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BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE STAGE 2

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CONTENTS

DESIGN: P2.3 AT HOME IN THE CITY

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- LEITH LIFE

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- BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN EDINBURGH AND LEITH - LEITH 2026

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- THE POTENTIAL IN LEITH

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- THE POWER OF A WORKSHOP - CHARETTE WEEK

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- A TRUE PUBLIC REALM - STUDY TYPE: BRUNSWICK CENTRE

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- A "RIBON" OF CONCRETE

18

- PROGRAMMING, STONE CIRCULATION

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- STRUCTURAL STRATEGY

56

- MATERIAL STRATEGY

58

- ATMOSPHERES

60

- MODELS

68

PROCESS + REFLECT

72

NON-DESIGN:

- HOUSING FROM A DIFFERENT POINT OF VIEW 20 - DESIGN PROCESS 22

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

78

- FINAL DESIGN 24

- TECHNOLOGY COURSEWORK PART 1

78

- MELTING LEITH TOGETHER AND POURING IT INTO A MOLD 28

- TECHNOLOGY COURSEWORK PART II A

82

- MOMENTS 29

- TECHNOLOGY COURSEWORK PART 11 B

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- INHABIT + DAY IN THE LIFE OF YOU 32

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

96

P2.4 ENGINEERING EXPERIENCE 34

- ENERGY STRATEGY COURSEWORK

96

- CONCEPT 36

ABOUT ARCHITECTURE

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- STORY BOARD OF THE FILM 38

- ESSAY: QUESTION 5

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DISSERTATION STUDIES

104

- DISSERTATION PROPOSAL

104

- INSTALLATION

40

P2.5 EXPLORING EXPERIENCE

42

- INTERPRETATION OF BRIEF

44

- DESIGN PROCESS + SITE ANALYSIS

46

CONTENTS AND DECLARATION

106

- FINAL DESIGN - PLANS, SECTIONS, ELEVATIONS

48

- CONTENTS AND DECLARATION DOCUMENT SIGNED

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INDICATION OF IMPROVED WORK


AT HOME IN THE CITY

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Challenging the singularity My design approach was to build up my project from my experiences from the site visit. In addition, I have spent much time understanding what Leith really is about, and how the dynamics of the community works. My aim was to create something for the whole of Leith; some would say to make a socially sustainable design. I like to imagine architecture as the tool for shifting the world in the right direction. The community of Leith is extraordinary divers, but do not have the opportunity to strive. With my design, I wanted to complement Leith and create something quality for its citizens to enjoy and be a part of. My project consists of two components; a public skatepark, influenced by my typology building, the Brunswick Centre and COBE’s Israel Plads; and a housing scheme, inspired by Alajendro Aravena’s model. During the site visit, the landscape reminded me of a ruin of a workshop, with all the left over second hand objects, it was extremely surrealistic. Therefore, I have decided to connect my themes with a workshop. Where people can make ramps for the skatepark, as well as furniture for their homes, but can also produce art, graffiti, installations and so on. From my point of view, there must be a relationship between architecture and society to produce something valuable. My intention was to design a sculptural concrete frame and let people from Leith intervene and express themselves within this structure. Throughout my project, I have been trying to put people in the centre; Tadao Ando’s philosophy was influential to my approach. I want to represent a kind of regionalism, which points to the future and not afraid of challenging the singularity. To conclude, I admire Bjarke Ingels’s representation style, and was constantly trying to tell a story with my portfolio, rather than just to past in projects after projects.

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LEITH LIFE The film called Trainspotting perfectly summs up the feeling of “Leith Life”. Through out of my project I was consantly trying to capture this picture and do not change the dinamics of Leith. When people see left over objects and graffiti in Leith, they would say “This is a dogy place”. On the other hand, I see potential and the possibility of a start of something new. I was also particularly interested in the relationship of Edinburgh and Leith. How money, or the lack of money can effect the architectural landscape.

What Is Leith? // Leith Walk near Inchkeith House. Begbie-Character from Trainspotting. Song by Haddaway What is Love? Enough said... - JC

The view of the Edinburgh Acropolis, Leith PAGE 


From my perspective, Leith and Bronx have many simularities. The series called The Get Down, tells the story of how Hip-Hop emerged from the streets of Bronx. What I was intended to achive with my project is to start something, maybe not that ordinary, but at least to make a hub for Leith, where they can express their creativity.

The view of New Yorks skyline, Bronx PAGE 


I have found a photo competition about Leith, where people tried to capture the life of Leith in one picture. It was certainly useful through my project. It helped me to understand Leith more, and showed me how divers it really is.

A Sunny Day in Leith - Cat Oshea

Akram is new in the town as me, works in the shop on Leith walk. Here is all I fell in love with in Scotland - internationality with it's best polish shops, indian restaurants, british charity shops and nice people from all over the Planet. Leith makes me feel peaceful. - Elina D

I stumbled across this drunken scene on Easter Road so asked if I could take a snap. The merry man in the chair exclaimed "Stick this picture on ebay and you'll get 5000 likes"! - Craig N

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The starting point of my project is my impression from the site. With my photos taken, I was able to experience the roughness of Leith during the design process. I was always aiming to resemble the left over objects in my project in an experimental way. In my head, the pure solution would have been to collect all the objects from the site, recycle them into a composite material, and apply it to my walls.

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BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN EDINBURGH AND LEITH For the symposium, I was working on the commercial part of the site. We have decided to open up the public space from the two sides, so people can access more easily. We had been exploring Leith and found out that the routs currently available are not optimal for the people who arrive by bus to the site, nor to the students of a close primary school, and nor to the people who use the carpark. The rest of our proposal was including the extension of the community centre. We were aiming to design a gathering space for the community of Leith, as well as a restaurant, where people can enjoy their time. A potential extension to the roof was also a solution we considered.

opening acces from the two sides

sketches for the proposal

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EDINBURGH

LEITH

The differences between Edinburgh’s and Leith’s architecture

the connection of past and future

I had three main input for the Symposium. First, instead of using the dark narrow space between the commercial buildings, why not create a gathering space on the rooftop for people. In this case, the open space would make the square more secure.

elegant vs suburban

At this time, I was already engaged with the possible extension of the community centre, because I felt it was not functioning well enough for the whole community of Leith.

pure forms and banal forms

My last idea was to reduce the sharp changes between the different architectural styles, and to bring them closer to each other.

detailed finishes - neglected walls

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THE POTENTIAL IN LEITH

And design a skatepark with a workshop for the children of Leith, so they can make ramps and enjoy them afterwards

I have found an article in the paper

So my idea was to extend the community centre to an emty public square

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CHARETTE 2016

THE POWER OF A WORKSHOP

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A TRUE PUBLIC REALM

Perspectives for my proposal Proposal sketch plan

Children from Leith using the neglected site as a playground

The same children would benefit from a park like this

When I visited Leith, I felt that there is so much talent wasted. The people are amazing, but the ingredients are missing. With quality facilities, Leith would be able to strive. I believe that from a public workshop all Leith would benefit. From my point of view, if there were a place where youngsters would express themselves, there would be less illegal activity. The community centre could organise skate-ramp building sessions, art classes or other courses related to a workshop. The children could express their creativity on a specified wall surfaces and make installations for the park. With the stand located next to the skate pool, the square could become the heart of Leith, where people gather to play music, skate, produce art, or just to meet friends. COBE’s Israels Plads is a park I consider to be a well functional public space. With my design, I hope I can achieve something similar. The way they used copper to distinguish between the different parts of the park inspired my design.

Israels Plads - copper as separator rather than using pavements

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FROM PAST TO FUTURE

1975: Film “The Passenger”

Brunswick Centre was my typology project. Unconsciously, it had a huge influence of my design decisions. I love the architect’s vision about the spatial, material organisation of the building. The scene from the movie “The passenger” gives a great sense of how Brunswick looked and felt like to be next to it after the finish of the construction work. The main idea of the design was to make an experiment with a huge open space between the two blocks of building. And find out how people would inhabit the negative space.

At the beginning, there was no specific function of the central open space. It was just later in 2006, when a Water installation was realised by Susan Heron, to invite people to interact. The refurbishment has an industrial feeling and fits into the context very well.

Our studio topic, intensify with pleasure is about how people inhabit negative spaces. In the case of the Brunswick Centre, there was two main driving forces. The economy and the consumer society for one. And the popular culture (films, tv, music) the other force. In the Brunswick, there are more than 80 shops, offices and restaurants as a result. Nevertheless, the public space also become a concrete skate park in the 80s. BBC’s skateboarder’s trailer was filmed on the site of the building.

2007: Song “Lodger - Brunswick Centre” The lyrics of this rock song shows how people feel about the building nowadays: “8 o'clock it opens, 8 o'clock it closes 8 o'clock it opens” “Boots Pharmacy toothbrush and some privacy”

- Public - private relationship

“Second hand meat hanging from the hooks”

- Rough experience

“Concrete, concrete life is sweet”

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- Monotony, dynamism of the BC community

- But, it is fun!


A "RIBBON" OF CONCRETE

The site of my building has a very strong character. The brutalist “Plinth” dominates the space. The modernist concrete jungle actually has a very close resemblance to the site of the Brunswick Estate. The main difference is that in Leith, the buildings and streets are completely neglected. You can find left over objects all over, during the site visit I saw burnt furniture, unneeded chairs, and also a broken TV on the site. I felt like if I was visiting a ruin of a workshop, so it was quite obvious for me to design one, to give order to the landscape again. With my design, I did not want to change Leith, on the contrary. I was aiming to complement the roughness of Leith, and give order to the site in an abstract and experimental way. I have designed a sculptural concrete frame for my building, transforming from a public shelter and workshop into a housing scheme, separating the individual flats. From the exterior, the residential building will be cladded with containerships, so each flat could be personalised with artwork. The material qualities will fit into the site. I do not want to alter from it, concrete, aluminium, steel, and copper will be the main materials. Tadao Ando - “Concrete symbolises freedom”

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Frank Gehry’s family house is somehow reminds me of the design intentions of my project. The exposed structure and the corrugated aluminium panels are some of the similarities of the two design. It actually really reminds me of Leith, and shows how the city could look like, if someone composed the now non-structural, messy landscape.

Frank Gehry in the Simpsons Maryhill Overlook

The main inspiration for my project was the Maryhill Museum of Art Overlook designed Allied Works. In this case, they used reinforced cast-in place concrete to create a “ribbon” of concrete in a sculptural quality. My intension was to use the same construction process “and” shalt my public space with bare concrete and then to transform this into the frame of the residential building, separating the flats. I have spent time studying the technological strategies of the president.

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HOUSING FROM A DIFFERENT POINT OF VIEW

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Alejandro Aravena’s adaptable housing scheme was my main precedent for this project. I have made a deep research in ELEMENTAL’s (AA’s firm) projects. I used their model and developed it for Leith. With the workshop located next to the housing, residents would be able to make furniture for their houses. In the UK, the interior works are, where companies make the most profit of the projects. However, with the provided workshop, the residents would not have to rely on the construction companies. Therefore, I have decided to construct all the structural elements of the housing, rather than to copy Aravena’s model to build the frame and then fill in one-half of the building, and leave the other half for residents to personalise it. But, instead, my idea was to leave the interiors for the occupants to intervene, and have their own say in how they want it to look like. Of course, there would be courses organised in the workshop for them to help creating the furniture they wish to have. In addition, there would be template for the houses, so they do not have to come up with ideas from the blank. Families in need for social housing would have to apply for a flat, with drawings of proposals, and ideas of how they would intervene, if they had a chance to occupy one of the flats.

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DESIGN PROCESS

The “ribbon” of concrete starts from the plinth to give shelter to the public workshop. Than shifts and becomes the frame of my housing scheme, seperating the flats.

From my original 4 flats I could increase the number of houses to 6. Each flat is 8.5 meters in width and spans 5 meters, and can be accessed from a one-way corridor.

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I was creating an open plan layout for the flats, so when people interact, they can make changes, and decide where to insert the furniture they have made in the workshop.


Sketchmodels

workshop

shift

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housing


FINAL DESIGN - ISO VIEW

public benches

public roof terrace workshop

skatepark terraces

Interior of one flat

passage under the building

zigzag organisation of flats

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open extension of workshop


PLANS

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CONCEPTUAL ATMOSPHERIC SECTION

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MELTING LEITH TOGETHER AND POURING IT INTO A MOLD

With this concept image I would like to represent the diversity of Leith, and how they would benefit from a workhop, which they can use to make skate ramps for the public square, as well as furniture for their own use. I inhabited the renders with people actually from Leith to communicate the essence of the project.

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MOMENTS

workshop

skatepark

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shift - public/private relation

housing

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personalisation of the facade

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INHABITION Cross section of interlocking flats. The flats open from a straight corridor, and have similar room layouts, before the people intervene and make their own furniture/ inhabitations.

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DAY IN THE LIFE OF YOU

During the “Day in the Life of you” project, I realised that I like to inhabit spaces in a multifunctional way. For example, I would use my chair to adapt to the time of the day. During the day I would use it in the ordinary way, but at night use it as a shelf to store things on it. For the layout of my flats, I have decided to have a relatively open plan, so the occupants can decide how they want to inhabit the spaces.

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ENGINEERING EXPERIENCE

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Uncovering the uncouncious This 3 week of working together as a group have brought new thoughts into my attention, many that never came across my mind before. Of course, I have had many things in my mind about how an artist, architect or an engineer would work in general and how we could contribute to this exciting project. Unfortunately, the artist from our group did not show up for any meetings, hence our group was seeking creativity through the whole project. I consider myself a rather creative architect and I believe my perspective of looking at things is different from what most of the people are. This was the first shock I had to suffer from the group work. The easiest way of describing the main difference of my way of thinking is by an example. When my groupmates tried to come up with an idea, they instantly thought of memories of their experience of their life. For example, an effect they have seen in a movie, or a particular sound they really liked, and they could show it right away. On the other hand, when I have an idea it seems to be more abstract, and I have a picture in my head. However, at that time I do not have the exact picture in my head of how it will look like. Neither do I know if it will turn out to be a good or a bad idea. As a result, it is quite hard for me to express my thoughts, and convince others that my ideas are valuable. I have spent some time discussing this problem with my flatmate who had the same experience as a fine art student also taking part in Engineering Experiment this year. Therefore, I was quite disappointed that we had no artist in our group. On the other hand, our engineer was very helpful throughout the project, and the fact that he always show up for the meetings, shows the difference between the two discipline. The other aspect I realised during the project - and never thought of before - was the effect that an environment has on a design. It is obvious that the people who are working on a project are the main driving forces of a project. On the other hand, in my experience, the studio space, its culture, and time for example are also other important factors that contribute to the shape of a result of a design process. For example, I find it more difficult to come up with ideas in a dense, packed studio environment, than in a calm chilled space. My dissertation module is strongly linked to this topic and after this experience, I would like to make a deeper research into this topic. Lastly, the film making process made my think about the way we work, and the hierarchy of it. In a creation of a movie there are very exact roles, such as cameraman, director, etc. In our case the optimal solution would have been, if everyone wanted to do the same film. But, because each of every person have had different things in their mind, it was very difficult to work in a democratic way. Rem Koolhaas and his childhood friends have managed to make a film where everyone was the director, film star, and camera man of the film. In our project we needed to operate in an autocratic way in order to finish the movie in time.

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CONCEPT

After analysing the two scenes of the movie we came up with the concept of creating alternative realities within our installation. Since, in the movie, there are different perceptions of the world as well. For instance, we can experience the acrophobic feeling through Scottie Ferguson’s view, or for another example, once we suddenly find ourselves in his dream. Therefore, we created four viewpoints - each related to specific symbols and sequences of the film - to transmit the experience of vertigo. We have built a 1:1 staircase, and hang down the four perspective boxes from the ceiling, so people rotate them and look inside to experience a much bigger scale in these universes. These boxes are complimented with bottles at the entrance, where people will create noises without attempting to make so, making the whole experience more uncomfortable. The narrow steps and the packed atmosphere are also contributing to the acrophobic feeling that can be experienced through the installation. At the end of the staircase there is the final test, where people can look down into a box of tower. I really enjoyed how we managed to create a very dense experience through walking up the steps, yet at the very top the experience is rather satisfying then incredibly scary. Thus, I believe, that we achieved to capture the essence of both of the scenes with our model. It was really interesting to see how people react to the challenges of the experience of the installation. Plus, I would say that it was successful in a sense that many people felt uncomfortable and could not make it to the top of the staircase.

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For the first box we choose the motive of the spiral from the intro of the film. We wrapped it around with tin-foil to make it more reflective and to distort the perspective of the box.

For the second one we used tracing paper to make it transparent so when people look down, they can also feel the height. In addition, the view from the tower was included to give a similar experience as in our key scenes.

The next box was covered with coloured tissue paper and included the silhouette of Scottie Ferguson falling down in the dream sequence.

For the last one, we used cling film to play with the shadows and lighting, and hang down multiple eyes - as another symbol from the film - to create an uncomfortable feeling of this universe.

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For the final look down we created this tower of box so people can test their vertigo at the highest point of the installation. With a reflective mirror at the bottom, it has a deeper feeling when you look down. We were aiming to create the impression of a staircase with this box. In the movie, this distorted reality transforms into a real staircase.


STORYBOARD OF THE FILM For the movie, we wanted to keep it simple, but effective at the same time. Hence, we came up with the idea of using flash lights to separate the scenes, or to use slow motion as an example, to increase tension. Firstly, it was very important to find the soundtrack that have the same atmosphere as our film. After experimenting with different sounds we decided to choose Erik Truffaz - Human Being for our main background music, which transmits the chaotic feeling of the sequence. After the selection of the sound, it was much easier to apply the effects and the footage onto the different layers.

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The narrative of the film is relatively straight forward. There is a man walking up the staircase, which was filmed at different staircases on campus. While, between the climbing of the steps there are viewpoints of the perspective boxes we created. By distortion and other effects, we were aiming to make these universes in order to experience the vertigo feeling of looking down from a high point. In addition, we also wanted to generate these alternative realities so that people lose the sense of scale and perception. At the end of the film, the distorted look down fades into a real staircase, which shows the true reality of height, and makes the whole film like a nightmare, which you just woke up from. At the end, with the black background and the messy names going around we wanted to give the impression of confusion and unpleasant feeling of waking up from a dream.

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INSTALLATION

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Watch our movie by scanning the qr code, or by using the link provided below!

Final movie, and other experimentation footage: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/95rdu5p6ebqgkar/AAADQQIkjydOPcNlOaU4prwua?dl=0 Youtube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IQIjPgWosY&feature=youtu.be

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EXPLORING EXPERIENCE

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Interlocking Past and Future With my design, I was investigating relationships and opposites such as: past-future, industrial-natural, public-private, circulation-contemplation, form-void. First, I was aiming to immediate my building within the context in three ways: engage with material and natural context, connect with the spirituality of the site, and create something for Berwick that relates to it historically, and culturally. During the site visit, I was interested in materials, details, and atmospheres of the site; with my building, I was trying to connect with the surrounding and complement the context. Tadao Ando was very influential for my design, with my architecture I also want to represent a kind of regionalism that points to the future, have its connections with the past, but not afraid to implement/introduce new ideas. I believe, that the connection of past-present-future is very important in architecture. My recent trip to India was also influential to me; at the Kochi Biennale I saw the merge of modern technology and the spiritual tradition of India. With my building I was constantly trying to create an “experience tour” for the visitors, where they experience the building, as a shift from past to future, encouraging people to create, and be innovative. At the end of the exhibition tour, there will be a virtual reality tour (drawing upon a similar virtual reality tour in India), which will capture the feeling of the historical Berwick, natural, material, and future potential of the site. Another key reference to the context is the vintage elevator shaft, the crane, and the metaphor of the excavation of the stone, which have to do with the historical past of the site (mining was taking place). I imagined the building as a living creature, the circulation of the stone, and the visitors would make it continuously moving. For the programming of my building, the office of OMA, within that, Joshua Remus Prince’s approach to the organisation of the Seattle Library was influential for me. The interlocking private and public spaces, the circulation of the building, and all of the programming were carefully designed in a logical way. The shape of the building was a result of the concept, and the information of the accommodations. To conclude, I would like to mention that graphically two Hungarian firms: Paradigma.Ariadne, and BUBAHAMORI were very influential for me. Operating with symbols and minimal textures, rather than trying to create realistic renders. In addition, consciously I wanted to keep a distance from 3D softwares such as Revit, or Sketchup during the design process, so I can benefit the full potential of my imagination.

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INTERPRETATION OF BRIEF

With my design I wanted to create a relevant multifunctional building for the Berwick Film Festival; a private sculpture studio for Eduardo Chillida’s admirers, supplemented with a public exhibition centre, which can be a main venue for the Berwick Film festival.

first sketch

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SITE ANALYSIS Woods - Blocking the wind Materiality - Sandstone

Chimney - Industrial Past History - Coal mining Berwick - View to the townscape

Seagulls - Wind, exposed site

Sailboat - A symbol for the city

Water - Mouth of the River Tweed Swan - Proximitu to nature Lighthouse - Location is close to the coast

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DESIGN PROCESS

With my design I was aiming to separate three segments: arrival, exhibition, and the workshop. At the same time, all of theses spaces required both single and double height stories. This is how I ended up with the idea of interlocking “L” shapes. In addition, the elevator shaft on the main facade also make the building more interesting, as it is in the focus of the intersection.

development model - Double and Single stories

first concept diagram: arrival - public - private relation ship development model - interlocking shapes

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DEVELOPMENT OF SPATIAL CONFIGURATION IN SECTION

Programming: public workshop and public exhibition rout

More defined section, with circulation

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Finalised section, ready for athmospheric render


TITLE

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PLANS

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TITLE

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FRONT ELEVATION

With this conceptual sketch, I was trying to capture the dynamics of the building. First, the tectonics of the different spaces. Second, the private and the public circulation. Third, the atmospheric qualities.

Conceptual Section

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PROGRAMMING AND STONE CIRCULATION

This is a key diagram to understand the spatial configuration of the building, and the movement of stone. The orange words are showing the public functions of the building, while the grey ones are the private accommodations. By organising the public and private spaces into two interlocking “L” shapes (one horizontal, one vertical), I have managed to create a complex programme, with the elevator shaft in-between the “L” shapes. The vintage elevator is the key circulation device for the people, while the crane at the back of the site has the function of moving the stone and sculptures. I have designed pick-up and drop off points for the crane as to be efficient and function well.

development sketches

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STRUCTURAL STRATEGY

Structure My first idea was to use loadbearing masonry walls for the base of the building and have a steel structure on the top. Later, have I realised that it would be more logical to construct the entire of the building with steel frame. In that case, the interiors will be cladded by local sandstone at the lower floors, with white panels at the gallery spaces, and exposed copper beams in the private workshop, where a secondary lightweight glasssteel structure would wrap around the top floors. This lightweight structure will create the window openings of the building; the panels will variate from copper to glass.

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MATERIAL STRATEGY

Materiality Remaining faithful to the textures, materials, details, and colours of the site I have decided to use a darker grey type of limestone for the cladding of my building, while using local sandstone in some of the interiors to create underground atmospheres. I choose copper for my secondary material, which is recurring material in Eduardo Chillida’s works. In addition, it has a nice contrast with the limestone, but at the same time roots into the site.

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ATMOSPHERIC SECTION

With this atmospheric section, I wanted to show how people would use the building, as well as the experiences of different floors and spaces. With the surrounding symbols and dream-like atmosphere, I would like to demonstrate my experiences from the site visit.

development sketches

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VERTICAL SECTION OF ELEVATIOR SHAFT EXPERIENCES OF THE EXHIBITION TOUR

With this vertical concept art, I am illustrating the three main different experiences of the building. It is showing, with the aid of symbols how the visitors are being excavated from the ground to the gallery space and later have an insight into the workshop, as well as a view to the townscape.

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VIRTUAL REALITY TOUR

At the end of the traditional exhibition, where visitors could learn about the industrial history, see how a contemporary workshop works and enjoy Eduardo Chillida’s work, they finally have the chance to take part in an experience tour in the woods at the back of the site. With a supervisor, they can experience the site in a utopic way. Listening to the wind blowing, touching different materials, and seeing the surrounding in a slightly futuristic way.

inspiration from Kochi Biennale, in india

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CONCEPT MODEL

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Left Side Elevation

Front Elevation

Back Elevation

Right Side Elevation

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CIRCULATON MODEL

from the back

from the front

double height gallery space

double height gallery space

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PUBLIC AND PRIVATE CIRCULATON

private circulation at the back

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PROCESS + REFLECT

Conceptual and Atmospheric artworks: During the past year, I developed a way of creating atmospheres and concepts for my designs. I have spent a long time to find my illustration language by studying other inspirations. I shifted from trying to achieve photo-realistic renders to more conceptual computer drawings. Symbols, textures, and three dimensional spaces can be very effective to transmit the essence of a project.

spatial configuration of spaces in sketchup

inspirations in no specific order

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rendering textures in photoshop

inhabitation with symbols


Model Crafting: When making my final model for the Exploring Experience project have I realised how much fun it is to create something with your hand. After spending days in my grandfather’s workshop, the result was even better than expected.

selecting the perfect wood

model in progress

Assembeling the pieces

curving out the shapes

idea for the copper cladding

final model

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Film-editing: This year, I was also engaged with filmmaking. After learning the basics of Premier Pro, I edited our film for the Engineering Experience project. Later I had the idea of making a landscape analysis for Berwick to support my project, a similar to GUBAHAMORI’s. Unfortunately, I did not have enough time to finish the film, but have put a lot of effort into it and uploaded one of my efforts to YouTube. In the summer, I would like to continue my work and finish this project.

GUBAHAMORI GELLERT HILL - LANDSCAPE DISCRIPTION

https://vimeo.com/193813656

BERWICK LANDSCAPE DISCRIPTION - BY ME

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a6yd3Ghvy4&feature=youtu.be

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snapshots from the film


LEARING JOURNAL

https://www.instagram.com/blmjournal/

I post my work, photographs, and inspirations on my instagram page.

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Instead of posting random pictures after each other, I carefully edit my feed. I am trying to tell my story of architecture.

instagram feed

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DESIGN SUMMARY

COURSEWORK SUBMISSION PART 1 ARC2009 Architectural technology 09.01.2017

SITE PLANS

STUDENT NUMBER: 150379368

PLANS

ELEVATION

SECTION

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A. PRECEDENT STUDY

RENDERS OF THE MODEL

The main inspiration for my project was the Maryhill Museum of Art Overlook designed Allied Works. In this case they used reinforced cast-in place concrete to create a “ribbon” of concrete in a sculptural quality. My intension was to use the same construction process “and” shalt my public space with bare concrete and then to transform this into the frame of the residential building, separating the flats. I have spent time studying the technological strategies of the president. What I did not realise at the time that it will not be easy to integrate this pure concrete form into the tectonics of my residential building. But, what it did help with was the type of foundation they used to make the building stand. I had to scale it up for my 3 story residential building, but the principles are the same.

CONTAINER SHIP RENDER BEFORE THE INDUVIDUALISATION OF OCCUPIERS

CORRIDOR- COPPER RAILING, CONCRETE FRAME, ALUMINIUM CLADDING

EXPLODED SECTION - FROM PUBLIC TO PRIVATE SEPERATED BY THE CONCRETE FRAME

B. CONSTRUCTION EVALUATION My other precedent I studied is the Valdemaqueda Town Hall. My design is quite unique; hence I could not find the same kind of construction method I wanted to use. But, I have spent much time on observing this concrete framed building. I was most interested in the slate cladding they have used for the building. But, at the end I came up with the conclusion that I would not be able to transmit my idea through this material. It would not work in the context and in addition it would give an impression of a civic building.

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SUGGESTED IMPROVEMENTS Steel floors and walls were the obvious option for my design, because of the concrete sculptural frame of the building. But, I see two other different ways of constructing my intended design. Either do the whole building in in situ concrete, but then the insulation of the building would cause problems. Also, this construction method would not be very sustainable. The only construction type, which would work in this case and would also make the building more sustainable is timber frame(summary rating of A+). I believe the shape and the scale of the housing part of my building could be constructed by timber. In this case, with a continuous concrete slab cladding I could show the frame of the building in order to give the impression of a concrete from the outside. And clad the walls in the same way, with aluminium container ships.

C. CONSTRUCTION DECLARATION

D. TECTONIC INTENT My concept for the building is to create an in situ concrete frame and let people from Leith personalise and express themselves within this structure. Fill in the frame in their individual unique way. My impressions of the site were very influential in terms of my decisions. The surrounding brutalist concrete buildings and left over objects on the site reflects “Leith Life”. I did not want to change Leith, instead reuse these materials in my project. The concrete frame begins as a sculptural shelter for a public workshop, where people can make furniture and artworks to individualise their flats. Then the concrete shifts and becomes part of the structure of the housing and functions as a flat separator. The floors and walls will be constructed by steel, as this material is the most easily connectable with my concrete “ribbon”. I choose a rainscreen wall construction and clad it with rough shipping containers, so people can personalise it with graffiti, or any other kind of expression. The railings will be made out of copper and exploded steel beams will help the building to fit into the site. The interiors will be cladded with plywood and plasterboard. In addition, the residents can make unique wooden furniture for their use. And the in situ roof will be covered by EPDM single ply roofing membrane.

Sketchup file

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CONTENTS

Introduction

4-5

Audit Location and Scope

6-7

Access Audit Checklist

8-9

Report Pedestrian Routes Street Furniture Sanitary Facilities Websites

10-13 14-17 18-19 20-21

BÁLNA, Budapest

Summary

22-23

Student No: 150379368

Bibliography

24-25

Appendix A - Access Audit

26-29

ARC2009 Architectural Technology Coursework Submission Part 2A Access Audit and Report

Introduction

Anterior cruciate ligament injury

Bálna Budapest /”Whale”/ Bálna Budapest is a cultural, entertainer and commercial centre in Budapest. It is located directly next to the river bank of the Danube. The building consists of several 19th century warehouses, but was redesigned by Kas Oosterhuis and Lénárd Ilona to create a new landmark for Budapest. It has opened in 2013 and gives accommodation to New Budapest Gallery, which is located on the first floor. The total floor area of the building is 30 574 m² from which 11 772 m² is available for rent.

A knee ligament injury is a relatively common sport injury (over 100 000 tears in the US annually) and it usually occurs in a non-contact situation. Full recovery time ranging between 1-2 years after operation. I choose this circumstance, because I have some own experience in sport injuries and the effects they have on everyday life. In addition, my father had this particular injury a couple of years ago.

The building from the main access route

Symptoms: - Unstable knees - Use of a crutch to reduce body weight from leg and increase balance - Reduced walking pace - Need for rest points, sitting down points

The interior of the building Torn anterior cruciate ligament

The biomechanical limits of the ligament are exceeded and the internal stabilizer of the knee joint is torn.

Bálna - After the reconstruction

The entrance of New Budapest Gallery 5

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Audit Location and Scope

Bálna ”Whale”

Date: 14th April, 2017 Name of building: Bálna Budapest Adress: 1093 Budapest, Fővám tér 11-12. Weather conditions: 12 degrees, sunny with some clouds

The report assesses the public accessibility of the selected building. Focusing on the external environment, investigating mainly the pedestrian routes, but also presenting the vehicular transportation. In addition, presenting the strengths and the possible improvements for the building’s sanitary facilities and communicational strategies. In order to increase the efficiency of the building and assure access for all, including disabled people.

Site map The site is easily approachable by several directions. By pedestrian routes from the two sides of Bálna. And by a vehicular route from a third side of the building. Although the performance of the building is not that successful due to the site’s distance from the busy parts of the city.

Diagrammatic Floor Plan - Level 1

Diagrammatic Floor Plan - Level 0

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Access Audit Checklist

The Steel Structure of Bálna

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Pedestrian Routes

The main access route originates from a metro station and arrives at the “tail” of the whale. This is a 3-4 minute walk, but street furniture assures the traveller to stop and enjoy the view of the river. A secondary access is available at the head of the whale, as well as a third and a forth entrance on the two sides of the building. The one from the riverside is for pedestrians, and the one from the city is for people arriving by bus. It is important to say that the site is out of the most crowded city centre, which makes it possible to create viewing points and make the people interact with the street.

Setting down point and acces to carpark The main pedestrian access route from the metro station

In general, the pedestrian routes are visually attractive, and well maintained. On the contrary, in some cases it excludes disabled and elderly people. Where gradients are greater than 1:20 alternative routes are provided. Also, the seating provided is not suitable for every people. In addition, the lack of visual contrast can be a source of danger. The pedestrian routes surrounding the building became a cherished environment for people from younger generations.

Pedestrian Accessibility

Acces to the building from the head of the Whale Pedestrian route connecting the two ends of the building - next to the river bank 10

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Access from the back and the riverside

The main access route

Youngsters occupying the street furniture

The lack of visual contrast and low height can be the source of danger

The trees are not providing enough headroom for commuters, and the path is very narrow between the tree and the bench. Also no litter bins are provided in a long distance.

Different colours and textures highlight the direction of the pedestrian routes. Drainage channels are set inside the access routes, but flush with the paving.

Bike storage at the edge of the building provided. Although, no coverage from the weather.

The bike road is seperated from the pedestrians

Lights and litter bins are provided at this part of the pedestrian route

Drainage channels flush with the paving surfaces

The bike road is continuing beside the building. And it is well indicated and lighting is installed.

A ramp provided with landings at the entrance of the building.

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Street Furniture The main characteristic of the site is the view onto the river and the other side of the city (Buda). As a result of this, many seating is provided for people. Although, most of the furniture is excluding elderly and disabled people. For example, for a person with an injury such as ACL it would be a struggle to sit down to these benches without a hand of a friend. Even sitting on some of them would not be relaxing at all. These individuals were not taken under consideration during the design process of the benches. No handrails are provided, the seating levels are extremely low sometimes, the materials and shapes are not comfortable to sit on. On the other hand, due to its recent construction the streets are well maintained and equipped. Lighting, cycle parking areas, plants, and signs are helping the people to navigate and access the building. Due to the location of the site, street furniture do not cause obstruction. However, in the case of a larger crowd the circulation of the people would be questionable. Furthermore, the furniture blends into the street, hence difficult to distinguish between background and furniture. Some additional signs could help to locate bike storages and other features of the site.

No back support provided, and difficult to conversate with others sitting on these furniture. The colour of the pavement makes it flush into the street. But the material provides some contrast for the eye.

These seats are difficult to sit on, but scateboarders are enjoying the curves of the furniture

This furniture provides a much more suitable seating. Also a handrail would be useful to help people sitting down.

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Seating areas are blocked with vegetation. Only a narrow bridge leads to the benches.

With the trees located close to the benches the pedestrian route can get overcrowded. Wheelchair users can hardly use the route, and would not be able to stop next to the benches.

These bright colour plastic seats are set back from the circulation road to provide seating.

Some traditional type of benches provided for a broader variety of users.

Although the lack of maintance and the material characteristics make the benches unpleasent.

They have become an obstruction, rather than seatings. Also some people use it for scretching

Older people have found some suitable seating for themself.

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Sanitary Facilities

During the day of my visit I have decided to investigate the sanitary facilities, which are located quite far from the exhibition space. I assume that for money saving reasons only the ground floor toilets are working. The rest are kept closed, which is quite annoying when you walk with a serious knee injury. Although, at least the baby changing facility was open on the first floor. As well as the disabled toilet on the ground floor, which is located quite far away from the elevator. The sanitary facility I could access was reasonably equipped, with some useful features missing. There was no colored facility indicator on the doors, no clothes hooks, no support rails. In addition, there was no effective visual contrast, because every part of the room was white. But, the most annoying part of the toilet was the tap and the soap dispenser. The automatic sensor on the tap was insufficient, and there was only cold water. Plus, it took me around one minute to figure out how the dispenser works. To conclude, the size of the sanitary facility was overcrowded compared to the size of the building.

ground floor

The sensor of the tap did not work very well, and the water temperature was not adjustable

No pushing or pulling, the end of the dispenser has to be squeezed.

Privacy screens are applied to the urinals.

first floor

International sign indicating the way of the toilet.t

Inside the baby changing facility.

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The baby changing facility is located next to the fire exit.

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Websites Embedded Google Maps is slowing down the website

I investigated two websites; the official website of Bálna Budapest, and the website of the New Budapest Gallery. Generally speaking, both websites are well organized, information is easy to find and it is simple to navigate around. They are structured either with a horizontal or a vertical menu bar.

You have to scroll down a whole screen to see the information

Balnabudapest.hu

Budapestgaleria.hu

This is a more information oriented website, it has a very simple layout, as well as a search tool, which makes it easy to find information. On the other hand, commercial components make it a slightly difficult to navigate around. Apart from Hungarian language, English and German is also available. The 3D diagram of the layout of the building is difficult to use it. Furthermore, an irrelevant google map of the location of the building is embedded in every page of the site, which slows it down.

This is a more professional website, designed by Ferenc Eln. Visual attractiveness was very important, as it is the communication channel for an art gallery. However, information can be found smoothly. Information can be accessed in both Hungarian and English languages. In addition, the website is optimized for Android and IOS and it is easy to navigate around on a mobile phone. The only disturbing feature is that the photographs are sometimes too big, which increases the scrolling time to get to the demanded information.

A useful 3D diagram of the layout of the building. Could be more accurate. Some signs are at the wrong place.

By clicking on windows more information is accessable. For instance, information about parking.

Logical layout, with profession team working on the website. They have facebook, instagram and other social media accounts to share information.

Language can be changed at the top of the homepage

Homepage of Bálna

Homepage of New Budapest Gallery

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Summary

To summarize, Bálna meets many of the requirements presented by the AAC and approved document M, due to its recent construction. Although, some changes could be implemented. During the design of the street furniture aesthetics were the main driving forces. Some of the unused benches could be replaced by simpler and more useful items. On the other hand, the building does not function well in its form today. The state-owned building’s biggest problem is its vacancy. The commercials for venue renting on the website are a good evidence of the lack of people visiting the building. Money saving could be the answer of why toilets were closed on several floors. From my experience, the building performs quite well in providing access to the inside of the building (Pedestrian routes, car park, bus drop-off). However, owing to the lack of visitors, the building has started to deteriorate. From my point of view, the building would function better as a museum due to its distance from the city center. Because, today it has no function other than the art gallery and the barely visited stores located in the building. Also, with the creation of more seating and viewpoints looking at the river - similarly how it works outside of the building - Bálna would attract more people.

Reflection of Flags

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Bibliography

Word count ~ 1230

websites: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A1lna_(%C3%A9p%C3%ADtm%C3%A9ny) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anterior_cruciate_ligament_injury http://budapestgaleria.hu/_/ http://www.balnabudapest.hu/ photographs and drawings: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=b%C3%A1lna&espv=2&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjyy8LI7bXTAhVMEVAKHQBjAnkQ_AUIBigB&biw=1280&bih=603#tbm=isch&q=b%C3%A1lna+budapest&imgrc=P6_JIBNedq-SfM: the rest was drawn, or taken by myself books: Access Audit Handbook, RIBA Publishing, 2013 Edition Design for Accessibility, RIBA Publishing, 2012 Edition Approved Document M - Access to and using the building, Volume 2, Newcastle NBS, 2015 Edition Viewpoint of the pedestrian route

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Appendix A - Access Audit

26

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Contents

ARC2009 Architectural Technology Coursework Submission Part 2B Means of Escape - Exploring Experience

Strategy Outline and Summary

4

Summary and Calculations

5-7

Background information

8-14

Amended Design

15-19

Student No: 150379368

Summary and Calculations Summary and Calculations

Summary and Calculations

STRATEGY OUTLINE:

Floor Space Factors

I used the floor space factors to calculate the estimation of the occupancy of my building. The orange colour shows the maximum occupancy calculation for the private section of the building. The blue colour stands for the public part. The total occupancy of the building is 557 people, shared between public (557) and private (55).

- Most staircases have to be fire protected - Some stair widths have to be increased. - Two exit routes provided for public users - One exit route for private users - Addition fire protection close to exit routes - Main exit door width has to be increased - Addition of refuge points

Maximum occupancy calculation

SUMMARY:

Type of room

Room name

Total floor area (m2)

Floor space factor (m2/person)

Calculation

14 8

Storage Exhibition space

80 65

30.0 5.0

80/30 65/5

level

Max occupancy 3 13

Level -1 total maximum occupancy Private Level -1 total maximum occupancy Public

My building consists of a public and a private accommodation. Hence, I was investigated my building as two separate escape strategy. Due to the few people occupying the private workshop of my building, I did not have to make many changes in that part. Door widths and stair widths were complying with the UK Building Regulations. Although, I had to add fire protection to the escape staircases. Because of my design concept, circulation and stairs are an important part of the experience of the building. Therefore, I could not add more staircases to the building, because it would have made the spaces illogical and overcrowded. Thus, in order to comply with the fire escape regulations my main staircases have to be fire protected.

Type of room

4 4 4

In my amended design there is one exit route for the private part of the building onto the backyard. In order to create this fire exit I had to move a crane located at that area (note the level difference between street level and the backyard) of the building. For the public I have created two exits, both located close to the main circulation point (staircase 1). The first one is rescuing people to the backyard on the first level, and another opening to the street. In addition, I added refuge points located close to the same staircase.

Room name

Reception Café Exhibition space

Total floor area (m2)

93 47 25

Floor space factor (m2/person)

1 1 1

Calculation

93/1 47/1 25/1

Level

4

Room name

Exhibition space

Total floor area (m2)

255

Level Level 1 total maximum occupancy

Maximum occupancy (Rounded to nearest whole person) 93 47 25 Max occupancy 165

Ground Floor total maximum occupancy Type of room

Maximum occupancy (Rounded to nearest whole person) 3 13

Floor space factor (m2/person)

1

Calculation

255/1

Maximum occupancy (Rounded to nearest whole person) 255 Max occupancy 255

Type of room

Room name

Total floor area (m2)

Floor space factor (m2/person)

Calculation

8

Workshop

132

5

132/5

Level

Max occupancy

Level 2 total maximum occupancy

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26

Type of room

Room name

Total floor area (m2)

Floor space factor (m2/person)

Calculation

2

Public Roof terrace Private Roof terrace Exhibition space Studio Space

21

0.5

21/0.5

Maximum occupancy (Rounded to nearest whole person) 42

15

1

15/1

15

27

1

27/1

27

64.5

6

64.5/6

4 4 9 Level

Level 3 total maximum occupancy - Public Level 3 total maximum occupancy - Private Total occupancy of entire building Total occupancy of Public part of the building Total occupancy of Private part of the building

5

4

Maximum occupancy (Rounded to nearest whole person) 26

11 Max occupancy 69 26 557 55 502


Summary and Calculations Summary and Calculations

Summary and Calculations Travel Distances After measuring the longest existing distances when escapig I realised that my building complies with the UK building regulations. Although, I added a secondary exit route on the first floor to develop my building’s exit strategy. As the number of maximum occupants are close to 600 people.

Using the capacity of the stairs table I calculated the minimal width of the stairs and the escape route corridors and door openings. The width of the exit door has to be 2510 mm on the ground floor and 1685 on the first floor. In addition, Staircase 1 has to be at least 1600 mm width, the other stairs have to be 1000 mm width.

Capacity Of Stairs

Travel distances for occupants of building when escaping

Minimum escape route corridor and door opening widths calculation Public floors Ground floor First floor Second floor Third floor Basement

Max occupancy 502 337 82 56 13

Min width 2510 1685 850 750 750

Private floors Ground floor First floor Second floor Third floor Basement

Max occupancy 0 55 52 26 3

Min width 750 750 750 750 750

STAIR 5 (private

Connecting Ground floor – Third floor Basement – Third floor First floor – Third Floor Basement – Ground floor Basement – Ground floor

Fire Protection Yes

Width (mm) 1600

Yes

1000

Yes

1000

Yes

1000

No

1000

Levels

5c

Public basement Public ground floor Public first floor Public second floor Public third floor Private basement Private ground floor Private first floor Private second floor Private third floor

5c 5c 5c

Minimum stair widths calculation Stair name STAIRCASE 1 (main public) STAIRCASE 2 (main private) STAIRCASE 3 (public) STAIR 4 (public)

Pupose group

5c 7 normal hazard 6 normal hazard 3

Minimum width for final exits: public: 2510, private: 1000

Maximum travel distance

-

More than one direction (m) 45

Longest existing distance One More direction direction (m) (m) 13

-

45

-

24

18

45 -

2

20

-

45 45

-

11 20

-

-

-

-

25

-

14

-

-

45

-

18

One direction only (m)

Number of escapes

6

7 LEVEL 3

Background Information

Background Information

SITE PLAN

LEVEL 3

8

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Background Information

Background Information

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

10

11

Background Information

Background Information

GROUND FLOOR BASEMENT LEVEL 12 13

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Background Information

Amended Design

SECTION

LEVEL 3 15

14

Amended Design

Amended Design

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

16

17

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Amended Design

Amended Design

BASEMENT LEVEL

GROUND FLOOR

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18

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SAP Evaluation Wall Type 1: Rainscreen cladding on Steel Frame Element description

Thickness (mm)

Thermal Conductivity (W/mK)

Thermal Resistance (m2K/W)

205

0

Containership Cladding

25

Metal Support (cavity)

75

-

-

Rigid Insulation

50

0.023

2.17

Steel Frame (Mineral Wool Insulation)

100

0.04

2.5

Plasterboard

45

0.72

0.0625

-

-

4.73

Overall

U value (1/R)

Owing to my rainscreen wall system, my original design scored very well in the SAP evaluation. With the double insulation I achieved a impressive 0.211 W/mK U value for my wall.

0.211 W/mK

Roof Type 1: Warm deck, Flat roof Element Description

Thermal Conductivity (W/mK)

Thermal Resistance (m2K/W)

2

-

-

Rigid Insulation

75

0.023

3.26

In Situ Concrete Slab

200

1.45

0.14

-

-

3.4

EPDM Single Ply Roofing Membrane

15379368 ARC 2009 Technology Dwelling Plus Site D 20.01.2017.

Overall

U value (1/R)

Thickness (mm)

My initial roof system scored 0.294 for U value, because of the relatively thin rigid insulation I intended to use.

0.294 W/mK

My selected flat is located on the first and second story of my building, hence I did not include my ground floor in the calculations.

Project 1 20.01.2017

Operator Telephone Fax e-Mail

Room 1 / Light scene 1 / False Colour Rendering

Improvements for SAP Wall Type 1: Rainscreen cladding on Steel Frame Element description

Thickness (mm)

Containership Cladding

25

Thermal Conductivity (W/mK)

Thermal Resistance (m2K/W)

205

0

Metal Support (cavity)

50

-

-

Rigid Insulation

75

0.023

3.26

Steel Frame (Mineral Wool Insulation)

100

0.04

2.5

Plasterboard

45

Overall

U value (1/R)

0.72

-

-

0.0625

5.82

Wall and Roof improvements

Window and Door configurations

To improve my wall system I increased the thickness of the rigid insulation by 25 mm, located in the cavity. I have managed to have an impressive 0.172 U-value.

I have selected a triple glazed window, provided by Pilkington energiKare1. This window has 0.6 U value, which is a big improvement, compared to my original double glazed window (2.0 U-value).

I also changed my roof, by improving its insulation. I added another 25 mm to its thickness and achieved an overall 0.22 U-value for my flat roof.

For my roof light, I choose the product of Roof Maker2, which has the same 0.6 U-value.

0.172 W/mK

EPDM Single Ply Roofing Membrane Rigid Insulation In Situ Concrete Slab Overall

U-value (1/R)

Thickness (mm)

Thermal Conductivity (W/mK)

Thermal Resistance (m2K/W)

2

-

-

100

0.023

4,35

200

1.45

0.14

-

-

4,49

Project 1

Project 1

Roof Type 1: Warm deck, Flat roof Element Description

Daylight Study

With the improvement of my insulations I have managed to reduce the space heating costs from 173 £ to 111 £ per year. Additionally, I increased the thickness of the hot water insulation jacket, by 25 mm to 50 mm, in order to get a delightful 126 £ cost per year for water heating.

The first simulation of my original design pointed out that my roof light configuration is oversized. In addition, the windows on the East would cause too much glazing. On the other hand, the only exposed wall surface I can use is the East side of my living room. Hence, I need the 3 windows to have light in every corner of the room. But, I have decided to use triple glazing instead of double, which will filter the light. Also, I was experimenting with the height and size of the window. I believe, I have managed to estimate the sizes and the heights of the windows quite correctly. But, I decided to increase the height with an additional 10 cm in order to have less glazing right next to my windows. After this, I have resized the roof light, and spent some time on positioning it in the most appropriate way. After I optimised the windows for my living room, realised that that with changing the layout of the room I could make the space more enjoyable for the occupants. In order to do that, I put the table close to the windows, and moved the cupboards into the darker corner of the room. 20.01.2017

20.01.2017

Operator Telephone Fax e-Mail

Operator Telephone Fax e-Mail

Final

Project 1

20.01.2017

Project 1

Operator Telephone Fax e-Mail

Room 1 / Light scene 1 / False Colour Rendering

Room 1 / Light scene 1 / False Colour Rendering

Room 1 / Light scene 1 / False Colour Rendering

I am using an Aluminium profiled door system for my front, and back door, provided by Everest.

DIALux 4.6 by DIAL GmbH

20.01.2017

Operator Telephone Fax e-Mail

Room 1 / Light scene 1 / False Colour Rendering

Page 4

0.22 W/mK triple glazed window

roof light

Initial design

aluminium door DIALux 4.6 by DIAL GmbH

Page 4

After changing the height of window and upgrading to triple glazing on the East wall

DIALux 4.6 by DIAL GmbH

References: 1 https://www.pilkington.com/en-gb/uk/products/product-categories/thermal-insulation/pilkington-energikare-range/pilkington-energikare-triple 2 https://roof-maker.co.uk/fixed-flat-rooflight/?infinity=ict2~net~gaw~ar~96779859961~kw~~mt~~cmp~HC%20-%20Google%20Shopping%20-%20Rooflights~ag~Rooflights&gclid=CJqxz5Tu0NECFQ-3Gwod_QcF2Q 3 http://www.everest.co.uk/doors/entrance/aluminium/#tab2

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After adjusting the size, and position of rooflight, plus upgrading to triple glaze

DIALux 4.6 by DIAL GmbH

Page 4

Page 4

After applying the more appropriate layout

DIALux 4.6 by DIAL GmbH

Page 4


Energy Strategy With the introduction of renewable energies, my building would be able to function more independently. After doing some research, I have decided to turn my flat roof surfaces into energy producing assets. In the case of my design, this solution seems to work with the best efficiency. The flat roof of my design makes it possible to install photovoltaic panels in the required angle to produce maximum electrical power. These panels are capable of picking up diffused sunlight, which is a key aspect in a site like Edinburgh. Also, the installed PV panels could be connected with a solar water heating system. Which, can reduce the fuel bills and the carbon dioxide emission, by 75 £ and 270 kg per year, respectively. In addition, I am considering the installation of a rainwater recovery system on the roof. This collects rainwater from the roof for toilet flushing. It may not be very useful in terms of reducing costs, on the other hand, it can make my building more environmentally friendly. Plus, my flat roof would be optimal for the installation of this system.

Rain water recovery - gravity system

Photovoltaic panels

Solar water heating system

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ARC2024 About Architecture: Cities, Cultures and Spaces - Essay

Exploring Bjarke Ingels's road of becoming a 21st century Starchitect - focusing on his architectural representation style INTRODUCTION TO THE ESSENCE OF BIG First and foremost, I would like to introduce Bjarke Ingels’s architecture agenda, which he expresses in one striking phrase: “Yes is more”. Bjarke Ingels Group is much more interested in evolution, rather than revolution. From their perspective, architecture projects gradually evolve, by adapting and improvising to the changes of the world. Rather than thinking in a coherent architectural style, they are much more interested in what have to be done in order to find the perfect solution. Therefore, their aim is to shift the world into a more liveable place. In the expression “Yes is more” there is the willingness of fighting for a better planet. Most architects are aware of the global warming and the environmental pollution caused by humanity, and there are many well-known engineering techniques humankinds have discovered in the past couple of decades. On the contrary, in the majority of the cases architects seem to forget about simple, but effective solutions. One of the main critique of the Danish firm is that they do not say anything new or revolutionary. On the other hand, they introduce sustainable design in their projects, and more importantly they are taking a relevant part of shaping the appearance of our cities. In addition, the firm’s approach is to not throw out any old models. They are not afraid of reusing or adapting ideas from previous projects, even though they have failed in another context. "I do not consider Bjarke Ingels the reincarnation of this or that architect from the past," said Koolhaas in the text published alongside Ingel's listing in the Time 100. "On the contrary, he is the embodiment of a fully fledged new typology, which responds perfectly to the current zeitgeist."i

QUESTION 5. Architects of the 20th and 21st centuries not only designed buildings, they also developed new techniques of representation (think Rietveld’s axonometrics, Venturi Scott Brown’s mappings of Las Vegas, Zaha Hadid’s constructivist paintings or MVRDV’s datascapes and many many more). Choosing the work of just one architect/architectural practice that is particularly interesting to you, and with reference to at least 4 carefully selected examples, suggest how their representational work informed their design or spatial ideas.

CHAPTER 1: “YES IS MORE” – IN A FORM OF A COMMIC BOOK “Yes is more” brings us to the first chapter of my essay, which is also the title of Bjarke Ingles’s first book, published by the brilliant Taschen. It contains BIG’s manifesto, as well as the story of their projects in an innovative way of representing. All of this in the form of a comic book. Ingels had been dreaming of becoming a comic book designer for a long period of time during his young ages, but throughout his studies he came across the field of architecture and fell in love with this creative practice. In order to tell the complex story of a certain architecture project, one has to make a huge effort. There are different levels of communicating an idea. If one thinks of a simple situation, for instance: information exchange between two people. A text message would not contain a very deep level of emotion. Even after the introduction of emoji characters we can hardly express a more complex feeling. With a voice message on the other hand, we have the opportunity of transmitting more information in a faster period of time. An even more advanced type of communication is Facetime, where one can also see the other person’s facial and other kind of expressions. However, none of the above can replace the efficiency of an in-person conversation, where people can exchange even more information. The same kind of model is true for presenting an architectural story. Only by showing the technical drawing of a project, it would be fairly difficult to sell it, or even to understand the depth of a project. BIG is a firm, which tries to explore new ways of communicating ideas. With their book titled “Yes is More" they are aiming to produce a representation method, which is capable of telling every interesting bit of their project’s stories. The Danish architect integrated the idea of using a comic-book for telling a story, in order to increase the quality of his presentation. In his early career Bjarke Ingels was also a big admire of Netherlandish Starchitect Rem Koolhaas, moreover he also spent some time in his firm, OMA as an intern. Koolhaas, who is also interested in telling a story throughout his architecture projects, has came in to the architecture world similarly, after spending some time of creating fiction. In the early stages of his life he was interested in film making, which helped him to tell his architectural projects. For example, in his movie called “A kind of an architect”, or a more recent film, titled “Rem”. Additionally, his books, e.g.: “S, M, L, XL” also endeavours to tell the story of his work in a more interesting approach. Incidentally, there are many similarities between “Yes is More” and “S, M ,L , XL”. The Dutch architect, who is also called the godfather of 21st century architecture owing to the fact that many architects who have spent a period of time at his firm, later became influential in shaping 21st century architecture - become the main Starchitect of his era. In addition, Rem was interested in the roles of an actor as well as a director, the same way as his disciple, Bjarke Ingels. With his exceptional, future pointing approach he is on the road of becoming the main Starchitect of his generation, but with a drastically different approach then Koolhaas. "He (Bjarke Ingels) threw out the ballast and soared," said Koolhaas, who is the founder of Dutch firm OMA. "He is completely in tune with the thinkers of Silicon Valley, who want to make the world a better place without the existential handwringing that previous generations felt was crucial to earn utopianist credibility.”ii

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BIG created stories which can be told through two dimensional printed books, or 2 or sometimes 3 dimensional video presentations, and purely entertaining live presentationsinterviews. The architecture stories have been adapted from a comic book to Ted talk presentation, and vice versa, from a story captured of a conversation between architects in the office to a comic book. From my perspective, this makes his approach extremely unique. Ingels invented a new typology, and what he achieves is making architecture out of pure fiction. vii. (2

CHAPTER 2: FROM 1D TO 2D TO 3D to 4D? Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Guillermo Fernandez Abascal’s “Architectural Political Compass”iii depicts that BIG is perhaps the ultimate example of populist emerging architecture, using diagrammatic forms and easily comprehensible explanations for their projects. In 2016 Bjarke Ingels was selected into the 100 most influential people by the Time Magazine. In order to achieve this kind of fame by the press, he uses two important instruments. Firstly, the Scandinavian architect have turned his comic book into a complex presentation, including the elements of comedy, architectural documentary, fiction, animation, etc., all this combined, and presented on the platform of TED Talks. Secondly, what makes Ingels different from many other architects is the efficiency of sharing his architectural ideas, reaching everyone, spanning from a high school student, through a middle-aged worker, to an architecture academic. To sum up, his presentations are clear and available for everyone in an up-to-date manner. There are numerous of presentations by him easily accessible on the world wide web for millions of people. I first came across his “3 warp-speed architecture tales” TED video 3 years ago. Which basically revives BIG’s comic-book: “Yes is More”. He immediately grabbed my attention. Through his youthful, entertaining presentation he can perfectly state his philosophy and at the same time show that with energetic and innovative ideas one can make sustainable architecture more exciting. Later, I ended up watching all of his videos, I could find on the internet, including a 2-hour long presentation which he held at Harvard University. As you can see, he has got a very broad audience. In this essay, I would like to concentrate on his video called “Bjarke Ingels: Architecture should be more like Minecraft”, in which he shows his incredible ability to articulate complex design ideas verbally and visually.

In this videoiv he shows off his skills of drawing, by presenting his projects on a canvas. He tells and sketches the storyline synchronously, which is being complemented by soft background music and the most up to date film editing techniques. From my point of view, his best ability is that he can convert his stories from drawings to verbal presentations, from verbal presentations to books, from books to animated videos, and so on, with lossless quality. In this particular video, Ingels explains his thoughts, both through visual and verbal communication, in order to have greater impact on people’s brain, and make his ideas more desirable. For other projects they use drones to fly through the construction sitev, or to show the final shape of their installationvi. For VIA, 57 West street, the pyramid like skyscraper they used a 360-degree videovii to show how does it feel to experience such a complex shape in live. In 2015 I had the opportunity to see this building during the final part of the construction, and I was amazed by the outcome of the skyscraper. It had a very strong visual appearance, even in the scale of New York’s skyline. From every different angle, it has a new and exciting face. With my photographs I tried to capture some of these appearances.

As you can see, Bjarke Ingels is not just an architect anymore, but more like an actor from Hollywood. His projects and their representation also have many resemblances with futuristic movie scenes. Moreover, in one of his performances he speaks about how a scifi movie have been copying one of their projects. He is a new kind of architect, not just Hollywood films are copying from him, but also he is taking elements from the film industry. He introduces funny stories, even jokes to make his presentation style more entertaining. In his book “Yes is More”, apart from including famous architecture philosophy’s, he also uses Barack Obama’s popular “Yes we can” slogan. It is also very important to add, that Bjarke Ingels himself, emphasises that every employee of BIG should do what they do the best. The business model of the Danish firm is also takes a vast part of their success. They give credit to every member of the firm. Bjarke hears the ideas straight from the inventor’s mouths. Recently I had the opportunity to talk in person with a young graduate who interned at Bjarke Ingles Group for one year. Her experiences confirmed my idea of the Danish architect’s office. She was pleased with the non-hierarchical form of work that Bjarke Ingels established. The firm’s creativity enables them, to create concrete reality out of fiction and fairy-tale magic. On the other hand, what many people do not know about, is the very professional business plan behind the office, which enables them to function as a multinational organisation at a global scale.

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In an interview with NPR, founder Bjarke Ingels said that "what defines [other architects’] styles are the sum of all their inhibitions." Characteristically, BIG takes the opposite approach not only in how it designs, but also in how it envisions and creates its operations. According to Søgaard, experimentation and a broad view are key: "We’ve been unafraid at trying things out, we’ve been unafraid of being inspired by other businesses and other industries, and we’ve been unafraid of thinking about our company as a professional consultancy rather than just a design studio." viii

the used method of shaping the form of their buildings, had been mastered by the Danish firm. My most cherished BIG project is the so called “CopenHill”, a waste to energy plant designed with a ski slope on the top of it. The original idea was to make the powder plant a visitor centre for children, but Ingels came up with this unique conception, which will attract many more people. It will be the cleanest waste-to-energy plant in the world, hence it is possible to use the roof of the building for skiing, climbing, or hiking. Ingels refers to it as Hedonistic Sustainability. The ski slope makes the whole project not just economically and ecologically, but also socially sustainable, by being a home for a school museum. To top this off, BIG funded an additional element for CoppenHill. They have been working with aerospace engineers and made an immense effort to design the scaled down prototype of the chimney of the building in a way, that it collects the nontoxic steam, and every time 250 kilograms of carbon dioxide has been collected, it puffs a giant smoke ring. Therefore, local residents can count the rings flying on the sky, and tell exactly how much waste had been transferred into energy. This project is also excellent for showing, how BIG uses their representation style to sell their unthinkable ideas. Using diagrams, renders, and powerful montages etc. And yes, they have also made a short movieix about the experimentation of the chimney’s prototype.

CHAPTER 3: THE REPRESENTATION OF HEDONISTIC SUSTAINABILITY

The most precious tool in the eye of Bjarke Ingels is creativity. He strongly believes that platforms, such as Lego, Minecraft, etc. have the power to shape our cities and lives. For an example, the Danish firm is fond of using Lego as a modelling material, rather than more traditional resources, such as card board. They have even designed the LEGO House in Cophenhagen, which is under construction. He inspires the new generation in an enormous way, for instance one of his employer had been offered a job after making a video presentationx explaining his carrier through Bjarke Ingels style story telling without the exclusion of humour, presentation quality, and most importantly creativity. Their official website is another great example of a clean contemporary display. Every project of BIG is captured in a logo design, by trying to show the essence of each architectural shape. Between the tight deadlines Bjarke and his firm even had time to create a classic arcade game of their website. Ingels emphasized the essential role it plays: "When you create your own office you have the responsibility to set the tone, establish the culture: establish the way that people talk to each other, the way they collaborate.... So I think establishing the culture and the environment is incredibly important. You’re going to be spending a lot of time in your office so if you don’t enjoy it, it’s going to be hell."xi

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In 2010 Bjarke Ingels and his firm established their new office in New York. Their unique approach attracted many young students and architects, and BIG started to become even more international. This yeat, in 2017 they have around 400 employees, and are opening a new office in London. They have clients from many continents, and different cultures, who require different considerations and approaches. The Danish firm also has around 30 different nationalities working for them, which obviously helps, when it comes to designing for such a diverse “audience”. The Danish firm’s new book titled “Hot to Cold” shows exactly how the firm has perfected their representation style and how they have become even more professional. The book shows their projects spreading from hot to cold climate. Ingels broke with the comic-book style, but its fundamentals can still be traced back to the previous book. Instead of bubble texts, they used simple text boxes, but the essence of the story telling is the same. For me, personally, it is very interesting to see how the quality of their renders, and visual appearance progressed from “Yes is more”. Obviously, the hundreds of talented architects joining the firm had a big part of this improvement, as well as the development of computer aided design technologies. On the other hand, the main success of this book and BIG’s projects, are the method of how the firm starts from simple ideas, then arrive at complex design solutions, which are combining the original concepts, but at the end it all represented through simple, easily understandable illustration techniques. Most importantly, process diagrams, explaining

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OUTRO - A FUTURE PRACTICE The Head Quarters for Google, with Thomas Heatherwick is an excellent example of a future major investment, imagined by the Danish firm and Heatherwick Studio. Yet again, the same kind of representation style is being used. Animated video presentations, usually the use of the most advanced technology to create realistic visualisations and diagrams aiming for easily comprehensible communication. To conclude, I would like to discuss BIG’s most recent futuristic project, the Hyper Loop Onexii. The construction works have just begun, after the corporation of many innovative teams and thinkers, such as the visionary Elon Musk and his company space x. We do not know what the future architecture holds, but BIG will definitely take part of the most exciting projects. They are not afraid to use the advanced tools of technology and lead the design of shaping our worlds new face. xii

REFERENCES

YouTube. (2017). Bjarke Ingels: Architecture should be more like Minecraft. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIsIKv1lFZw [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

Books:

YouTube. (2017). BIG’s Hyperloop pods to travel at “near supersonic speed”. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQDABvB9nhQ [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

Koolhaas, R.; Mau, B. (1998). Small, medium, large, extra-large : Office for Metropolitan Architecture. 1st ed. New York: Monacelli Press Hyde, R. (2012). Future practice : conversation from the edge of architecture. 1st ed. New York: Routledge. Ingels, B. (2010). Yes is more. 1st ed. Köln: Taschen.

YouTube. (2017). YO IS MORE. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuyl6X42or8 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

Ingels, B. (2015). BIG, hot to cold. 1st ed. Köln: Taschen.

Film:

Articles:

Rem Koolhaas: A Kind of Architect. (2008). [film].

Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Guillermo Fernandez Abascal (2017). Architecture's "Political Compass": A Taxonomy of Emerging Architecture in One Diagram. [online] Available at: http://www.archdaily.com/801641/architectures-political-compass-a-taxonomy-of-emerging-architecture-inone-diagram [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

BIG’s official website

Bob Fisher (2017). The Business of Design Success: How did BIG Get So... Big?. [online] Available at: http://www.archdaily.com/776929/the-business-of-design-success-how-did-big-get-so-big [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Mairs, J. (2017). BIG reveals pod and portal design for Dubai Hyperloop. [online] Dezeen. Available at: https://www.dezeen.com/2016/11/08/big-designs-dubai-abu-dhabi-hyperloop-one-new-videotechnology-news/ [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Winston, A. (2017). Bjarke Ingels included in Time's 100 most influential people of 2016. [online] Dezeen. Available at: https://www.dezeen.com/2016/04/22/bjarke-ingels-named-time-100-most-influentialpeople-2016-rem-koolhaas-citation/ [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Videos: Ingels, B. (2017). Hedonistic sustainability. [online] Ted.com. Available at: https://www.ted.com/talks/bjarke_ingels_hedonistic_sustainability [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

"I’ve always been very conscious of what I like doing and where I think my skills are the strongest. I’ve tried to establish an office that allows me to always have my dream job." Later in the same interview, he (Bjarke Ingels) tells the story of hiring a project leader to manage him as project designer, so that everyone’s talents can be applied where they will do the most good: "In the end I’m left with having the job I do the best, and I constantly create positions and help people create their own positions to make sure the office really becomes more like an organism where everybody has their favourite role in that organism."xiii

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YouTube. (2017). VIA 57 West. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKSTB5Ie_HM [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

Ingels, B. (2017). 3 warp-speed architecture tales. [online] Ted.com. Available at: https://www.ted.com/talks/bjarke_ingels_3_warp_speed_architecture_tales [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Vimeo. (2017). BIG. [online] Available at: https://vimeo.com/137783144 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Vimeo. (2017). BIG Vortex – A building – Site art installation by ralities:united for Amagerforbrending, Copenhagen. [online] Available at: http://vimeo.com/40229132 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Vimeo. (2017). BJARKE ON CHARLIE ROSE SHOW. [online] Available at: https://vimeo.com/131798276 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

Big.dk. (2017). BIG | Bjarke Ingels Group. [online] Available at: http://big.dk [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

FOOTNOTING i

Winston, A. (2017). Bjarke Ingels included in Time's 100 most influential people of 2016. [online] Dezeen. Available at: https://www.dezeen.com/2016/04/22/bjarke-ingels-named-time-100-most-influentialpeople-2016-rem-koolhaas-citation/ [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

ii

Winston, A. (2017). Bjarke Ingels included in Time's 100 most influential people of 2016. [online] Dezeen. Available at: https://www.dezeen.com/2016/04/22/bjarke-ingels-named-time-100-most-influentialpeople-2016-rem-koolhaas-citation/ [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. iii

Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Guillermo Fernandez Abascal (2017). Architecture's "Political Compass": A Taxonomy of Emerging Architecture in One Diagram. [online] Available at: http://www.archdaily.com/801641/architectures-political-compass-a-taxonomy-of-emerging-architecture-inone-diagram [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. iv

YouTube. (2017). Bjarke Ingels: Architecture should be more like Minecraft. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIsIKv1lFZw [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. v vi

Vimeo. (2017). BIG. [online] Available at: https://vimeo.com/137783144 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Vimeo. (2017). BIG Available at: https://vimeo.com/179772331

vii

YouTube. (2017). VIA 57 West. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKSTB5Ie_HM [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

viii

Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Guillermo Fernandez Abascal. (2017). The Business of Design Success: How did BIG Get So... Big?. [online] Available at: http://www.archdaily.com/776929/the-business-ofdesign-success-how-did-big-get-so-big [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

Vimeo. (2017). HOT TO COLD. [online] Available at: https://vimeo.com/121902967 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. Vimeo. (2017). The Big U - BIG Teams Vision for Rebuild by Design. [online] Available at: https://vimeo.com/117303273 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

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Vimeo. (2017). BIG Vortex – A building – Site art installation by ralities:united for Amagerforbrending, Copenhagen. [online] Available at: http://vimeo.com/40229132 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

Vimeo. (2017). 2 World Trade Center in New York City, a BIG design, Squint/Opera production. [online] Available at: https://vimeo.com/130206124 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

x

YouTube. (2017). YO IS MORE. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuyl6X42or8 [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

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Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Guillermo Fernandez Abascal. (2017). The Business of Design Success: How did BIG Get So... Big?. [online] Available at: http://www.archdaily.com/776929/the-business-ofdesign-success-how-did-big-get-so-big [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

xii

YouTube. (2017). BIG’s Hyperloop pods to travel at “near supersonic speed”. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQDABvB9nhQ [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017]. xiii

Alejandro Zaera-Polo & Guillermo Fernandez Abascal. (2017). The Business of Design Success: How did BIG Get So... Big?. [online] Available at: http://www.archdaily.com/776929/the-business-ofdesign-success-how-did-big-get-so-big [Accessed 5 Feb. 2017].

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Levente Mate Borenich Tutor: James A. Craig, Studio: Architectural Biography Title: Tracing Rem Koolhaas - What is the role of an architect in the modern, globalized world? i) an 8,000 word text-based illustrated dissertation

The Outline of the Dissertation:

Proposal: During the dissertation elective I was engaged with the life of Rem Koolhaas, and his working methods. In my presentation I was talking about how he was inspired

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throughout his life, how that helped him to create the environment of OMA, and how

(1) Platform of Architecture: “inaccessible architecture” Rem studying the Berlin Wall

his firm became a model for architecture practices. In addition, a conversation between Peter Eisenman, and Rem was also important, taking place at AA in 2006,

This would be the first chapter of the dissertation. Introducing the early life of Rem,

in terms of finalising my essay topic, and find my interests within his work. The essay

and presenting why he chose architecture as a profession, after working in film

will be built around Rem Koolhaas, and his philosophy in architecture. Going through

industry, and going into journalism.

his life, achievements, works, books, models, with references back to his early life and how he was inspired to become an architect. As our dissertation elective’s main

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(2) Architecture in the scale of urbanism: The Voluntary Prisoners of Architecture, and Delirious New York

topic was the investigation of how studio environments have an impact on design, I would also like to explore how the context or the lack of context was inspiring for Rem, and his work. One of the key moment in his life was that he was working as a

This chapter will be concentrating on his early published work, again with close

journalist, before coming into the field of architecture. I would like to analyse his

references to his inspirations form his childhood and other experiences from his life.

design approach, which is basically promoting research as opposed to design. Also

In addition, at this stage it will be important to state that Rem is interested in the

see and investigate, if he has managed to create a design model, which could be

scope of a city and the connection between architecture and urbanism.

applied to every different cultures and contexts all around the world. In addition,

Representation technique would also be in focus in this section. (Dali’s paranoid

investigate if there is international language or approach that can be used in a

critical method for instance)

globalized world. In terms of teaching architecture and practicing as well. Furthermore, I want to investigate what does it mean to be a critical practice today.

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(3) Research as opposed to design: Trés Grande Bibliothékue, Seatle Library, Casa Da Musica, Porto

What I mean by that is how he created AMO which tries and get out of the way of „traditional” way of getting commissions. And go around the media and have responsibility where no one asks him to do so. Being a public intellectual as well as

Teaching Studios or Seminars? Peter Eisenman says it is much more useful for

an architecture intellectual. After coming into architectural education I have realised

students to see the movement of Rem Koolhaas from the Grande Bibliothékue to

that the issue of global warming cannot be solved within the profession of

Casa Da Musica, than to try and design a library for instance. Can Journalism be a

architecture. The question concerns many other fields, including politics. At the same

model for 21st century architects? Is it necessary to reinvent the discipline? In

time, from my point of view, architecture is the tool to produce a lifestyle to show the

addition, what is the language of Rem Koolhaas? How does he communicate?

society the “right direction”. Hence, I believe architects, as creative thinkers have a

Representation of his programing (narrative, diagrams, modelling etc.) Diagram as a

lot to offer in helping the world to solve the problem of globalization, what is highly

device to look at the world, plus represent.

connected to global warming. I want to investigate, if there is a model that could be used to reinvent Le Corbusier’s, or Rem Koolhaas’s model and use to build future

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(4) The effect of globalization on architecture? CCTV

cities. (Such as Alejendro Aravena’s model for instance). And to conclude, I will try and analyse what the future will bring after Rem’s era to the profession of

How does the globalization of the world effects architectural education and

architecture.

practice? CCTV is a good example of a symbol for the globalized world. Is there a

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References: -

model by which you can design buildings or “read culture in different contexts

Lecture: Peter Eisenman, Rem Koolhaas – Architecture, Ideology, The City

(video, and book version) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3J-giyFlROM

from all around the world? The relationship between OMA and AMO, having

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responsibilities, where no one asks you, a new paradigm.

Jeff Kipnis and Robert Somol analysing Rem’s and Eisenman’s discussion

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bn-h9jXF7lU&t=2043s -

Rem Koolhaas – A kind of Architect

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaVbc3XQOQk -

(5) What comes after the era of Rem Koolhaas? Venice Biennale: Elements of Architecture

What is Rem Koolhaas’s idea of an architect’s responsibility? Being a public intellectual vs an architectural intellectual? Do architects have to become global experts? What does it mean to be a critical practice today? In Eisenman’s opinion

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Exodus, or the Voluntary Prisoners of Architecture (A.A. final project 1972)

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Delirious New York (1978)

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S,M,L,XL (1995)

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Rem Koolhaas: conversation with students (1996)

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Le Corbusier – Toward an architecture (1923)

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Peter Eisenman - The Formal Basis of Modern Architecture: dissertation (1963)

Rem Koolhaas publicly stated retirement with the Venice Biennale: Elements of Architecture. How can we face the quantity of urgency (globalisation), when

Research Methods:

architects are no longer in the centre of the world? Where does architecture takes us in a world, where there is no dominant ideology to follow?

Archival research, books, dissertations, essays, articles, videos, diagramming, mapping

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CONTENTS + DECLERATION

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ARCHITECTURE portfolio - Newcastle University, stage 2 - Levente M Borenich  
ARCHITECTURE portfolio - Newcastle University, stage 2 - Levente M Borenich  
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