Science Laboratory - Grade 5 - Preview

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SCIENCE LABORATORY

LABORATORY

LABORATORY

J & J Educational Bootcamp 5010 North Hiatus Road Sunrise, FL 33351

grade 5

jandjeducationalbootcamp.net www.educationalbootcamp.net

j&j

al ion cat amp edu otc

bo

J&J EDUCATIONAL BOOTCAMP

commanding results !

GRADE 5

Tel. 305-423-1999 Fax. 305-423-1132

Hands on activity addressing specific benchmarks as required by the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for Science.

j&j

al ion cat amp edu otc

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THE LABORATORY ACTIVITY BOOKLET INCLUDES: 

Labs – complete experiments that walk students through the process of the scientific method.

Lab Forms – helps students define their specific role in the group and record notes accordingly.

Lab Team Response Form – a handy worksheet to be completed by student groups at the conclusion of the lab.

Lab Report Rubric – a precise way to measure group performance on the scientific method.

Connecting the Process Skills – provides a reminder of questions to ask each group after the lab.

The Science Section of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment 2.0 Test is based on the Next Generation Sunshine Standards The Science FCAT 2.0 evaluates students’ knowledge of scientific processes/content. Students must be able to analyze and apply these principles in order to demonstrate scientific understanding. The Science FCAT 2.0 is adapted from Florida’s Next Generation Sunshine State Standard benchmarks that encompass specific concepts involving several Big Ideas. Among these concepts are items involving the Nature of science, Life Science, Physical Science and Earth & Space Science.

Science Boot Camp Laboratory Activities Booklet Grades 3 - 5 Publisher: J & J Educational Boot Camp Content Development: J & J Educational Boot Camp Senior Editor: Chantel Styles Cover Design: Doris Araujo, Inc. Copyright © 2011 by J & J Educational Boot Camp J & J Educational Boot Camp P.O. Box 824221 Pembroke Pines, Florida 33082 All rights reserved. This publication may be reproduced for classroom use only.

Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 0-85-8343007 10 9 8 7 6 5

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TABLE OF CONTENTS FLORIDA CODE

SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION

SC.5.N.1.1

CONNECTING THE PROCESS SKILLS TYPES OF SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD HEAT IT UP ORGANIC MATTER IN SOIL SAMPLES HEAT CONDUCTION SOUND WAVES MEASURING DISTANCES OF STARS AFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON COMETS EARTH’S ROTATION MOON PHASES INVESTIGATING MINERALS LIMESTONE: A FLORIDA RESOURCE PHYSICAL WEATHERING OF ROCKS THE WATER CYCLE CLOUD IN A BOTTLE BIOME IN A BAG TEXTURED MATERIALS AND ABSORBENCY DENSITY DETERMINES BUOYANCY THE EFFECT OF HEAT ON LIQUID MATTER REFRACTION AND THE VISCOSITY OF LIQUIDS PHYSICAL CHANGES CAUSED BY HEAT ENERGY ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS ELECTROMAGNET GRAVITY AND ITS EFFECT ON MOTION MASS AND ITS EFFECT ON MOTION PHOTOTROPISM BREATHE IN, BREATHE OUT! REPRODUCTIVE PARTS IN PLANTS COMPARING NON-FLOWERING PLANTS BEAN SEED GERMINATION LIGHT CHASERS BLUBBER: AN ADAPTATION THE MAD DASH: COMPETING FOR RESOURCES FOOD WEBS LABORATORY FORMS/RUBRIC LAB FORM: Project Director LAB FORM Assistant Director LAB FORM: Materials Manager LAB FORM: Data Analyst LAB TEAM RESPONSE FORM LAB REPORT RUBRIC

SC.5.N.1.2 SC.5.N.1.1 SC.5.N.1.1 SC.5.N.1.2 SC.5.N.1.3 SC.5.N.1.6 SC.5.E.5.1 SC.5.E.5.2/SC.5.E.5.3 SC.4.E.5.1/SC.4.E.5.3 SC.4.E.5.2 SC.4.E.6.2 SC.4.E.6.6 SC.4.E.6.4 SC.5.E.7.1 SC.5.E.7.3/ SC.5.E.7.4 SC.5.E.7.5 SC.5.P.8.1 SC.5.P.8.3 SC.5.P.9.1 SC.5.P.10.1 SC.5.P.10.2 SC.5.P.11.1 SC.5.P.10.3 SC.5.P.13.1 SC.5.P.13.3 SC.3.L.14.2 SC.5.L.14.1 SC.5.L.14.2 SC.3.L.15.1 SC.4.L.16.4 SC.5.L.17.1 SC.5.L.17.1 SC.5.L.15.1 SC.4.L.17.3

SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION

PAGE NUMBER

Controlled Experiment

2

MIXED

3

Controlled Experiment

4

Controlled Experiment

5-7

Field Study

8 - 10

Controlled Experiment

11 - 13

Controlled Experiment

14 - 16

Systematic Observations

17 -19

Controlled Experiment

20 - 22

Making A Model

23 - 25

Making A Model

26 - 28

Systematic Observations

29 - 31

Controlled Experiment

32 - 34

Controlled Experiment

35 - 37

Controlled Experiment

38 - 40

Controlled Experiment

41 - 43

Controlled Experiment

44 - 46

Controlled Experiment

47 - 49

Verified Observations

50 - 52

Controlled Experiment

53 - 55

Controlled Experiment Controlled Experiment

56 - 58 59 - 61

Controlled Experiment

62 - 64

Controlled Experiment

65 - 67

Controlled Experiment

68 - 70

Controlled Experiment

71 - 73

Controlled Experiment

74 - 76

Making A Model

77 - 79

Systematic Observations

80 - 82

Systematic Observations

83 - 85

Controlled Experiment

86 - 88

Controlled Experiment

89 - 91

Controlled Experiment

92 - 94

Controlled Experiment

95 - 97

Making A Model

98- 105

PAGE NUMBER 106 - 107 108 109 110 - 111 112 - 113 114 - 115

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VERIFIED OBSERVATION ACTIVITY - RESPONSE FORM MEASURING DISTANCES OF STARS -SC.5.E.5.1

Student Name: _____________________________________

TITLE PURPOSE

MATERIALS

Date: _____________

MEASURING DISTANCES OF STARS To construct a device to measure the altitude of the Sun.      

one – protractor one – piece of dark yarn (30 cm long) one – small metal washer one – plastic straw one – pair of scissors one – roll of masking tape  one – hole puncher To Construct the Astrolabe: Step 1:

Cut the straw to match the length of the side of the protractor.

Step 2:

Tape the straw onto only the flat edge of the protractor.

Step 3:

PROCEDURES

Step 4:

Pull one end of the yarn through the front of the hole of the protractor and tie it securely. Tie the opposite side of the yarn to a washer.

Taking Measurements with the Astrolabe: Step 1: To measure the altitude of the top of your school’s building, look through the straw. Another student should look at the side of the astrolabe (protractor) to read the angle the string lines up with on the protractor. Record your observations. Repeat for measuring the altitude of a tree. Step 2: Next, measure the altitude of the Sun. Point the straw at the Sun, but do not look through the straw directly at the Sun. Look first for the shadow of the straw on your hand and continue to lower it until a small round light forms on your hand. Step 3: Another student should look at the side of the astrolabe to read the angle the string lines up with the protractor. Record your observations. Note: As a home learning assignment, you will measure the altitude of stars in the night sky. First, look for the North star. Look through the straw and have someone else read the side of the astrolabe to read at what degree of angle the string is laying. Repeat this process and record your observations for the next three nights.

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OBSERVATIONS Data Table

Responding Variable

ALTITUDE (Degrees) (Independent Variable)

OBJECTS

Trial 1

Trial 2

Trial 3

Average

Tall Tree School Building Sun

Graph Title Degrees

Altitude

Heading on the Y-axis

Units

STAR DISTANCES

0

Object to be measured Heading on the X-axis

RESULTS CONCLUSION APPLICATION 18


TEACHER NOTES MEASURING DISTANCES OF STARS - SC.5.E.5.1

PROBLEM STATEMENT:

How can the altitude of stars be measured? HYPOTHESIS: (predictions will vary) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In this activity, students will construct an astrolabe to compare the height of the North Star over a period of three days. An astrolabe is a device used to measure the altitude or the height of objects in the sky. Our galaxy is a big place, with hundreds of billions of stars. Some stars are relatively close and others are over on the other side of the galaxy. Stars are massive shining spheres of hot gas, the closest of which is our Sun. VARIABLES: Control Group Independent Variable Dependent Variable Constant (Controlled) Variables

Stars Tall building and tall trees The altitude The same…. Protractor, type of dark yarn, metal washer, plastic straw, etc…

DATA COLLECTION/OBSERVATIONS: (data collection will vary) GRAPHS: (answers will be based on the data collected) RESULTS: (answers will vary) CONCLUSION: (answers will vary) APPLICATION: (answers will vary)

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CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT - RESPONSE FORM AFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON COMETS - SC.5.E.5.3 Student Name: _____________________________________

Date: _____________

TITLE AFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON COMETS PROBLEM How does temperature affect the lifespan of comets? STATEMENT HYPOTHESIS If comets are placed near a heating source (like the Sun), then the comet will melt (faster/slower). circle one

CONTROL

INDEPENDENT VARIABLE

DEPENDENT VARIABLE

NUMBER OF TRIALS

FIXED VARIABLES       

MATERIALS

      

two – large plastic mixing bowls two – large plastic bags ( about the size of a small garbage bag) one – pair of safety goggles one – heavy duty gardening gloves one – pitcher of water six – tablespoons cornstarch one handful – backyard soil five to ten pounds of dry ice one – mallet or hammer two teaspoons – dark cane syrup one – plastic bag one – heating lamp one – 2 gallon-sized zip lock bags one – clock or watch

Day 1

PROCEDURES

Step 1: Place a mixing bowl on a table. Step 2: Open the plastic bag and place it inside the bowl with the sides hanging over the bowl. Step 3: Pour two cups of water, three tablespoons of starch, two teaspoons of syrup, and a handful of backyard soil into the bag. Mix these ingredients together. Step 4: Wearing gloves and goggles, place half the dry ice into an insulated bag and crush with a hammer into small pieces. Step 5: Place the pieces of dry ice into the mixture in the bowl. Step 6: Twist the top of the bag and press down on the ice mixture to form a solid mass. Step 7: Remove the mass from the bag and place inside a Ziploc bag. Step 8: Repeat steps 1 through 7 to form a second comet. Place both comets in a freezer for overnight storage.

Day 2 Step1: Step2: Step 3: Step 4:

Remove both comets from the freezer. Place one comet beneath a heating lamp. Place the other comet on a tray covered with ice away from the lamp. Record the time it takes for the comet to melt.

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OBSERVATIONS Responding Variable

Data Table Independent Variable

PLACEMENT

MELTING TIME (min) Trial 1

Trial 2

Trial 3

Average

Heating Lamp Tray of Ice Graph Title

Units

min.

Heading on the Y-axis

Melting Time

COMETS

0 Placement of the Comet Heading on the X-axis

RESULTS CONCLUSION APPLICATION 21


TEACHER NOTES AFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON COMETS - SC.5.E.5.3 PROBLEM STATEMENT:

How does temperature affect the lifespan of comets? HYPOTHESIS: (predictions will vary) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In this activity, students will combine dry ice with other ingredients to form a comet. Comets are small celestial bodies that revolve around the Sun. A comet is made up of ice, dust, and small rocks. Ice-filled comets are formed far away from the Sun. When comets, during their orbit, come into close proximity with the Sun, they lose mass as the ice melts and vaporize to form a tail. The comet then loses its carbon dioxide gases through small holes that eventually resemble craters. There are only 3,572 known comets. VARIABLES: Control Group Independent Variable Dependent Variable Constant (Controlled) Variables

Comet placed on a tray of ice Comet placed near the heating lamp Time it takes the comet to melt The same…. Dry ice, amount of materials mixed into the dry ice, heating source, etc…

DATA COLLECTION/OBSERVATIONS: (data collection will vary) GRAPHS: (answers will be based on the data collected) RESULTS: (answers will vary) CONCLUSION: (answers will vary) APPLICATION: (answers will vary)

22


CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT - RESPONSE FORM BIOME IN A BAG - SC.5.E.7.5 Student Name: _____________________________________

TITLE

Date: _____________

BIOME IN A BAG

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How does the land cover in varying environments affect the growth of rice grass?

HYPOTHESIS

If the rice grass seed is placed in different environments, then it will grow the tallest in the (gravel/soil/or sand). circle one

CONTROL GROUP

INDEPENDENT VARIABLE

DEPENDENT VARIABLE

NUMBER OF TRIALS

FIXED VARIABLES

MATERIALS

      

three – 16 ounce clear plastic cups three – quart sized zip lock bags one – pack of rice grass seeds one – spray bottle of water (container of water) ½ cup – gravel or pebbles ½ cup – sand ½ cup – potting soil  one – teaspoon  one – metric ruler

Step 1: In the first cup, pour the potting soil into the clear plastic cup until it is about half full. Step 2: Using your thumb, press firmly into the soil. Sprinkle one teaspoon of seed over this spot in the soil.

PROCEDURES Step 3: Cover with a very thin layer of soil about 2 centimeters deep.

Step 4: Spray or sprinkle with water just until a small amount begins to collect at the bottom of the cup. Step 5: Place the cup inside of a zip lock bag and seal. Step 6: Repeat steps 1-5 using the gravel. Step 7: Repeat steps 1-5 using the sand. Step 8: Observe for 12 days and record the measurements. 44


OBSERVATIONS

Data Table Independent Variable

GROUND COVER

Responding Variable

GROWTH OF THE RICE GROWTH (cm) Day 3

Day 5

Day 7

Day 9

Day 12

Gravel Sand Potting Soil Graph Title

cm Growth

Heading on the Y-axis

Units

BIOME IN A BAG

0 Ground Cover Heading on the X-axis

RESULTS CONCLUSION

APPLICATION 45


TEACHER NOTES BIOME IN A BAG - SC.5.E.7.5

PROBLEM STATEMENT:

How does the land cover in varying environments affect the growth of rice grass? HYPOTHESIS: (predictions will vary) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In order for grass seeds to germinate the soil conditions must be at the appropriate temperature, have enough moisture, and be loosened up. The soil must be kept as moist as possible. Too little moisture causes the seed to dry out. Too much moisture and the seed will rot. It is important for the conditions to be just right. VARIABLES: Control Group Independent Variable Dependent Variable Constant (Controlled) Variables

Potting soil Gravel and sand The growth of grass seeds The same…. Amount of soil, amount of grass seeds, and water, etc…

DATA COLLECTION/OBSERVATIONS: (data collection will vary) GRAPHS: (answers will be based on the data collected) RESULTS: (answers will vary) CONCLUSION: (answers will vary) APPLICATION: (answers will vary)

46


GROUP No: __________

OR

STUDENT NAME: _____________________________________

TOTAL POINTS: ____________ GRADE (select one) :

A (39 – 36)

B (35 – 31)

C (30 – 27)

D (26 – 23)

F (22 – 0)

Lab Report Rubric Problem – (select most appropriate) stated as a problem that is clearly testable 3 stated as a problem statement but is not measurable 2 not stated as an experimental question (this is a “yes” or “no” question) 1

Hypothesis - (select most appropriate) stated the (1) “if, then” format”, (2) includes the independent and dependent variables, and (3) is testable by the student. 3 stated 2 of the 3 from above. 2 stated 1 of the 3 from above. 1 Materials - (select most appropriate) describes in detail both quantitatively and quantitatively 3 not adequately described quantitatively or qualitatively 2 not adequately described quantitatively and qualitatively 1 Procedure - (select all that apply – 1 point for each) all steps beginning with an action word steps are written clear enough to be completed by another person steps listed sequentially

Variables – (select all that apply – 1 point for each) fixed manipulated responding control 114


SCIENCE LABORATORY

LABORATORY

LABORATORY

J & J Educational Bootcamp 5010 North Hiatus Road Sunrise, FL 33351

grade 5

jandjeducationalbootcamp.net www.educationalbootcamp.net

j&j

al ion cat amp edu otc

bo

J&J EDUCATIONAL BOOTCAMP

commanding results !

GRADE 5

Tel. 305-423-1999 Fax. 305-423-1132

Hands on activity addressing specific benchmarks as required by the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for Science.

j&j

al ion cat amp edu otc

bo