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Border Action Network

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2007 Arizona Legislative Scorecard

Table of Contents

A Word from the Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Bill Summaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Best of the Best, Worst of the Worst. . . . . . . . . 11 Legislative Report Card: How They Voted House of Representatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Senate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Scores By District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Score Summaries and Awards Top of the Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Academic Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Acknowledgements/Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

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Border Action Network

A Word from the Director Border Action Network formed in 1999 and is a human rights community organization that works with immigrant and border communities in southern Arizona to ensure that our rights are protected, dignity upheld and that our communities are safe and healthy for everyone. We combine community organizing, leadership development, policy advocacy and litigation.

This re report reflects a low-point in Arizona politics; a point, however, that we hope to change. It reveals a highly high polarized legislature that has given way to supporting poorly thought-out, over-reaching bills suppo not only deny the democratic participation, but that no actively attempt to undermine the basic human dignity activel immigrant families and border communities. Many of imm of the bills included in our analysis that aim to harrass criminalize immigrants also negatively impact U.S. or crim citizens, Arizona businesses, tourists and other vital citizen sectors of our state’s economy. A quick glance at the sector names that repeatedly appear appea as sponsors on these bills reveals a roster of mean-spirited bullies that lead lea debates by conjuring fear and chearleading backlash rather than compelling our leaders to promote solutions and a compel unifying vision for a our state state. We applaud the legislators that take what have been perceived to be political risks by standing up for the rights and dignity of immigrant families and border communities. The report describes three positive bills that attempt to curtail border violence, urge support for comprehensive immigration reform, and seek solutions for young people aspiring to higher education. We hope that in coming years we will see bills like these pass with unanimous support in the House and Senate. We understand better than anyone the volatility and divisiveness of the current political climate and pressure to label complex political issues as “anti-immigrant vs. pro-immigrant” or “open borders vs. closed borders”. However, this black and white approach fails to accurately reflect the complex realities and needs confronting our communities and our state. Polarization does not serve the interests of anyone truly concerned with the state of our state. In fact, Border Action’s vision, developed by immigrant families in the border region, is one of human rights for all and includes not only immigration reform, but universal access to quality health care, good education, workers rights and good working conditions, a healthy environment, dignified housing, and broad democratic political participation to name just a few key elements. During the 2008 and future legislative sessions we will have a presence at the state legislature where we will actively promote a move away from fear and division, toward a vision for Arizona that recognizes the dignity and inherent rights of all people while supporting the economic, political, social and environmental sustainability of the state. Clearly, our task is neither simple nor quick. We will need the support of all our members throughout Arizona. We are all invested in this beautiful place that we call home and our legislators need to hear that message from every one of us. We believe it can and must be done! Thank you for your involvement and support. Sincerely,

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Jennifer Allen, Executive Director


2007 Arizona Legislative Scorecard

Report Methodology Border Action’s 2007 legislative report card monitors Arizona legislation that would, if enacted, directly impact immigrant families and southern Arizona border communities. Out of all border and immigration related legislation introduced during the 48th Legislature, First Regular Session, only 12 bills came to a vote on the floor of at least one of the two legislative chambers. Border Action has chosen to score 10 of the 12. In order that all legislators be evaluated on an equal playing field, this report card only assesses each individual based on his/her voting record on the pieces of legislation, out of the ten, that were voted on in his/her respective legislative chamber. However, since all bills are not created equal, an interdisciplinary committee was assembled in order to give each bill a weight in proportion to the severity of its potential impact on the aforementioned communities. Many thanks to Steve Arnquist, John Fife, Mo Goldman, James Anaya, Maru Moreno, Alonzo Morado, and Carolyn Trowbridge for serving on this committee. The committee was tasked with ranking each piece of legislation from a one, signifying the least impact, to a six, the most impact. If a legislator voted in a manner that supported human rights, he/she received the number of points that the bill was “weighted” with. If he/ she voted against human rights, he/she received zero points. If the legislator was not present for a vote and his/her absence was not excused, no points were awarded. Making the best score in each class equal 100% curved the scores. This percentage was then converted into a grade according to the standard grading scale used in most academic communities, however, given that more than half of the scores in each class were 0%, a “D” grade was awarded to all legislators that scored more than 0%, but less than 70%. Extra credit was awarded if a legislator was the prime sponsor or co-sponsor for an exceptional piece of pro-human rights legislation, listed in this report as the “best of the best.” Primary sponsors were awarded two extra credit points; co-sponsors one extra point. The scores as well as the breakdown of how all legislators voted on each of the bills can be found in the tables at the end of the report. Border Action Network is a non-partisan 501(c)3 organization and neither supports nor opposes candidates for office.

A B C D F

90-100%

80-89%

70-79%

1-69%

0%

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Border Action Network

Bill Summaries

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE

WEIGHT: 2.5 FAILED HOUSE FINAL READ: APRIL 4, 2007

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE. WEIGHT: 4 PASSED SENATE THIRD READ: JUNE 18, 2007 PASSED HOUSE FINAL READ: JUNE 19, 2007 SIGNED BY THE GOVERNOR: JULY 2, 2007

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HB2460 - VALID IDENTIFICATION; CONSULAR CARDS; PROHIBITION Primary sponsors: Reps. Pearce, Murphy, Gray C. et al. HB2460 prohibits the state of Arizona or any “political subdivision of this state” from accepting a foreign issued consular identification card as a valid form of identification. This discriminatory bill is specifically designed to prohibit the use of Mexican government consular identification cards in Arizona. Consular IDs are official, government-issued forms of identification. The legislature’s attempt to prohibit acceptance of another government’s identification would make day-to-day life very difficult for anyone who is not a citizen of the U.S., including legal permanent residents, and discourage visitation from individuals that grow Arizona’s economy, including tourists, and international students. Furthermore, and most importantly, access to government issued photo identification for every member of our communities is essential for public safety. Senate Version: SB1236.

HB2467 - PUBLIC PROGRAMS; ELIGIBILITY Primary sponsors: Reps. Pearce, Murphy, Gray C. et al. HB2467 builds on 2004’s Prop. 200 and 2006’s Prop. 300 by stating that self-declaration is no longer a legitimate method to demonstrate legal presence in the country. In order to participate in certain stateadministered public programs written documentation demonstrating the person’s lawful presence in the U.S. must now be provided. HB2467 is another bill that portends to address the false claim that people without lawful presence in Arizona are abusing public programs. Proposition 200, which was approved by voters in 2004, already requires state employees to verify the citizenship or immigration status of applicants to public services; failure to do so results in a fine and/or prison sentence for the state employee. With HB 2467, all applicants, regardless of their legal status in the state, would need to show documentation establishing their citizenship, legal residency or other status. This creates an unnecessary and undue burden on state employees and legal residents of Arizona while attempting to counter an insignificant issue.


2007 Arizona Legislative Scorecard

HB2475 - LEGAL PRESENCE; TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS Primary sponsors: Reps. Pearce, Groe, Gray C. et al. HB2475 requires that all residents of foreign countries carry proof of their legal status in the U.S. and a driver’s license issued by their country of residence in order to operate a vehicle in the U.S. HB2475 would turn local police, sheriffs and other law enforcement officers into immigration officers. A routine traffic stop would become an immigration stop if the person shows the officer a foreign driver’s license. This bill would undermine the years of work by local law enforcement to build trust and confidence within immigrant communities. If people fear police inquiries into their immigration status, they will not contact the police to report robberies, domestic violence, child abuse, sexual assault and other crimes. This bill puts everyone in Arizona at risk by endangering public safety.

HB2589 - CRIMINAL TRESPASS; DAY LABORERS Primary sponsors: Representatives Kavanagh et al. HB2589 prohibits the solicitation of employment by any person if he/she is unlawfully present on any piece of public or private property. Governor Napolitano’s veto message stated that HB2589 is “vague, overbroad and discriminatory.” The bill applies to any Arizona adult seeking work while “standing or remaining unlawfully on any public highway, public street or adjacent public property…” While the bill is a blatant attempt to criminalize immigrant workers seeking day-employment on street corners or other locations, the bill was so poorly conceived that any individual who is “beating the streets” looking for work would be subject to a class 1 misdemeanor. Fortunately, the bill was limited to adults; otherwise children’s lemonade stands and school car washes would presumably have been subject to criminal penalties.

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE. WEIGHT: 5 FAILED HOUSE THIRD READ: APRIL 4, 2007

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE. WEIGHT: 5 PASSED HOUSE THIRD READ: MARCH 8, 2007 PASSED SENATE THIRD READ: MARCH 24, 2007 VETOED BY THE GOVERNOR: MAY 1, 2007

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Border Action Network

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE. WEIGHT: 6 PASSED HOUSE FINAL READ: JUNE 20, 2007 PASSED SENATE FINAL READ: JUNE 20, 2007 SIGNED BY THE GOVERNOR: JULY 2, 2007

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE. WEIGHT: 3 PASSED SENATE THIRD READ: APRIL 12, 2007 PASSED HOUSE FINAL READ: APRIL 18, 2007

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HB2779 - FAIR AND LEGAL EMPLOYMENT ACT Primary sponsors: Representatives Pearce, Barnes, Boone, Burges, Farnsworth, Groe, Kavanagh, Murphy, Yarbrough, Senators Blendu, Johnson, Verschoor, Bee et al. HB2779 declares that all employers must use the federal Basic Pilot Program (BPP) to verify their employees’ eligibility to work. Employers who knowingly employ unauthorized workers will be sanctioned. The severity of the sanctions imposed vary depending on the length of time that an unauthorized worker was employed and whether it was a first or second time violation for the employer. Commonly referred to as the nation’s harshest employer sanctions law, HB2779 is a poorly drafted, unrealistic, and discriminatory approach to a much larger federal issue. HB2779 has left the Arizona business community dumbfounded. The bill mandates that businesses use a federal database reputed to be riddled with errors, particularly with reference to Hispanic surnames. Without having anti-discrimination clauses or a means for businesses to appeal or intervene in investigations, HB2779 undermines the basic rights to redress and representation. With business licenses and thousands of needed workers’ jobs at risk, this bill does more damage to Arizona’s economy than it could ever do in resolving the issue of employers hiring undocumented workers. There is speculation that this bill could result in skyrocketing prices for items such as lettuce and cotton and dramatically increase costs within the already stressed construction industry due to worker flight.

HCM2012 - NATIONAL GUARD; BORDER DEFENSE Primary sponsor: Representative Nichols HCM2012 asks Congress to “change the rules of engagement for the National Guard troops on the Mexico border and place the Guard members in a primary role of enforcement.” HCM 2012 would violate the civil war reconstruction-era Posse Comitatus Act, which prohibits the use of the military for enforcing domestic laws. The function of the military is to attack enemies of the state; the function of domestic law enforcement is to protect public safety. These very different functions must necessarily be carried out by different agencies. The National Guard has specific jurisdictions, limited resources and training geared for war and national emergencies. They are in no way prepared or trained to engage in enforcement of domestic, administrative issue of immigration law and procedures. Border communities have struggled for years calling for improved training and accountability of border enforcement agencies that specialize in border and immigration policies. The last thing needed on the border is another agency with inadequate training and preparation.


2007 Arizona Legislative Scorecard

SB1236 - CONSULAR CARDS; VALID IDENTIFICATION; PROHIBITION Primary sponsors: Senators Gray C., Harper Prohibits the state of Arizona or any “political subdivision of this state” from accepting a foreign issued consular identification card as a valid form of identification. This discriminatory bill is specifically designed to prohibit the use of the Mexican consular identification cards in Arizona. Consular IDs are official, government-issued forms of identification. The legislature’s attempt to prohibit acceptance of another government’s identification would make day-to-day life very difficult for anyone who is not a citizen of the U.S. and delegitimates the processes and authority of foreign governments. Furthermore, access to government issued photo identification for every member of our communities is essential for public safety. House Version: HB2460.

SB1265 - BAILABLE OFFENSES; ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION Primary sponsor: Senator Gray L. SB1265 establishes a “probable cause” standard for determining illegal presence in the U.S. for purposes of bail eligibility. It requires that incarcerating agencies make citizenship determinations within 24 hours and transmit citizenship information to the court and prosecutor if the detainee is a not a US citizen. SB 1265 follows up on the voter-approved 2006 Proposition 100 which excludes undocumented immigrants facing felony charges from posting bond. SB 1265 gives law enforcement a very broad “probable cause” standard to determine the citizenship status of the person detained. The law enforcement agency has 24 hours to determine someone’s legal status and may use “any indication by a law enforcement agency” or “any other relevant information obtained by or presented to the court by a party or any other person” to make a determination of someone’s citizenship status. Given that this determination will be made quickly by agencies that are not (and should not be) trained or qualified to determine an individual’s immigration status, the risk of violating someone’s rights is high. This bill contributes to the growing trend in Arizona and across the country to create a separate, more restrictive legal system and set of standards that apply only to non-citizens.

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE. WEIGHT: 2.5 PASSED HOUSE THIRD READ: APRIL 23, 2007 PASSED SENATE FINAL READ: MAY 2, 2007 VETOED BY THE GOVERNOR: MAY 8, 2007

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE. WEIGHT: 4 PASSED HOUSE THIRD READ: JUNE 13, 2007 PASSED SENATE FINAL READ: JUNE 18, 2007 SIGNED BY THE GOVERNOR: JULY 2, 2007

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Border Action Network

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE.

WEIGHT: 1 PASSED SENATE THIRD READ: FEBRUARY 27, 2007 PASSED HOUSE THIRD READ: MARCH 23, 2007 SIGNED BY THE GOVERNOR: MAY 1, 2007

A “NO” VOTE IS A PRO-HUMAN RIGHTS VOTE.

SB1639 - NOTARIES; CITIZENSHIP REQUIREMENT Primary sponsor: Senator Johnson SB1639 requires a notary public to be a citizen or a legal permanent resident of the United States. While notary fraud is a legitimate concern and should be addressed, SB 1639 does nothing to reform the notary system. In fact, SB1639 only excludes people from becoming notaries who may have work authorization in the U.S., special visas or other legitimate forms of lawful status in the U.S. and who employment may require them to become notaries. SB 1639, like many other bills in the Arizona legislature, is a misdirected effort at denying the participation and leadership of non-citizens in the Arizona.

SM1004 - SBINET Primary sponsors: Senators Bee, Blendu, Burns, Verschoor et al.

WEIGHT: 3 ADOPTED UNANIMOUSLY BY SENATE:

Senate Memorial 1004 recommends that the United States Congress continue to fund the SBInet, or Secure Border Initiative Network, until completion. The SBInet program relies on private contracts to enhance the technology along the physical border.

APRIL 30, 2007 In the name of SBINet, more than $20 million in contracts were awarded to Boeing and nearly one hundred of Boeing’s subcontractors to integrate high-technology into current border enforcement operations in southern Arizona. Yet, at the conclusion of their 2 year contract, none of the technology worked and local residents who had high-tech towers staring down at them were furious at the lack of communication and consideration for the impacts of the projects on their daily lives. SM1004 is a bill that encourages the Congress to fund a boondoggle, pork barrel project that has thus far only lined the pockets of private companies at the expense of border communities and taxpayers. The Arizona senate should support Congressional action on comprehensive immigration reform which would dramatically decrease the number of immigrant men, women and children walking through the Arizona desert to reunite with loved ones or in search of a better quality of life.

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2007 Arizona Legislative Scorecard

Since this report only covers legislation that came to a vote on the floor of the House, the Senate, or both, this section is designed to highlight certain bills that did not make it that far in the legislative process. The following six pieces of legislation are important to note either for their attempt to promote human rights or for their inherent atrociousness. For each piece of the “best of the best” legislation that a legislator was a prime sponsor for, he/she was awarded two extra credit points or one extra point for co-sponsorship.

Best of the Best

Worst of the Worst

HCM2011 - Comprehensive Immigration Reform

HB2471 - Public benefits; eligibility:

Gallardo, Ableser, Farley, Kirkparick, Lopes, Lujan, Sinema et al.

Pearce, Groe et al.

House Concurrent Memorial 2011 would have shown the federal government the Arizona State Legislature’s support for comprehensive and timely immigration reform.

HB2286 - Domestic terrorism Sinema, et al. HB2286 stated that an individual would commit domestic terrorism, a class five felony, if he/she was not affiliated with a law enforcement agency and, while armed, patrolled either with a group or individually for the purpose of detecting alleged illegal activity.

HCR2029 - Arizona DREAM Act Lujan, Ableser, Gallardo, Schapira, Sinema et al. HCR2029 stated that regardless of the person’s immigration status, a person who (1) entered this state as a minor, (2) who is entitled to classification as an in-state student pursuant to section 151802 or is a resident for tuition purposes pursuant to section 15-1802.01 and (3) who is eligible for admission to a university, can be admitted and is eligible for financial aid.

HB2471 stated that any person born on or after the date that the bill would have taken effect, who’s parents are illegal aliens, are not eligible to receive public benefits. Public benefits include K-12 education, higher education, grants, loans, professional licenses and employment, retirement payments, welfare, retirement, healthcare, disability and public housing benefits.

HB2752 - Illegal aliens; domestic terrorism: Pearce, Barnes, Boone, Burges, Farnsworth, Groe, Murphy, Yarbrough, Bee, Blendu, Burns, Johnson, Verschoor et al. HB2752 stated that an individual or group commits domestic terrorism if they are present in violation of 8 US code section 1325 and either (a) protests against a citizen by an act that threatens, intimidates, or results in personal injury, (b) commits a criminal offense against a citizen, or (c) is (are) [a] member(s) of a street gang and protests against a citizen by an act that threatens, intimidates, or results in personal injury. The violation is a class five felony; a class three felony for members of street gangs.

HCM 2005 - Illegal aliens; children; noncitizenship status: Pearce et al. HCM2005 asked Congress to re-write the 14th amendment to deny citizenship status to children of illegal aliens who are born in the United States.

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Border Action Network

2007

Arizona Legislative Scorecard

House of Representatives

D

Out of the 10 pieces of legislation discussed in this report, the House of Representatives had the opportunity to act on nine. The House passed two bills out of the nine. Using the weighted system, the House as a whole is awarded 7.5 out of 33 possible points.

22.7%

9

Failed by House HB2460 - Valid identification; consular cards; prohibition

8

Passed by House HB2467 - Public programs; eligibility

9

Failed by House HB2475 - Legal presence; traffic violations

8

Passed by House HB2589 - Criminal trespass; day laborers

8

Passed by House HB2779 - Fair and legal employment act

8

Passed by House HCM 2012 201 - National Guard; border defense

8

Passed by House SB1236 - Consular cards; valid identification; prohibition

8 8 12

Passed by House SB1265 - Bailable offenses; illegal immigration Passed by House SB1639 - Notaries; citizenship requirement


HB 2460 (2.5)

HB 2467 (4)

HB 2475 (5)

HB 2589 (5)

HB 2779 (6)

HCM 2012 (3)

SB 1236 (2.5)

SB 1265 (4)

SB 1639 (1)

WEIGHTED SCORE

Ed Ableser – (17-D) Kirk Adams – (19-R) Manuel V. Alvarez – (25-D) Mark Anderson – (18-R) Ray Barnes – (7-R) Nancy K. Barto – (7-R) Andy Biggs – (22-R) Tom Boone, Majority Leader – (4-R) David Bradley – (28-D) Jack A. Brown, Asst. Minority Leader – (5-D) Judy M. Burges – (4-R) Jennifer J. Burns – (25-R) Olivia Cajero Bedford – (27-D) Chad Campbell – (14-D) Cloves C. Campbell, Jr. – (16-D) Doug Clark – (6-R) Rich Crandall – (19-R) Sam Crump – (6-R) Mark DeSimone – (11-D) Adam Driggs – (11-R) Steve Farley – (28-D) Eddie Farnsworth – (22-R) Steve M. Gallardo, Minority Whip – (13-D) Martha Garcia – (13-D) Trish Groe – (3-R) Pete Hershberger – (26-R) John Kavanagh – (8-R) Ann Kirkpatrick – (2-D) Bill Konopnicki – (5-R) Phil Lopes, Minority Leader – (27-D) Linda Lopez – (29-D) David Lujan – (15-D) Lucy Mason – (1-R) Marian McClure – (30-R) John McComish, Majority Whip – (20-R) Barbara McGuire – (23-D) Nancy McLain – (3-R) Robert Meza – (14-D) Ben R. Miranda – (16-D) Rick Murphy – (9-R) John B. Nelson – (12-R) Warde V. Nichols – (21-R) Lynne Pancrazi – (24-D) Jonathan Paton – (30-R) Russell K. Pearce – (18-R) Tom Prezelski – (29-D) Michele Reagan – (8-R) Pete Rios – (23-D) Bob Robson, Speaker Pro Tempore – (20-R) Lena S. Saradnik – (26-D) David Schapira – (17-D) Kyrsten Sinema – (15-D) Bob Stump – (9-R) Jackie Thrasher – (10-D) Andrew M. Tobin – (1-R) Albert Tom – (2-D) Theresa Ulmer – (24-D) Jim Weiers, Speaker of the House – (10-R) Jerry Weiers – (12-R) Steven B. Yarbrough – (21-R)

GRADE

House of Representatives

B F B F F F F F A D F F D C C F F F F F A+ F A+ A F F F D F A+ D A+ F F F D F B A F F F A+ F F A+ F C F C B A+ F D F D A+ F F F

9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 8 8 { 9 9 8 8 8 { 8 9 8 9 9 { 8 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 { 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 { 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8

9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 8 8 9 9 { 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8

9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 8 8 { 9 9 8 8 8 { 8 9 8 9 9 { 8 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 { 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 { 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8

9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 8 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 9 { 9 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 { 9 8 8 8

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 { 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 { 8 8 8 9 8 8 8 8 9 8 8 8

{ 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 8 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 { 8 8 { 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 8 8 9 { 9 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8

9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 8 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 { { 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 { 9 { 8 9 8 { 9 8 8 8

9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 { 8 8 8 9 { 9 9 8 8 8 { 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 8 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 { 9 8 8 8

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 { { 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 { 8 { 8 8 8 { 8 8 8 8

89%* 0% 81% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 61% 0% 0% 59% 73% 76% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 105%* 0% 114%* 100% 0% 0% 0% 67%* 0% 111%* 67% 114%* 0% 0% 0% 61% 0% 85% 100% 0% 0% 0% 102% 0% 0% 108% 0% 73% 0% 78% 81%* 110%* 0% 55% 0% 53% 105% 0% 0% 0%

9 = vote in support of human rights; 8 = vote against human rights; = excused absence; {= no vote Asterisks identify all weighted scores that were influenced by extra credit points for prime- and co-sponsorship of pro-human rights legislation.


Border Action Network

2007

Arizona Legislative Scorecard

Senate

F

Out of the 10 pieces of legislation discussed in this report, the Senate had the opportunity to overturn eight. The Senate passed all eight pieces of legislation, and is therefore awarded zero out of the 28.5 possible points.

0%

8

Passed by Senate HB2467 - Public programs; eligibility

8

Passed by Senate HB2589 - Criminal trespass; day laborers

8

Passed by Senate HB2779 - Fair and legal employment act

8

Passed by Senate HCM2012 - National Guard; border defense HCM201

8

Passed by Senate SB1236 - Consular cards; valid identification; prohibition

8

Passed by Senate SB1265 - Bailable offenses; illegal immigration

8

Passed by Senate SB1639 - Notaries; citizenship requirement

8

Adopted Unanimously by Senate SM1004 - A memorial encouraging the United States Congress to continue the funding and completion of SBINet. Congres

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HB 2779 (6)

HCM 2012 (3)

SB 1236 (2.5)

SB 1265 (4)

SB 1639 (1)

SM 1004 (3)

Weighted Score

Grade

HB 2589 (5)

HB 2467 (4)

Paula Aboud (28-D)

D

8

9

8

9

9

8

8

8

51%

Amanda Aguirre (24-D)

D

8

9

8

{

9

9

8

8

56%

Carolyn S. Allen (8-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Marsha Arzberger, Minority Leader (25-D)

A

8

9

9

9

9

9

8

8

100%

Timothy S. Bee, President (30-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Robert Blendu, President Pro Tempore (12-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Robert “Bob” Burns (9-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Meg Burton Cahill (17-D)

D

{

9

{

{

9

{

8

8

37%

Ken Cheuvront (15-D)

C

8

9

{

9

9

9

8

8

71%

Jake Flake (5-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Jorge Luis Garcia, Assistant Minority Leader (27-D)

A

8

9

9

9

9

9

8

8

100%

Pamela Gorman (6-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Ron Gould (3-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Chuck Gray (19-R)

F

8

8

{

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Linda Gray (10-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Albert Hale (2-D)

C

8

9

8

9

9

9

8

8

71%

Jack W. Harper (4-R)

F

{

8

{

8

8

{

8

8

0%

John Huppenthal, Majority Whip (20-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Karen Johnson (18-R)

F

8

8

8

{

8

8

8

8

0%

Leah Landrum Taylor (16-D)

C

8

9

8

9

9

9

8

8

71%

Barbara Leff (11-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Debbie McCune Davis (14-D)

C

8

9

{

9

9

9

8

8

71%

Richard Miranda (13-D)

A

8

9

9

9

9

9

8

8

100%

Tom O’Halleran (1-R)

D

8

8

8

9

9

8

8

8

27%

Charlene Pesquiera (26-D)

D

8

9

8

8

{

8

8

8

24%

Rebecca Rios, Minority Whip (23-D)

D

8

9

8

8

9

8

8

8

37%

Victor Soltero (29-D)

A

8

9

9

9

9

9

8

8

100%

Jay Tibshraeny (21-R)

F

8

8

{

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Thayer Verschoor, Majority Leader (22-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Jim Waring (7-R)

F

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

0%

Senate

9 = vote in support of human rights; 8 = vote against human rights; • = excused absence; {= no vote


Border Action Network

District 1 Rep. Lucy Mason, R

District 11 0%

Rep. Mark DeSimone, D

Rep. Andrew M. Tobin, R

0%

Sen. Tom O’Halleran, R

27%

Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick, D

67%

Rep. Albert Tom, D Sen. Albert Hale, D

Rep. Warde V. Nichols, R

Rep. Adam Driggs, R

0%

Rep. Steven B. Yarbrough, R

0%

Sen. Barbara Leff, R

0%

Sen. Jay Tibshraeny, R

0%

Rep. John B. Nelson, R

0%

Rep. Andy Biggs, R

0%

53%

Rep. Jerry Weiers, R

0%

Rep. Eddie Farnsworth, R

0%

71%

Sen. Robert Blendu, R

0%

Sen. Thayer Verschoor, R

0%

0%

Rep. Steve M. Gallardo, D

114%

Rep. Barbara McGuire, D

District 2

District 12

District 3 Rep. Trish Groe, R

0%

District 22

District 13

District 23 61%

Rep. Nancy McLain, R

0%

Rep. Martha Garcia, D

100%

Rep. Pete Rios, D

73%

Sen. Ron Gould, R

0%

Sen. Richard Miranda, D

100%

Sen. Rebecca Rios, D

37%

District 4

District 14

District 24

Rep. Tom Boone, R

0%

Rep. Chad Campbell, D

73%

Rep. Lynne Pancrazi, D

102%

Rep. Judy M. Burges, R

0%

Rep. Robert Meza, D

85%

Rep. Theresa Ulmer, D

105%

Sen. Jack W. Harper, R

0%

Sen. Debbie McCune Davis, D

71%

Sen. Amanda Aguirre, D

56%

61%

Rep. David Lujan, D

114%

Rep. Manuel V. Alvarez, D

Rep. Bill Konopnicki, R

0%

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D

110%

Rep. Jennifer Burns, R

0%

Sen. Jake Flake, R

0%

Sen. Ken Cheuvront, D

71%

Sen. Marsha Arzberger, D

100%

District 5 Rep. Jack A. Brown, D

District 15

District 6

District 25

District 16

81%

District 26

Rep. Doug Clark, R

0%

Rep. Pete Hershberger, R

0%

Rep. Sam Crump, R

0%

Rep. Ben R. Miranda, D

100%

Rep. Lena S. Saradnik, D

78%

Sen. Pamela Gorman, R

0%

Sen. Leah Landrum Taylor, D

71%

Sen. Charlene Pesquiera, D

24%

0%

Rep. Ed Ableser, D

89%

Rep. Olivia Cajero Bedford, D

District 7 Rep. Ray Barnes, R

Rep. Cloves C. Campbell, Jr., D 76%

District 17

District 27 59%

Rep. Nancy K. Barto, R

0%

Rep. David Schapira, D

81%

Rep. Phil Lopes, D

111%

Sen. Jim Waring, R

0%

Sen. Meg Burton Cahill, D

37%

Sen. Jorge Luis Garcia, D

100%

District 8

District 18

District 28

Rep. John Kavanagh, R

0%

Rep. Mark Anderson, R

0%

Rep. David Bradley, D

100%

Rep. Michele Reagan, R

0%

Rep. Russell K. Pearce, R

0%

Rep. Steve Farley, D

105%

Sen. Carolyn S. Allen, R

0%

Sen. Karen Johnson, R

0%

Sen. Paula Aboud, D

51%

Rep. Rick Murphy, R

0%

Rep. Kirk Adams, R

0%

Rep. Linda Lopez, D

Rep. Bob Stump, R

0%

Rep. Rich Crandall, R

0%

Rep. Tom Prezelski, D

108%

Sen. Robert Burns, R

0%

Sen. Chuck Gray, R

0%

Sen. Victor Soltero, D

100%

Rep. Jackie Thrasher, D

55%

Rep. John McComish, R

0%

Rep. Marian McClure, R

0%

Rep. Jim Weiers, R

0%

Rep. Bob Robson, R

0%

Rep. Jonathan Paton, R

0%

Sen. Linda Gray, R

0%

Sen. John Huppenthal, R

0%

Sen. Timothy S. Bee, R

0%

District 9

District 19

District 10

16

District 21 0%

District 29

District 20

67%

District 30


2007 Arizona Legislative Scorecard

Top of the Class: House of Representatives

Rep. Steve M. Gallardo (13-D), A+, 114%

Rep. David Lujan (15-D), A+, 114%

Rep. Phil Lopes (27-D), A+, 111%

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (15-D), A+, 110%

Rep. Tom Prezelski (29-D), A+, 108%

Rep. Steve Farley (28-D), A+, 105%

Rep. Theresa Ulmer (24-D), A+, 105%

Rep. Lynne Pancrazi (24-D), A+, 102%

Rep. David Bradley (28-D), A, 100%

Rep. Martha Garcia (13-D), A, 100%

Rep. Ben R. Miranda (16-D), A, 100%

17


Border Action Network

Top of the Class: Senate

Sen. Marsha Arzberger (25-D), A, 100%

Sen. Jorge Luis Garcia (27-D), A, 100%

Sen. Richard Miranda (13-D), A, 100%

Sen. Victor Soltero (29-D), A, 100%

Academic Probation: House Kirk Adams (19-R) Mark Anderson (18-R) Ray Barnes (7-R) Nancy K. Barto (7-R) Andy Biggs (22-R) Tom Boone (4-R) Judy M. Burges (4-R) Jennifer J. Burns (25-R) Doug Clark (6-R) Rich Crandall (19-R) Sam Crump (6-R) Mark DeSimone (11-D) Adam Driggs (11-R) Eddie Farnsworth (22-R) Trish Groe (3-R) Pete Hershberger (26-R) John Kavanagh (8-R) 18

Senate S t Bill Konopnicki (5-R) Lucy Mason (1-R) Marian McClure (30-R) John McComish (20-R) Nancy McLain (3-R) Rick Murphy (9-R) John B. Nelson (12-R) Warde V. Nichols (21-R) Jonathan Paton (30-R) Russell K. Pearce (18-R) Michelle Reagan (8-R) Bob Robson (20-R) Bob Stump (9-R) Andrew M. Tobin (1-R) Jim Weiers (10-R) Jerry Weiers (12-R) Steven B. Yarbrough (21-R)

Carolyn S. Allen (8-R) Timothy S. Bee (30-R) Robert Blendu (12-R) Robert “Bob” Burns (9-R) Jake Flake (5-R) Pamela Gorman (6-R) Ron Gould (3-R) Chuck Gray (19-R) Linda Gray (10-R) Jack W. Harper (4-R) John Huppenthal (20-R) Karen Johnson (18-R) Barbara Leff (11-R) Jay Tibshraeny (21-R) Thayer Verschoor (22-R) Jim Waring (7-R)


2007 Arizona Legislative Scorecard

Border Action Network P.O. Box 384 Tucson, AZ 85702

(520) 623-4944 ban@borderaction.org www.borderaction.org

Border Action Network Staff

Weighting Committee*

Jennifer Allen

James Anaya

Executive Director

University of Arizona Indigenous Peoples’ Law and Policy Center

Julia Goldin Administrator

Steve Arnquist Arizona League of Conservation Voters

Katie O’Connor Assistant to the Director

John Fife

Kendal Nystedt

Day Laborer Program of the Southside Presbyterian Church

2007 Intern

Julissa Villa Organizing Coordinator

Zaliah Zalkind Program & Online Coordinator

Maurice “Mo” Goldman Arizona American Immigration Lawyers Association, Goldman & Goldman Law Offices

Alonzo Morado People for the American Way

Maru Moreno Board of Directors* Veronika Pasos-Garcia, Chair Mexicayotl Academy

Cámara de Empresarios y Profesionistas Hispanos de Arizona

Carolyn Trowbridge Arizona American Civil Liberties Union

Zoe Hammer, Vice-Chair Prescott College

Research by Kendal Nystedt

Raymond Michalowski

Written by Kendal Nystedt

Northern Arizona University

Guadalupe Quijada Youth Human Rights Promoter

Jesus Romo Attorney

Gabriel Saspe Douglas Community Member

Edited by Jennifer Allen Designed by Zaliah Zalkind Sources www.azleg.gov www.azhouse.gov www.azsenate.gov www.governor.state.az.us www.borderaction.org

* Organizational affiliations listed for identification purposes only

19


2007 Arizona State Legislative Scorecard  

This report refl ects a low-point in Arizona politics; a point, however, that we hope to change. It reveals a highly polarized legislature t...