Abedian School of Architecture Review 2019

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REVIEW

03 ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE > REVIEW 2019


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PhD research Dion Enari Fa’a Saymore Brisbane

PhD research Rosemarie Rusch Woven walls threaded horizons Papua New Guinea

Thesis > 192 > Joshua Bowkett Civic memory Brisbane

PhD research Dr KPC Hudson Architecture of survival Antarctica

Thesis > 182 > Sidney Russell A place to call home Brisbane

Thesis > 181 > Anthony Pannolino Finca: Social and tectonic exploration Colombia Thesis > 183 > Emma Sommerville Business School of Textile Arts Laos Thesis > 173 > Sarah Ndigare > Testing farming community models Uganda Thesis > 181 > Dhruv Arora Housing the poor Mumbai


Thesis > 191 > Jichang Pan Coastal public space thresholds Southport Coastal > 181 > Bachelors Studio 4 ReDUX Discovery and Research Centre South Stradbroke Island Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 4 Gondwana Case Study House Gaven Hinterland > 191 > Masters Tectonics: Movement and light Mount Tamborine

Thesis > 173 > David Gray Broadwater Museum of Modern Art Southport

Thesis > 192 > Sam McLintock Fragments of Time Bond University

Thesis > 191 > Arvin Abbassian A neighbourhood archetype Bundall

Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 6 Enabling life in our city Southport

Thesis > 191 > Shane Collins Restoring urban connections Robina Peri-Urban > 183 > Bachelors Studio 3 Exploring alternative dwelling models in a growing city Robina

Urban > 173 > Masters School of Creative Arts Southport

Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 3 Shift Chevron Island Coastal > 182 > Masters Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway

PhD research Tory Jones The self-image of the City Gold Coast

Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South

Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 5 Architecture as city making Surfers Paradise

Coastal > 192 > Masters Surfers Future 2 Surfers Paradise

Thesis > 192 > Jai Barrett Redefining education environments Merrimac


Thesis > 191 > Ryan Fell Saving the beach house Gold Coast Highway

Peri-Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 2 Studio Dolphin Palm Beach

PhD research Susan Lambert Courting daylight East Coast Australia

Hinterland > 181 > Bachelors Studio 1 Wilderness, farmyards and the sea Binna Burra Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 1 Place, scale and atmosphere Binna Burra

Hinterland > 181 > Masters Bound is a boatless man Tweed River Thesis > 191 > Rohan Chauhan Ayurvedic detox retreat centre Murwillumbah

Peri-Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 2 Programmatic hybrids and the section Palm Beach Thesis > 192 > Russell Ward Addressing the missing middle Burleigh Heads

Urban > 183 > Masters Re-thinking in-between space Palm Beach

Coastal > 183 > Bachelors Studio 6 Enabling life in our city Burleigh Heads

ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE BOND UNIVERSITY

< BRISBANE

SYDNEY >


ABEDIA SCHOOL ARCHITE REVIEW


AN L OF ECTURE W 2019


010 0 This third edition of the Bond University Abedian School of Architecture Review 2019 is realised with the generous support of Dr Soheil Abedian, Patron.


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“Within its vast e seen its diverse e coast, plain, and that diversity can mechanisms, nat that have made support a way of


extent can be ecologies of sea– d hill; within n be seen the tural and human, those ecologies of life…” Rayner Banham, Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies


Photo: John Gollings

Surfers Paradise, Gold Coaast, Queensland




CONTENTS

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PATRON’S FOREWORD SOHEIL ABEDIAN

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EXECUTIVE DEAN’S WELCOME DEREK CARSON

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ESSAY JACKIE COOPER

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HEAD OF SCHOOL’S INTRODUCTION CHRIS KNAPP

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DESIGN STUDIOS

163

MASTER’S DESIGN THESES

201

PhD RESEARCH

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THE SCHOOL

231

OUR PEOPLE


Photo: Peter Bennetts

The Abedian School of Architecture building was designed by Sir Peter Cook and Gavin Robotham of London practice CRAB Studio.



Photo: Luke Marsden


“Design is about the betterment of our lives poetically, aesthetically, experientially, sensorially and emotionally.� Karim Rashid

Opposite, left to right: Dr Soheil Abedian Professor Derek Carson Professor Chris Knapp

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PATRON’S FOREWORD

Dr Soheil Abedian

This year’s Review proudly presents an overview of our emerging architects and potential leaders in contemporary architecture. Since the commencement of the Architecture School in 2011, the program has produced over 150 graduates. With any new school, the early fledgling achievements lay the foundation for future prosperity as these graduates take small steps to progress in their professional fields. We are delighted to acknowledge some milestone achievements, with the first alumnus to achieve professional registration as an architect in 2018, and several alumni now well-established in their own practices. Notably, some alumni are now spearheading nationally recognised practices throughout Australia. The incorporation of a design studio in the School lends impetus to students’ design imaginations. The studio has been a key catalyst for engendering architectural designs that balance the dialogue between the poetic and the practical. Of paramount importance are the hands-on skills and pragmatic contexts students develop in the studio, providing the pathway to their transition to professional opportunities.

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Connecting and engaging with local industry and the Gold Coast City Council as well as other local councils through partnerships is vital to cementing understanding and appreciation of the role of architecture in the City. Through collaborations with local practices and businesses, including internships and mentoring programs, students interact with industry and the community and gain firsthand experience as they prepare to enter the business world. Closer relationships with the business community to explore entry-level work opportunities inevitably enhance students’ ability to transition quickly from study to employment and to play a role in this City’s design landscape. Our City provides a rich, diverse range of environmental settings that students explore and document to create different types of architectural outcomes. This diversity is exemplified in this year’s Review. Student work undertaken over the past two years is presented in the contexts Urban, Hinterland, Coastal and PeriUrban — exploring the suburban middle. We are proud to showcase our students’ range of achievements and congratulate them on their dedication. Dr Soheil Abedian Patron

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Photo: Luke Marsden


EXECUTIVE DEAN’S WELCOME

Dean and Patron’s Welcome Semester 3, 2019

The approach to student learning at the heart of the Abedian School of Architecture embodies everything we strive to achieve at Bond. The creativity and craft displayed by students and staff bring to life the impressive learning environment afforded by the nurturing and inspiring physical space. I acknowledge the immense contribution of our Patron Dr Soheil Abedian, Mrs Anne Abedian, and the Abedian Foundation. Their guidance and unflagging support to our School and students are both valued and appreciated. In Bond’s 30th Anniversary year, 2019 marks a coming of age for the School: new leadership, new curriculum, and a refreshed approach to pedagogy, with design firmly placed at the core of the School’s identity. The importance of architecture is considerable. Architects provide us with spaces to live, work, and interact in. The quality of the student work depicted in this Review demonstrates the future of the discipline is in exceptionally good hands. Professor Derek Carson Executive Dean Faculty of Society and Design

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Photo: Luke Marsden



ESSAY


“In these raw, brash drive-by strip cities, memory gives way to constant architectural churn. The big commercial signifiers dominate: ugly duck buildings and decorated sheds. Cars rule all along the horizontal linear urban blur and attention-grabbing vertical signs punctuate the visual field. These are lessons Gollings drew from Surfers Paradise.�


ESSAY

Learning from Surfers Paradise, then and now How and why John Gollings documented the strip Jackie Cooper

Fig 1

Looking west, Pacific Highway, Surfers Paradise, 1973

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In 1973, recent architecture graduate John Gollings – who chose photography over architecture – documented the Surfers Paradise strip. His collaborator was fellow University of Melbourne alumnus, Tony Styant Browne. The impetus for the photographic survey was Styant Browne’s history thesis on Surfers Paradise. Styant Browne had lived on the Gold Coast as a kid before moving to Melbourne. In 1973, he and Gollings joined forces at Surfers over a two-week holiday, both with young families in tow, and dodging turbulent weather and a super king tide that claimed the beachfront, they drove the strip and shot what they saw. Gollings carried in his mind’s eye two references. Calling the project Learning from Surfers Paradise was a direct homage to Learning from Las Vegas, the wildly influential book by Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Steve Izenour published in 1972. These Yale scholars had stepped away from the ivory tower and turned their attention to the “non-city” of Las Vegas, documenting and analysing the garish frontages and iconic commercial signage lining the urban strip that defined the desert gambling city. Their academic interest in the taxonomy and signification of the ugly and the ordinary would validate a wider architectural yearning to be free of the strictures of functionalist modernism. Post-modernism was champing at the bit. The art world was in a similar mood. Artists like Andy Warhol had been re-evaluating and raising to iconic status the commonplace and prosaic. Pop art was a thing. The other reference/homage Gollings acknowledged was to Ed Ruscha (born 1937), an artist who worked alongside the Pop artists of California, and also a photographer. Ruscha’s arresting, deadpan photographic surveys of gas stations and strip malls in small town America made people stop and think about the ordinary everyday world in a new light. Notable was Ruscha’s 1966 photographic survey, Every Building on the Sunset Strip. He mounted his camera on a pickup truck and shot a mile and a half of the Strip in Los Angeles, both sides of the road, and compiled the photographs into a 25 foot-long concertina fold-out. Ruscha did not edit content or frame buildings artfully. He shot what was in front of his camera

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Fig 2

Fig 3

Night shots of Surfers Paradise. The indifferent, mixed identity and mostly low scale and density of the strip of the 1970s give way to high-rise hotel blocks and placeless commercial architecture. The king tide of 1973 took out the beach. No one at the time attributed the disaster to climate change. The discourse has radically shifted.

then 1973 now 2012

Fig 2

Fig 3

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as he passed. It was “no style” documentary photography. And he went back time and again thereafter to document Sunset Strip. Las Vegas, Sunset Strip and Surfers Paradise sprang up as brand new cities along a single road. Being linear urban growths sprouting along humdrum commercial strips, they necessarily lacked the urban complexity and amenity of traditional cities: the monuments and leafy boulevards, the historic urban fabric of place and memory. In these raw, brash drive-by strip cities, memory gives way to constant architectural churn. The big commercial signifiers dominate: ugly duck buildings and decorated sheds. Cars rule all along the horizontal linear urban blur and attentiongrabbing vertical signs punctuate the visual field. These are lessons Gollings drew from Surfers Paradise. He also recognised the innocent charm of modest holiday apartment and motel facades freighted with aspirational names evoking the fantasy destinations of Florida or Las Vegas – Bel-Air, Rancho, Stardust, Siesta, Biscayne, Cuba Flats, Silver Sands, Flamingo. With Styant Browne driving Gollings’ station wagon slowly down the middle of the road, Gollings sat perched on the bonnet shooting. Like Ruscha, he did not edit out buildings or frame the images. He worked intuitively and without an aesthetic objective. They also hired a Cessna and photographed the city from above the beaches, and showed the newly emerging canal estates. They recorded the development boom of the 1950s and 60s. The Japanese-led boom of the 1980s was yet to happen. They worked frantically, making use of the limited periods when the sun shone during a stormy couple of weeks. King tides engulfed the beachfront, sucking out all the sand and leaving bare rocks exposed, towers perching precariously. This had happened before. In 1967 eight cyclones successively thrashed the Gold Coast. Authorities acted to save the beaches from erosion, and among the remedies was a 16 metre-deep seawall constructed in the 1970s and 80s, and constant “nourishing” of the beaches with shipped-in sand. In 1973, when Gollings recorded the beach erosion, climate change was only dimly understood.

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Fig 4 Fig 5

Fig 6

Fig 7

Fig 8

Fig 6

Transformation in scale and character. Tall buildings casting long cold shadows on the beaches. Cavill Avenue has morphed from its friendly, scruffy, low-scale beachside identity to a developer vision of unexceptional commercial architecture. Gollings used a fisheye lens for the 1973 photographic project, and in the interests of historical accuracy and authenticity, he used the same lens 40 yeas later, distorting the towers. Like Ruscha, Gollings did not edit out buildings or frame the images. He worked intuitively and without an aesthetic objective. Pop imagery redolent of American commercial strip architecture, with its catchy character that raises a smile, has given way to a dour, bland, beige vaguely institutional building that could be anything: church? library? ticket office? The absence of identity destroys place.

Fig 4

Fig 5

Fig 7

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Fig 8

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Now we know that thousands of buildings along the Gold Coast would be exposed to coastal flooding should sea levels rise. Like Ruscha, Gollings has returned to his subject, documenting Surfers Paradise many years later in 2012. He is obsessed with constantly documenting one place. He used the same lens – which proved problematic because while the fish-eye provided an ideal wide angle to show relatively low-rise urban development in 1973, in 2012 it bends high-rise structures out of shape, serving to accentuate the shocking jump in scale. It is significant that Gollings reshot Surfers Paradise from the exact locations of his initial pictures. This provides a compelling set of urban comparisons as well as a forensic historical document. Gollings mourns the loss of the friendly, low-scale, naive developer architecture he recorded in 1973. It has been replaced by slick beige concrete high-rise developer-driven buildings that return nothing to the life of the street and relentlessly homogenise the urban experience to one of being anywhere. Surfers Paradise has become a bitumen and concrete jungle where nothing of the original landscape remains – apart from the golden beaches, now monstrously walled-off and in the afternoons made gloomy by raking high-rise shadows that greedily sap the sun. Here lies the great challenge: to re-envision Surfers Paradise, to bring back to it a special sense of being somewhere with an authentic heritage and culture, to design climatically-sane buildings rather than sealed mineral enclosures, to privilege pedestrians and engender an inviting street culture of engagement and delight, to cherish the coastal environment. It can be done. Egregious mistakes of the past can be avoided in the future. Unfriendly streetscapes can be rehabilitated. New building models can be developed. There is so much that now needs to be learned from Surfers Paradise.


Fig 9

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Fig 11

Fig 12

For Gollings, the tragedy of the beachfront is evident in the greedy jostling high-rise architecture usurping sight-lines and genius loci. The modest Rancho Motel contributed an evocative message to the street. It spoke in an American accent yet it conveyed the promise of a working-class Australian beach holiday dream. A dreary blond brick replacement sucks life out of the street. Surfers deserves better. The Nerang River connects the hinterland to the coast, debouching into the Broadwater, which has long been a boating haven. The 57 km of mid Pacific Ocean beachfront is the Gold Coast City’s glory. The City’s varied natural aquatic environments define its topography. Potentially, water becomes the powerful signifier of the Gold Coast City, supplanting the semantic primacy of the often undifferentiated high-rise towers as the key element in the beachside City’s identity.

Currently, water in the City is uncelebrated. But given a larger, unifying vision for the City, this richly evocative resource could be better exploited to contribute identity to many urban precincts.

Fig 9

Fig 10

Fig 11

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Fig 13

Fig 13

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In 1973 a lone tower breaches the skyline, leaving views intact both of and from the surrounding low-rise development. But 40 years later, the density and scale of competing, crowding towers obliterate all previous sense of place.


Fig 14 Fig 15

Fig 14

In spite of the nature of the architecture, the denizens of Surfers Paradise keep it casual. This speaks of incomprehensible loss of identity: “the wanton destruction of 1960s typography obliterated by beige paint.� (Gollings)

Fig 15

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Fig 16

Fig 16

Fig 17 Fig 18

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Fig 17

The crass but innocent developer architecture of a typical holiday motel, with its aspirational name – bel air – and 1960s graphics and colour scheme, has gone from memory. In its stead is a bland, well-mannered replacement that might be anywhere and speaks of nowhere – a lost opportunity to re-envision the Gold Coast. Before and after, indicating the pressure of population. Gollings revelled in the 1950s and 60s low-key, low-scale beach architecture, with flats and motels named after faraway places, and he mourns their demise.

Fig 18




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“An architecture school, in the best possible incarnation, is an experimental laboratory for ideas that will evolve and redefine the discipline itself. By acquiring an intellectual and technical toolkit used to negotiate the complexities of architecture, students become readily equipped to be the agents of change required by an uncertain yet exciting future.� Chris Knapp


HEAD OF SCHOOL’S INTRODUCTION

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Head of School’s Welcome Semester 3, 2019 Photo: Luke Marsden Gold Coast, Queensland Photo: John Gollings

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The work of the 2019 Abedian School Review displays six semesters’ worth of production from the design studios, master’s theses, PhD research, and other curricular aspects of the Abedian School of Architecture. Our School is entirely dedicated to a studio-based pedagogical approach, starting with our 24/7 accessible, bespoke building designed by Sir Peter Cook and Gavin Robotham of CRAB Studio, London. This building acts as the petri dish containing the evolutionary experiments set by our academic staff team and carried out through the enthusiastic, curiosity-driven inquiries of our diverse student body. Taking this metaphor further, if the building is the petri dish, and the student studio work the experimental growth, what then is the substrate – or agar – feeding the outcome? This third edition of the Review foregrounds the quite particular and diverse substrate that supports and defines our design enquiry at the School: the experimental ecology that is Australia’s Gold Coast. Often misunderstood and subject to superficial characterisations, the Gold Coast is a fascinating amalgam of environmental beauty and late-20th-century urban development.

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Fig 3

Fig 4

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Fig 3 Coastal ecology Fig 4 Urban ecology Fig 5 Peri-Urban ecology Fig 6 Hinterland ecology Photos: John Gollings Fig 6

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While a fraction of total population, it is a compelling antipodean twin to Los Angeles which exhibits similar geographic and sociocultural traits. Seen through the lens of historian Rayner Banham’s Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies which highlights distinct regions of Surfurbia, The Plains of Id, The Hills, and Autotopia, the Gold Coast displays equivalent typological zones. In contrast to Los Angeles, these zones are aligned in parallel against the dominant feature of a 57 km continuous beach facing the same Pacific Ocean that also orients our Angeleno counterparts. As framed in this Review, the work of each studio or student project can be seen as participating in and responding to the distinct character of each precinct: the Coast, the Urban core, the Peri-Urban, and the Hinterland ecologies. If our contemporary condition as architects is to be given a skillset which can operate in any corner of the globe, the reality remains that one must negotiate the complex and competing local aspects of site and setting. The physical and cultural qualities of place must be well-understood in the successful resolution of an architectural proposition. The work of the Abedian School of Architecture featured herein demonstrates a range of responses to the local. Often challenging the status quo, redefining what is possible, and seeking to propose architectures that are at once contextually precise and globally relevant.

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Fig 7

Master’s thesis crit, April 2019 Photo: CornÊ Lategan

Fig 7

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Congratulations to our students, and our academic and program staff, for collectively producing this impressive body of responses to the conditions of the Gold Coast. It is an honour to have the generous contribution of eminent photographer John Gollings, whose images are significant inclusions; Gollings’ 1973 photo essay on Surfers Paradise forms the subject of Jackie Cooper’s text. Thank you to our book editor, Jasper Brown, his student team who helped to lay the groundwork for this edition, and graphic designer, Jane Mooney, for their exceptional efforts in realising the 2019 Abedian Review. And our gratitude to our Patron, Soheil Abedian. Professor Chris Knapp Head of School Abedian School of Architecture

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DESIGN STUDIOS

Coastal > 181 > Bachelors Studio 4 ReDUX Discovery and Research Centre South Stradbroke Island Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 4 Gondwana Case Study House Gaven Hinterland > 191 > Masters Tectonics: Movement and light Mount Tamborine

Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 6 Enabling life in our city Southport

Urban > 173 > Masters School of Creative Arts Southport

Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 3 Shift Chevron Island Coastal > 182 > Masters Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway

Peri-Urban > 183 > Bachelors Studio 3 Exploring alternative dwelling models in a growing city Robina Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South

Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 5 Architecture as city making Surfers Paradise

Coastal > 192 > Masters Surfers Future 2 Surfers Paradise


Peri-Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 2 Studio Dolphin Palm Beach

Peri-Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 2 Programmatic hybrids and the section Palm Beach Urban > 183 > Masters Re-thinking in-between space Palm Beach Coastal > 183 > Bachelors Studio 6 Enabling life in our city Burleigh Heads

Hinterland > 181 > Masters Bound is a boatless man Tweed River

COASTAL URBAN PERI-URBAN HINTERLAND

Hinterland > 181 > Bachelors Studio 1 Wilderness, farmyards and the sea Binna Burra

ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE BOND UNIVERSITY

Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 1 Place, scale and atmosphere Binna Burra


Coastal > 181 > Bachelors Studio 4 ReDUX Discovery and Research Centre South Stradbroke Island

Coastal > 182 > Masters Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway

Coastal > 192 > Masters Surfers Future 2 Surfers Paradise


ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE BOND UNIVERSITY

COASTAL

Coastal > 183 > Bachelors Studio 6 Enabling life in our city Burleigh Heads


Coastal > 182 > Masters > Kamran Granfar

Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway



Coastal > 182 > Masters > Joshua Bowkett Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway




Coastal > 182 > Masters > Joshua Bowkett

Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway


Coastal > 182 > Masters > Megan King Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway



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Coastal > 182 > Masters > Bianca Bujaroski 61 >

Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway


181 > Bachelors Studio 4

ReDUX Discovery and Research Centre South Stradbroke Island

4x STUDIOS

“Look deep into Nature and then you will understand everything better.� Albert Einstein Students were asked to make proposals for a ReDUX Discovery and Research Centre on South Stradbroke Island. The Centre investigated the future harvesting of food, water and/or energy. Architectural concepts were derived from a learning from nature approach and developed into bio-adapted, eco-integrated and sitespecific design solutions. The Centre also needed to communicate state-of-the-art research and outcomes to visitors in a time of emerging global issues around food, fresh water, energy production and over-exploited resources for a growing population. Students gathered in discovery teams and developed a dialogue with the historical, topological, climatic, and botanical environments around the Dux Hut heritage site on the Island.

Coordinator Daniela Ottmann Architects-in-residence Kerry Clare Lindsay Clare Tutor Jasper Brown Guest critics Joerg Baumeister Jack Bryce Other contributor Katelyn Hudson

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182 > Masters

183 > Bachelors Studio 6

192 > Masters

Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway

Enabling life in our city Burleigh Heads

Surfers Future 2: What have we learned? Surfers Paradise

The City of the Gold Coast is expected to experience substantial population growth over the coming years, which is planned to occur within the existing urban footprint as well as areas that adjoin the new light rail network.

This studio was a history-inspired, ecointegrated, climate-adaptive speculation on a sustainable future for Surfers Paradise. It developed designs for a large-scale, mixeduse, co-living, co-production, co-working and co-recreational building. The projects were a homage to John Gollings’ Learning from Surfers Paradise (1973 and 2012).

“The key to a sustainable future for humanity can be found in a healthy balance between the use of land and water for the production of food, energy, clean water and shelter. Going beyond the waterfront is an efficient and exciting way to bring extra flexibility to our planet.” Koen Olthuis The design studio project was an eco-integrated and climate-adaptive floating Hydrotecture located within a collective Hydropolis for a new sustainable subtropical living proposition. In the greater setting of the Gold Coast Seaway students first explored the design of a Hydroid, followed by development of a Hydropolis master planning exploration, and finally an individual Hydro-tecture proposition for a floating architecture.

Coordinator Daniela Ottmann Tutors Peter Kuhnell Anthony Pannolino Guest critics Joerg Baumeister Zuzana Kovar Pradesh Ramiah Other contributors Mauro Baracco Rafael Contreras Monica Earl Harald Schmidt Nicholas Skepper Louise Wright

Students focused on infill sites around Burleigh Heads. Their investigations centred on authenticity of experience, local traditions, contextual rigour and social interactions to facilitate true community and city-making. Typologies focused on public infrastructure and housing. This project becomes a model for the densification of infill areas within the City.

Coordinator Matthew Eagle Architects-in-residence Aaron Peters Stuart Vokes Tutor Brian Toyota Guest critics Jack Bryce Kamran Granfar Katherine Rickard Other contributors Dan Plummer Josh Neale

This studio project imagined designs that challenge the idea of tall buildings as a single iconic piece of sculpture standing in isolation from their surroundings. Designers have a responsibility to ensure that permanent urban structures engender a future-oriented urban response to the greatest challenges of our time: unprecedented population growth; mass urbanisation; climate change; social, political and economic change; and the rapid advance of a myriad of technical innovations.

Coordinator Daniela Ottmann Architects-in-residence Rafael Contreras Monica Earl Special guest John Gollings Guest critics Jack Bryce Paola Leardini Marja Sarvimaki Other contributors Katelyn Hudson Belen Jerez Chris Knapp Susan Lambert Fernando Perez

< Coastal ecologies 63 >


Zarli Skinner

Brooke Harris

Brooke Harris

Kyle Loutit

Joy Wong Lin

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Zarli Skinner

Ellie Gilchrist

Thomas Brunton

Sara Mora Rodriguez

Thomas Brunton

Coastal > 181 > Bachelors Studio 4 65 >

ReDUX Discovery and Research Centre South Stradbroke Island


Bianca Bujaroski

Joshua Bowkett

Bianca Bujaroski

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Megan King

Coastal > 182 > Masters 67 >

Hydro-id/polis/tecture Gold Coast Seaway


Jichang Pan

Arvin Abbassian

Russell Ward

Coastal > 182 > Masters

Arvin Abbassian

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Sam McLintock

Jichang Pan

Sam McLintock

Arvin Abbassian

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Outer shell

Existing structure trusses with added accentuated structural support

Kyle Loutit

Gallery 2 Gallery 3

Gallery 1 Artist studio

Administration multi-purpose outdoor area

Existing

Ellie Gilchrist

Ellie Gilchrist

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Michelle Hsu

Thomas Brunton

Coastal > 183 > Bachelors Studio 6 71 >

Enabling life in our city Burleigh Heads


Dana Kittel


Kamran Granfar

Moh’d al-Saadi

Jobin Manamel

Kamran Granfar

Coastal > 192 > Masters

Surfers Future 2 Surfers Paradise


Urban > 173 > Masters School of Creative Arts Southport

Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South

Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 5 Architecture as city making Surfers Paradise


ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE BOND UNIVERSITY

URBAN

Urban > 183 > Masters Re-thinking in-between space Palm Beach


Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 > Christopher Grieve / David Marino / Joseph Norcross-Webb

The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South



Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 > Tristan Bennett / Ryuta Ishino Debaecker / Marcel Moller

The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South



Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 > Sam Abel / Melek Ada / Caroline Falasqui Marostica

The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South



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Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 > Ansel Chan / Grace Sargeant / Ethan Wairau 83 >


173 > Masters

4x STUDIOS

School of Creative Arts Southport The studio investigated a significant cultural and urban site in Southport and proposed its regeneration. The program was for a School of Creative Arts whose mission was to develop and enhance its position as a leading international art and design institution. The creative arts, being increasingly central to the economic and cultural life of the community, informed schemes that responded to being part of the historic centre of Southport, its proximity to one of the few remaining buildings of heritage significance (Southport Town Hall) and its locality on the important arterial urban axis within this part of the Gold Coast.

Coordinator Justin Twohill Architects-in-residence Kerry Clare Lindsay Clare Guest critics Karl Eckermann Michael Keniger Stephen Long

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182 > Bachelors Studio 5

183 > Masters

192 > Bachelors Studio 5

Architecture as city making Surfers Paradise

Re-thinking in-between space Palm Beach

The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South

The design studio was an exercise in big-picture planning and design, exploring changing attitudes in building typologies, and investigating the potential for creating exciting and meaningful urban places.

The studio investigated an urban in-between site in Palm Beach. It proposed uses and connections to contribute to the civic needs of people in this evolving part of the Gold Coast, which in little more than 50 years has developed from being a sleepy coastal town of beachside shacks to Australia’s sixth largest city. The program included a library along with a cultural and creative hub (imagined as live-work spaces), lettable work spaces and collaborative studios. A key element of the brief was the new Playroom to offer the Gold Coast a purpose-built live music venue as a focus for local contemporary music culture.

Studio 5 speculated on a new topography, the vertical sub-city, a pocket of hyper-density within the city. Supercharged spaces offering a diversity of vibrant uses are strategically located between vertical circulation structures and high-level horizontal linkages. Research looked into developing a site-specific, dense and dynamic mixed-use, three-dimensional master plan delivering aesthetic, typological and programmatic architectural diversity.

Coordinator Justin Twohill Architects-in-residence Kerry Clare Lindsay Clare Guest critics Matt Cooper Clare Kennedy Other contributors Angus Munro Aaron Peters

Coordinator Mark Bagguley Tutor Brian Toyota Guest critics Melody Chen Victoria Jones Other contributors Jasper Brown Chris Knapp Peter Kuhnell Josh Neale Ryan Wirth

The project encouraged students to think spatially, beyond two-dimensional planning, to fulfil a complex mixed-use brief for a controversial 1.6 hectare site in Surfers Paradise. Learning from their investigations of global cities, students challenged the notion of the straightforward single ground level in complex urban developments. Rather, they created multiple levels of public open space throughout their buildings. The programs they investigated included vertical schools, convertible car parking structures, alternative residential strategies, museums, galleries and hotels.

Coordinator Brian Toyota Tutors Kamran Granfar Marguerite Pollard Justin Twohill Guest critics Kelli Adair Leah Lang Other contributor Michael Keniger

The Studio accepts the need for growing cities to have multiple “ground” planes and to re-envision public spaces captured at higher datums to create sustainable neighbourhoods, re-weaving the urban fabric upwards: a car-less intervention connected to readily accessible modes of public transport.

< Urban ecologies 85 >


Anthony Pannolino

Dhruv Arora

Urban > 173 > Masters

School of Creative Arts Southport Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 86


Shane Collins

87 >


Maedeh Rashedi

Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 5

Architecture as city making Surfers Paradise Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 88


Chloe Athans

89 >


Shane Collins

Arvin Abbassian

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 90


Sam McLintock

Sam McLintock

Urban > 183 > Masters 91 >

Re-thinking in-between space Palm Beach


Shane Collins

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 92


Russell Ward / Shane Collins

Joshua Bowkett

Urban > 183 > Masters 93 >

Re-thinking in-between space Palm Beach


Fig 1

Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3

Fig 2

Christopher Grieve David Marino Joseph Narcross-Webb Tristan Bennett Ryuta Ishino Debaecker Marcel Moller Philip Baura Benjamin Ferguson Jonathan Gidas Yucheng Miao

Fig 3

Fig 1

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 94


Fig 3

Fig 2

Fig 3

Fig 2

Fig 3

Fig 3

Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 95 >

The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South


Fig 1

Fig 1

Fig 1

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 96


Fig 2

Fig 1 Fig 2

Tristan Bennett Ryuta Ishino Debaecker Marcel Moller Ansel Chan Grace Sargeant Ethan Wairau

Fig 2

Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5 97 >

The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South



Fig 1

Fig 1 Fig 2

Fig 3

Nicole Mesquita-Mendes Mitchell Backler Tiffany Semonte Philip Baura Benjamin Ferguson Jonathan Gidas Yucheng Miao Tristan Bennett Ryuta Ishino Debaecker Marcel Moller

Fig 1

Fig 2

Fig 3

Opposite: Nicole Mesquita-Mendes Mitchell Backler Tiffany Semonte

Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 5

The vertical sub-city Broadbeach South


Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 6 Enabling life in our city Southport

Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 3 Shift Chevron Island

Peri-Urban > 183 > Bachelors Studio 3 Exploring alternative dwelling models in a growing city Robina


Peri-Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 2 Programmatic hybrids and the section Palm Beach

ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE BOND UNIVERSITY

PERI-URBAN

Peri-Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 2 Studio Dolphin Palm Beach


Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 102

Peri-Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 2 > Ryuta Ishino Debaecker

Programmatic hybrids and the section Palm Beach


103 >



Peri-Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 2 > Tiffany Samonte

Programmatic hybrids and the section Palm Beach


Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 106


Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 6 > Travis Armes

107 >

Enabling life in our city Southport


Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 108


Peri-Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 2 > Kayla Soler 109 >

Studio Dolphin Palm Beach


Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 3 > Ellie Gilchrist

Shift Chevron Island



5x STUDIOS

173 > Bachelors Studio 3

173 > Bachelors Studio 6

Shift Chevron Island

Enabling life in our city Southport

This studio investigated an urban site on Chevron Island on the Gold Coast and explored its potential to accommodate the increasingly pressing housing needs of the City. Chevron Island and its environs form an important part of Gold Coast’s cultural landscape. The site is surrounded by a mix of uses including public transport routes, shops, business premises restaurants, tourist accommodation and various forms of housing. To the south across the water is the Gold Coast cultural precinct, which contains a proposed pedestrian bridge that links it to Chevron Island. The studio observed the physical and social contexts of the site and its current and proposed future uses, and explored ways to respond to patterns of urban form, densification, and the desire for open space.

The project centred on a brownfield site on the western periphery of the Southport CBD. Students examined the broader impact of built interventions on the landscape including the rehabilitation of the Loders Creek catchment area. Investigations also focused on the social and cultural role of community facilities and housing typologies in the city, the role of architecture as community maker and the architect as custodian. Students prepared speculative studies for the organisation of a master plan, followed by the development of a particular typological built form.

Coordinator Vanessa Menadue Tutor Jasper Brown Guest critics Michael Bailey Paul Hotston

Coordinator Matthew Eagle Architects-in-residence Aaron Peters Stuart Vokes Tutor Leah Gallagher Guest critics Leah Lang Brian Toyota Other contributor Nick Lorenz

Peri-Urban ecologies > Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 112


182 > Bachelors Studio 2

183 > Bachelors Studio 3

192 > Bachelors Studio 2

Programmatic hybrids and the section Palm Beach

Exploring alternative dwelling models in a growing city Robina

Studio Dolphin Palm Beach

As greater numbers of people call the Gold Coast home and as the City matures, there is growing appreciation of the history, culture and contextual values of the region. It is important as architects to use this impetus to drive new patterns of urban development and to facilitate the layering of history that one finds in great cities. Authentic, small-scale, mixed-use urban interventions that are respectful of the existing built fabric can be far more effective in the making of a great city than large-scale, instant-city impositions. The students explored this proposition and generated unexpected responses, seeking incrementally to enrich the public realm.

Students focused on a site in Robina with a large vacant warehouse building. The building was purpose-built to house the now defunct Masters Hardware store. The primary objectives of the design studio were threefold:

Studio Dolphin conceived of new, unfamiliar, non-typological architectures in which dwellers could live, work, love, sleep and dream together. Far from accepting housing as a natural way of being, the studio questioned its architectural nature as a historically constructed domain in which issues such as subjectivity, gender, ownership, and class play a role. We used Dolphin Court in Palm Beach as our test bed. This is a typical low-density microcosm of the Gold Coast in which dwellings are generally dull, inflexible, undifferentiated, and climatically unresponsive. To develop critiques and new propositions, the studio undertook analytical diagramming, studies in precedent, plan and section, and iterative analogue model making.

Coordinator Jasper Brown Tutor Jodie Cummins Guest critics Leah Gallagher Dirk Yates

113 >

Re-purpose: to recycle selected components from the existing building into proposed designs. Co-house: to develop an understanding of and generate a design response to prevailing global co-housing models. Re-integrate: to challenge the prevailing unimaginative singular zoned planning strategies on the Gold Coast and propose a richer tapestry of use across the site as an exemplar and possible catalyst for surrounding neighbourhoods.

Coordinator Jasper Brown Tutor Jodie Cummins Guest critics Amelia Lee Karen Ognibene John Price Other contributor Peter Richards

Coordinator Oliver du Puy Tutor Marguerite Pollard Guest critics Melody Chen Peter Kuhnell Jordan Mulherin Rebecca Whan Other contributors Adrian Carter Matthew Eagle Paul Hotston Chris Knapp Peter Kuhnell Silvia Micheli Antony Moulis Yohei Omura Leo De Witte


Braden Bloomfield

Brough Whibley

Yucheng Miao

Brittney Patterson

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 114


Thomas Brunton

Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 3 115 >

Shift Chevron Island


Santiago Rendon Bechara


Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 6 117 >

Enabling life in our city Southport


Jake White

Travis Armes

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 118


Amelia Mohajer

Peri-Urban > 173 > Bachelors Studio 6 119 >

Enabling life in our city Southport


Maxwell Dowd

Ryuta Ishino Debaecker

Elizabeth Barker

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 120


Ethan Wairau

Peri-Urban > 182 > Bachelors Studio 2 121 >

Programmatic hybrids and the section Palm Beach


Ethan Wairau

Nicole Mesquita-Mendes

Nicole Mesquita-Mendes

Peri-Urban > 183 > Bachelors Studio 3 Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 122


Marcel Moller

Exploring alternative dwelling models in a growing city Robina 123 >


Nelson Michaels

Nelson Michaels

Nelson Michaels

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 124


Renee Lingard

Imogen Barry-Murphy

Kayla Soler

Peri-Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 2 125 >

Below: Donta Ray Boon-Tennet

Studio Dolphin Palm Beach


Nicholas Clark-Burton


Amadeus Bellinger

Peri-Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 2

Studio Dolphin Palm Beach


Mohamed Mouallem

Nelson Michaels

Aaron Larkin

Alexander Pollard

Gemma Borra / Tess Charter

Alexander Pollard

Ellin Minogue

Below: Kayla Soler

Imogen Barry-Murphy

Peri-Urban > 192 > Bachelors Studio 2 Studio Dolphin Palm Beach Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 128


Alexander Pollard

Tess Charter

Alexander Pollard

Ellin Minogue

Gemma Borra

Bicaucci Banzi

Aaron Larkin

129 >

Imogen Barry-Murphy


Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 4 Gondwana Case Study House Gaven Hinterland > 191 > Masters Tectonics: Movement and light Mount Tamborine


Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 1 Place, scale and atmosphere Binna Burra

ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE BOND UNIVERSITY

Hinterland > 181 > Masters Bound is a boatless man Tweed River

HINTERLAND

Hinterland > 181 > Bachelors Studio 1 Wilderness, farmyards and the sea Binna Burra


Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 132


Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 4 > Ryuta Ishino Debaecker 133 >

Gondwana Case Study House Gaven


Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 1 > Aaron Larkin

Place, scale and atmosphere Binna Burra




Hinterland > 181 > Masters > Megan King

Bound is a boatless man Tweed River


Hinterland > 181 > Bachelors Studio 1 > Ryuta Ishino Debaecker / Marcel Moller / Nicole Mesquita-Mendes / Tiffany Samonte Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 138


Wilderness, farmyards and the sea Binna Burra 139 >


Hinterland > 191 > Masters > Jai Barrett

Tectonics: Movement and light Mount Tamborine



181 > Bachelors Studio 1

181 > Masters

Wilderness, farmyards and the sea Binna Burra

Bound is a boatless man Tweed River

5x STUDIOS

“My art is a visual autobiography of my life. My concerns have been about the places where I have lived and these have shaped my whole imagination.” William Robinson Students were tasked with designing a home and studio for local artist William Robinson, one of Australia’s most respected landscape painters and winner of the Archibald and Wynne prizes. The places where Robinson has lived have always been a critical part of his work: from the small semi-rural farm at Birkdale and subtropical rainforest property at Beechmont, to the coastal environs of Kingscliff in northern New South Wales, and a rainforest studio in Springbrook. These places have inspired paintings including The Farmyards, The Creations Series and The Mountain Series.

Coordinator Matthew Eagle Tutors Peter Kuhnell Justin Twohill Guest critics Morgan Jenkins Lachlan Nielson Other contributors Marja Sarvimaki Brian Toyota

“Architecture has its own realm. It has a special physical relationship with life. I do not think of it primarily as either a message or a symbol, but as an envelope and background for life which goes on in and around it, a sensitive container for the rhythm of footsteps on the floor, for the concentration of work, for the silence of sleep.” Peter Zumthor, Thinking Architecture The design studio studied a landscape site on the banks of the Tweed River and proposed structures to accommodate the needs of the Tweed River Wooden Boat Centre. The project at its core was quite simple: design a structure for boat building and enable a wider public to share in that experience. A challenge of the semester’s project was to go beyond this core need and question what architecture can bring to the experience of crafting boats and how this building can contribute to our connection to and relationship with the site, its qualities, and the region.

Coordinator Adrian Carter Architect-in-residence Ric Leplastrier Tutor Justin Twohill Guest critics Peter Frost-Møller Anna O’Gorman Other contributors Marcus Cranney Bruce Keir Susan Lambert

Hinterland ecologies > Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 142


191 > Bachelors Studio 1

191 > Bachelors Studio 4

191 > Masters

Place, scale and atmosphere Binna Burra

Gondwana Case Study House Gaven

Tectonics: Movement and light Mount Tamborine

The semester 1 design studio in first year is an introduction to the discourses and practice of architectural design. Students explore notions of space, place, materiality, atmosphere, abstraction, organisation and composition through contextual studies and making. The projects during the semester were rich and varied. Making a series of 1:1 scale “rooms” constructed in the studio space was followed by a camping trip to Binna Burra in the Gold Coast hinterland to better understand a landscape context for which students designed a studio for a local artist.

The Gondwana Case Study House design studio developed responses to the original Case Study House program but relocated to the sea on the Gold Coast within a UNESCO heritage-listed Gondwana Rainforest in 2045, exactly a century after the start of the original Case Study House Program. One of several reasons for the choice of this precedent was its location in a similar climatic zone. The designs sought to anticipate and adapt to the future socio-cultural and bio-climatic contexts. The brief included reduced car dependence; more hybrid mixed-use functionality; more flexible occupation scenarios; and the incorporation of a productive cottage industry.

Understanding how the human body moves through built space and how the experience of that space is determined by form, construction, materiality, detail, play of light, are all fundamental to realising good architecture. This studio designed a Centre for Dance and the Performing Arts for the Mount Tamborine community. This was located near the Tamborine Mountain Sports Association’s facilities and sports fields on a dramatic, sensitive site overlooking the Gold Coast. Students explored a tectonic and phenomenological approach to architectural design, considering qualities such as the bodily experience of architecture, atmosphere, spatial narrative, light, tactility, materiality and detail, as well as critical regionalism and relationships to landscape.

Coordinator Justin Twohill Tutors Jodie Cummins Peter Kuhnell Guest critics Kate Humphreys Anna O’Gorman Rebecca Whan Other contributors Matthew Eagle Damien Eckersley

Coordinator Daniela Ottmann Tutors Mark Bagguley Brian Toyota Guest critics Chris Alston Cecilia Bischeri Paul Burton Other contributors Chris Alston Katelyn Hudson

Coordinator Adrian Carter Architects-in-residence Kerry Clare Lindsay Clare Tutor Oliver du Puy Guest critics Mick Angus Ray Jones Anna O’Gorman Marja Sarvimaki Other contributors Geraldine Balcazar Viviane Freher Susan Lambert Alica Min Harvie Kate Shearer Guy Webster Ashleigh White Tammy Zarb

143 >


Hinterland > 181 > Bachelors Studio 1

Maxwell Dowd

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 144

Wilderness, farmyards and the sea Binna Burra


Marcel Moller

Tiffany Samonte

Christopher Grieve

145 >


Bianca Bujaroski

Opposite: Shane Collins

Sidney Russell

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 146


Hinterland > 181 > Masters

Bound is a boatless man Tweed River


Jichang Pan

Jichang Pan

Hinterland > 181 > Masters

Bound is a boatless man Tweed River Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 148


Arvin Abbassian

Arvin Abbassian

149 >


Shane Collins

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 150


Megan King

Hinterland > 181 > Masters 151 >

Bound is a boatless man Tweed River


Gemma Borra

Donta Ray Boon-Tennet

Kira-Lee Shaw

Alexander Pollard

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 152


Bicaucci Banzi

Nelson Michaels

Mohamed Mouallem

Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 1 153 >

Place, scale and atmosphere Binna Burra


Nicole Mesquita-Mendes

Ethan Wairau / Grace Sargeant

Ethan Wairau / Grace Sargeant

Ethan Wairau / Grace Sargeant

Nicole Mesquita-Mendes

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 154


Nicole Mesquita-Mendes

Nicole Mesquita-Mendes

Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 4 155 >

Gondwana Case Study House Gaven


Elizabeth Barker

Elizabeth Barker

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 156


Ryuta Ishino Debaecker

Ryuta Ishino Debaecker

Hinterland > 191 > Bachelors Studio 4 157 >

Gondwana Case Study House Gaven


Jai Barrett

Russell Ward

Hinterland > 191 > Masters

Tectonics: Movement and light Mount Tamborine Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 158


Amelia Mohajer

Amelia Mohajer

159 >

Amelia Mohajer


Joshua Bowkett

Joshua Bowkett

Hinterland > 191 > Masters Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 160


Megan King

Megan King

Tectonics: Movement and light Mount Tamborine 161 >


MASTER’S DESIGN THESES

Thesis > 192 > Joshua Bowkett Civic memory Brisbane

Thesis > 181 > Anthony Pannolino Finca: Social and tectonic exploration Colombia

Thesis > 182 > Sidney Russell A place to call home Brisbane

Thesis > 183 > Emma Sommerville Business School of Textile Arts Laos

Thesis > 191 > Jichang Pan Coastal public space thresholds Southport Thesis > 173 > David Gray Broadwater Museum of Modern Art Southport

Thesis > 192 > Sam McLintock Fragments of Time Bond University

Thesis > 191 > Arvin Abbassian A neighbourhood archetype Bundall

Thesis > 173 > Sarah Ndigare > Testing farming community models Uganda Thesis > 181 > Dhruv Arora Housing the poor Mumbai

Thesis > 192 > Jai Barrett Redefining education environments Merrimac

Thesis > 191 > Shane Collins Restoring urban connections Robina


Thesis > 191 > Ryan Fell Saving the beach house Gold Coast Highway

Thesis > 192 > Russell Ward Addressing the missing middle Burleigh Heads

ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE BOND UNIVERSITY

LOCAL AND GLOBAL ECOLOGIES

Thesis > 191 > Rohan Chauhan Ayurvedic detox retreat centre Murwillumbah


15x THESES

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 164


173 > David Gray

173 > Sarah Ndigare

181 > Dhruv Arora

Broadwater Museum of Modern Art Southport

Testing farming community models Uganda

Housing the poor Mumbai

This project proposes a new Broadwater Museum of Modern Art (BoMA) in Southport, a part of the Gold Coast that would benefit from a significant cultural building to complement its primarily commercial and retail character. The building is located near public sporting facilities that were completed for the 2018 Commonwealth Games. The new cultural building orchestrates a sequence of active connections with its ocean, Broadwater, City and hinterland contexts, counterpointing these experiences with a variety of art display spaces.

Analysis of the existing community activities on Kafu Farm in the Nakasongola District of Uganda included studies of the local history, climate, economy, political processes and farming procedures, along with the daily routines of the community. This informed the development of a brief to cater for individual as well as communal and public needs. The architecture to meet this brief was conceived of as a series of structures that provided points of departure, rather than completed buildings. It would then be up to the community to appropriate the designs according to their growing needs over time.

In the 16th century, Mumbai consisted of seven islands lying off the west coast of India. In around 1845, the islands were merged into a land mass by means of multiple land reclamation projects. Over the years this region attracted extensive growth and urbanisation, overwhelming efforts and initiatives to provide affordable housing for the increasing numbers of residents.

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Lindsay Clare

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Matthew Eagle

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Daniela Ottmann

This thesis project draws inspiration from a detailed investigation into the variety of multiresidential housing typologies in the city, in order to create new, compact, hygienic, flexible and environmentally-responsive housing into which families from nearby slum districts can relocate.

< Master’s design theses 165 >


181 > Anthony Pannolino

182 > Sidney Russell

183 > Emma Sommerville

Finca: Social and tectonic exploration Colombia

A place to call home Brisbane

Business School of Textile Arts Laos

The proposed site for this thesis project is on the top of a hill in rural Colombia. A primary aim of the design is to establish a tightly-knit rural community, and to provide views of the farms on the downward slope.

How co-housing can challenge traditional Australian housing typologies and provide an alternative inner-city model that addresses affordability, sustainability and place-making in the age of relentless urban densification

A holistic approach to local cultural sustainability

As outlined by the national Colombian Coffee Federation, the ideal coffee plantation size for quality and production is five hectares. The site has enough land for a community of 10 micro-communities on five-hectare farms. Each of these would have a population of about 150 to 160 people, which would be supplemented by a constant cycle of daily visitors and short term vacationers.

As major cities across the globe experience substantial population increase and urban densification, questions are raised about what the future morphology of these cities might be. A delicate approach is required to introduce more dwellings into existing urban and suburban areas – far more delicate than the awkwardly-scaled residential apartment towers appearing throughout the inner-city suburbs of Brisbane. This thesis investigates more suitable, flexible and affordable co-housing typologies which reinforce the prevailing character of the place where they are located. The main site for the project is the old Red Hill Skate Arena in Brisbane. The suburbs immediately surrounding this existing building are also selectively tested for less intensive densification opportunities.

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Matthew Eagle

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Jasper Brown

This thesis project is located in Luang Prabang Province in Laos. The thesis explores the role architecture might play in enriching existing, fading or lost cultural traditions. A School of Textile Art in Laos is the vehicle to test ideas. In this region, weaving is particularly important to women as it allows them to contribute to both their family and community in parallel with the farming economy. The research explored how, by adapting principles embodied in vernacular architecture, the designer can create spaces within the existing urban fabric that can help preserve and enhance the cultural traditions of that society. There may be opportunities to integrate modern technologies, construction techniques and materials, etc, with the vernacular architecture, but local culture and society should always be the primary drivers in any decision-making.

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Justin Twohill

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 166


191 > Arvin Abbassian

191 > Jichang Pan

191 > Rohan Chauhan

A neighbourhood archetype Bundall

Coastal public space thresholds Southport

Ayurvedic detox retreat centre Murwillumbah

Connecting a Home of the Arts to Surfers Paradise

The north-south orientation of the City of the Gold Coast is repeatedly reinforced by the similar orientation of its primary transport networks. The stratified accumulation of these disrupt a potentially more seamless pedestrian connectivity between inland urban areas and the beach.

Ayurveda is an ancient holistic healing method that originated in India over 3000 years ago. It seeks to achieve within each individual a careful balance between spirit, mind and body.

The task was to develop a brief that addressed the lack of infrastructure supporting local and visiting artists and artisans on the Gold Coast. This design thesis examines the Gold Coast cultural precinct and suggests a foil to the formal Home of the Arts site: a series of insertions that service artists and artisans and extend the possibilities of three existing concrete buildings, giving them new meaning and purpose. The approach was to introduce adaptive reuse. The work varies in scale from urban to finer grain. These investigations question the way we currently design buildings and how we consider them for future use.

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Peter Kuhnell

This thesis project defines a strong counterpoint to the current directionality of the prevailing urban condition through the design of a carefully defined multi-level public open space that links the Broadwater back to inland areas. The new infrastructure also integrates both existing and proposed public transport networks.

This thesis design for an Ayurvedic detoxification retreat is conceived as a haven where people come to enhance mental and emotional wellbeing. The site for the project is in northern New South Wales. The scheme organises its transient community of inhabitants by means of a sequence of courtyards that respond to the prevailing climatic and topographical context, as well as the ancient Indian organisational principles of “Vastushastra�.

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Adrian Carter

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Adrian Carter

< Master’s design theses 167 >


191 > Shane Collins

191 > Ryan Fell

192 > Jai Barrett

Restoring urban connections Robina

Saving the beach house Gold Coast Highway

Redefining education environments Merrimac

Re-imagining the retail experience to reintroduce community and civic placemaking to the suburbs through biophilic intervention and genuine engagement with nature

As a consequence of the rapid rate of population growth on the Gold Coast (290,000 additional residents are predicted over the next 20 years), the most iconic form of architecture – the mid-20th-century Modern beach house – is under threat of obliteration by the increasing price of land these buildings occupy. Selected period beach houses that contribute to neighbourhood place-making in Gold Coast communities need to be protected from demolition. Densification in their vicinity should occur in a more carefully considered way. This thesis study investigates different design typologies that meet this challenge.

Creating engaging, collaborative, community-driven education spaces

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentors Kerry Clare Lindsay Clare

Coordinator Jasper Brown Mentor Justin Twohill

The thesis investigates how a civically-minded architectural intervention into the existing retail environment of Robina Town Centre on the Gold Coast can reintroduce community place-making within a retail setting, and in doing so, challenge the traditional conception of well-worn retail typologies by inciting community participation. By establishing a biophilic design agenda with an experiential architecture, this examination complements the positive community benefits of people-centric civic place-making with the additional benefits of engagement with nature. It also redefines the notion of Town Centre; embraces local history and craft; responds to climatic conditions; and promotes localised small-scale retailers.

Coordinator Michael Keniger Mentor Justin Twohill

This proposal interrogates the bygone and uninspiring architecture of government-funded education environments throughout the Gold Coast and wider Queensland. It considers the Gold Coast’s rapidly increasing student population in relation to an ageing school building stock. A strategy of adaptive re-use and repair is selectively applied in two stages to the existing built fabric of a particular school. The first stage is a strategic master plan, the second introduces a matrix of carefully designed adaptations to the existing buildings and outdoor spaces. This approach would cost-effectively transform existing educational spaces to be better aligned with flexible 21st-century learning needs and methodologies. Once key principles are developed for one school, these could be applied to many others in the region.

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 168


192 > Russell Ward

192 > Joshua Bowkett

192 > Sam McLintock

Addressing the missing middle Burleigh Heads

Civic memory Brisbane

Fragments of Time Bond University

Establishing a localised cultural identity through missing middle housing typologies

What is the value of civic memory, and how can a city’s narrative be retained in a changing contemporary context? How may future civic needs be accommodated within the city’s existing fabric?

Exploring the emotional landscape of the architecture school experience through the medium of film

The urbanisation of the Gold Coast continues apace. This has led to the demolition of many historic buildings, in particular some significant post-war modern heritage structures. This raises concerns about the enduring cultural identity of the City. Research investigations into this local postwar era building stock have yielded evidence and possible clues about the possibility of a richer, more place-responsive architecture. Additionally, analysis of funding models such as Baugruppen, Nightingale and Vienna Social Housing help in understanding funding options for affordable housing. This thesis investigates a medium-density, mixed-use development which responds to the cultural identity, climate, and demographics of carefully selected parts of the Gold Coast.

Coordinator Jasper Brown Mentor Matthew Eagle

Brisbane, like so many global cities, is under an intense period of transformation. Recent years have seen dramatic redevelopment in the South Brisbane area, in particular along the Montague Road corridor. Increased development here has progressively eroded its once thriving industrial character. This project highlights the importance of retaining South Brisbane’s rich industrial narrative by investigating the adaptive reuse of South Brisbane’s Parmalat Factory. With a community-centric and place-making agenda, it proposes a sequence of civic minded architectural interventions to accommodate contemporary urban programmatic requirements while selectively retaining significant elements of existing urban fabric.

Coordinator Jasper Brown Mentor Matthew Eagle

In making the film Fragments of Time, design techniques and architectural knowledge gained during Undergraduate and Master’s studies were applied. It was hoped to highlight the common ground between these two disciplines. Fragments of Time sought to explore and communicate to the public an idea that although ultimately rewarding, an architectural education can at times be unexpectedly confronting and mentally and emotionally demanding. The different and challenging approaches to designing, making and learning that architectural education offers can surely benefit many other creative disciplines, of which film is only one.

Coordinator Jasper Brown Mentor Jasper Brown

< Master’s design theses 169 >


Broadwater Museum of Modern Art Southport Thesis > 173 > David Gray

SINGLE WALL

DOUBLE WALL

MAZE

HANG

CONTEMPORARY

ARTIFICAL

NATURAL

TOOTH

SUBTLE

VISUAL

AMPHI

CIRCULATION

THRESHOLD

LEVEL CHANGE

PROJECTION

COLONNADE

NATURAL

LINK

INDIGENOUS

FRAMED

REFLECTION

BEYOND

LANTERN

FOLDED FRAME

WORKSHOP



ROOF: CORRUGATED IRON

ROOF STRUCTURE: TIMBER

ROOF STRUCTURE: CORRUGATED IRON

WATER TANKS

LOGISTICS AREA

PREPARATION AREA

ELEVATED LANDSCAPE

TEMPORARY PATHWAYS

Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 172


Thesis > 173 > Sarah Ndigare 173 >

Testing farming community models Uganda


Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 174


Thesis > 181 > Dhruv Arora 175 >

Housing the poor Mumbai


Thesis > 181 > Anthony Pannolino

Finca: Social and tectonic exploration Colombia



Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 178


Thesis > 182 > Sidney Russell 179 >

A place to call home Brisbane



Thesis > 183 > Emma Sommerville

Business School of Textile Arts Laos


Thesis > 191 > Arvin Abbassian

A neighbourhood archetype Bundall Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 182


PIERCING VOIDS

BRIDGING LINKS

CIRCULATION

183 >



Thesis > 191 > Jichang Pan

Coastal public space thresholds Southport


Thesis > 191 > Rohan Chauhan

Ayurvedic detox retreat centre Murwillumbah



Thesis > 191 > Shane Collins

Restoring urban connections Robina Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 188



Thesis > 191 > Ryan Fell

Saving the beach house Gold Coast Highway Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 190


191 >


Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

< 192


Thesis > 192 > Jai Barrett 193 >

Redefining education environments Merrimac


Thesis > 192 > Russell Ward

Addressing the missing middle Burleigh Heads Abedian School of Architecture > Review 2019

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Thesis > 192 > Joshua Bowkett 197 >

Civic memory Brisbane


“Each architecture student who has endured the trials and tribulations of a semester’s worth of design studio will instantly empathise. The film highlights the character’s internal struggle and the external manifestation in a way that expresses the complexity of architectural education.” Shane Collins, MArch Graduate

Thesis > 192 > Sam McLintock

Fragments of Time Bond University



PhD RESEARCH

PhD research Dion Enari Fa’a Saymore Brisbane

PhD research Tory Jones The self-image of the City Gold Coast

PhD research Rosemarie Rusch Woven walls threaded horizons Papua New Guinea PhD research Dr KPC Hudson Architecture of survival Antarctica


ABEDIAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE BOND UNIVERSITY

ABSTRACTS

PhD research Susan Lambert Courting daylight East Coast Australia


5x PhD

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Rosemarie Rusch

Woven walls threaded horizons: Traditional architecture in the modern urban fabric Papua New Guinea

Homes are special places in one’s life. Even with the separation of physical distances, it is refreshing and sustaining to be able to be spiritually, emotionally and affectionately attached to one’s home. The attachment to home brings reassurance and warmth and living hope and energy in times of despair and hopelessness. The sentiment attached to home is such that, even when the house is no longer standing, it is fresh in one’s memory as if it was yesterday, and as if everything had never changed. (Gonduan 2000, p51) Escalating demand for housing solutions to meet the needs of both urban and rural residents has been highlighted by the impact of human settlement expansion on overpopulation and the resultant development crises, particularly for Pacific Rim economies. Importantly, many reports have focused on development agendas, basic human rights, urban poverty, urbanisation, and infrastructure, yet little research has extended specifically to housing.

Supervisors Eric Best Paul Jones Marja Sarvimaki

Evaluation of village and settlement housing tends to be based on social and physical images that are often subjective and at odds with the comparative desires of architects and planners. Residents may well prioritise location, access to kinship structures and support, as well as the economic benefits of informal trade, over and above the physical appearance of a building. The result of a complex balance between environmental, social and economic factors, criteria in vernacular architecture are often implicit and unstated. Furthermore, a group’s adaptive strategies in its ecological setting encourage a particular designed environment based on values, which lead to the constructed norms that broadly distinguish one group from another (Rapoport 1998).

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Dion Enari

Fa’a Saymore: From promised land to dreamland Brisbane

The constant navigating of the in-between world – from my local gym and lecture theatre to my Ie faitaga (formal Samoan male attire) singing in my Samoan church choir – moving from western ways of interaction to Samoan ways of being is not without its trials. This in-between world becomes a ground for searching, observing, improving and at times discarding. Each world is lovely, explicitly rich in meaning, yet not without its flaws. I write from the “centre” not only looking forward but looking sideways and back. I write with the guidance and protection of my ancestors. I write as a proud man, embracing all that has allowed me to safely navigate the Palagi (white) and Samoan worlds in which I live. The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions of Fa’a Samoa (the Samoan way) understood by New Zealand-born Samoans who reside in Brisbane. Through identifying factors that influence their formation and actualisation pertaining to Fa’a Samoa, the study aims to identify the themes pertinent to Fa’a Samoa among this cohort.

Supervisors Danny O’Hare Marja Sarvimaki

This study is based in the literature and life narratives of New Zealand-born Samoans, their journey through Brisbane and their relationship with Fa’a Samoa. The culturally appropriate method of talanoa (Vaioleti, 2003) will be used to analyse this cohort’s perceptions of the three main concepts of Fa’a Samoa: fa’a Matai, aiga potopoto and faalavelave/fesuiaiga (Sauni, 2011).

Limited research is available on Fa’a Samoa in Australia and in particular the Brisbane Samoan community, or the factors that shape its existence. This study will provide a valuable snapshot of the Fa’a Samoa practised by New Zealand-born Samoans in the Brisbane Samoan community, which has a growing migrant population. These lessons will provide a significant contribution to the education system and Samoan communities. Key factors from the research will be identified and will influence government and Samoan communities to further support Fa’a Samoa initiatives in urban areas. The study findings will inform interventions to break the cycle of negative and inferior stereotypes among the Samoan community, encouraging them to achieve higher, while also increasing visibility of Samoan role models in the urban setting. Further, higher achievement academically and personally will increase earning capacity of individuals and their standard of living, thereby also increasing the contribution of Samoan people to the Australian economy.

The Australia Multicultural Policy released in 2013 reported 270 diverse ethnic cultures and 260 different languages spoken in Australia (Department of Social Services, 2013). Among these cultures are increasing numbers of Samoan peoples.

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Dr KPC Hudson

Architecture of survival: The habitation of Antarctica through a biophilic lens Antarctica

Humans developed the built environment through behavioural patterns that were necessary to provide shelter and protection from their surroundings. Today we have continued to innately use those elements, which have become known as “biophilic design”, the principles of which bring us closer to nature to develop healthier spaces to live and work in. This research investigates how those elements have been integrated in one of the few climates that requires humans to still rely on buildings purely for the basic purpose of survival, Antarctica. The thought of living in such a remote, harsh environment might be far-fetched for the majority of Earth’s population. Yet, aspects of the Antarctic climate are becoming more commonplace in what has been considered relatively normal climatic patterns. Disruptions by once-in-a-lifetime weather events occur with greater frequency. Typhoons, hurricanes, blizzards, earthquakes, etc, have resulted in the failure of traditional building approaches. Studying buildings designed to adapt to extreme environments can provide understanding into how current practices can be adapted in a conscientious manner.

Supervisors Daniela Ottmann Marja Sarvimaki

The cases will be analysed based on the elements and attributes of biophilic design to investigate how it has been integrated. The result of this research is a greater insight into biophilic design regarding residential architecture, with a specific focus on how the behavioural patterns developed from the need of architecture to aid in human survival. Since the attributes of biophilic design are considered instinctive, so too is the planning or design process it is presumed they will be incorporated into in the buildings studied, regardless of a conscientious intent. Also, the extreme climate of Antarctica presents a unique opportunity to see the source of “natural” features. Do they reference the surrounding site, the original environment of the inhabitants, or is it not feasible for it to occur, in which case, is that resolved?

Through a case study framework, six examples of buildings exemplifying the history of human habitation in Antarctica will be explored through archival research and interviews of design professionals who have worked on the structures, and with inhabitants themselves. The buildings are Robert Falcon Scott’s Hut at Cape Evans; Douglas Mawson’s Hut; Australia’s Casey Station; United Kingdom’s Halley VI; and the United States of America’s McMurdo Station and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Not only do they represent significant periods in the relatively short Antarctic history but they also illustrate different scales, building practices, material technology, cultural backgrounds, and locations in the continent.

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Tory Jones

The self-image of the City Gold Coast

The Gold Coast is an unconventional city with a complex identity that eludes orthodox classification. In the wake of hosting the 2018 Commonwealth Games, the Gold Coast is regularly asserted by local news media to have “come of age” and “matured as a city”. Yet, nobody has articulated this in more than superficial terms or described what that means for the City. Tory Jones is researching the role and power of urban narrative at Australia’s Gold Coast. Self-creationism is at the heart of the identity and culture of the Gold Coast. Demographer Bernard Salt speaks of the Gold Coast as “a city that has been willed into existence”. As an urban phenomenon, it has been born out of fantasy and speculation, designed for fun and profit, and it remains unfettered by historical precedents. It has flourished in these conditions, always generating its own imagery, mostly around visions of a Paradise, and for this characteristic it is popularly maligned for lacking what people sense and perceive as culture in more traditional, serious cities.

Supervisors Adrian Carter Marja Sarvimaki

Increasingly now, boosted by algorithmic culture, information and communication technology is becoming a force majeure in the construction and projection of urban narratives and the self-image of cities. Undoubtedly, benefits would accrue through the development of deeper, nuanced, authentic representations of the Gold Coast. This research aims to: 1/ Elucidate the city’s current narrative identity; 2/ Demonstrate the role and power of prevailing narratives to influence development and city image; 3/ Identify methods for deepening urban narratives.

Taking anthropologist Clifford Geertz’s definition of culture as “the ensemble of stories we tell ourselves about ourselves”, the research applies this as a lens to the living, growing organism of the city. The assumption here is that to grow an original culture in a place, citizens should simply start telling more stories about the place and their connections to it. Eventually, as the narrative evolves, the identity of the city will become the stories they keep repeating. But it’s not quite that simple. Jane Jacobs in Dark Age Ahead (2004) writes about possibilities brought by digital technology and media for better understanding the image of cities. Jacobs sees opportunities as infinite and exciting, but also unwieldy and prone to homogeneity, superficiality, and even corruption.

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Susan Lambert

Courting daylight: Bringing daylight into architecture East Coast Australia

Fig 1 Kimbell Art Museum by Louis Kahn. Photo: Christopher Martin

Supervisors Adrian Carter Daniela Ottmann

“We are born of light. The seasons are felt through light. We only know the world as it is evoked by light.� Louis Kahn How can naturally daylit courtyards and screened interior spaces create an environmentally-responsive architecture conducive to wellbeing? This question is explored by looking at traditional examples of enclosed gardens as well as more contemporary examples where a microclimate is created with plants to filter pollution and improve the air quality. The courtyard model has developed in many parts of the world as a response to both climate and culture. This study reviews qualitative aspects of designing with light and also the quantitative aspects proposed through building codes or local government-prescribed guidelines/ legislation, in order to determine under what conditions the courtyard model works for a residential project. This study looks at the courtyard as a method employed over time in various parts of the world to provide seclusion and recreation with access to air flow and daylight. Case studies in SE Queensland and NSW will be included in order to assess and quantify the suitability of the courtyard model to provide natural light and so mitigate the use of artificial light during the day. Information will come from case studies assessing the approaches taken by designers, based on discussions and site inspections with architects who actively incorporate light and landscape in their designs. The interviews will determine how they approach the inclusion of daylight into their designs, the aspirations they have for their projects, and will question the challenges. Practitioners would be working in the Asia Pacific region including Australia in the tropics or subtropics. The architects selected are those whose work engages with nature and designs that consider light and air flow as critical elements.

The case studies will form an integral part of the research: they will provide insight into the resources currently used in architectural practice to include available daylight into designs. Interviewing architects who have been developing creative solutions will provide an avenue to examine what solutions have been successful and which directions architects are taking. Computer models based on the axis of the site will document the expected illuminance values at a specific time of year. This insight will be valuable in developing a principled approach to incorporating daylight into modern interiors and the fundamental principles of incorporating daylighting into buildings. I believe the proposition of bringing daylight into architecture is of significant sustainable value both in terms of the potential benefit to energy savings and improvement to the spaces in which to live.

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Previous page, photos: Surfers Paradise, John Gollings


THE SCHOOL


THE SCHOOL

Pedagogical ecologies About the Abedian School of Architecture program structure and school culture Chris Knapp

Key strategic values > An urban focus on the future of cities > Environmentally sustainable design > Progressing and advancing disciplinary roles and skills > Making as fundamental to creative learning > Architecture as a global international practice operating upon the local > Entrepreneurship and the future of practice > Interdisciplinarity, communication, and collaboration > Ethical, social, and cultural awareness and responsibility

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The Abedian School of Architecture is an ecology unto itself – bristling with ideas, energy, material, and work – facilitated by a diverse academic staff who guide our students to be curious, risk-taking, exacting, and ambitious. The identity and success of the School results from our dedication to fostering the exploration of architecture in a 24/7 accessible, thriving studio culture.

We are a small, boutique school. With small studio sizes, our students receive feedback and instruction from our staff that is highly meaningful and genuinely collaborative. Small numbers also mean unparalleled access to world class equipment including architectural robotics, ceramic and plastic 3D printing, and other forms of digital and analogue craft.

Among our program staff, who are also from numerous international backgrounds, 74 per cent are in active practice roles while simultaneously teaching. The program ethos, focused on design excellence, is realised through the experience and expertise our staff bring to the studio. Our students, since the inception of the program, have come from 24 countries, graduating with either a Bachelor’s or Master’s level degree in architecture.

Abedian School of Architecture program descriptions:

Master of Architecture The Master of Architecture (MArch) is the accredited professional degree for a career in architecture, complying with the competency requirements of the Board of Architects Queensland and the Architects Accreditation Council of Australia.

The Master of Architecture provides a tailored architectural education in a creative studio-based environment focusing heavily on design through hands-on and digital making with state-of-the-art tools. Project-based design studios focus on realworld scenarios with specific attention to urbanism, the future of global cities, and the role of architecture and the architect in addressing urban, environmental, social, and technological change. Graduates display mastery of architectural design abilities that are creative, critical, analytical, and spatial and based in advanced historical, theoretical, technical and disciplinary knowledge. All graduates complete a design thesis as the cumulative result of the Master’s course that demonstrates independent, self-directed critical thinking and sophisticated design capability.

Through the program offerings at the Abedian School of Architecture, issues of pressing international and national concern form the core content of the studio curriculum. Among the most prominent of these are the challenges posed by our contemporary condition globally, one characterised by rapid urbanisation, environmental change, technological emergence, and increasing socioeconomic inequity. The MArch prepares students for globally-relevant employment through development of a sophisticated set of disciplinary competencies and acquired knowledge, providing the ability to synthesise diverse information in the resolution of complex creative design challenges using a globally applicable skillset that is deployed locally.

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THE SCHOOL

+ Practice + Craft + Robitics lab

+ Design charrettes

Design for climate Design for sustainable futures Design systems for environmental sustainability

Environmental sustainability

+ Architects-in-residence

Construction technology

+ Study tours + Field studies + Publications

Studio culture

Digital and analogue communications

Architecture + urbanism design thesis Creative practice studio History theory Design futures studio

Professional studies

Architecture + urbanism studio

Materials + methods Structures + materials Design ethics + design detailing Digital architecture + intelligent construction Building services Digital design + prototyping Subtractive fabrication lab Additive fabrication lab Design thinking through drawing Graphic design BIM + documentation Rendering + animation VR + AR for design World architecture + urbanism Architecture + urbanism of the Asia Pacific Contemporary architectural + urban theory Design thesis: research + development

Architectural practice: management + procurement Design practice: futures + frameworks + Pacific Rim

+ Workshop

Urban studies

+ Lecture series + Global sites

Elective studies

Cities: people + place Urban futures + parametric cities Urban design + place-making principles

+ Urbanisation + Regional practice

+ Making

+ Research

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Bachelor of Design in Architecture The Bachelor of Design in Architecture (BDes Arch – formerly known as the Bachelor of Architectural Studies) provides the foundation for a career in broad fields of design and creative practice, with a specialisation in the discipline of architecture.

In the Bachelor of Design in Architecture, learning in a design studio comprises the majority of coursework and is project-based. This features projects focused upon real-world scenarios, collaborating with students and external guests from interdisciplinary fields of expertise to develop solutions for a range of stakeholders and end-users. In addition to practical skills and disciplinary knowledge learned through studio and seminar-based studies in design, communications, technology, history, theory, and professional studies, students acquire “soft skills� in collaboration, team-work, time management, self-critique, and spatial intelligence unique to an architectural education.

Established as a highly-flexible and student-focused degree program, students in the BDes Arch study for two years full-time but may also choose to study parttime. Studies include content from the disciplines of architecture, digital media, construction, urban planning, film, and university electives. Students in the BDes Arch undertake a brief period of work-integrated learning to provide relevant industry experience prior to graduation.

Additional layers of the School ecology Key highlights of the program include an annual all-School charrette that kicks off each year in the January semester. Students work in vertically integrated teams on a project led by a distinguished visiting architect or practice. Recent charrette leaders include Phil Harris (2019), Virginia Kerridge (2018), and Peter Stutchbury (2017).

All programs include several off-campus study tours to local sites, practices, and manufacturing facilities, as well as international and interstate studio trips that are included in the program tuition fees. Such trips allow for immersion in new contexts and an opportunity to work on projects of global and international relevance. First year students take part in a multi-day camping and discovery trip in the hinterland ranges west of the city.

An international guest-lecture series is run yearly with two-three speakers per semester and an annual symposium on a topical theme. Highlights of the series include Patrik Schumacher (2017), Julie Eizenberg and Hank Koning (2019), Juhani Pallasmaa (2015), and Jimenez Lai (2016).

The School runs a biennial student exhibition at the end of the year, and the document you are currently reading is produced in conjunction with that exhibition.


Design Thinking drawing workshop led by architect Peter Richards of Deike Richards, Brisbane.




All design studios culminate in a one-day all-School presentation event at the end of each semester.


WORKSHOP

Our workshop and robotics laboratory are run by experienced staff, and allow students unparalleled access to world class equipment including architectural robotics, ceramic and plastic 3D printing, along with many other digital and analogue tools.

Photos: Benjamin Ferguson

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The School’s focus on a design studio culture encourages students to discuss and develop their ideas with both their peers and their tutors.


The program includes an annual all-School design charrette that kicks off each year in the January semester. Students work in vertically integrated teams on a local project led by a distinguished visiting architect, notably Phil Harris (2019), Virginia Kerridge (2018), and Peter Stutchbury (2017).

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DESIGN CHARRETTE

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An international guest lecture series is run yearly with two-three speakers per semester and an annual symposium on a topical theme. Highlights of the series include Patrik Schumacher (2017, pictured), Julie Eizenberg and Hank Koning (2019), Juhani Pallasmaa (2015), and Jimenez Lai (2016).

PATRIK SCHUMAC HTTPS://VIMEO.C


CHER LECTURE COM/243040707

LECTURE SERIES


Space/Time/Interaction Selected images from the 2019 Japan study tour. Photos: David Marino

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Commencing in 2016, the Abedian School of Architecture conducts an annual study tour to Japan for our undergraduate students led by Associate Professor Marja Sarvimaki. This program provides an immersion in Japanese architecture and culture, and features a week-long design project hosted by local universities and practitioners. The 2019 trip was conducted with host Professor Thomas Daniell and students from Kyoto University.

STUDY TOUR

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OUR PEOPLE


ABEDIAN ALUMNI

Fig 3

Fig 1

Fig 2

Fig 5

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Fig 1

Chongqing master plan, wind study (Steensen Varming) Alexandra Bogdanova Fig 2 Top: Singapore Founders’ Memorial competition entry Bottom: Seaview residence (EHKA Studio) Amoz Boon Fig 3 Queens Park Plaza (MOSO) Steven Palomo Fig 4_____Dubai Creek Harbour (image by Binyan Studios) Elise Taylor Fig 5 Trinity Place (image by Binyan Studios) Elise Taylor Fig 6 Ghana Cathedral (David Adjaye Associates with Steensen Varming) Alexandra Bogdanova Fig 7 Lotus Tower (Elenberg Fraser) Jordan Mulherin

Alexandra Bogdanova

Jordan Mulherin

Elise Taylor

Graduation: 2017 Country of citizenship: Russian Federation Current city: Sydney Current position held: Sustainability Consultant, Steensen Varming

Graduation: 2015 Country of citizenship: Australia Current city: Gold Coast Current position held: Director, SLAM, Teaching Fellow, Abedian School of Architecture

Graduation: 2014 Country of citizenship: Australia Current city: Melbourne Current position held: Studio Manager, Binyan Studios

During an internship in project management as part of the double degree at the Abedian School, I found myself working in the ESD team at Steensen Varming. Some two years after graduation I am still here working in the role of a sustainability consultant. High-level concept advice, daylight/ energy/wind/thermal modelling, project management and coordination with multidisciplinary teams and clients are what keep me busy. I’ve been lucky enough to be exposed to exceptional projects such as the Art Gallery of NSW, the Canadian Museum of Human Rights, Sydney Science Park, and a new master plan for Bangalore. Amoz Boon Graduation: 2015 Country of citizenship: Singapore Current city: Singapore Current position held: Graduate Architect, EHKA Studio

Fig 4

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EHKA Studio is an architecture and interior design office which focuses on small-to medium-scale architecture and interior projects. For the first few years I was actively involved in most if not all aspects of the design and delivery process, from schematic design and design competitions, to design development, tender documentation, construction drawings, authority submissions, and project management. I now lead the design department at EHKA, a trajectory that I’m sure would not have been possible without the experience and friendships that I gained during my time at the Abedian School.

After graduating from Bond with a Bachelor of Architectural Studies in 2013, I worked for a year in the practice of Richard Kirk in Brisbane on projects including the Advanced Engineering Building at UQ and the ABC headquarters building in Brisbane’s Southbank. In 2014 I returned to Bond to complete my studies and earn a Master’s of Architecture, after which I moved to Melbourne to work for Bates Smart Architects on large multiresidential and commercial projects including a proposal for the Munroe site adjacent to Queen Victoria Markets. Following this I returned to Brisbane in 2017 to work for Elenberg Fraser on the delivery of large multi-residential projects. During this period, in 2018 I became the first registered architect from Bond University. Since then I have been establishing my own practice, and I have returned to my alma mater to assist with the education of future architects. Steven Palomo Graduation: 2016 Country of citizenship: United States Current city: New York Current position held: Associate Architectural Designer, Handel Architects

My first project at Handel Architects was a multi-family high-rise residential project in which my duties included facade design as well as services and superstructure coordination. I also worked on two national memorial projects: the 9/11 Memorial Glade, dedicated to those who died after the 9/11 catastrophe; and the Emanuel Nine Memorial, dedicated to the lives lost in the AME Church shooting in South Carolina. It was an honour to be part of such a delicate and powerful process where we designed for the purpose of remembering. Concurrently, I am following my other curiosities in industrial design, and to that end my design partner and I have just started a design studio called OSUZA which is based in Brooklyn and the Gold Coast.

After receiving my undergraduate degree from the Abedian School I moved to London where I started my career at 20 years old, working as a graduate in architecture and interior design. When my two-year working visa ended I relocated to Australia to continue my career by joining a world-leading architectural 3D rendering and film company – Binyan Studios. While working at Binyan I have been fortunate to have had the opportunity to manage many of their most high-profile projects, and to lead the Melbourne team as their studio manager.


AWARD RECIPIENTS

2017

2019

Ellie Gilchrist The Highest Achievement by an Undergraduate Student in the area of Architecture Sponsored by Architecture Australia

Nicole Mesquita-Mendes The Highest Achievement by an Undergraduate Student in the area of Architecture Sponsored by Architecture Australia

Sarah Kukkiriza Ndagire Soheil Abedian Certificate for Excellence in Postgraduate Architectural Studies Sponsored by Soheil Abedian

Shane Collins Soheil Abedian Certificate for Excellence in Postgraduate Architectural Studies Sponsored by Soheil Abedian

2018

Ellie Gilchrist Soheil Abedian Medal of Excellence (Undergraduate) Sponsored by Soheil Abedian

Ellie Gilchrist The Highest Achievement by an Undergraduate Student in the area of Architecture Sponsored by Architecture Australia Sarah Kukkiriza Ndagire Soheil Abedian Certificate for Excellence in Postgraduate Architectural Studies Sponsored by Soheil Abedian Russell Ward The Highest Achievement by an Undergraduate Student in the area of Architecture Sponsored by Architecture Australia Anthony Pannolino Soheil Abedian Certificate for Excellence in Postgraduate Architectural Studies Sponsored by Soheil Abedian

Nicole Mesquita-Mendes The Highest Achievement by an Undergraduate Student in the area of Architecture Sponsored by Architecture Australia Megan King Soheil Abedian Certificate for Excellence in Postgraduate Architectural Studies Sponsored by The Abedian Foundation Arvin Abbassian Soheil Abedian Medal of Excellence (Postgraduate) Sponsored by The Abedian Foundation

Nicole Mesquita-Mendes The Highest Achievement by an Undergraduate Student in the area of Architecture Sponsored by Architecture Australia Shane Collins Soheil Abedian Certificate for Excellence in Postgraduate Architectural Studies Sponsored by Soheil Abedian

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PUBLIC EVENTS

2017*

2019

Public Lecture Series Andrew Maynard, Melbourne Hannah Tribe, New South Wales

Public Lecture Series Kim Bridgeland, Melbourne Julie Eizenberg and Hank Koning, Los Angeles Chris Gilbert, Melbourne Phil Harris, Adelaide Belen Perez de Juan and Fernando Jerez, Madrid/Perth Boonserm Premthada, Bangkok

Guest lecture Patrik Schumacher, London Symposium: Dwelling in Queensland Brit Andresen Haig Beck Lindsay Clare Kerry Clare Jackie Cooper Brian Donovan Matthew Eagle Keiron Gait Michael Keniger John Mainwaring James Russell Stuart Vokes 2018 Public Lecture Series Rex Addison, Queensland Paul Haar, Melbourne Richard Johnson, Sydney Virginia Kerridge, Sydney Richard Naish, Auckland Panov Scott, Sydney Baracco Wright, Melbourne Guest lecture Shaun Lockyer, Queensland Symposium: Dwelling and Place Rex Addison Paul Haar Katelyn Hudson Daniela Ottmann Rosemary Rusch Design charrette Virginia Kerridge, Sydney

* Events prior to September 2017 were featured in the previous issue of the Abedian Review.

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Guest lectures John Gollings, Melbourne Ric Leplastier, Sydney Chris Thurlbourne, Denmark Symposium: Sunshine Coast Architecture Lindy Atkin Haig Beck Kerry Clare Lindsay Clare Jackie Cooper Steven Guthrie John Mainwaring Dan Sparks David Teeland Design charrette Phil Harris, Adelaide


STAFF DIRECTORY > 2017 TO 2019

Daniela Ottmann Adrian Carter Jodie Cummins

Mark Bagguley

Matthew Eagle

Santiago Rendon Bechara

Marja Sarvimaki

Jasper Brown

Jordan Mulherin Brian Toyota Peter Kuhnell

Chris Knapp

Oliver du Puy Ryan Wirth

Justin Twohill

Marguerite Pollard


Staff Andrew Armstrong Teaching Fellow BArch, QUT Principal, Armstrong & Co Architects Mark Bagguley Clinical Assistant Professor BA (Hons) Ind Des, BA (Hons) Arch, AA Dipl, PG Dip (Professional Practice) Director, SNO studio Jasper Brown Senior Teaching Fellow BA(Hons), Dip Arch, Bartlett ARB, AIA, RIBA Director, Jasper Brown Architects Ben Carson Teaching Fellow BArch, QUT Director, Ben Carson Architect Adrian Carter Professor of Architecture BArch, Dip Arch, Portsmouth School of Architecture PhD, Aalborg University Architect MAA, Denmark Jodie Cummins Teaching Fellow BEnv Stu, BArch, QUT Director, Redcoop Architects Matthew Eagle Clinical Assistant Professor BEnv Stu, BArch, QUT Architect AIA Director, ME Alec Gentile Workshop Technical Officer BArch Studies, Bond University Chris Knapp Head of School Professor of Architecture BS Arch, Michigan, MArch, Princeton Director, Studio Workshop

Michael Keniger Honorary Professor AA Dipl Architectural Association LFRAIA, FTSE, RIBA

Architects-in-residence

Contributors

Peter Kuhnell Teaching Fellow BArch, RMIT, Melbourne Director, Kuhnell Architecture

Haig Beck Architectural editor-inresidence QIT, AA Dipl Kerry Clare BArch QUT Director, Clare Design

Jonathan Nelson Assistant Professor BCon Prac, Bond Univeristy BArch, Oregon Director, Studio Workshop

Lindsay Clare Dip Arch QUT Director, Clare Design

Kelli Adair Rex Addison Chris Alston Brit Andresen Mick Angus Lindy Atkin Michael Bailey Geraldine Balcazar Mauro Baracco Joerg Baumeister Cecilia Bischeri Kim Bridgeland Jack Bryce Paul Burton Melody Chen Rafael Contreras Matt Cooper Tracey Cooper-Lavery Marcus Cranney Jodie Cummins Thomas Daniell Leo De Witte Brian Donovan Monica Earl Damien Eckersley Karl Eckermann Julie Eizenberg Viviane Freher Peter Frost-Møller Keiron Gait Leah Gallagher Criena Gehrke Chris Gilbert John Gollings Kamran Granfar Caroline Grundjean-Thomsen Steven Guthrie Paul Haar Phil Harris Tom Heneghan Paul Hotston Katelyn Hudson Kate Humphries Morgan Jenkins Belen Jerez Richard Johnson Victoria Jones Ray Jones Bruce Keir Clare Kennedy Virginia Kerridge Hank Koning Zuzana Kovar Susan Lambert Leah Lang Paola Leardini Amelia Lee Ric Leplastrier Shaun Lockyer Stephen Long Nick Lorenz

Jordan Mulherin Teaching Fellow BArch Studies, MArch, Bond University Director, SLAM Daniela Ottmann Associate Professor PhD/Dr-ing, University of Duisburg-Essen MArch, BTU, DEU Oliver du Puy Clinical Assistant Professor BCommerce, BArch, MArch, Uni Melb Architect AIA Director, Oliver du Puy Architects

LFRAIA

Rafael Contreras BArch (UPC), MArch AADRL Director, Contreras Earl Architecture Jackie Cooper Architectural editor-inresidence Polytechnic of Central London Monica Earl BDes Arch, MArch (USyd), MAUD (Harvard) Director, Contreras Earl Architecture Aaron Peters Architect-in-residence BArch QUT Director, Vokes & Peters

Marguerite Pollard Teaching Fellow BArch, MArch, UQ Principal, Marguerite Pollard Architect

Stuart Vokes Architect-in-residence BArch QUT Director, Vokes & Peters

Santiago Rendon Bechara Workshop Technical Officer BArch Studies, Bond University

Brit Andresen Michael Banney David Brown Amy Degenhart Greg Ewart Chris Gee Tom Hanrahan Tom Heneghan Richard Johnson Leah Lang Barry Lee Gavan Ranger Katherine Rickard Virginia Rigney Brian Toyota Stuart Vokes Kristen Whittle

Marja Sarvimäki Associate Professor MArch, PhD, Helsinki University of Technology Architect SAFA Brian Toyota Teaching Fellow BArch, University of British Columbia Design Lead, Bureau Proberts Justin Twohill Senior Teaching Fellow BEnv Des, ANU, MArch, UQ Director, Buro Two Ryan Wirth Workshop Manager BArch Studies, Bond University

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LFRAIA

Advisory panel

John Mainwaring Andrew Maynard Silvia Micheli Alica Min Harvie Jane Mooney Antony Moulis Angus Munro Abe Muriata Richard Naish Josh Neale Lachlan Nielson Anna O’Gorman Karen Ognibene Yohei Omura Anthony Pannolino Anita Panov Fernando Perez Belen Perez De Juan Aaron Peters Boonserm Premthada John Price Pradesh Ramiah Peter Richards Katherine Rickard Cleveland Rose James Russell Florian Schaetz Harald Schmidt Patrik Schumacher Andrew Scott Kate Shearer Nicholas Skepper Dan Sparks David Teeland Chris Thurlbourne Hannah Tribe Bradley Vincent Stuart Vokes Guy Webster Rebecca Whan Ashleigh White Louise Wright Dirk Yates Tammy Zarb


Photo: Luke Marsden

STUDENT DIRECTORY > 2017 TO 2019


Bachelors Arvin Abbassian Sam Abel Melek Ada Travis Armes Chloe Athens Mitchell Backler Steven Baleva Bicaucci Banzi Elizabeth Barker Imogen Barry-Murphy Philip Baura Amadeus Bellenger Tristan Bennett Braden Bloomfield Donta Ray Boon-Tennet Gemma Borra Niesha Brown Alahni Brown Thomas Brunton Carolina Carsjoe Maxwell Cartwright Ansel Chan Tess Charter Nicholas Clark-Burton Herodotos Constantinides Justin Corbett Shannon de Sousa Julienne Dime Maxwell Dowd Sam Fairless Caroline Falasqui Marostica Benjamin Ferguson Alec Gentile Jonathan Gidas Ellie Gilchrist Vivianne Goncalves Cordeiro

239 >

Christopher Grieve Nathan Grimmond Logan-Maree Gunthorpe Marc Haack Brooke Harris Zhaoqiu He Jessica Hogg Michelle Hsu Ryuta Ishino Debaecker Mikayla James Deborah Keioskie Suraj Khandve Jeremy Langridge Aaron Larkin Renee Lingard Kyle Loutit Patrick Lovell-Davis David Marino Corey McGilvery Ryan McKillop Mia Medic Nicole Mesquita-Mendes Yucheng Miao Nelson Michaels Blake Mills Cameron Minear Ellin Minogue Amelia Mohajer Marcel Moller Sara Mora Rodriguez Mohamed Mouallem Madison Muller-Bailey Joseph Norcross-Webb Brittney Patterson Luke Pearce Benjamin Perkins Alexander Pollard Ashley Quintana Maedeh Rashedi Santiago Rendon Bechara Tiffany Samonte Grace Sargeant Laura Sayers Thomas Sefton Kira-Lee Shaw Mikayla Simic Donna Simon Zarli Skinner Emily Smith Kayla Soler Ainslie Sutherland Adam Svard Vaclav Toncar Ethan Wairau Russell Ward Brough Whibley Jake White Kazan Wilson Sam Wilson Joy Wong Lin Luke Wyatt Lauren Yan Martina Zatta

Masters Arvin Abbassian Moh’d Al-Saadi Dhruv Arora Jai Barrett Joshua Bowkett Heath Breen Bianca Bujaroski Rohan Chauhan Shane Collins Ryan Fell Vivianne Goncalves Cordeiro Kamran Granfar Radhika Karvir Megan King Dana Kittel Meghana Madgundi Jobin Manamel Sam McLintock Amelia Mohajer Dharmendra Mohan Jichang Pan Anthony Pannolino Sidney Russell Rithika Soman Emma Sommerville Kirstin Tuckey Russell Ward Jessie Williamson Design Thesis Arvin Abbassian Dhruv Arora Jai Barrett Joshua Bowkett Rohan Chauhan Shane Collins Ryan Fell David Gray Sam McLintock Sarah Ndagire Jichang Pan Anthony Pannolino Sidney Russell Emma Sommerville Russell Ward


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ISBN 978-0-646-81068-3

Copyright Š2019 All rights reserved Abedian School of Architecture Faculty of Society and Design Bond University 14 University Drive Robina 4229 Queensland Australia T +617 5595 1111

email: fsd@bond.edu.au instagram: asa.bond Book design elective Masters students Megan King Jobin Manamel Sam McLintock Meghana Madjundi Dharmendra Mohan Kirstin Tuckey Russell Ward Editor Jasper Brown Copy editor Jackie Cooper Editorial advisers Haig Beck Chris Knapp Publication design Jane Mooney Printing Gunn&Taylor Photographers Peter Bennetts Christopher Campbell John Gollings CornĂŠ Lategan Luke Marsden Bond marketing Angela Clark Carly Stevens Thank you to all staff and students who committed their images to this publication. Every attempt has been made to locate the copyright holders for material quoted in this book.


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