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FRESH PRODUCE INSIDE

Akira Back: Freshness First Tomato, Tomato Lessons in Foraging Sari Organik’s Nila Wati

JAN 15 | volume 2, Issue 01 Rp. 55,000 | S$ 8.00


P U B L I S H E R ’ S N OT E

Founder

Richmond Blando

Publisher Jed V. Doble Managing Editor

Kyle Gregorio

Art Director Juke Bachtiar Photographer

Dennie Benedict

FRESH PRODUCE The new year brings us plenty of new opportunities and together with is a bounty of fresh produce. We decided to not go with cliché theme of healthy food for the new year but instead side step to a Fresh Produce issue. The Foodie Magazine team has came together and created a list of articles celebrating the greenest, freshest and most succulent harvest of foodstuff available. Chef Akira Back graces our cover and reveals his freshness first policy when it comes to his restaurants. He also shares his very interesting and delightful ‘Seoul Garden’ recipe for you to try to replicate at home. On a recent trip to Auckland, I visit the colorful and fascinating tomato farm of Curious Croppers. I tell you, I have never been as excited about tomatoes as I was when I was at their farm. We also visited the Bumi Langit farms in Yogyakarta and the Agritektur farms in Bandung. As part of a trip to Margaret River, Adithya Pratama writes about Foragers, a farm to table dining experience at the heart of Southwest region of Western Australia. We feature two Singapore establishments which grow their own herbs in their own gardens: the award-winning restaurant, bar and lounge, Bacchanalia and the stylish and modern Anti:dote bar at the Fairmont hotel. We also run profiles on Natalia Tanyadji of Mama Toko Kue in Makassar, Reno Andam Suri, author of the Rendang Traveler, Bali-based food blogger, Bayu Amus of Epicurina and the famous Ibu Nila Wati of Sari Organik in Ubud. The team has obviously gotten their hands dirty visiting the most interesting farms and sampling the best produce, near and far. I hope, like me, you will gain a better understanding and respect for these food heroes who till the fields and grow livestock. Their hard work is aptly complimented by the handiwork of like-minded chefs who create the best dishes possible with the freshest produce available. Happy reading! JED V. DOBLE

Photograph by DENNIE RAMON

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Contributors

Adithya Pratama Rian Farisa Melanie Tanusetiawan Akhmad Baihaki (Aki)

Administration Distribution

Boedy Astuti Mukti Pelupessy

PT. NUSA BINTANG LESTARI Tel: +62 21 2905 3959 www.thefoodiemag.com The Foodie Magazine is published monthly by Bold Prints Publishing. Jalan Gunawarman No. 16, Jakarta, Indonesia. The Foodie Magazine and its logo are registered trademarks of Bold Prints Publishing. COPYRIGHT 2014. The Publisher reserves the right to accept or reject all editorial and advertising material. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or copied without the explicit written consent of the Publisher. Neither the Publisher, editors and their employees and agents can be held liable for any error and omission, nor any action taken based on the views expressed or information provided within this publication. All rights reserved. ISSN: 2355-0198. Printed by PT. Gramedia.


C O N T R I B U TO R S

THE GUEST LIST ADITHYA PRATAMA

MELANIE TANUSETIAWAN

RIAN FARISA

AKHMAD BAIHAKI (AKI)

After two diplomas in pastry and bakery arts, Adithya left the jacket and opted for the ink. While still engulfed in chocolate and butter, he’s also an aspiring food and travel writer, food stylist and an avid scuba diver. Join his mouth-watering discussions on Instagram @adith1801 … You’ve been warned!

Melanie graduated from Melbourne’s RMIT with a Bachelor of Arts in Photography and is well known for her vivid dreamlike imagination. Her love for simple living, food and people is reflected through her lifestyle work. She has also been actively involved in exhibitions and has won various awards. www.studio-melt.com

Once a foodie, always a foodie. Rian started his popular food blog gastronomy-aficionado. com in 2009. He has since become a culinary contributor for lifestyle and inflight magazines and newspapers. His job ranges from having intriguing conversations with celebrity chefs to memorizing the French names of Michelin-starred dishes he encounters. But at the end of the day he enjoys his scouring the city for good soul food with his beloved wife.

Entusiastic and dedicated Aki has been a professional photographer for over 10 years now. Originally from Mojokerto, East Java, in his spare time, he loves to travel, watch and play his favorite sports and listen to music.

Writer/Stylist

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Photographer

Writer

Photographer


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

The Foodie magazine volume 1, Issue 11

Things That Make You Go Yum 12

Fresh Produce

At The Dinner Table By Richmond Blando 14

Something Old This New Year

The Foodie’s List 16 20 22 23

Margaret River Gourmet Escape Satoo Red Night Hujan Locale ‘Truff It Out’ by Three Buns

Cover Feature: Magical Christmas 24 Akira Back: Freshness First 30 Tomato, Tomato 34 Good For Eats: The Bumi Langit Inspiration 38 Agritektur And The Farm Life 42 Finding Lawar 46 Lessons in Foraging 52 A New Zealand Snapshot

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

Went There Ate That 58 A Foodie In West Sumatra

Finer Things 62 Bacchanalia’s Secret Herb Garden

Tried And Tipsied 64 A Welcome Remedy 68 The Penfolds Legacy

Taking It To The Streets 70 Angkringan Lik Man 72 Mie Kocok Pak Haji Endan

Iconic 74 Tizi

A Foodie’s Life 76 Natalia Tanyadji 78 Reno Andam Suri

Confessions Of A Foodie 80 Bayu Amus

Maya’s Musings 82 A Cause For Our Heroes

Tried And Tested 84 Celebratory Beef Roulade

Stuff Of Legends 88 Nila Wati – Ubud’s Purveyor of Wellness

Pantry 101 92 Home Grown Produce

What Chef Eats 94 Yusuf Yaran

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T H I N G S T H AT M A K E Y O U G O Y U M

Things That Make You Go Yum is monthly column featuring our choices of the best

by RIAN FARISA

food photos on Instagram. If you think you have a great photo worth sharing with us, tag it with #TTMYGY and @TheFoodieMag

@adisscte

@ adi _ sinomo

@agus3

@andryaniade @alloysjambo

@antoineaudran

@aredheiadi

@cathhsp

@cocoamish 12 | www. thefoodiemag.com

@davidjohn84

@chef.elise

@dintaaaaa


T H I N G S T H AT M A K E Y O U G O Y U M Talking about fresh produce, it’s all about an intricate root far from to farm and then us as the consumers. But somewhere in-between there’s the market, the very place where our sustenance in the city life begins. Here we collected among the most beautiful market pictures we can find in the Instagram world!

@agus3

@idubsuadrif

@jfmurph

@mudandbralettes

@producelifer

@skye _ mcalpine @venovena

@tataevipritata

@davidjohn84

@williamwongso

@agus3

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AT T H E D I N N E R TA B L E B Y R I C H M O N D B L A N D O

Copyright Disney Pixar

Something Old this New Year Quickly… how many foodie movies can you name?

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spent some time with our resident chef, Maya the other day and the conversations went from holiday food, artisan markets and found itself going to memorable foodie movies. By the time you read this you have already gone through your holidays and the idea of having a movie marathon over the holidays might have escaped you, but the conversation sparked an interest in me since I have always been a serious movie buff, sometimes more than I would care to admit. I will not mention all the recent movies about cuisines that most likely you would have seen and picked apart already, like “Chef” and “The Hundred Foot Journey”, but I will mention some of the movies that have resonated with me over the years, they are a very short list: Julie and Julia: excellent performance of Meryl Streep as Julia Child, other than that I take away nothing from that movie. Jiro Dreams of Sushi: amazing story, excellent cinematography. Makes me want to go to Tokyo and spend USD 300 for one meal. Ratatouille: The movie’s antagonist, Anton Ego, the food critic, gave some very memorable lines, one being my favorite is, “Not everyone can become a great artist, but a great artist can come from anywhere.” So now, on to movies that every Culinary Enthusiast or Foodie should watch.

The Big Night (1996)

Stanley Tucci and Tony Shalhoub plays Italian brothers, Primo and Secondo (either they have cruel parents or the writer was not all that creative). Primo’s style of classic Italian dishes is flawless but their customers are more interested in a rustic, gloppy plate of spaghetti and meatballs than a carefully prepared portion of risotto. The brothers are given one last chance to save their eatery when they learn that Louis Prima plans to dine there following a concert in the area. So the brothers sink every last penny they have into their “big night,” cooking up perfect versions of nearly impossible-to-prepare dishes like a timpano. This is honest-togoodness Italian food porn, executed at the highest skill level. You’ll never contemplate a cheap meal at a pizza joint again.

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AT T H E D I N N E R TA B L E B Y R I C H M O N D B L A N D O

Eat Drink Man Woman (1994)

Ang Lee… Nuff said. The opening scene of widower Master Chef Chu preparing the traditional family torture Sunday meal for his three daughters is probably the most quintessential scene that sets the whole framework of the movie. I have eaten my share of Chinese food but I have never eaten anything that was ever prepared that way. Overall, it’s a movie that literally makes your mouth water. A lip-smacking comedy about a Taipei master chef who’s lost his sense of taste and his tangled family problems with three romantically troubled daughters. It crackles with iridescent style and wit. Eat Drink Man Woman, takes its title from a wry Chinese proverb about the “basic human desires” of food and sex. Lee likes his movies talkative, which is fine - but if you’re not fluent in Mandarin, you might get lost in the translation as the subtitles whiz by really quickly. And while Lee mostly manages to balance his quiet, observational comedy with familial tragedy, there are moments when it all feels a trifle mundane or draggy… but those are just a few moments.

Tampopo (1985)

In an era that made it impossible for those who have very little access to foreign films discover gems like these and even a much lesser chance since the “Foodie” revolution caught on from the emergence of food shows and cooking competitions, I am grateful that the world of torrent allows me to discover this gem even if I am a few decades late. “Tampopo” is one of those utterly original movies that seems to exist in no known category. As it opens, the film looks like some sort of Japanese satire of Clint

Copyright MGM Studio

Eastwood’s Spaghetti Westerns. The hero, Goro stages a search for the perfect noodle restaurant but cannot find it. Then he meets Tampopo, a sweet young woman who has her heart in the right place, but not her noodles. This movie will make you hungry for noodles. I don’t care if you are sick or you just ate. You will be hungry for noodles. It is so consumed and detailed, so completely submerged in noodle-ology, it takes on a kind of weird logic of its own. There are few scenes that seemed to not have any place in the movie like a few

love scenes, an old woman in a grocery store, a man rushing home to his dying wife, etc. The ONLY thing these scenes have in common is food. Why are these scenes there? No matter the reason, they are there and they will get people laughing. There you go. If you know your way around the web and a place called torrent sites, you can find these gems. You might not find it in hi-def quality, but you can try and see if these movies warrants the praise from myself and the rest of the netizens out there. Happy New Year.

Copyright Itami Productions

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F O O DI E L I S T S

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MARGARET RIVER GOURMET ESCAPE by ADITHYA PRATAMA

From the heart of Western Australia, a feast of fine cuisine and wine pampered many foodies from all over the world throughout the weekend. Welcome to Gourmet Escape!

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hroughout the weekend of 22 November 2014, the wine region of Margaret River hosted the annual Margaret River Gourmet Escape 2014 –a series of events involving fine food and wine from the region and talented chefs from Australia and the world. Combining the lush greeneries of wine country with the casual laidback settings of the beautiful beaches of Western Australia, Gourmet Escape is an event worthy for every foodie all over the world. This year’s line up includes the father of modern British cuisine; Heston Blumenthal in anticipation for his highly anticipated The Fat Duck in Melbourne, three Michelin star Chef Massimo Bottura as a part of his Australian book tour ‘Never Trust A Skinny Italian Chef’, Frank Camorra of Movida in Melbourne, Peter Gilmore, highly acclaimed food and travel writer A.A. Gills, Masterchef Australia’s judges Matt Preston and Anna Gare and many other talented names gracing the third event held in the iconic Leeuwin Estate Winery. Located three and half hours drive away from the capital city of Perth, Leewuin Estate held over 100 food, wine and kitchen exhibitors showcasing Australia’s finest products. With restaurants of the region and breweries from Western Australia joined in the crowd this year and some masterclasses from the grand

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Siemens Chef’s Theatre, Chef’s Secret where attendees rub shoulders with guest chefs or writers discussing a certain topic, Book Signings spot and the popular Food Photography Classes. The festivity of Gourmet Escape did not stop at Leewuin Estate alone, a series of satellite events were conducted for three days at various venues all over Margaret River. This year’s highlight includes Trivia Nights hosted by Matt Preston and A.A. Gills where attendees battled their hearts out showcasing their food and wine knowledge, Food For Thoughts series where chefs like Heston Blumenthal, Matt Stone and George Calombaris discussed food topics and upcoming trends in the culinary scene, series of wine dinners prepared by the guest chefs and the sold-out events of Gourmet Beach BBQ with menu specially prepared by Frank Camorra, Dan Hong and Rick Stein on the beautiful sunset background of Castle Rock beach. With admission starting from a mere AUD$38 for the Gourmet Village entrance, Margaret River Gourmet Escape is a festival that should be in every avid food and wine lovers’ bucket list. From the vast options of great delicacies to the award winning wines and craft beers as well as a chance to rub shoulders with world-class chefs gives plenty of good reason to pack your bags for next year’s event.


F O O DI E L I S T S

MARGARET RIVER GOURMET ESCAPE | www.gourmetescape.com.au Facebook: Gourmet Escape | Twitter & Instagram: @gourmetescape

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SATOO RED NIGHT by RIAN FARISA photographs by SHANGRI-LA HOTEL, JAKARTA

The recently unveiled SATOO’s Red Night redefines the boundary of all-day dining into something that every other restaurant in Jakarta would be envious of. Find out the reasons why The Foodie Magazine has received the honor to enjoy the red temptations.

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s a prestigious all-day dining restaurant in Jakarta, SATOO is popularly known for its vast array of twelve open kitchen buffets comprising of quality Indonesian, Chinese, Indian, Japanese, and Western cuisines from start to finish. Recently, SATOO introduced the “Red Night” with a sole purpose of elevating the dining experience for its loyal customers. For this special night, the appearance of SATOO becomes different with so many infusions of red on every element you can perceive through your senses. You will become the witness that every little thing from the napkins, the uniforms, the ornaments, and even the lighting mood are colored in red. Needless to say, the Red Night casts its color well on the very element that will treat our tasting sense into maximum pleasure. Start from the parade of fresh seafood from the beautiful yellow fin tuna, tiger prawns, oysters, mussels, swimmer crabs, yabbies, white clams, and a creative lineup of sushi rolls and sashimi. These amazing selections of seafood are complimented with an array of special red sauces for guests to choose from; strawberry and mango vinaigrette, raspberry vinaigrette,

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Thousand Island dressing and also the blood orange emulsion to as far as sundried tomato pesto. Representatives from Indonesian cuisine are also present in the color of passion theme with offerings such as chicken in rica-rica sauce, “Merah” sweet and sour fish, beef rendang and red jackfruit curry. Other international selections such as the seared ahi tuna, red dragon rolls, shrimp bisque, red wine braised beef medallion, salmon roll in spicy Provençal sauce, Singaporean chili crab, Szechuan style beef, Seafood kway tiao and Thai red duck curry with lychees are all waiting to be explored. To end with a sweet note, follow the colorful desserts paraded through the dining hall to one corner where the red color reigns supreme over the rest with rich European-style desserts, pink chocolate fountain, as well as the customizable ice cream concoction made upon cold stone. While it may not be red, be sure not to miss the pride and joy of our culture, a variety of classic power drinks from herbs brewed by the genuine mbok jamu. Those are the reasons why you should not miss the Red Night at all. Remember, it is only held every Thursday evenings. Book now and enjoy your dinner!


F O O DI E L I S T S

SATOO | Shangri-La Hotel Jakarta, Kota BNI, Jalan Jend. Sudirman Kav. 1, Jakarta | T: +62 21 2922 9999 www.shangri-la.com/jakarta

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HUJAN LOCALE by RIAN FARISA photographs by WILL MEYRICK’S PERSONAL COLLECTION

Celebrity Street Food Chef Will Meyrick embarks on a new journey to please the locavores with his latest venture, Hujan Locale.

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nown with his fast pace, urban restaurants – Mama San and Sarong at Seminyak, Will Meyrick, alongside his partners-in-crime Chefs Palm Amatawet, Tim Bartholomew, and Stuart Marsden, decided to utilize the best from local ingredients, sourced from local farmers, and to foster stronger relationships with their surrounding community with the unveiling of Hujan Locale. After several years of developing great teamwork with local farmers by using the most of their produce in his restaurants, Will Meyrick wanted to also honor the amicable relationship by devising something in contrast with both his previous renowned restaurants. With Hujan Locale, Will Meyrick returns to his roots by creating something smaller in scale and opting for the slow cooked food as the main theme. By that, Hujan Locale will also focus the essentials in its cuisine with the “found and foraged” philosophy. The name itself, Hujan (or “rain” in Bahasa), was chosen to represent the belief that rain brings good fortune, harvest, and prosperity. With a twist on traditional Indonesian food, Hujan Locale serves a combination of style found in the backstreet kitchens of Southeast Asia focusing on slow grassroot cooking. By incorporating Will’s Scottish background and his love for Asian cuisine, expect a creative fusion between East and West. Additionally, everything will focus on seasonality and provenance with the ingredients. The Hujan Locale’s concept is to keep dishes simple, fresh and consistently created with anything found in the house. The chef picks the produce from the kitchen garden and farm that will help assemble and decorate the plate. The space will casually reflect a cool tropical and rural setting and an old Asian charm with tropical freshness thrown in it. Provincial but slightly urbanized, Hujan Locale’s façade has been stripped back to reveal a softened concrete color with beautiful wooden shutters as reminiscent of colonial mansions during the old French Indochina times. Upstairs, the dining room is beautifully lit by milky glass vintage lighting and becomes an ideal setting to watch the passing monsoon. The bar that is filled with amber glass and is made from reclaimed teak is tucked upstairs as well and is equipped with leather bar stools to add the warmth alongside the herbs and citrus in glass jars that adorn the bar. With all of these, Hujan Locale will soon be the next big thing for you to try in Ubud, Bali.

HUJAN LOCALE | Jalan Sriwedari no.5, Ubud, Bali | T: +62 361 473 7809


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‘TRUFF IT OUT’ BY THREE BUNS by RIAN FARISA

Our neighborhood artisanal burger joint introduces an exquisite, seasonal menu to its ever-indulging array of our favorite comfort food. Say hello to truffles!

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or Three Buns’ executive chef Adam Penney, It’s no joke devising great burgers and every little good thing that surrounds them. To celebrate this festive season, Chef Adam introduces the ‘Truff It Out’ menu comprising of a finely crafted set from start to finish by playing around with the exotic black truffle as the main theme. I’d like to start right away with the star of the show - Street Truff, the ultimate truffle burger with homemade ketchup, melts-in-your-mouth cheese, onion jam and miso mayo, alongside Truffle Mac N Cheese and the artisanal Truffle Gelato to give that punch you need as the closure. Additionally, the Truffle Passion - a concoction of fresh, local tropical fruits combined with vodka, or a Truffle Martini – a crafty reinvention of the classic drink would complement this whole mouthwatering set wonderfully!

THREE BUNS | Jalan Senopati no. 90, Jakarta | T: +62 21 2930 7780 www.threebuns.com | Facebook: Three Buns | Instagram: @burgerandheads

The truffle gelato comes from a local artisanal gelato maker, Milkbar, whose pop-up gelato bar is stationed in Three Buns until the end of January 2015. The gelato bar features original flavors from salted caramel to peanut butter and chocolatecovered potato chips – exclusively made for Three Buns only! Out of the “Truff It Out” menu, there are also permanent new additions to the Three Buns menu such as ‘Big Krabby Kane’ – a succulent fried crab patty with homemade curry mayonnaise, pickled chilli, coriander and crisp onions and ‘Piggie Smalls’ is a mouth-watering burger made with pork belly also catered specially for the explorer of gourmet burgers. For the real connoisseurs of truffles, not to worry though, the Street Truff existence will last much longer in the menu. Let’s get it on then!

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Akira Back: Freshness First by JED DOBLE photographs by DENNIE RAMON

Since opening his restaurant in Jakarta, Chef Akira Back has focused on sourcing the best produce available for his dishes, making sure that freshness always comes first.


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akarta seems to be growing on Chef Akira Back. He has made a number of trips here since opening his eponymous restaurant. He also apparently enjoys Indonesian food. “My first and most favorite Indonesian food experience, is Padang food. I was amazed at the variety of dishes that are all served at once, and they all have a deep character and layers of flavor. Combinations between numerous spices on dish, but they all complement each other. I think it is safe to say that Indonesians knows their spices well!” the celebrity chef exclaims. Knowing that Indonesians are quite picky with food helps push Chef Akira to make sure that dishes served at the restaurant are always top quality. They have even gone the way of working with local produce growers for their requirements. He explains: “In the US, we have our supplier for specialty produce from all over the world. But we have a grower down in the San Diego area who can modify and grow anything, including our micro herbs and custom baby vegetables.” Chef Akira continues: “In Jakarta, as we all know, specialty produce is very limited. We are fortunate to have a good relationship with both of our growers from the West Java highlands and also in Bedugul, Bali. They have helped us produce the Jalapeño peppers that we use, which previously we had to import, now we can proudly say that they are locally produced to ensure freshness.” But unfortunately, the micro herbs they use are still imported from Australia. Chef Akira shares with us his love affair with fresh produce: “I am personally a big fan of fresh produce, especially baby root vegetables and micro herbs. They both have

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the same flavor punch as their ‘grown-up’ counterparts, but are still tender, and who can resist how sexy they look!” Born in Korea and raised in Aspen, Colorado, Chef Akira Back brings a sense of adventure and boundless creativity to his culinary creations. Following the success of Kumi Japanese Restaurant + Bar at Mandalay Bay and the famed Yellowtail Japanese Restaurant & Lounge at Bellagio Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, Chef Akira opened Akira Back New Delhi last year and Akira Back Jakarta earlier this year. His restaurants all feature his inventive and enticing menus that embody classic Japanese cuisine and always feature innovative dishes that use the freshest ingredients from the world’s top purveyors. Before taking his turn in the kitchen, Chef Akira spent his early years as a professional snowboarder in Colorado, appearing in extreme movies and garnering praise from the sport’s top trade publications. During this time, he began working at local restaurants to supplement his income as an extreme sports athlete. After seven years on the pro-snowboarding circuit, he realized that he felt the same thrill in the kitchen as he did on his board, shaping his decision to pursue a full-time culinary career. Chef Akira went on to study at the International Culinary School at The Art Institute in Colorado. In 1993, he began working at Kenichi in Aspen as Sushi Prep Cook and was later recruited to Kenichi in Austin, Texas and then in Kona, Hawaii, where he worked as the Opening Chef. Combining his passions for adventure, travel and culinary exploration, Chef Akira toured extensively throughout Japan and

Europe, studying under top celebrity chefs and industry leaders, including Masaharu Morimoto and Brian Nagao. It was during this period that Chef Akira learned the value of using rare and exotic ingredients. In 2003, Chef Akira returned to Aspen to lead the kitchen as Executive Chef of Nobu Matsuhisa’s namesake restaurant. Gaining this wealth of experience, only compelled him to pursue his tangent, to open his own restaurants. One of Chef Akira’s most favorite dishes to make is called ‘Seoul Garden.’ “There is this dish that I developed not too long ago, and I always love the reaction from people when they taste it.” It is his version of edible soil, consisting of 13 dehydrated ingredients including a variety of nuts. It resembles the earth or ground where the baby vegetables are sprouting out of. “Sometimes, for a bigger format dish, I serve this with a little garlic chili oil in addition to a mildly seasoned poached Ama-dai. To me this dish is like poetry, the earth elements together with the fish from the ocean in pure harmony.” To close, I ask Chef Akira what his advise is for budding Indonesian home cooks. He replies: “Keep trying new things, be open minded about new ingredients that you might never have tried cooking with before. Try them as is, to get their true flavor profiles, then you can incorporate these to your dishes. Knowing your ingredients is the first step to become a better cook.” Now that inspires me to go to the kitchen and whip up something myself. Chef Akira shares his Poached Halibut with ‘Seoul Garden’ in the following pages. Brave enough, try it out and let us know how it goes.


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AKIRA BACK JAKARTA | MD PLACE, 12TH Floor, Jalan Setiabudi Selatan No. 7 Setiabudi, Jakarta | T: +62 857 7778 8777 www.akirabackindonesia.com | Twitter: @akirabackjkt | Instagram: @akirabackjakarta

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ALASKAN HALIBUT ON ‘SEOUL GARDEN’ Serves: 2

INGREDIENTS: Edible Soil Garden 250 gr 80 gr 80 gr 80 gr 80 gr 125 gr 20 gr 20 gr 1 pc 1 pc 1 pc 1 pc 65 ml 125 gr

Korean Chili Oil 1 pc 65 ml 125 ml 1/4 tsp

Garlic, finely chopped Peanuts Almonds Walnuts, blanched Cashews Gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste) Black sesame seed White sesame seed White onion Red onion Yukon gold potato Firm tofu Soy sauce Sugar Assorted baby root vegetables and mushrooms, blanched Korean red chili Sesame oil La-yu chili oil Salt

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Sake & Butter Poached Halibut 2 pcs Halibu filet, portion into 5x5 cm 90 ml Sake 70 gr Unsalted butter 2 pcs Dried kombu, portion into 5x5 cm 2 pcs Garlic, smashed 90 ml Chicken stock Salt and pepper, to taste 2 pcs Baby zucchinis, sliced thinly Olive oil

STEPS on a silicon mat and dehydrate in the oven at 65C for 5 days, grind into powder. and dehydrate at 65C for 48 hours.

2 hours. Deep fry in hot oil until crispy. Once crispy and cooled, pulse them until fine. Cool and grind into crumbs. bowl by hand. aside. chili in hot oil until cooked and finely chopped. La-yu, heat up and steep overnight then add half of dehydrated garlic to chili oil mixture. 53C.

season with soy sauce. Let drain all liquid and place it on a tray and dehydrate at 65C oven for 24 hours. Grind into powder.

kombu and place in a bag then fill with sake, chicken stock and garlic. Vacuum the bag and submerge in water bath for 14 minutes.

Mashed the potato and spread on a silicon mat, season and dehydrate in a 65C oven overnight and then grind until fine.

the halibut to resemble fish scales. Brush lightly with olive oil and reheat in steamer until the zucchinis are cooked.

180C oven until golden brown. Cool down and grind until fine.

add the blanched baby vegetables and mushroom on top of it.

oven separately for 5 minutes. Grind into powder.

soil and drizzle with Korean chili oil. Serve immediately.


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Tomato, Tomato by JED DOBLE photographs by DENNIE RAMON

Little Miss Sunshine, Black Morris, Red Kiss, Orange Blossom, White Doris, these are just a few of the stunning tomatoes you will meet at the Curious Croppers vegetable farm in Clevedon, Auckland. I swear, I have never been excited about tomatoes until now.


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was back in Auckland, and was spending the day with one of my favorite foodies, Elle Armon-Jones of The Big Foody Tours. I was beyond happy! Elle tells me that the first stop on our itinerary was a trip to Clevedon suburb in northern Auckland to visit The Curious Croppers. In my head, I said to myself, okay, its a tomato farm… Hmmmm… We meet Anthony and Angela Tringham and their kids Max and Olivia, The Curious Croppers. Anthony was already a tomato grower when Angela met him but three years ago, they expanded their range and started selling at the Clevedon Farmers Market. That’s when people started talking about their amazing tomatoes. Their philosophy in growing their tomatoes is simple. Like grapes, they grow their tomatoes in harsher than normal conditions and restrict the yield, lesser yield creates a more intense flavor. They then pick as ripe as possible, they can do this because they have a small gap between harvesting and selling. Anthony tells us that the fruit that their consumers receive have been picked in the last 24 hours. The Curious Croppers farm also adhere to organic growing techniques and only very rarely will use a pesticide. A new planting cycle will start with a sterilized greenhouse. They control the insects by hanging yellow sticky traps for every plant. These are yellow plastic sheets covered in a non toxic glue, they have discovered that insects can’t resist yellow, so they are attracted by the color, fly towards the sticky traps and get stuck. To control the whitefly, the main pest

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for tomatoes, they introduce a parasitic wasp called the Encarsia formosa. It is an insect the size of a flea that lays its eggs in the developing larvae of the whitefly. These parasites grow in the larvae and eventually kill it. They hatch out and continue the lifecycle. This is usually very successful that we now hardly see any whitefly. They also control lesser pests like aphids and thrips with a range of spiders and ladybirds that they let loose in the greenhouse. As I was walking through the greenhouse, I noticed boxes which were actually bumble bee hives. I was told that they use the bees to pollinate the tomato flowers. Very occasionally things go wrong and they are forced to use a spray. If so they try to use the most gentle ones at their disposal because the bumble bees are very sensitive so such pesticide. After a brief lesson on the growing and pest control, we walk about the different greenhouses to meet the stars of the farm. I found it very interesting that each of the tomatoes that they grow has a personality and flavor, hence they have all been named. As we walk around, Anthony and Angela pick some tomatoes to prepare a tomato tasting for us! The Spanish Red is the king of tomatoes and is their best seller. It is a large, shiny and meaty tomato, that goes well with everything. Then we meet Spanish Green, the slightly bitchy cousin of Spanish Red. It is tart and edgy, when sliced it is a brilliant green. The flavor is like cool cucumber and capsicum, its tartness to me was almost that of apple, with lots of crispness.

Little Horrors is a longer, taller tomato. They are fleshy and sweet. Best served with buffalo mozzarella, olive oil and basil. The Medley is their pack of little gems of different colors and flavors. Little Miss Sunshine is yellow, she is sweet and addictive. Black Morris is dark, almost purple, it is loud and tannic. Next is Red Kiss, bright red, with a soft flavor. Orange Blossom is shiny, it is blousy, fruity and tropical. And White Doris, soft, subtle and sublime. They all make a quick, colorful and tasty salad. They also look lovely sliced on a pizza. This tomato tasting that they laid out for us got me very excited. Never have I tasted tomatoes like this, carefully detecting the different flavors and nuances. Chefs around Auckland have taken notice of their tomatoes and Curious Croppers have been supplying various upscale restaurants for a few years now. Anthony tells me that they will usually work with a chef to produce a specific variety or chefs will choose from what they have each season. Its a family affair with Olivia and Max helping to sell vegetables at the Sunday Farmers Market in Clevedon. Max knows all about the picking, packing and selling of the products. While Olivia knows the name and flavor of everything and can tell the difference between varieties. It may sound odd, but I left Curious Croppers with a big sense of respect for the tomato and for the family that has made their living growing these colorful gems. Next time you bite into a tomato, try to notice its flavor and see if it has as much personality as those I met in Clevedon.

THE BIG FOODY TOURS | Elle Armon-Jones | T: +64 21448 1177 www.thebigfoody.com


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CURIOUS CROPPERS | 124 Mc Nicol Road, Clevedon, 2248 Auckland, New Zealand | T: +64 9292 8734 www.curiouscroppers.co.nz | Facebook: Curious Croppers | Instagram: @curiouscroppers

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GOOD FOR EATS: THE BUMI LANGIT INSPIRATION by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE RAMON

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Who would have known that a short trip to a farm deep in the mountains can be inspirational? Let’s take a look at what the duo from Good For Eats have to share with you, our dear readers!

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ainters, poets, and writers all embark on grand tours to many places around the world for the sake of finding inspiration, to seek more knowledge, as well as getting in touch again with nature or a different kind of worldly pleasure. Chefs, nowadays, have become in line with those heroes of culture and are seeking the exact same thing with their peers. For chefs in Indonesia, it has become increasingly easy to seek such inspiration especially when interacting with many talents, the availability of plentiful produce, the openness of the internet world, and of course - the undiscovered source of knowledge that comes from nature itself. During our visit to Yogyakarta to attend Good For Eats’ last leg of pop-up tour, chefs Fernando Sindu and Ivan Wibowo took us for a day trip down south to Imogiri to visit a farm, hidden within the hills of Gunung Kidul. The experience was a priceless one as we were caught in awe with how beautifully made Bumi Langit Institute is. Mr. Iskandar Waworuntu, the sole proprietor of the estate, designed his farm to be self-sufficient in every way possible. Deriving from his natural green thumb skills, permaculture knowledge in farming, and an eco-sufism approach; you can learn so much even from a single visit. The imparted knowledge on how it is possible to reach so many things by living in a farm brought a new horizon for both of the chefs. Inspired by the trip, Nando and Ivan decided to share Bumi Langit-inspired recipes for our readers that consist of curious experimentations, fresh ingredients, and also creativity. While living in a farm may feel like a dream for those who live in the city, hopefully with what these young chefs shared in the recipes, we hope that this will bring a spirit of balance and health in you to start everything good in 2015.

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GOOD FOR EATS | T: +62 878 3298 8338 | E: goodforeats@gmail.com


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PAN SEARED DUCK BREAST WITH COUSCOUS Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS: 2 pcs

100 gr 100 gr 20 ml 1 pc 5 gr 50 gr 1 pc 30 gr 3 gr

Skin-on duck breast, portion at 100gr Couscous Red cabbage, thinly sliced Red wine vinegar Thyme sprigs Sugar Maitake mushrooms Garlic cloves, minced Kale, chopped Garlic sprouts, pickled Salt and pepper, to season

STEPS boiling water with a ratio 1:1. Add the boiling water to the couscous and a bit of butter. Cover and let it sit. oil. Add the red cabbage and sauté until caramelized. Add the thyme, vinegar and the sugar and lower the heat. Season and cook until all the liquid is gone and the cabbage is “braised”. up oil until smoky, add the mushroom and season it with salt and pepper. Once colored, add the garlic and chopped kale. Cook it for little longer and make sure the garlic doesn’t burn. Take it off the heat and reserve. with cross mark. Heat up a pan on a very low heat. With the skin side down, render the fat until only 1 cm of fat left on the meat. o

185 C oven for 3 minutes. Take it out and let it rest. with maitake mushrooms beside it. Place the duck on the bed of maitake and scatter the kale with pickled garlic sprouts around the duck.

STRAWBERY SALAD WITH ORANGE VINAIGRETTE Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS: 30 gr 5 gr 20 gr 1 gr 200 ml 50 ml 1 gr 4 pcs

Macerated strawberries (soaked in salt and sugar for 30 minutes) Romaine lettuce, chopped Kale, chopped Pickled radish Orange juice Extra virgin olive oil Thyme and chopped parsley Orange segment, chopped Salt and pepper, to season

BUMI LANGIT INSTITUTE | Jalan Imogiri-Mangunan Km. 3, Desa Giriloyo, Wukirsari, Imogiri, Bantul Regency – Yogyakarta T: +62 274 857 2121 | www.bumilangit.org

STEPS juice until it thickens and becomes glossy. Reduce and let it cool. parsley into the reduce liquid. forms vinaigrette. Season and reserve. strawberry and chopped orange segment. and adjust it to your likeness. Serve immediately to prevent the salad from wilting.

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AGRITEKTUR AND THE FARM LIFE by RIAN FARISA

The rejuvenator of farming life, Agritektur, took us on a mindbending tour of their visions and a farm that might forever change the Indonesian agricultural world. www.thefoodiemag.com | 39


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s one of the biggest agricultural nations in the world, Indonesia severely lacks appreciation for the farmers - the true unsung heroes of our society from the long, forgotten past to the unknown future. Even until this day, their feats remain unknown but for some people, it’s more than enough reason to introduce these heroes again to the society. With that, it’s hard to overlook the Agritektur community and their visionary movements. A group of aspiring young architects decided to empower themselves by devising a fresh concept so that farming could be perceived as something cool and inventive. It’s pretty much like what we see nowadays with food, fashion, and other aspects of lifestyle. That’s why since 2012, Agritektur has devised so many events and has immersed themselves in every class to promote the role of farmers and also to introduce their products. As can be seen from their Instagram account, Agritektur has brought so many produce that many of us think as imported, but turns out that they can be found locally and comes with a very competitive price as well. When we met in Bandung, one of Agritektur’s founders, Robbi Zidna Ilman, explains that there are so many things that could be done for the farmers and that he’s happy with the enthusiastic welcome that he got from citizens of Bandung and Jakarta in particular. Agritektur currently has a modest tent to sell local, organic produce and is also active in promoting their cause through seminars, urban markets, and other

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form of social interactions. “As fellow architects, Bandung’s current mayor is an ardent supporter for our cause. However, the support from the local bureaucracy that deals with farming proved to be a bit too slow. Even so, we still see an interesting future ahead for this cause”, says Robbi with no sign of defeat coming from his face. Not only have they involved themselves in communities, Agritektur also brings people to join them for farm visits, secret dining events, and also by teaching the visually impaired people to plant herbs. “We are surprised they are actually gifted with their other senses. That makes them a really good quality inspector for the clients produce”, he further explains. Herbs itself have become Agritektur’s current pride and joy with a broad collection that they can provide for the customers during their market days. For that, Agritektur is working closely with a farm in the outskirts of Bandung and it became their exclusive supplier for fresh herbs. Curious about it and with the trend of having fresh herbs in the kitchen, I immediately asked Robbi for a field trip to the farm and the next day, we tread ourselves uphill to Ciburial. It’s not far, but it’s best to ready yourself for a bit of a bumpy trip ahead. Finally, we reached a modest farm owned by Kang Asep. Within the slopes, Asep and his family have been planting quality, organic vegetables for some time now. He seems elated that he can now steadily supply the demands, but ultimately

it’s a test of consistency for him. Fueled by the initiatives shown by Agritektur and having an inventive partner, Asep is not only traditionally planting the vegetables but he also reserves space for green houses and implements an advanced farming technique for some fruits and vegetables. In one greenhouse, I witness how extensive the collection of herbs that Asep has from basil, coriander, dill, oregano, marjoram, parsley, and even sage, rosemary, tarragon, thyme and stevia; but on another greenhouse, his partner experiments and plants vegetables by using hydroponic and aquaponic techniques. Slowly but surely, everything becomes full of hope again with the work of these wonderful young friends of agriculture. For curious customers, Agritektur even recommends them to personally deal with the farmers and hence giving the benefits of the direct trade for both sides. “Hopefully in the future, we can build our own supermarket filled with local produce and seeds. Or that we can build a permanent farmers market in the city to promote the cause even further”, says Robbi sharing his dreams with Agritektur. It’s probably a dream that, not too far from now, will be fulfilled. The citizens of big cities have grown weary with the entrapments of the so-called modern lifestyle and will soon realize how pleasant it is to achieve harmony with living a rural life as well. It’s a great start for Agritektur and we will surely see more of them and our farmers for years to come with success.

PARAPPA | Jalan Mataram no. 2, Bandung | Instagram: @agritektur | Facebook: Agritektur Indonesia Open every Tuesday and Saturday morning


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ASEP HERBCIK | Jalan Cibeungang, RT 5/RW 2, Desa Ciburial – Dago, Bandung | T: +62 878 2362 7857

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FINDING LAWAR by ADITHYA PRATAMA

The Foodie Magazine spent a day with Ade Putri to discover the many types of lawar that can be found all over Bali.

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alinese food is my favorite amongst any other Indonesian food;” explained Ade Putri as we sat down at our first place in Sanur, “even the bad ones would still be okay for me. So if I say that there’s an ‘okay’ Balinese food, then it must be pretty bad” Ade Putri Paramadita –or popularly known as @misshotrodqueen on social media platforms, spends plenty of her time in Bali. Be it for her work as road manager of an Indonesian metal band or just to lay by the beach and soak up all the sun, she would have spent most of the island time she had to enjoy Balinese food –street food in particular. The journey starts early in the morning as many of these places could easily run out of their goodies a couple of hours just after they opened. We reached Sanur area around half past eight in a small warung named “Kasih Sayang” –literally translates to Love, where Ade always has Rujak Bulung Kuah Pindang.

“Unfortunately she didn’t get any Bulung Buni today” sighed Ade, Bulung Buni is the local name for sea grapes, a species of seaweed that is also known as the green caviar. The lady owner –would like to be addressed as Ibu Kasih Sayang, immediately crushed some chilies with fragrant Balinese terasi (shrimp paste) and pour some kuah pindang; a stock made out of boiling some fish bones with a little

SHANGRI-LA HOTEL, JAKARTA | Kota BNI, Jalan Jend. Sudirman Kav. 1, Jakarta | T: +62 21 29229923 www.shangri-la.com/jakarta | Twitter and Instagram: @ShangrilaJKT

bit of tamarind. She then poured it over a bowl full of bulung or seaweeds that has been dressed with shredded coconuts and freshly grated galangal. “There’s also another type of rujak kuah pindang that uses fruits and they add sugar into the dressing. But honestly, I like this one much better. Simply because I don’t have a sweet tooth” Ade then savored her freshly made rujak.

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“So the good idea is to explore more every time I come to Bali, sometimes, just to get lost and find this little warung that is swarmed by locals.”

Apparently this was only our first stop, Ade then drove us towards the west to greet her favorite Balinese dish: lawar. Lawar is a traditional Balinese salad made out of mixed vegetables, shredded coconuts and seasoned commonly with Balinese spice mix known as basa gede –which contains over eight components to form such a complex flavor into it. Lawar is commonly served as a side dish for Nasi Campur Bali or Babi Guling. There are two types of lawar in general: lawar putih and lawar merah, the latter is popular for the usage of fresh blood to season the salad with. “But there are so many more than just regular Lawar in Bali!” exclaimed Ade as she stopped at another warung along Jalan Kerobokan, “that’s why I am taking you here!” The humble warung served one dish only: nasi campur served with lawar gedang; a Balinese salad composed of young papaya seasoned with basa gede. The plate is further completed with pork sate, pork crackles and plecing kangkung –blanched water spinach served with peanut and a mild tomato based sambal. The nasi campur is very humble yet packed with so many flavors, the texture of young papaya reminds me of Thai Somtum with its distinct crunchiness but with a better pack of spice and herb into the taste. It was a quick second breakfast for us before heading west towards Canggu for another lawar that Ade really likes. “We’re going to stop and pick my friends up;” said Ade just as we head west, “she’s Swedish but loves Balinese food as much as I do.” Then we met Emelie from Sweden who has spent years traveling to Bali. Unlike many, she opted to stay with the locals and let them take her to new places to eat more authentic Balinese food. One of them is the mouthwatering Lawar Kuwir at Desa Buwit; about thirty minutes drive from Canggu towards Tanah Lot.

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C O V E R F E AT U R E Though commonly made with pork, often enough lawar also uses other proteins as a condiment, like lawar kuwir with rich duck meat to accompany the whole plate. There are two options of lawar putih with vegetable and seasoning only, and lawar merah that use fresh duck’s blood to give a bold, savory flavor to the dish. It is then served with duck meat that has been cooked in Balinese style stew and sambal of bird’s eye chili and shallots. Another delicious treat is pepesan made out of duck’s meat and innards that are wrapped with banana leaves and steamed over a wood fire. The result is a rich and thick duck broth with a distinct smokiness that is simply addictive. Be aware that you could also get the diamond in between the pepesan: duck’s ovary that tastes a lot like bits of foie gras. “I have known this place for quite some time and every time I come back to Bali, I

just have to eat here;” shared Emilie as she enjoyed the plate of lawar in front of her, “there was a time I had lawar kuwir for five days consecutively and still crave for it!” “The same case with me, I had this for the first time about one year ago;” added Ade, “it is the richness and smokiness as well as the hint of spicy inside the lawar that keeps me coming back for more.” As the Balinese sun got hotter, we moved along towards Denpasar for another lawar with octopus. Small eatery called Warung Mikmak was where we stopped for our last leg in finding all the different lawar in Bali. This lawar has a less appealing look as compared to the others due to the usage of squid ink to season the lawar klungah – from toasted coconut, that comes with the dish. With fresh and mildly fishy aroma of the lawar and bold spice from the octopus, this has become my personal favorite for the crunchy texture of the coconut and

the subtle umami from the squid ink that elevates the dish into a whole different level. “So now you get it why I love Balinese food so much right, especially lawar. The simplicity of the ingredients as well as the many variations that the Balinese put into it is simply amazing. And this is not everything! There are many other lawar out there made with different combinations too; the most common one would be lawar kacang that is made with string beans and chicken and lawar nangka that is served alongside a babi guling usually, but there are also lawar with lamb and also lawar penyu with sea turtles that are only consumed for special ceremonies in Balinese culture;” explained Ade Putri as she sipped on a bottle of refreshing temulawak – a sweet curcuma drink, “So the good idea is to explore more every time I come to Bali, sometimes, just to get lost and find this little warung that is swarmed by locals.”

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LESSONS IN FORAGING by ADITHYA PRATAMA

Though known as the mining region of the continent, Western Australia hides a fertile land to grow some of the country’s best harvest. The Foodie Magazine met the dedicated lady chef Sophie Zalokar and joined her in the stunning farm-to-table establishment she set up with her husband.


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he lush karri trees alongside the hilly roads toward Pemberton were such a serene and calming sight through one of the best routes I have ever driven on. The balmy late spring breeze completed the whole repertoire of being away from the concrete jungle city of Perth. It wasn’t the outback, no deserts in sight –only green farms, orchards and wineries, throughout the trip to a sevenhectare cooking school, dining room and accommodation known as Foragers. Foragers was founded by Sophie Zalokar and her husband Chris in 2005 as a cottage that Chris –a native Switzerland architect, refurbished from a caravan park into luxury chalets surrounded by huge areas of farms and gardens in a stunning natural environment. Sophie herself is native South Australian –Barossa Valley to be exact, who fell in love with the beauty of food through working with Maggie Beer at Pheasant Farm Restaurant many years ago. Sophie and Chris created a forty-seat dining room with a large kitchen and re-launched the place as Foragers in 2011 serving seasonal dinners every Saturday nights with ingredients grown from the Southwest region. “The long table dinners at Foragers are very special because, not only do we have guests coming in from outside of the areas, but also many locals who come over to enjoy the food here;” shared Sophie as we walked around the area, “often you will get to sit next to a farmer that might be growing the ingredients used in the menu that evening.” Not only do the people get to feel the soul of the region through its food in Foragers, but also get handy through Sophie’s cooking classes and workshops throughout the year. The workshops ranged from butchery to bread making and includes a visit to gardens, orchards and farms to learn about the variety of produce that is offered at the particular season to then be cooked and consumed by the participants. The place also offered close-to-nature accommodations that allowed guests to stay and enjoy the countryside feel Foragers has to offer. The inspiration for Foragers came about from many years of traveling around Europe looking at beautiful countryside restaurants where menus are fixed, tables are shared and the food were traditionally made and served by the family that runs the place. The similar concept on preserving the local produce and family’s culinary heritage are what is implemented by Sophie and Chris

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into Foragers with a humble setting that is approachable by people from different layers. “People can come to Foragers without knowing anything about food and not be intimidated by it to get an enjoyable experience throughout;” said Sophie, “it is a mix of foodies and non-foodies that are gathered in my dining table that gets me excited every time.” Sophie took me to her kitchen garden where many of her fresh herbs, vegetables and even nuts were grown. A fragrant smell coming from the lemon myrtle tree next to a pomegranate tree built up a true orchard feel of the place alongside the whole bunch of kale and fresh herbs that Sophie regularly picked for her cooking as well as the hazelnut and almond trees that composed up her beautiful garden. Completing the whole countryside living, Sophie also raised farm animals in Foragers. She keeps six Wessex Saddleback Pigs with an adorable white belt and flappy ears that she often used for the once-ayear butchery workshop, couple of chickens raised for the fresh eggs and a duck named Amelie. “We used to have a whole bunch of them but a fox came in and got most of them one night and Amelie is the survivor of that night –she is a strong girl” Having lived in the region for over ten years, Sophie knows many farmers and producers around the Southwest that regularly supplies her kitchen with the best seasonal ingredients. Including beautiful potatoes from Pemberton, crisp asparagus from Manjimup and Marron that is commonly found in the streams and dams in Southwest region. “Marron is a similar species to crayfish that are found only in Western Australia;” explained Sophie, “it might be considered as a luxury food out there, but for many farmers here, it is one of the common food consumed in the family. It is a part of recreational fishing in this region alongside freshwater trout that are found commonly here too.” As the season changes, harvest will also change and, therefore, bring a new creation to Sophie’s menu at the dinner. Summer is always considered as a cherry and stone fruits seasons for Sophie, so there are many nectarines and apricots to be used and a Cherry Festival is conducted every December in Manjimup where long table lunches were held in cherry orchards and guests can just pick directly from the trees

throughout. Where as autumn is for the pink lady apple –which was founded 40 years ago in Manjimup, and winter is the time for Truffle Kerfuffle; an event to celebrate the truffle harvest time in the region where chefs from all over Australia come to cook with the fragrant black truffles from Western Australia. “This concept of culinary tourism is what gets people to be more excited about the produce and make connections to the people and the place where the food was grown;” we went inside the dining room as Sophie prepared some food, “and that is what I would like to introduce to the dining experience here in Foragers.” Sophie also introduced the produce of Southern Forests and its recipe inside her recently launched book “Food of The Southern Forests” where she shared stories about Southern Forests, the produce of the area and the producers alongside recipes that Sophie composed beautifully. As Sophie continued preparing the food, we talked a little bit about the upcoming food trends in 2015 which involves lots of basic and straight forward home cooking –in other words: Sophie’s style of cooking. “I believe that an eating experience is a connection between where you are, the personality and style of the chefs and the ingredients as well. For me, I am not in place to play around with new techniques like the younger chefs; it takes a whole different kind of skills and also a different set of toys to play with. But these skills are amazing and not to be scoffed at, if it has a place in the dish –say a foam or smoke, and it makes the dish better, we should always use it. But back to that connection of the people, produce and the place is what I felt as the most important part of the food.” As we continued with the meal at Foragers, I can easily say that what Sophie had shared was fully translated into each and every single plate served. From the beautifully cured trout served with avocado and pickled ginger to the flavorful rib eye with smoked tomatoes and fresh-from-thegarden kale pesto. The flavor shone through this farm-to-table meal that I had at Sophie’s and as I noticed the mileage it took for most of the ingredients of my daily meal, I have no doubt why it tasted very differently. “There’s always a place for all eating experiences, but the best one is the one that rings through to the person that cooks, the produce and the way the food connects to the area with an authenticity attached to the experience.”


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photograph by Craig Kinder

FORAGERS FIELD KITCHEN | 1 Roberts Road, Pemberton, Western Australia | T: +61 8 9776 1580 www.foragers.com.au | Facebook: Foragers Field Kitchen & Cooking School | Twitter: @foragers2 | Instagram: @foragersfieldkitchen

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CRISPY POTATO SKINS WITH GOAT CHEESE AND PAPRIKA Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS: 2 pcs

4 tbsp 4 tbsp 1/2 tsp 1 tbsp 1 tbsp

Medium-sized potatoes, washed Extra virgin olive oil Goat’s cheese Paprika powder Sea salt flakes Chives, finely chopped

STEPS: directly and bake for 45 – 60 minutes until tender. it and scoop out most of the soft flesh and reserve for another use. potato skins on a baking tray and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil. Bake for 10-15 minutes until golden and crispy. Leave to cool for a little. cheese. flakes, sprinkle on top of the potato and garnish with chopped chives.

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AVOCADO SALAD WITH GRAVLAX, PICKLED GINGER AND PINE NUTS Serves: 4

2 pcs 1 tbsp ginger 75 gr 1 pc 2 tbsp 1/4 tsp

or vodka and rosemary leaves in a bowl. the trout filet and place half of the mix on top of the plastic.

INGREDIENTS: For Gravlax 250 gr 200 gr 100 gr 60 ml 2 pcs 500 gr

STEPS:

Coarse sea salt Sugar Fresh dill, chopped Gin or vodka Fresh rosemary sprigs Boneless ocean trout fillet, skin-on Ripe avocados Japanese pickled Toasted pine nuts Lime segments, diced Extra virgin olive oil Cinnamon powder Salt and black pepper, to season Basil leaves, to garnish

side down and smear the remaining mix on top of the filet. Wrap tightly with the plastic wrap. a smaller tray. Weigh it down with food cans or chopping board and refrigerate for 12 hours. other side down for another 12 hours in the refrigerator. seed, scoop out the flesh and dice it. plate, spoon the avocado on top. nuts, diced lime, extra virgin olive oil and cinnamon powder. Season well. basil leaves and drizzle a little bit of extra virgin olive oil to serve.

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A NEW ZEALAND SNAPSHOT by JED DOBLE photographs by DENNIE RAMON

Tourism New Zealand recently introduced Joe Taslim as their Tourism Ambassador in Indonesia at a dinner at the New Zealand Ambassador’s residence.


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fter coming back from a fantastic trip to New Zealand with his family, Joe Taslim was officially introduced as the Indonesian Tourism Ambassador of New Zealand. An intimate evening of fine food inspired by fresh produce of the country was hosted by Tourism New Zealand. Together with his family, Joe had an immersive experience in Auckland, Rotorua and his unique visit to Hobbiton where the Lord Of The Rings and The Hobbit movies were filmed. Joe shared his experiences through a pictorial travel diary during the dinner. Joe expressed that New Zealand is a stunningly beautiful place, where the people are warm, and where the culture and landscapes are embraced through activities that he and his family enjoyed while they were there. The event was opened by Ms. Tredene Dobson, New Zealand Deputy Head of Mission, with her opening remarks, followed by the introduction of Mr. Steven Dixon, newly named Regional Manager for South and South East Asia of Tourism New Zealand. This was followed by a market update by Tony Everitt, TNZ Acting Country Manager for Indonesia. Tony shared that New Zealand has become an emerging destination for many Indonesian families to visit for holiday. Top activities range from hiking trails and experiencing volcano, wildlife and marine attractions, to learning the Maori culture and trying new cuisines. The menu for the dinner was created by Good For Eats chefs, Fernando Sindu and Ivan Wibowo. Chef Fernando spent a total of 11 years in New Zealand from ages 14 to 20, he went to school at Christ’s College Canterbury in Christchurch and came back to do his computer science degree from Massey University. He tells us that the menu they prepared is inspired by his experiences in New Zealand, and his favorite foods there. Dinner commenced with a canapé of olive tapenade and tasty gourgette with chicken rillettes to accompany Feijoa Passion –a cocktail specially created with passion fruit juice and Feijoa flavored 42 Below Vodka. Feijoa has an aromatic and sweet flavor and is popular in New Zealand, it is also called pineappleguava or guavasteen in other countries. The menu included a cured salmon starter with Waldorf salad – which had Braeburn apples, a pumpkin and butternut soup with mushroom tortellini and crispy croutons. The main course was a succulent New Zealand tenderloin, served with portabella mushroom, potato foam and garlic thyme jus. The meal was closed by a dessert of burnt apple, ricotta cheese and Hokey Pokey shards.

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JOE TASLIM | Instagram & Twitter: @Joe_Taslim


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TOURISM NEW ZEALAND | www.purenewzealand.com Instagram & Twitter: @purenewzealand | Twitter: @pureNZIndonesia

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A FOODIE IN WEST SUMATRA by RIAN FARISA

Never have I felt such longing for a place such as what I feel for West Sumatra. It is a province full of natural colors and flavors. After several trips there, it is high time for me to share a bit of my foodie adventures in West Sumatra.


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hrice I have joined the ranks of journalists on trips to West Sumatra on different reasons but I was fortunate enough to squeeze the small room of time I had and the opportunity to explore the country’s rich heritage of cuisines from different regions and also the magnificent landscapes inbetween. Oftentimes, I have to thank today’s technology in helping me to pinpoint the exact location of eateries within the map of rural West Sumatra. That, and some help from the natives through Twitter, but most of all, my biggest achievement was that I managed to steer fellow journalists and drivers to follow my directions. The highlight of this piece is mainly

about where to eat in regencies outside of Padang, even though my sentimental side asked me to feature one also from the city. So without further ado, let’s tread it together! PADANGPANJANG The city of Padangpanjang lies upon the mountainous region on the heart of West Sumatra. The cool climate of this region makes the city a favorite destination for weekend vacation, almost on par with the more popular Bukittinggi. Most of all, for us foodies, we all know that the city is the capital of the famous sate Padang. As a much-loved dish for lunch and dinner, sate Padang from this city emphasizes the use of turmeric more than

the coastal city of Pariaman with its red, fiery sauce from the chilies. Despite the strong presence of Mak Syukur, the biggest sate Padang restaurant in town that also has expanded itself to Jakarta, the city is basically proud of the heritage. That’s why during my last visit, which coincided with Tour de Singkarak 2014, the mayor of the city decided to present everyone with a free-for-all sate bazaar and it was that very moment that I will never ever forget. While people are feasting upon different hawkers, I sampled some of them and found out how brilliant it was to mix between the meat, the tongue, the cheek, and other parts of the cow altogether with the intense marinating and the flavorful sauce. Respect!

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SAWAHLUNTO A bit far to the south, the city of Sawahlunto is hidden between the surrounding valleys of rich coal deposits which makes it one of the most beautiful cities in West Sumatra. The way in and out of the city is through the snake-like main road that leads up to the small town strip of Muaro Kalaban. In Muaro Kalaban, you will easily find the best dendeng batokok ever in the whole country. While considered as a delicacy in any Padangnese restaurant, the restaurant’s owner has been in the business for decades and the uniformed meat size from tokok-tokok process (pounding the meat) is cooked for many hours, and then topped with red chilies and minyak tanak (pure coconut oil) – the olive oil for Minang people. There’s a perfect chemistry behind the richness of the spices, the sweetness that came from the meat, and the extra flavor from the coconut oil. Needless to say, each of the elements came from painstaking efforts and I felt like I was digging on something heavenly, something that you would cherish on every bite. DHARMASRAYA This newly formed regency is tucked far away on the southeastern part of the province. It is even said that the medieval kingdoms of Sumatra started here, even before the time of Adityawarman. Dharmasraya only has long strips of small towns upon the main road to the neighboring provinces and a few recently revived historical sites for now. However if you take a look a little bit inside, you will find cheerful housewives saying more than just hello for the newcomers. In the villages of West Sumatra, it is a customary thing for the housewives to cook together to cater for the wedding on the next day. What I found was something that is rarely seen anymore in cities and the togetherness in cooking anything Minangnese from grinding the chilies, frying the chicken, and the making of delicious potato fritters. You can find restaurants out of here, but to view a celebration like this and mingle with the natives has become something so valuable that you will not want to trade with anything else.

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W E N T T H E R E AT E T H AT SOLOK SELATAN The southern frontier of West Sumatra begins here. Upon the long road ahead, downhill that heads to the province of Jambi, you will witness the beautiful Danau Di Atas and Danau Di Bawah, and also Mount Kerinci from far away. It’s always a pleasant scenic journey down this way. The Sungai Kalu restaurant, upon the main road, dates back since the 1950s and flourishes from time to time as the government paves way to develop the regency. Now, it has become an oasis for travelers and frequented by many every day. So, whenever you’re here, be sure to try anything with green chilies and by that I mean, not just the dendeng or the chicken, but also the eels. It’s a simple pleasure found only in rural West Sumatra.

PADANG So many things to share from the capital city but I would like to just highlight this one for now. After the sate and the proteins from the rich Minang cuisine, then of course it is time for the Soto Padang! Soto Garuda has been there for many years and sells the much-loved Soto Padang that you can find in Jakarta as well. However, their version is simply the best. It feels classic, fresh, clean, but also packed with flavors. The proteins come from the fried cow’s lungs or the meat but adding their take on gado-gado is a must as well. Clearly the two dishes are the best sellers there and it’s better to come not too late in the evening or you’ll run out of it.

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T H E FI N E R T H I N G S

BACCHANALIA’s Secret Herb Garden by JED DOBLE

Named Singapore’s best new restaurant for 2014, Bacchanalia’s passion for food is highlighted by their homegrown herbs in their classic and distinctive dishes.


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he concrete jungle of Singapore has left very limited space for homegrown produce - even for mere herbs. So it is a polite surprise that executive chef Ivan Brehm of Bacchanalia has gone the extra mile to provide and plant their own herb garden right in the middle of the city. The fruit of which makes their way quickly to the finest and most unique dishes on the menu. From his days working for Thomas Keller’s Per Se to Heston Blumenthal’s Fat Duck, Chef Ivan Brehm is well equipped with the experience to not only conceptualize dishes with scientific precision, but also bringing out excellent flavor intensity in all of his dishes through highlighting their umami and acidity. Many of the concepts he has applied at Bacchanalia have also come from his years working at Mugaritz under Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz where only two to three ingredients were used within a dish to create a complex and artistic plate behind truly exquisite flavors of the best ingredients. Chef Ivan tells us that many of the dishes in Bacchanalia are inspired by his memories of his two grandmothers. Brought up in a multicultural family, he inherited that eclectic mix of plates from every culinary experience he had growing up. This aspect also applied to the style of dishes at Bacchanalia where sharing is always recommended. An approach to fresh produce shown through Chef Ivan’s A Different Vegetable Salad where organic greens from Cameron Highland in Malaysia are plated alongside root vegetables, pickled banana hearts and banana purée to bind the flavors together and give a distinct sweetness to the dish. Another plate that highlighted this approach is Bacchanalia’s Cauliflower Gratin with white truffle and cheese foam topped with homemade Gremolata with herbs harvested from their own garden. But not only is he good with his greens, Chef Ivan has turned hand dived Norwegian scallops into a refined dish with borlotti beans, caviar and hints of cocoa and his pork belly with a classic braised cabbage, apple and capers to bind the dish together and give it that nostalgic, home-cooked feeling. Housed in a colonial shop house right next to the famous Singapore Philatelic Museum, Bacchanalia provides a laidback kind of fine dining where lounge-like velvet chairs and leather-lined couches have been placed for diners to share their meal in a casual way be it for weekend flair or weekday affairs where the seven course menus are available to share at the restaurant. Bacchanalia and its secret garden are truly a gem worth discovering.

BACCHANALIA | 23A Coleman Street, Singapore 179806 | T: +65 6509 1453 www.bacchanalia.asia | Facebook: BacchanaliaSG | instagram: @bacchanali _ asia

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

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TOM HOGAN | Instagram: @thoganhogan


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A Welcome Remedy by JED DOBLE photographs by ANTI:DOTE

Head Craftsman Tom Hogan offers up a selection of cleverly concocted cure-alls using the freshest herbs from their own garden.

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ith almost a year under its belt, Anti:dote has been making waves among the Singapore drinking elite. Head Craftsman Tom Hogan honed his craft behind the bar at notable Chicagoan institutions such as Bernard’s Bar at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel and North Pond Restaurant for more than five years before his relocation to Singapore. At a recent visit to Anti:dote, I was handed the menu and complimented the various sketches of the cocktails. I discovered that Tom is a graduate of the School of the Arts Institute of Chicago and a keen painter and sculptor. This artsy side of Tom gives him a different edgy side to making his cocktails. He is known in the cocktail scene for approaching bartending as a fine art form, combining the craftsmanship of classic cocktail making with the flair of modern experimental mixology. Appealing to the most discerning tippler, the artistry of Anti:dote’s recipes are based on premium spirits and market-fresh ingredients, house-made aromatic bitters and liqueurs as well as flavored sodas, perfectly balanced with the subtlety of fragrant home-grown herbs and flowers like Cuban mint, cinnamon basil and marigolds from the bar’s very own herb garden. Tom says that he can’t lay claim to creating the method of bartending utilizing fresh ingredients, and to this I agree. But what Tom has been doing at Anti:dote, if I may say so myself, is head and shoulders above many cocktail bars I’ve seen. He says that Market Fresh has become popular as well as essential in contemporary cocktails. “The term ‘Fresh is Best!’ was ingrained in my psyche from very early on in my career when I was bartending at a restaurant that was farm to table. In order to fully embrace the chef’s approach to food and dining, I began to embrace the theme and

culture of sourcing seasonal ingredients from local farmers to draw the restaurant and the bar into one cohesive statement,” Tom shares. Tom recounts, growing up, his mother was and still is , a great cook who loves to experiment in the kitchen. He was always a willing participant to help out. He says: “It also meant that if you made dinner, you were exempt from cleaning up after dinner, which was a huge plus since I was one of six children.” This experimentation, however, began with the foundation of understanding what he was eating, how it was prepared, and the different methods of preparation that would eventual influence the outcome of the dish. He never realized at the time what he was learning. He shares too that it was a unique experience that he had as a child growing up in a family that loves food. He learned to pick the correct produce for the dish they were making - what is ripe or what is over ripe, and he learned to be resourceful. Today, using fresh ingredients is as important as the spirits he uses to create his cocktails. The herb and vegetable garden at Fairmont Singapore and Swissôtel The Stamford started in July 2008 as one of Singapore’s pioneering urban farming projects. It was later shifted to a larger plot three times the size of the original in June 2013, before it received its new harvest in November 2013. The herb and vegetable garden was first created to provide the various food & beverage establishments managed by the hotels with a steady harvest of organically grown herbs and vegetables. With over 50 varieties of herbs and vegetables, some of the essential crops include arugula, basil, bulls blood beets, zucchini flowers, celery, cilantro, cress, onions, kohlrabi, dill, rosemary, bergamot,

ANTI:DOTE | Fairmont Singapore, Level 1, 80 Bras Basah Road, Singapore | T: +65 6431 531 www.antidotebar.com | Instagram: @antidotebar Facebook: Antidote Singapore

lavender and sage just to name a few. I ask Tom if there are there specific herbs which go well with specific spirits. In reply he says that nothing is set in stone, and he is happy because of that. “I’m constantly juggling flavors to see what happens and every once in a while I land on something that is truly exciting. Have you ever tried feta and cinnamon together? Try it. It will blow your mind.” I ask if the trend of using fresh herbs in cocktails will stay. Tom says: “I don’t see the use of fresh herbs in cocktails as a trend, but more of a personal choice of ingredient use. Nonetheless, it is a preference for many bartenders as fresh herbs offer versatility. These days, guests are no longer just keen on enjoying a cocktail, but instead, they want the story behind the ingredients, where the ingredients are from and why these ingredients are utilized.” On the lighter side, I ask Tom what his your favorite cocktails are. “A cocktail I always fall back on is the Tuxedo #2. It’s a stiff drink with a lot of character including a nice meaty gin or genever, dry vermouth (I like using a blanc instead), a touch of Luxardo Maraschino liqueur, orange bitters, and the sting of a nice absinthe rinse. It is an elegant, yet feisty little number that never ceases to captivate me. Another go-to for me would be a more contemporary classic called the “Greenpoint.” It was originally developed in PDT of New York and packs just the right kind of punch. It is made up of rye whisky, sweet vermouth, yellow chartreuse, orange bitters and angostura bitters. For a personal touch, I always throw in some palo cortado sherry to boost the finish of the cocktail so it rounds out to nice nutty, umami end.” Here, Tom shares his recipe for the Corpse Reviver #2 a classic concoction to cure a sever hangover. Try it out at home.

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

CORPSE REVIVER #2 Serves: 1

INGREDIENTS: 30 ml 30 ml 30 ml 30 ml

Bitters Gin Orange liqueur Lemon juice Absinthe, to rinse Orange peel, to garnish

STEPS with ice. quickly discard. with orange peel and serve immediately.

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

The Penfolds Legacy by JED DOBLE photographs by PENFOLDS

Penfolds winemaker Stepahnie Dutton, was a recent Jakarta visitor and sat down with us to discuss her passion for wine.

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stablished in 1844, Penfolds is one of Australia’s most iconic wineries with a pivotal role in the evolution of winemaking in Australia. The Penfolds collection of benchmark wines were established in the spirit of innovation and the constant and endless pursuit of quality, evidenced from the secret bottlings of Grange in 1951 and the unbroken line of vintages, of what is now Australia’s most iconic wine. Penfolds Grange is Australia’s first growth and heritage-listed wine, protected by the National Trust of South Australia. Born and raised in Melbourne, a city renowned for its love of food and wine, Stephanie discovered her passion for fine wine while working in some of the city’s signature restaurants. Stephanie recalls that while opening a bottle of Borolo that she began to consider a career in wine. She later finished a Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Melbourne, and then moved to Adelaide to embark on a Masters in Oenology. In 2010, she joined the Penfolds red winemaking team, based in Nuriootpa Winery in the Barossa Valley and is now responsible for crafting Penfolds Koonunga Hill wines. Embracing the cyclical nature of winemaking, Stephanie looks forward to the opportunities and challenges that each vintage brings, noting advice given to her by former red winemaker, John Bird, that ‘no two vintages are the same’ and that it is what keeps the fascination for winemaking alive. “This year was a busy year for us, the first half with harvest and vintage, the second half with the launch date of our Penfolds

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

Collection of Bin and luxury & iconic wines and our recorking clinics,” Stephanie says. “Unlike other brands, Penfolds started with their flagship wine and developed a family of wines cascading in tiers over the past five or six decades. The 1951 Penfolds Bin 1 Grange Hermitage is the father figure, which stands on the top of the family tree, the family of wines below it, form wines which have a common thread among them, like siblings, with a common DNA,” she continues to explain. Since it is our produce issue, I ask Stephanie about produce. “When I think about produce, my mind goes to our growers. Some of our growers have worked with us across generations, over three to four generations.” Stephanie continues: “It is very easy for winemakers to make bad wine out of good fruit, but it is impossible to make good wine from bad fruit. Winemakers need the growers and the growers need the

winemakers. It is important that we work together.” To close my quick chat, I asked Stephanie what she would say to our readers who are just starting to discover wine. “First and foremost, pick a trusted retailer, wine shop or restaurant to go to. If you start returning to that same place, over and over again, the people will start to know your preferences and they can give recommendations based on what you like.” Stephanie adds: “The other thing I say to people when you’re working with food and wine matches, is that the best food and wine match is a wine that you like with food that you like. We’ve had rules in the past with white wine with white meat and red wine with red meat. And they have worked in the past. But if you are eating something that you really like and are drinking a wine that you really like, that’s the best pairing.” Well said.

PENFOLDS BAROSSA VALLEY CELLAR DORR | Tanunda Road, Nurioopta, South Australia www.penfolds.com | Facebook: Penfolds | Twitter & Instagram: @penfolds

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TA K I N G I T TO T H E S T R E E T S

ANGKRINGAN LIK MAN by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE RAMON

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oughly around sixty years ago, the first generation of angkringan opened their business on the street of Jalan Wongsodirjan. Angkringan Lik Man is known to many as amongst the first and, quickly, the rest of the competition appeared all over. Angkringan is basically a stall selling food not using a pushcart. The goods are carried around on the shoulders and the seller will stop somewhere to show his delicious merchandise. For us, we decided to stop by at Lik Man’s due to its historical values, but typical angkringan will provide exactly the same stuff like the rest. The best part from angkringan is its sego kucing or literally translated as ‘cat’s rice’ due to its small portion. In spite of that, the combination kicks in a lot of flavor. The usual combination of sego kucing is the rice itself with orek tempe (stir-fried sweet and spicy tempe) and ikan teri (fried anchovies) with a really good sambal. If that’s not enough for you, always pick something from the sate department such as the sate kerang (cockle sate) or sate telur puyuh (quail’s eggs sate). Believe it or not, your visit to any angkringan will never be complete without having their kopi joss or black coffee served with a fiery charcoal inside. It might be something alien for you to see something like this, but it is believed that the charcoal will reduce the amount of caffeine quite significantly. Of course, you can remove the charcoal when you start drinking it and the sweetened coffee would taste like regular coffee in the end. Even so, while it is only considered as a gimmick, it felt good nonetheless to enjoy a cup of coffee under the cool night skies of Yogya. Well, it’s an experience that you cannot trade elsewhere. Other than that, typical angkringan provides snacks as well such as tempe mendoan (halfway fried battered tempe), bacem tempe (sweetened tempe), and jadah (grilled sticky rice, sometimes topped with bacem tempe or made into a ‘bun’ with tempe filling). That’s how colorful it can be when stopping by to treat yourself in an angkringan and it’s a really cheap yet a good treat also! One other thing that you should do while enjoying your angkringan experience is to have it the traditional way by sitting together on a mat that each angkringan provides for its customers. It’s like having a picnic on the street side at night!

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Many are amazed at how affordable one can eat on the streets of Yogyakarta. That’s surely because of the city’s pride and joy, the angkringan!


TA K I N G I T TO T H E S T R E E T S

SPEND: IDR 5,000 – IDR 30,000 / person

OPENING HOURS: Everyday, 7am – 8pm SPEND: IDR 15,000 – IDR 20,000 / person

ANGKRINGAN LIK MAN | Jalan Wongsodirjan (north of Tugu station), Yogyakarta

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TA K I N G I T TO T H E S T R E E T S

MIE KOCOK PAK HAJI ENDAN by RIAN FARISA

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ie kocok is literally translated as “shook noodles”, but I fear that it’s only an understatement if you compare it with the shaking process in cocktails, for instance. However if you ask the Sundanese people, as where this dish actually originated from, they will tell that the shaking process is when the yellow, flat noodles are put altogether inside this container alongside the bean sprouts and then simmered for a while in a very hot soup. The regular tukang bakso in Indonesia usually also does this particular step during the serving. What makes mie kocok different than the rest lies on the traditional use of beef tendon instead of meatballs. Although we all have to admit that, sometimes, it is also incomplete without meatballs. So aside from that, I’d like to repeat again that there will always be bean sprouts in use here but some also put the part of kaki sapi into it for an enhanced experience and flavor. The soup itself is made from beef broth; making it thicker in texture and richer by nature. Additionally, you can always squeeze a kaffir lime for a refreshing note, fried shallots for the extra crunchiness, optionally some kecap manis, and of course the kerupuk. Recently, during my trip to Bandung, I decided to give a visit to one of the big names in the mie kocok business. Mr. Endan, who has been selling mie kocok since 1980s faithfully from his pushcart, for the past few years has also been expanding his business to be included as one of the stalls in Bandung’s famous hawker center like The Kiosk and Paskal Hypersquare. It’s clearly not hard to find the original branch on Jalan Kebon Jukut as Pak Endan has positioned his pushcart conveniently for many years in front of Kartika Sari, Bandung’s famed oleh-oleh shop. His reputation also brings fortunes for other surrounding pushcarts selling orange juice and es cendol. Despite his hardened exterior with big moustache and occasional army camo outfit, Pak Endan is actually a nice person who would serve everyone nicely and is open for any questions. Not to mention of course, his mie kocok is also delicious, but no meatballs here though. It’s just a plain and straightforward affair between the noodles, the bean sprouts, and the sliced beef tendons with the thick beef broth and the crunchy kerupuk. Absolutely spot on, Pak Endan!

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You simply can’t call it a day in Bandung if you haven’t tried mie kocok. Pak Haji Endan’s version is definitely to die for.


TA K I N G I T TO T H E S T R E E T S

OPENING HOURS: Everyday from 7.30am – 6pm SPEND: IDR 15,000 – IDR 20,000 / person

MIE KOCOK PAK HAJI ENDAN | Jalan Kebon Jukut (in front of Kartika Sari), Bandung

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I CO N I C

TIZI by RIAN FARISA

For the older generation, Tizi is probably one of the places they would pick to spend a romantic dining experience in Bandung.

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he memory of visiting the leafy street of Kidang Pananjung during my youth, to visit my dentist or to have dinner at Tizi. By all means, the latter sure sounds more appealing and it’s also the reason why this dead end street deserves a visit. It’s not that hidden anyway but it sure is a good change of scenery from the busy Simpang Dago street and all the fuss it makes. Since my childhood memory remembers Tizi as a permanent resident of this street, I was shocked to know that the restaurant apparently existed since 1967 on a different place. Jalan Hegarmanah upon the different slope of Bandung used to be the original location, but they moved in Kidang Pananjung during the 80’s. During its golden age, Tizi has everything that nowadays restaurants would be envious of. Not only did it boast of hearty German dishes, but it also used to have its own bar and wine cellar. Additionally, Tizi has its own bakery that again, boasts German tradition with plenty of selections that you won’t normally see in usual bakeries. Despite the

disappearance of the bar and the wine cellar, Tizi remains as one of the most sought after heritage eateries in Bandung. Expect to be put in the waiting list especially if you’re planning to have dinner on weekends if you forget to reserve a table. The ambiance may be a contrast during night and day, but I chose lunchtime specifically just for the sake of really absorbing Tizi at its quietest time and pristine surroundings. Tizi’s hacienda-style architecture with a garden in-between the dining areas is a novelty that you won’t find anywhere else. Top that with Bandung’s cool breeze – it’s immaculate! Now that it’s time to talk about food, the one thing that comes in mind when visiting Tizi is to not miss their collection of sausages from bratwurst to lammwurst and their specialty dish – the schaschlik. The latter proved to best everything else in this restaurant especially when you’re having more than just one skewer – if you can handle the Germanic size by the way. One skewer of schaschlik comprises of grilled vegetables, a sausage, and a really

TIZI | Jalan Kidang Pananjung no. 3, Bandung | T: +62 22 250 4963

good yet smoky beef. Their secret sweet and savory barbecue sauce was more than just a complement for the delectable meat skewer. It’s clearly a high-prized dish best kept for your most memorable dinner here at Tizi. If you wish to seek something else from the menu, then you can always have your beef steak, ox tongue with mushroom sauce, or the juicy and flavorful wiener schnitzel. It will also be good to spend the togetherness with your family over a pizza or a relaxing high tea time with Tizi’s exquisite pastry collection from the magnificent apfel kuchen, Copenhagener and other Danish pastries, käse rolle, and many more. The seemingly timeless restaurant still stands proud and tall despite the competition and never loses its touch for decades. From the older generations to this day, we simply have the same opinion when it comes to Tizi. We form a belief that the legacy has to be preserved and that it’s always a must visit it from time to time. Tizi, you will always be in our hearts!

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A F O O DI E ’ S L I F E

NATALIA TANYADJI by ADITHYA PRATAMA

Amongst the high tide of modern hip food and beverage trends, Natalia Tanyadji sticks with her Sulawesi roots and preserves the tradition through Mama Toko Kue in Makassar.

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atalia Tanyadji is a serious sweet tooth that likes to run. I could always skip a meal as long as you give me sweets;” she admitted as we sat down for a coffee together, “and bread –please, give me bread anytime and I’ll be as happy as I can be.” It’s hard to believe that this eloquent, model-esque lady sitting in front of me is a true foodie with a serious passion towards local Indonesian sweet delights. Over the past three years, Natalia has helmed Mama Toko Kue in Makassar for their day-to-day service and production of kue-kue Bugis that never seems to end. It’s great to see someone so passionate about traditional food in the ever so developing city of Makassar. Mama Toko Kue started 14 years ago by Mama Mimi –Natalia’s mother, serving bread and traditional Bugis style snacks for small caterings. It was started very idealist simply because Mama Mimi loves to cook for her kids. “Even back then it was difficult to find good and authentic Bugis food;” commented Natalia, “you will find them in the pasar but the quality is just disappointing. Many had opted for flavorings and colorings to decrease the production cost and sell it at a cheaper price.” But then Mama Mimi thought differently. Why do we have to sacrifice the quality for price? Why can’t we compromise with the higher price for the market, but assuring them that the ingredients used are of a prime standard? And what about the people who dislike going to pasar? Will they not be able to try them if they do not go to the Twitter & Instagram: @nataliatanyadji

pasar? And therefore, Mama Toko Kue was started in 2000. Patience is one of the most important factors in making a good kue kue Bugis for Natalia. Many of these cakes are labor intensive and take time to produce, like Seruni for example. Seruni is a mochi-like sweet with sticky rice skin filled with durian and then shaped into a chrysanthemum flower –bunga seruni, individually prior to steaming. This alone can be a simple reason why one would opt to make modern cakes and pastries instead. “I did tried to set up a more modern pastry shop in Jakarta a couple of years ago, but we decided to close it down;” told Natalia, “apart from the fact that it is difficult to manage two places in different cities, it is also difficult to find good quality ingredients in Jakarta even though we had opted for a more modern approach. So we closed it and I moved back to Makassar and helped my mother run the show together.” Natalia uses no preservatives and colorings for their products –everything has to come naturally like pandan or suji leaves for green colors, hence making it a difficult task to comply when it comes to finding perfect ingredients for her standards and most of the time, it does not come cheap. Like Cucur Bayao for instance, the traditional Bugis cake simply calls for egg yolks, sugar and canary nuts flour. Often enough, a producer would replace the canary nuts with regular flour to –again, cut the cost, but Natalia even orders specific canary to be processed as needed by her. Mama Toko Kue has a signature product that is loved by many including William

Wongso himself; Bluder. The traditional cake was a hand down recipe from Natalia’s aunt, though it is not native Makassar but Bluder has a long history from Dutch-Peranakan ancestral in Indonesia. The cake uses tuak –Indonesian palm wine, as a rising agent and requires a delicate process while making it. “If the oven temperature is too low, it won’t rise. But if it gets over proofed, the cake sinks. If the tuak is too old, it also won’t rise;” explained Natalia, “so it takes a lot of patience to make it that the local Bugis people believe that if a girl can make Bluder and Pisang Ijo, then they are ready for marriage.” Not only does Mama Toko Kue sell traditional cakes, they also provide a range of dishes like lontong cap gomeh, bubur manado and Sate Makassar with beef that is marinated in belimbing wuluh to give a mild tang to the flavor. It is so rare that when Chef Vindex Tengker came to visit Mama Toko Kue, he was stunned. As for now, Natalia will focus on Makassar alone for business. As they have a strict control for ingredients quality, often enough Natalia and Mama Mimi would go to the market themselves to purchase the required produce including the palm sugar they specifically sourced from Bone in South Sulawesi. “This is the big difference of Indonesian food in comparison to the western style food and cakes in my opinion: ingredients source play a major role to affect the flavor. We often try to replace with a more easily sourced produce but the result will never be the same. That’s the whole reason we’re keeping the business strict to our family alone.”

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A F O O DI E ’ S L I F E

RENO ANDAM SURI by RIAN FARISA

Rendang is probably Indonesia’s most well known dish. Meet Reno Andam Suri, the Rendang Lady.

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n 2012, a group of aspiring graduate students from STP Trisakti organized Rendang Journey, a series of events to promote and appreciate Indonesian culinary world revolving around rendang as the main star. During the seminar at the Ministry of Tourism, I was utterly impressed with a book that explains rendang from a perspective never seen before. Yes, that’s when I first saw Reno Andam Suri, who was featured as one of the speakers, alongside her monumental work – The Rendang Traveler. Thoroughly researched but written casually, the book also boasts the beautiful presentation of the dishes as well as the landscape of West Sumatra. It ultimately lays the groundwork about the origins of rendang and its philosophical approach, but it also explains that ultimately, there are so many other varieties other than the one we usually have in Padang restaurants. On why she had to go through such lengths to document the whole thing was finally explained during our meet up quite

recently. Truth be told, the book was not the trigger for Reno Andam’s adventure with rendang. It was all started in 2004 with the foundation of her home food business Rendang Uni Farah, named after her eldest daughter. As we all know, most Padang households usually have good home cooks and the knowledge passing technique inspired many of them to start their own businesses. “However, much to my dismay, people are only interested in talking more about the flavors but not about the story behind rendang. That’s when I decided to pour in my energy to create this book”, explains Reno. While she also personally financed the whole project, Reno wanted to cover many areas previously unheard of about rendang and she shares the story from a perspective of a traveler. The book gained good recognition locally and even Mari Elka Pangestu, the previous minister of tourism, asked her to start the English version. However, long story short, the book was not warmly received by international publishers because rendang for them is considered to be a highly specialized subject

RENDANG UNI FARAH | Kompleks Ciledug Indah, Jalan Pelangi Blok A6/100, Tangerang | T: +62 21 730 8515 www.rendangunifarah.com

and they needed more than just that. While it may seem like a double standard if one compares it to books exclusively talking only about kimchi or tom yum for example, but quite seemingly, it’s because that rendang has not yet reached the desirable prestige on international scale and that it may need more time for us and the government to work on that. Writer to writer, I was quite curious on how she does her writing projects while keeping the balance of family life and business at the same time. “Of course, family comes first and it’s a good thing that I can now delegate the rendang business to my employees. So, after I take care of my family in the morning, the me time is usually filled with writing and sometimes I go out by myself to the cinema”, she confesses and was in fact, already planning to watch Interstellar after the interview. Of course, I asked about what she’s writing currently. “Hopefully, this will become a trilogy. I’m currently working on stuff about nasi kapau and sweets from Padang. Wish me luck for that!” exclaims Reno excitingly. Good luck, Uni Reno!

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CO N F E S S IO N S O F A F O O DI E

Bayu Amus by RIAN FARISA photographs by RIAN FARISA AND BAYU AMUS’ PERSONAL COLLECTION

Bayu Amus and his blog, www.epicurina.com continue to showcase Bali’s vast growing food and beverage scene.

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here was a time when people were not yet familiar with blogging and those were the days when social media was hardly a term that we knew well, let alone utilize it to express ourselves. Back then, mailing list groupies led the way to contemporary citizen journalism. Moving out from the familiar taste of Bandung street food to Jakarta was a culture shock for Bayu Amus. He and fellow other Bandung migrants (including myself years after he first moved to Jakarta) were under the impression that our hometown street food is better than in the capital J. Therefore as a true foodie, he decided to gather around with other migrants from Bandung to discuss on where to eat, about the taste, the price, and other basic aspects that we like to talk about food. Until one day he decided to start a mailing list groupie that goes with the name Epicurina. During its zenith, Epicurina reached as many as 300 followers from many professions and did more than just discussion. They also held trips outside of town with one sole purpose: to eat! However, as the era of mailing list wanes, Bayu decided to express himself more rewardingly by starting his own blog with the same name. The reason was also driven by the facts that neighboring bloggers from Singapore and Malaysia were gaining the high ground on promoting rendang on

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Google pages. “It’s no matter where rendang came from originally for many people especially when they found out that the early pages of Google search indicate that Malaysia has the upper hand on promoting it. That’s why I felt the urge to include Indonesia as well on that list and that can only come true if I start to seriously blog about our food”, he says with conviction. “Not only that, I’d like to show the world also that our country is a culinary destination as well. From time to time, our international restaurants reach the top chart in awards such as from Miele Guide for example. That clearly shows something”, Bayu then continues. Although he’s now exposed to the rich culinary scene in Bali while working there as a user experience consultant for an international IT company, he cannot hide the fact that his Sundanese blood requires him to enjoy the beloved nasi tutug oncom with dendeng kere. “That’s what I always like to have whenever I come to visit my family in Garut. But if you ask me on what to pick from the street food, I’d love to have mie ayam from time to time”, confesses Bayu. Apparently that’s not all as Bayu confesses on something else more sinful, “I rarely have this anymore now but back then, I’d love to have a bowl of Indomie added with milk and mayonnaise with meatballs and sausage!”


CO N F E S S IO N S O F A F O O DI E

BAYU AMUS | www.epicurina.com | instagram and Twitter: @epicurina

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M AYA ’ S M U S I N G

A CAUSE FOR OUR HEROES by MAYA ALDY

Chef Maya Aldy shares her two cents worth about fresh produce and how we should rally the cause to appreciate the farmers.

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iving life as a professional chef and restaurant owner, having fresh produce and ingredients in the kitchen all the time would be a treasure. However, in real life, sometimes we are forced to accept the products that are easily available. Acquiring good produce is no easy task and in order to have that, working with the farmers closely is the answer. Back when I was working in the US and Bali, communicating your needs with local farmers was much easier than in Jakarta. By having a good relationship with them, they can supply your needs with a standard that your restaurant expects. This relationship can also go as far as commissioning farmers to plant customized crops to suit our need. Additionally, creating an online forum that connects farmers and chefs or restaurant owners is a huge step that we can consider to work on. It would be a great thing to have a medium where we can directly interact with the farmers or between the chefs as well. It’s like looking for a yoga teacher that suits your budget and style, so why can’t we make it between the farmers and us as well? A forum between chefs can be interesting as well because we can share a lot of things that will surely empower us in many ways. So, at the end of the day, if we can have happy farmers who are proud of what they produce, we’ll all end up having great food and become merry as well. What more can you ask for? Of course there are many steps and hardship to reach this. I believe that we should appreciate these food heroes who nurture us every day. Hopefully, my two cents here would be something that helps our cause and serve as a spark that ignites everything. This is my dream, and I hope this can be yours as well. I salute the hardworking farmers and producers who make my life as a chef exciting and interesting. Until next time,

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Instagram and Twitter: @maya _ aldy | E: maya _ aldy@otellobby.com


M AYA ’ S M U S I N G

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TRIED AND TESTED

W EBBER >< T H E FOODIE

Celebratory Beef Roulade

by JED DOBLE photographs by MELANIE TANUSETIAWAN

Celebrating the bounty of fresh produce, Chef Christian Bruhns, chef-ambassador and product developer of Webber Kitchen Appliances, shares his recipe for Beef Roulade.

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hef Christian Bruhns has had a storied career working in hotels and restaurants in his native Germany, through many countries around the

world. Chef Christianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for food and cooking started when he was just 6 years old, helping his mother in the kitchen and baking cakes. At the age of 16 he decided to make his dream come true and started working in various restaurants in Germany to learn the trade, gain experience and move up the ladder. Another passion of Chef Christian is travel. This second passion gained fulfillment when he joined the world famous cruise liner MS Europe in 1993. Upon boarding the ship, his culinary journey started. During six months at sea Christian had the opportunity to literally go around the world and discover many countries. After his tenure on the cruise liner, Chef Christian had the option to return home, but the travel bug had bit him, so he started to work in South Africa, where he stayed for three years, before moving to Dubai for a year. Next Chef Christian decided to return to Europe, he started to work in Manchester, joining the Hilton family. After 14 months, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, joining the landmark The Drake hotel in Chicago. After spending two years in the Windy City, Christian decided that it was time for a bit of sun and sea, so he moved to Puerto Rico, where he spent three years at the Caribe Hilton. After these years in the Americas, Chef Christian craved for other experiences and Asia beckoned. He took on the executive sous chef position at the Hilton Shanghai, the first five star hotel to open in the gateway

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Chinese city. Here he learned not only about Chinese food and its versatile ingredients but also experienced a totally different world of culture, tradition and lifestyle. After a few years in China and moved to other properties, Christian joined the Hilton Petaling Jaya. Here he learned about the delicious melting pot flavors of India, China, Indonesia and Malaysia. His most recent hotel post, at the St. Regis Singapore, he was executive chef, looking after six food and beverage outlets and over 1,000 square meters of banquet

space. Chef Christian recently visited Jakarta and shared with us his recipe for a German classic. The Beef Roulade is commonly made from inexpensive cuts of meat to go along with the components inside. Chef Christian also shares his recipe for stewed root vegetables and also recommends pairing the roulade with sauteed mushrooms and celeriac puree or mashed potato as the perfect companion. You may also put a dollop of sour cream to give the dish a mild tangy finish.


B R O U G H T TO Y O U B Y W E B B E R

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TRIED AND TESTED

BRAISED BEEF ROULADE WITH SAUTテ右D ROOT VEGETABLES Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS: 1600 gr 8 tsp 8 pcs 1 pc 160 gr 100 ml 100 gr 100 gr 100 gr 40 gr 50 gr 80 gr 80 gr 80 gr 80 gr 50 gr 80 ml 10 gr 5 pcs

Beef rump, portion into 8 pcs Dijon mustard Back bacon, sliced White onion, diced Pickles, cut into strips Sunflower seed oil Carrots, diced Celeriac, diced White onion Garlic, crushed Leeks Pumpkin, diced Parsley root, diced Carrot, diced Sweet potato, diced Tomato paste Red wine Black peppercorn Bay leaves Salt and pepper, to season

STEPS mustard and fill with 1-2 tablespoon of diced onion, 2 strips of pickles and bacon.

with a string.

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B R O U G H T TO Y O U B Y W E B B E R

roulade. Set aside. vegetables, onions, leeks with tomato paste in the same saucepan. pepper.

sautĂŠed vegetables on top. tender. Season if needed.

Webber SE470103EX - 60cm Multifunction Electric Oven Enjoyable Cooking! This 70L Webber Oven offers up to 25% more space than conventional 60cm ovens, the spacious interior means you can prepare larger food quantity with better cooking results thanks to better air circulation. The EnamelKleen special grey coating is scratch resistant & designed to withstand chemical erosion like lemon juices, etc. Each roasting and grill pan are also treated with the same protective coating to make your oven cavity and cooking accessories looking new and clean! Perfect cooking results... With 10 multi cooking functions. you can be assured of seamless and effortless cooking by selecting the ideal cooking function on a Webber oven! Functions like the Double Grilling + Fan allows top & bottom heat combined with fan for even cooking, also suitable for roasting your meat together with vegetables or different food items together. Packed with features such as Pyrolytic self cleaning, Touch Controls and Digital Timer to keep track of your cooking, you will be suitably impressed with the perfect cooking results. For more information on stockists, visit Webber Gallery today! WEBBER GALLERY Jakarta Design Centre Jl. Gatot Subroto Kav. 53 7th Floor, Jakarta 10260 Tel: +62 210536077702 marketing@kitchenatelier.co.id

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NILA WATI – UBUD’S PURVEYOR OF WELLNESS by ADITHYA PRATAMA photographs by AKI

Through the ups and downs of life, Ibu Nila Wati sailed through and landed herself in the abundance of Sari Organik. She shared her life story with The Foodie Magazine and her values in standing proud against the hard knock life.


STUFF OF LEGEND

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s the mecca for those tranquil seekers and healthier lifestyle doers, Ubud has transformed herself from the artsy artist village to a wellness center of Bali with arrays of organic restaurants, raw food providers as well as yoga and meditation centers sprouting up over the past four years. But the story of organic and healthier crops went far beyond that for Ibu Nila Wati –the founder of Sari Organik in Ubud. For many, Sari Organik is considered as a hideout. Located 800 meters away from Jalan Raya Ubud, Sari Organik’s restaurant; Bodag Maliah, provides an all-day dining with ingredients taken from Ibu Nila’s very own gardens housed in a quaint wooden house over a lush green subak –Balinese style rice field, that were grown organically by Ibu Nila herself. “These rice below us right now is one of the first crops that I grew out here myself,” Reminisce Ibu Nila; “From then until now, I still uses compost and natural fertilizers instead of those chemical ones.” Long before her day starting up Sari Organik, Ibu Nila went through a hard knock life. Coming from a poor family, she had to move from one village to another during her childhood. It was not until the age of 12 when she decided to be independent and head out of the village to Denpasar to support her family for three years. At the age of 15, she left the island and opted for Java; Surabaya and Jakarta, without being able to speak in Bahasa Indonesia for she did not attend any school. Life in Jakarta was not a breeze for her. Without any education and work experience, Ibu Nila did any job that she could possibly find; from carrying heavy goods at Pasar Senen at the dawn to being a bus conductor and even a construction worker. She did all that with her hair cut short and scarf on her neck to disguise herself as a man. “Sometimes, I would help the fruit vendors or the warung owners in exchange for a little bit of fruits or rice for me to eat,” told Ibu Nila; “simply because I could not afford to buy anything to eat, life was really hard back then.” In year 2000, she moved back to Bali for her mother and tried to find a job in Ubud. She then met an American who lived at the area where Sari Organik is right now that offered her a housemaid position but with a small salary. She mentioned that money was not a big issue, but if allowed, she would like to get free boarding and meals for the

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family too. The American agreed. While working there, she noticed that the farmers sprayed pesticides at the fields. In the beginning, she thought it was salt. But why do they use salt for the field? And why does the fume makes it difficult for her to breath? Also, she found out that there are no longer any snails or eels around the subak. She then figured that it was pesticides used to grow the crops faster and keep away the pests. “I did not realize that it has become so modern now,” thought Ibu Nila; “I am pretty sure that spray cannot be good for the food that will eventually be eaten. I don’t even take MSG, let alone these hard chemicals used. So I thought of something else.” She approached the landlord and asked for a piece of land in that area to grow her own crop. At the beginning, the landlord was skeptical about Ibu Nila and thinking that she would not be able to take care of it herself. “Don’t take it wrong! I’m not orang kota –city person, I’m an orangutan!” joked Ibu Nila to the landlord; “I was raised in a village full of farmers, so of course I know how to take care of a garden.” Ibu Nila then started growing her own crops at a piece of land that she divided into a rice field and a garden –both organically. Not only did she grow it all herself, but she also went from farm to farm to gather all the manure needed for fertilizers. Apart from taking care of it, Ibu Nila also did small caterings and cooking classes in Ubud –teaching mostly Indonesian and Balinese food, to make a living. Ibu Nila admitted that through the first seven years, the farm did not make any money and even some of the leftovers vegetable had to be turned back into compost. Many thinks that her pricing is expensive due to the organic labor that went into it. Although many farmers had given up due to this, Ibu Nila insisted on continuing with one simple reason: faith. “I don’t ever feel like I’m losing anything from all these, for I believe that if I feel that I’m making a loss then I will eventually make more loss,” explained Ibu Nila wisely; “but if you have the thought that you are benefitting not only monetarily, I believe that the blessings will continue. Remember that God do listens to every single word that we say.” And then in 2005, Bodag Maliah was opened. A humble hut with banana leaves and plastic as a roof was built as Ibu Nila leased out a space for a restaurant next

to Sari Organik –the farm. The name Bodag Maliah translates into “an overflowing basket”, it came coincidentally two days prior to the opening as a lady came to Ibu Nila offering a basket full of chilies that it overflows. Ibu Nila wants the place to provide good blessings that it will overflow not only for her but also for other people who work for her and even for those who come to visit Bodag Maliah. Through the restaurant and the farm, Ibu Nila wants to educate people about farming and eating properly without any chemical additives in it. “The growth was slow but steady –there never was an empty day at Bodag Maliah,” said Ibu Nila; “from only four girls who helped me waited the tables then, now I have many staffs that help, not only for service, but also in the kitchen –and look, the guests are also here over flowingly; Maliah” followed by a big grin on her face. She never had a recipe at Bodag Maliah, almost everything on the menu came from a combination of her creative hands and –sometimes, leftover scraps. Ibu Nila made do with whatever she had from the farm, be it vegetables, fruits and even a mere lemongrass that she turned into a drink simply by combining it with lemon, honey and ginger. The nasi campur at Bodag Maliah always came with a surprise depending on the ingredients availability and Ibu Nila’s creativity. “I had to learn everything by simply doing it, even for things like raw food that were specifically ordered by a group. I am happy enough that I was able to feed them and fulfill their needs of raw food –plus served them dessert with a raw coconut chocolate ball!” Ibu Nila believes in simplicity of life. Through this urban setting, sometimes people often forget the beauty of nature and its clarity of tradition that will keep a harmonious life amongst us. “Everyday I will begin my day with prayer: may the blessings and favors that we get today be mesari –truthful, melia – glorified, just like Your name and that I can also continue this blessings for many others and grace me with a bright and positive mind and do not let the negativity affect me throughout the day,” shared her as we bid farewell to a beautiful soul that we have just spent nearly two hours talking to around the gorgeous setting of her paddy that has been overflowing and growing abundantly –just like the way she prayed for in her entire life.


STUFF OF LEGEND

WARUNG BODAG MALIAH | Subak Sok Wayah, Ubud, Bali | T: +62 361 972 087 | E: sari-organik@hotmail.com

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PA N T R Y 1 0 1

HOME GROWN PRODUCE by KYLE GREGORIO

SPRING ONIONS

TOMATOES

PEAS

Spring onions tend to be treated as an afterthought by most gardening books yet they are a popular crop and very useful, possibly because they are really easy to grow. Salad onions, also properly called scallions are not just easily grown; they can provide a useful substitute for bulb onions if stocks are low as you await the new crop. When growing spring onions youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see that they have slightly rounded bulbs that are more defined and larger than the slender scallion onions. Spring onions can be used raw or cooked. Because raw spring onions are pungent, taste to make sure their flavor does not overpower more delicate flavors.

It would be hard to imagine any home garden that did not have at least a few tomato plants. Tomatoes are considered by many to be the most prized vegetable in the garden. Tomato plants can be started indoors from seed four to seven weeks before they are to be planted. Transplants can also be purchased from a garden center, ready to plant immediately. If starting your own plants from seed, use a light soil mix and give the plants plenty of light. You may need to use supplemental light if a south-facing sunny window is not available for growing.

Peas are a cool-season crop, now coming in three separate varieties to suit your garden and cooking needs. They are: Pisum savitum, which includes both garden peas (sweet pea, inedible pod) and snow peas (edible flat pod with small peas inside) and Pisum macrocarpon, snap peas (edible pod with full-size peas). They are easy to grow, but with a very limited growing season. Furthermore, they do not stay fresh long after harvest, so enjoy them while you can.


PA N T R Y 1 0 1

Wouldn’t it be nice and healthy to be able to grown your own produce in your backyard? Here are some you can easily plant and use for your dishes.

POTATOES

BEETROOT

ONIONS AND GARLIC

Potatoes are one of those mystery crops that develop out of sight, underground. The potatoes we eat are starchy tubers that grow under ground, swelling and getting larger as the top half of the plant matures. The humble potato can be very finicky to grow, because of pest and disease problems. Potatoes are relatively inexpensive to purchase, but growing your own is the best way to ensure they will not have been exposed to excessive chemicals to offset their growing problems. Plus you’ll have a lot more varieties to choose from.

A favorite in 1970’s British salads (served cooked and pickled in vinegar), beetroot is a root vegetable with dark, purple skin and pink/purple flesh. Beetroot is a close relative of spinach and chard and has an earthy flavor and a good nutritional content - it’s also reckoned to be a good detoxifier. Beetroot grows best in wellprepared, humus-rich soil, which is well drained. You can produce good crops in the heavy soils of the Canberra region, provided you ensure drainage is good.

Onions and garlic are among the easiest garden vegetables to grow and add some of the best flavors to your kitchen. They’re also some of the most rewarding because they store well. That means you can enjoy the fruits of your labor for months after harvest. Onions are cool- season vegetables and some of the first to appear in garden centers in the second quarter of the year. As soon as the soil is workable, you can plant onions. Plant garlic middle of the year; wait until the cool weather lay on them so the plants won’t send up shoots before late in the year. Split individual cloves off the bulbs and plant them with the sharp tip pointed upward. When the leaves start to turn brown, plants should be nearly ready to harvest. Like onions, you should keep the tops on while the garlic cures.


W H AT C H E F E AT S

YUSUF YARAN by RIAN FARISA

“My family always knew that I would become a chef one day,” says Chef Yusuf Yaran and here’s the story as he savors his favorite meal in a Chinese restaurant!

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ithin the hierarchy of a hotel or restauranmt kitchen, there will always be someone who gets to be the bubbly one. At Shangri-La Hotel Jakarta, that role belongs to this Turkish chef. Being the hotel’s Executive Sous Chef, Yusuf has many things to be proud of. He is apparently the tenth generation of a long ancestry line of chefs from Bolu Mengen, a small town nearby Istanbul designated as the capital of chefs during the height of the Ottoman Empire. “During the Ottoman period, The Topkapi Palace in Istanbul entrusted the role of royal chefs for the best from Bolu Mengen. My family preserves that heritage and that’s why I knew that I was destined to become a chef,” says Yusuf. Having excelled in Turkish cuisine, Chef Yusuf embarked on an international spell to further hone his skills and tutored under many famous chefs in France. He then joined the Shangri-La Hotel group and enjoyed the past several years in the Far East: including China, the Philippines and now Indonesia. “My tenure at Pudong Shangri-La introduced me to this amazing creation, xiao long bao. I was simply impressed with how delicate it is and that it requires a lot of cooking skill to make it perfect. I fell in love with it since then,” reminisces the chef. “On my recent visit to Turkey, I decided to make xiao long bao for my family dinner filling it with ground lamb instead. Everybody loved it!” he says while getting his chopsticks ready for his third dumpling.

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Profile for Bold Prints

The Foodie Magazine - January 2015  

The new year brings us plenty of new opportunities and together with is a bounty of fresh produce. We decided to not go with cliché theme o...

The Foodie Magazine - January 2015  

The new year brings us plenty of new opportunities and together with is a bounty of fresh produce. We decided to not go with cliché theme o...

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