavern road.com. Brothers Louis and Michael DiBiccari combine forces with local Boston artists to bring Fort Point a high-energy, modern menu and bar. D, LS, C. $$

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Boston accent

Ship Shape Anne Grimes Rand tells the history of the oldest naval vessel afloat, as it was and as it is today.

“I thought telling the story of boy who joined the crew at the height of the just one historic ship would be fun for about war. “One of the comment cards from a young three years,” says Anne Grimes Rand, presigirl who went through said, ‘I used to think it dent of the USS Constitution Museum. Rand was boring. Now I “heart” it.’ It’s exciting when came to the museum more than 25 years ago you can help a kid on an elementary school field with a love of the sea, sailing and maritime trip realize ‘Wow, these people, they’re just like history, and still learns something new every us!’ History isn’t boring, it’s really fascinating!” day. “The longer I’m here the more I under This July 4th is your last chance to see the stand the story. I feel very fortunate to have USS Constitution set sail for quite some time arrived here and to still be here.” when she makes her annual turnaround cruise in Before the story gets started, there is one Boston Harbor. The ship is going into dry-dock thing we should know first. “She’s called ‘Old next year to undergo a major restoration project Ironsides,’” Rand says. During the War of 1812, that will take three years to complete. Rand is sailors witnessed cannonballs bounce inefcurrently working on the details of a new introfectively off of the ship’s hull during a battle, ductory exhibit at the museum: From Fourth to exclaiming, “Huzzah! Her sides are made of Frigate. “We will be working with the Navy to iron!,” and the nickname has stuck ever since. tell a more structural story about the ship and The beloved American icon is docked at how she was put together.” The exhibition will the Charlestown Navy Yard just across the explore the challenge of shipbuilding in Boston pier from the USS Constitution Museum. The museum brings visitors USS Constitution Museum through the ship’s rich history, from Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, 617-426-1812, ussconstitutionmuseum.org the lives and lore of courageous crew members to the trials and tribulations during the War of 1812. “People more than 200 years ago and answer the same leave with a very memorable sense of what life questions builders asked themselves as they was like 200 years ago,” Rand says. designed the biggest ship ever built to date. “It’s The exhibit called All Hands on Deck: A a chance to really dig into the live oak that is the Sailor’s Life in 1812 is based on the museum’s real secret in Old Ironsides, this incredibly dense ongoing research into the lives of the 1,243 wood used for her frames.” Though the ship may sailors and officers that served aboard the USS be out of commission, Anne Grimes Rand will Constitution during that conflict. You’ll meet be steady at the wheel keeping the history of the David Debais, an 8-year-old African American USS Constitution alive. —Samantha DiMauro 78

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We’re #1! We’re #1! First place. In the entire country. Legal Sea Foods was recently named “Best Seafood Restaurant in America” in a survey conducted by USA Today, and we couldn’t be happier. Now everyone knows: For the freshest, most delicious seafood, it doesn’t get any better than Legal.

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Panorama Magazine: June 23, 2013 Issue