Page 1

BOISE WEEKLY J U LY 1 5 – 2 1 , 2 0 1 5

LOCA L A N D I N DE PE N DE N T

“An attack on the king’s man is an attack on the king.”

7

Jailhouse Rocked

Sources claim a ‘cancer’ inside Department of Correction led to widespread records tampering

9

Top Cop Talks

Chief Bill Bones goes on the record about his vision for BPD

VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 0 4

NEWS 7

17

Olé, Olé, Olé

Boise gears up for the first ever Basque Soccer Friendly

FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com Associate Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, Tara Morgan, John Rember Interns: Patty Bowen, Micah Drew, Shannon Heller, Justin Kirkham, Hannah Loveless, Emily Peters, Keleah Pinto, Sarah Rosin Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Buzz Valutis, buzz@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Marketing Intern: Stacy Marston Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Jeremy Lanningham, James Lloyd, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2015 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

EDITOR’S NOTE CRIME AND PUNISHMENT This is the “crime and punishment” edition of Boise Weekly. Through a series of coincidences, we found a fair bit of our coverage this week hinging on cops, courts and prisons. On Page 7, Boise Weekly News Editor George Prentice continues reporting on the growing scandal surrounding Idaho prison officials’ handling—or, according to some, mishandling—of inmates’ medical records. The story has been floating in the ether for months, with hints appearing in the news in February and references to untoward dealings in the steady stream of letters flowing into BWHQ from prisoners at the Idaho State Correctional Institution. Controversy isn’t new to Idaho prisons, but this most recent round of allegations—that high ranking members of the Idaho Department of Correction systematically altered and/or destroyed prisoner records in order to skirt court-ordered investigations— threaten to spread to higher and higher levels of government. Where it will stop, nobody knows, but it starts with a hearing in federal court on Wednesday, July 22. Read Prentice’s report for a glimpse of who knew what and when they knew it. Also on Page 7, staff writer Harrison Berry provides an update on the continuing effort to ensure civilian oversight of the Boise Police Department. It has been two years—to the month—since longtime former Boise Community Ombudsman Pierce Murphy left for a similar job in Seattle, but his office still hasn’t been officially filled. An interim, part-time ombudsman retired in April, and now a staffer is keeping the seat warm. Meanwhile, the Boise City Council voted July 7 to change the department name to the Office of Police Oversight and limit the job to part-time. Berry checks in with the ACLU, Murphy and his former interim replacement to find out what that means. Finally, on Page 10, we’re devoting almost three pages to a wide-ranging conversation with BPD Chief William “Bill” Bones, who took the department’s reins from former Chief Mike Masterson at the beginning of the year. Talking with Prentice, Bones covers everything from use-of-force and body cameras, to diversity on the force and policing in the 21st century. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST

Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Grant Olsen TITLE: “This Has Always Been Where” MEDIUM: Digital ARTIST STATEMENT: I am asking how much one iconic shape can take before it is fundamentally altered.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each

week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

BIG DIG A N A RC HEOLOGICA L DIG AT THE HISTORIC HAYMA N HOU SE NE A R RIVER STREE T IN BOISE HA S YIELDED A TROVE OF A RTIFACTS FROM ITS A LM O ST 100-YE A R HISTORY. A TOTA L OF 10,000 ITEM S WERE DU G U P AT THE SITE OF THE STONE HOU SE, LOCATED AT 617 A SH ST., WHIC H WA S BU ILT IN 1907. M ORE ON NE WS/CIT YDESK .

KEGS FOR KERRY

Kerry Thomas, head brewer at Edge Brewing Co., suffered major burns in a work accident on July 10. While she’s recovering, a fundraiser has been set for Saturday, July 18. See News/Citydesk.

EUSKADI

On Monday, July 20, Boise will become the only city in the U.S. with a Basque preschool. That’s when Boiseko Ikastola, a Basque language school, will move to its new digs. See News/Citydesk.

BLUE CHIP?

A Chinese microchip company is eyeing the purchase of Micron Technology in a reported $23 billion deal that has sent the Boise-based chip maker’s stock soaring. Details on News/Citydesk.

OPINION

4 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


OPINION PREZ-DICTIONS All the lite we cannot see... yet BILL COPE We agree that midsummer is an unusual time for a list of predictions. However, upon learning that the first GOP presidential debate is a mere three weeks away, Nostril Bill fell into a trance-like state, not unlike what happens to him any time his wife turns on one of those Hallmark movies. When he came out of it some two hours later—just in time for dinner, cryptically—he reported having had one vision after another, fleeting images of these familiar (and some not-so-familiar) faces struggling through the Sisyphean task of trying to balance conservative dogma with acceptable human behavior. He feels that whatever it was he saw must be shared with the public, lest they enter the coming season unprepared. Incidentally, while the debate sponsors insist on limiting the number of participants to the top 10 contenders, Nostril Bill’s revelation must not omit any of the declared candidates, no matter their lowly polling status. Unlike Fox News, he doesn’t feel it’s his place to decide for the American people who’s worth paying attention to. ••• • In the days leading to the debate, Jeb Bush tries different clothing combinations on focus groups, hoping to find the right ensemble that will influence viewers into thinking of him as “the adult on the stage.” In a decision that will be discussed for decades, he will go with a plaid bow-tie, locking up the Tucker Carlson/George Will vote... if no one else. • Minutes before the debate begins, Carly Fiorina is backstage, getting some final coaching from a member of her staff, when Donald Trump lurches up and demands, “Listen sweetheart, fetch me a cup of coffee, chop chop! Cream, three sugars, in a real mug. No cheap styrofoam, savvy?” • During the barrage of opening statements, somehow or other, George Pataki is passed by. He will protest his omission at the first opportunity to speak and is promised a three-minute slot as soon as the closing statements have been made. That will be the last thing the television audience sees—poor George delivering his opening statement as the crowd files out. • The in-hall audience repeatedly violates the request of debate moderators to hold their applause every time Chris Christie tells another of the candidates to “Sit down and shut up!” • Bobby Jindal sits down and shuts up. • Determined not to have the same trouble with dry mouth that plagued him during his rebuttal to the 2013 State of the Union address, Marco Rubio will arrange for a 32-ounce Big Gulp filled with ice water and a straw to be positioned on the podium before him. Unfortunately, the only straw his staffer will find is a curly, pink B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

novelty straw like little kids play with when their moms gives them fruit juice. Even worse, the same staffer will have overloaded the container with ice and Rubio will go through all the liquid water in the first few minutes of the debate, leaving nothing but slowly melting cubes. Throughout the remainder of the event, the moderators and other debaters will be continuously distracted by that raspy gurgle sound of small amounts of water being sucked through a straw as Rubio desperately tries to keep his mouth hydrated. • In a theatrical maneuver to take viewers back to what he considers his finest hour—the effort to shut down the United States government— Ted Cruz will once again perform the Winston Churchill “I will never surrender” speech, this time sounding even more like his testicles are being gnawed on by a weasel. • Whatever points Scott Walker will score during the debate will be entirely overshadowed by the impression that his eyes are crossed. • When asked his views on what should be done with the Confederate “Stars and Bars” flag, Rand Paul will reaffirm his previous statement that it should be relegated to a museum— ”Unless,” he adds,”it was also shown to be a symbol of the free market’s sacred right to refuse service to the descendants of slaves.” • Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson uses the debate as an opportunity to announce that he identifies 110 percent as Caucasian, and that it is only because of the brave example of “transracial” activist Rachel Dolezal that he has decided to come out in such a public way. “A person should be judged by the color of his heart, not by the color of his skin,” Carson explains. “And believe me, my heart is whiter than anyone’s up here.” • Mike Huckabee will ramp the pious to new levels with a lapel pin depicting Jesus on a combination cross/flag pole with Old Glory waving proudly over the Son of God’s anguished head. • In a move to capture the conservative Catholic demographic, Rick Santorum suggests that Pope Francis should be impeached. • Rick Perry thanks the organizers for providing air conditioning in the hall, saying, “Look, ya’ll, this time I’m not sweating like a pig,” to which Chris Christie—who is sweating like a pig—replies, “Sit down and shut up!” • When it’s over, as Pataki is trying to make his opening statement and the wives of the candidates gather around their mates, John McCain will join Lindsey Graham on stage, swaying armin-arm to the strains of “We Are Fam-i-ly.” The next day, Sister Sledge will sue the Republican Central Committee to stop them from ever using the song again. BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 5


OPINION PUPPIES AND GUNS Parsing the Second Amendment JOHN REMBER The big news around our house is the new puppy. Her name is Juno. She’s a mix of Australian shepherd and blue heeler. She’s part of a rescued litter, which means she wouldn’t be here but for the kindness and salvation of a young woman who bottle-fed her and her litter-mates for the first six weeks of their lives. Juno already knows two words: “Juno” and “Come,” although she only knows the latter when you’ve got a bit of fried chicken skin in your hand. We’re hoping in time she’ll understand full sentences. “Don’t bite,” and “Please poop outside,” are two we’re working on. Of course, we want her to follow the examples of her new parents and learn to read, write and act in dramatic productions. Thus far, she’s chewed the covers off the books and plays we’ve given her. “It’s only a phase,” I say. “All English majors go through it.” What? Of course she’s going to be an English major. I want her to use words correctly. I don’t want her to be wordy, or vague, or to get in stupid arguments with cocker spaniels or pit bulls about the meaning of the Second Amendment. Which brings me to an overwhelming question: Why is it that presidents persist in appointing lawyers to the Supreme Court instead of writing professors? Lately we’ve been subjected to Justice Scalia’s tantrums about the court’s decisions on Obamacare and same-sex marriages. Scalia has attacked his colleagues’ use of language, although they were clever enough to use previous Scalia opinions to buttress their own. In unkind moments, I think that Scalia has spent most of his life thinking he’s the smartest guy in the room, and when confronted with evidence to the contrary, he starts snarling and foaming at the mouth. Anyway, he’s claiming that language has lost its ability to define reality through what he calls “jiggery-pokery,” which is his phrase for good old sophistry, the ability to make words mean anything you want them to mean. Whenever a lawyer goes out on that particular limb, border collies and other connoisseurs of irony prick up their ears and start howling. As a lover of language, I like the sound of “jiggery-pokery,” but if a student used it in a story or essay, I’d make him stop. It’s an archaic Scottish phrase for prevarication. When Richard Nixon said, “I am not a crook,” or when Bill Clinton said, “It depends on what the meaning of is is,” or when Idaho Sen. Larry Craig said, “I have a wide stance,” you could call it jiggery-pokery. But even a golden retriever would recognize all these as flat-out lies, a term which is more precise and one that lacks the perverse shepherding connotations 6 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

to which archaic Scottish is prone. I’ll get around to the Second Amendment, but first let’s look at Scalia’s description of his colleagues’ language as “applesauce.” He doesn’t mean pureed apples. He means something a lot like puppy poop, especially if the puppy has been eating too many fried chicken-skin treats. He’s being rude, and is sullying the dignity of his office. He avoids the phrase “puppy poop,” however, because his is a dissembling rudeness, one he can deny if confronted about it. As a writing professor and new puppy parent, I can say that many of the objections to Obamacare—including Scalia’s—really are the verbal equivalent of puppy poop, and that the organizations generating them need to clean up after their dogs and maybe avoid walking on other people’s clean carpets. Of course, much of Obamacare is puppy poop also, seeing as it’s the desperate resuscitation of a dying and corrupt health care system that will bankrupt this country unless it is mercifully euthanized. So: The Second Amendment states, “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” It’s a sentence with an independent clause, which is “the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” The militia clause is subordinate, and only one of many that could support the independent clause. “Arms being necessary for self defense,” or “In order to prevent the formation of a police state,” or “Equality before the law being an iffy proposition,” are all subordinate clauses that could have begun the Second Amendment without altering the meaning of “the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” The Supreme Court in 1939 was wrong to interpret the militia clause as having any bearing on the types of arms people could have. If you want to change America’s relationship with firearms you have to change the independent clause in the Second Amendment. That’s my opinion as a writing professor and grammarian, and I’m sticking to it. It doesn’t matter that the public stands in relation to guns as it stood in relation to tuberculosis before antibiotics. It doesn’t matter that opposition to insuring poor people in this country stems in part from their disproportionate number of catastrophic gun injuries. It doesn’t matter that gun narratives are not narratives of kindness and salvation. It doesn’t matter that there’s a lot of puppy poop around these issues, some of it quite literal, and I’m spending time, these beautiful summer mornings, trying to clean it up. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


NEWS

CITYDESK

IDAHO’S PRISON SCANDAL ESCALATES How far up IDOC’s org chart will it climb? GEORGE PRENTICE

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

dedicated IDOC staff are afraid to speak out,” he wrote. “But the verbal cracks are spreading, far afield of the original Balla issues. The [July 22] hearing looms; and people with firsthand knowledge are moving beyond fear to the truth.” “Balla” is Walter Balla, and fear and truth had everything to do with his decades-long class action lawsuit against IDOC, dating back to the 1980s. The resulting lawsuit, Balla vs. Idaho, triggered U.S. Chief District Judge B. Lynn Winmill and U.S. Judge David Carter to order a so-called “special master” to have unfettered access to the prison and its records during on-site investigations. Seattle-based Dr. Marc Stern was assigned

ADAM RO SENLUN D

The wheels are quickly turning in a case against the state of Idaho, which alleges prison officials altered and/or destroyed medical records in an effort to “taint” a federally mandated probe of the prison’s mental health unit. “I hope [U.S. Chief District] Judge Lynn Winmill tears the roof off the place and sends a team of forensic auditors into the prison,” said Boisebased attorney Andrew Schoppe, representing a former clinician-turned-whistleblower. “I think it’s just a matter of time for us to see who on the inside of the Department of Correction will turn state’s evidence first and starts telling everything.” Drawing on court documents, including depositions from clinicians and IDOC officials, Boise Weekly reported July 8 on how six inmates are preparing to testify in federal court that their medical records—some requesting they be diagnosed with gender identity disorder—were tampered with in order to save the state having to provide treatment. The allegations don’t end there. “Your report was shocking. I’m presuming that the court and the special master are furious,” said Amy Whelan, senior attorney for the National Center for Lesbian Rights, a public interest law firm that advocates for equitable public policies affecting LGBT communities. “The allegations are so egregious, it’s clear that Idaho needs to nip this in the bud,” she said. “Otherwise, I wouldn’t be terribly surprised if the U.S. Justice Department wants to investigate this.” The case also caught the attention of at least one Idaho lawmaker. “I had a range of emotions, from shock to anger, when I read your report,” said Idaho House Rep. Melissa Wintrow, a member of the House Judiciary, Rules and Administration Committee. “I plan to speak with the Idaho attorney general’s office. I’ve got a lot of questions.” The most telling reaction to BW’s investigation came from someone who, up until a few months ago, was responsible for the integrity of information recorded and disseminated at IDOC. His comments echoed those of other inside sources who, on more than one occasion, told BW of a “cancer” inside IDOC. “This is no surprise,” Michael Chacon, IDOC business analyst from May 2012 to April 2015, wrote in a prepared statement. “Top IDOC leadership has been informed of this behavior many times, and their squelching of information remains alive and well. It is sad that exceptionally

by the court to be that special master. According to allegations in the upcoming hearing, Stern’s investigations have been repeatedly compromised by IDOC officials. Brian Fariss, a six-year veteran of IDOC who served as the psychiatric treatment coordinator and correctional manager at the Idaho State Correctional Institution, said in a sworn deposition that IDOC had deliberately moved some inmates out of the mental health unit and into the prison yard, thus giving them no access to Stern and “putting inmates who needed mental health services at risk.” Additionally, a number of IDOC clinicians testified in depositions that “dry cells” routinely

used to punish prisoners—so named because they have no running water and a hole in the floor for use as a toilet—were temporarily shut down during Stern’s visits. Stern later told attorneys he was under the impression that he had free access to inmates and records during his investigations. “The special master is the ambassador of the judge. So, you treat him like the judge. You don’t lie to the special master,” said Schoppe. “An attack on the king’s man is an attack on the king.” Schoppe represents former IDOC clinician Diana Canfield, who has testified that her then-supervisor, Shell Wamble-Fisher, who rose through IDOC’s ranks to become a deputy warden, altered or even scrubbed medical notes Canfield had entered into prisoners’ health records. WambleFisher will retire from her post, effective Aug. 1, as part of a “personal action request.” “Wamble-Fisher is a huge part of the problem we’re talking about, but it’s important to note that nobody at IDOC stopped her,” said Schoppe. Schoppe and Canfield emerged victorious in an earlier Ada County court case where, on March 6, a jury agreed the whistleblower had strong evidence against Wamble-Fisher, ultimately awarding Canfield $78,000—$3,000 in back wages and $75,000 “for the hell that Canfield has gone through,” Schoppe said. In preparation for the federal hearing on July 22, Schoppe pointed BW to several other high-profile officials. “Keep in mind that Dr. Richard Craig [IDOC chief of psychology for nearly eight years] was Wamble-Fisher’s boss. He was certainly aware of the allegations,” Schoppe said. “Other names you should know are Garrett Coburn [currently an IDOC deputy warden] and former warden Johanna Smith [a 22-year IDOC veteran]. When a number of clinicians went straight to Warden Smith, she supposedly said, ‘This may finally help me change things.’” But Smith recently retired from IDOC. The man at the top of IDOC is Kevin Kempf, whom Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter appointed to the director’s post in December 2014. Kempf’s 19-year career with IDOC includes two years as deputy IDOC director and six years as a department administrator. No one has officially named Kempf in the allegations, but Schoppe said it’s important to note that top 8 IDOC officials have regular, ongoing meetings regarding the Balla case.

According to Boise officials, a city staffer is temporarily running the Office of Police Oversight.

OFFICE OF POLICE OVERSIGHT: NEW NAME, NEW PART-TIME HOURS, STILL VACANT

The Boise Office of the Community Ombudsman is no more—at least in name. The Boise City Council voted unanimously July 7 to rename the unit the Office of Police Oversight, now a part-time permanent position. For city leaders, the new title reflects a yearslong project of “cleaning up” Boise City Code. Hoever, some worry that without a permanent civilian police overseer in place, important functions such as fielding community complaints against police, conducting investigations into critical use-of-force incidents and generating police policy recommendations could be diminished. “I’ve expressed concerns with the fact that this is an incredibly important position that serves the community, and it’s still incredible that after two years we haven’t placed someone permanently,” said ACLU-Idaho Interim Executive Director Leo Morales. “It’s important for the city to move as fast as possible to make sure we have someone permanent there.” Since spring, six candidates have been in the running for the now part-time position, and City Hall has given no hints as to when it might announce its decision on a permanent replacement for former full-time Ombudsman Pierce Murphy, who left the job in 2013 for a similar position in Seattle. According to Mike Journee, spokesman for Boise Mayor Dave Bieter, the city Human Resources Department has been taking a deliberate approach to “find the right person.” A staffer from Office of Police Oversight is currently filling the job. “Interviews are and have happened, and everyone is very pleased with that process in the pool, and we’re hopeful that things will move quickly,” Journee said. The ombudsman position was originally created amid a spate of police shootings. During a 23-month period leading up to Murphy taking the ombudsman’s job in 1999, several highprofile police shootings left both civilians and Boise Police Officer Mark Stall dead. Murphy’s relationship with the Boise Police Department was sometimes rocky, notably following his July 2006 report on the officer-involved shooting death of Matthew Jones. 8 In his response to Murphy’s investigation, then-Boise Police Chief BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 7


CITYDESK

Since spring, Boise officials say six candidates have been in the running for the overseer job.

8 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

LAWMAKERS HEAD TO SUMMER SCHOOL

Tort claim, IEN implosion cast shadow over interim committee hearing HARRISON BERRY In February, members of the Joint FinanceAppropriations Committee of the Idaho Legislature warned that the impending collapse of the Idaho Education Network would need a quick fix if it was to avert a blackout of computer screens in schools throughout the state. JFAC’s temporary solution was to allow school districts to secure their own broadband contracts. On July 21, the 10-member House-Senate Broadband Access Study Committee will convene at the Statehouse in a one-day effort to generate new options to put before the 2016 Legislature. “A win would be that we can see a clear path forward and we can make a clear recommendation. I honestly would be surprised if that comes out of this meeting. I have a feeling we’re going to need at least one more meeting,” said Moscow Democratic Sen. Dan Schmidt. Citing concerns about the complexity of broadband access in Idaho, Schmidt said he’s still uneasy about the committee’s ability to craft new solutions. He indicated that some lawmakers have

already fronted a number of possible recommendations, but Schmidt added it would “take some convincing” for him to support another statewide managed network. The interim committee co-chair, Coeur d’Alene Republican Rep. Luke Malek, said he doesn’t want to take any recommendations off the table. “I don’t even know if legislation is the right option,” Malek said, adding that he would be interested in anything that would help the state “position itself as a leader in education.” IEN was a debacle from the beginning. Soon after Education Networks of America won the contract to build IEN, Syringa Network, which lost the initial bid to be the broadband provider despite submitting the least expensive and most

Perhaps the most egregious allegations concern what current and former clinicians 7 said were marching orders from WambleFisher never to enter the term “gender identity disorder” in any prisoner medical records. One former clinician testified that Wamble-Fisher had gone as far as removing previous references to GID from some medical records. When attorneys asked the clinician about what explanation was given by Wamble-Fisher, the clinician said he was told, “IDOC would then be forced to provide treatment to those inmates.” If that is true, it flies in the face of IDOC directive No. 401.06.03.501, which in the department’s standard operating procedure manual, outlines the diagnostic requirements and treatment available “to all IDOC offenders who request or are evaluated for and/or diagnosed with GID.” That was news to a number of inmates cur-

rently at the Idaho prison complex. They said a number of inmates had been denied GID services and/or testing. On July 22, six of those inmates will be transported from the prison to the U.S. courthouse in Boise to testify on the matter. “Thank you for investigating our situation,” one inmate said in a phone conversation from the prison. “You realize the inhuman treatment of individuals who are different, and how Idaho treats us.” “We don’t fight for special treatment,” another wrote in a letter. “We just ask for equality. We’re all human.” “I think it’s going to hit the fan,” said another inmate. “In fact, we’re a little afraid.” From the San Francisco offices of NCLR, attorney Amy Whelan said, “Every major medical and mental health expert has spoken about [GID] and has confirmed that it’s a diagnosable

JAMES LLOYD

Mike Masterson pushed back against implications that members of his depart7 ment may have behaved unethically or unprofessionally during their inquiry. “This is unwarranted speculation on the part of the ombudsman,” Masterson then wrote to the Boise City Council. “There is simply no evidence to support his personal conjecture and I question his reasons for resorting to such speculation.” After Murphy left the office in July 2013, Dennis Dunne, who was an investigator under Murphy, oversaw the department on a part-time, interim basis until earlier this year. Meanwhile, there has been a reduction in the number of complaints and critical incidents. In 2013 and 2014, the ombudsman’s office investigated 113 complaints—a low number for a two-year period since the office was established. Bieter’s office took note and, earlier this year, announced Dunne’s replacement would work part-time. According to Boise City Council President Maryanne Jordan, that reduction is in keeping with the job’s reduced workload, rather than a reduced need. “Any other position in the city that has less than half the workload it had 10 years ago would be analyzed for efficiencies,” Jordan said. Murphy, reached at his office in Seattle, was skeptical of the logic behind reducing the hours of the job because the number of complaints is down, given the other time-consuming activities required of that job. The police overseer will perform policy reviews and audit internal affairs investigations as time permits. “The role of that position was always more than just handling complaints,” Murphy said. “I think the great value is having someone that is auditing all of the internal affairs investigations, launching policy reviews. It was not conceived only as a reactive complaint-taker position.” During his tenure, Murphy engaged the community through speaking appearances and considered public outreach integral to the success of the position. Jordan said that changing the job title to police overseer “clarifies the definition of the office,” but in February, Dunne told Boise Weekly he had performed less public outreach than his predecessor since becoming the interim ombudsman. “That’s one of the things that’s lacking having the interim, because the community outreach that Pierce [Murphy] was doing has not been done since he left in terms of his public speaking to community groups,” Dunne said. —Harrison Berry

NEWS

technically proficient bid, sued the state for violating its own procurement law. It was later learned two top Idaho ENA staffers had ties to then-Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna, and one ENA staffer had served as Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s campaign finance director. Meanwhile, former Idaho Department of Administration Director Teresa Luna—sister of the former schools superintendent—extended the state’s contract with IEN through 2019, even as Syringa’s lawsuit against the state moved through the court system. Fourth District Court Judge Patrick Owen sided with Syringa in November 2014, voiding the state’s $60 million contract with ENA and Qwest Communications. In February, lawmakers pulled the plug on IEN. Meanwhile, ENA and CenturyLink submitted tort claims against the state, alleging Idaho still owed them $6 million in back payments. The state faced a 90-day period in which to submit a response to those claims and could now face possible lawsuits. “ENA finds itself in the ... position of having undeniably provided valuable services to the IEN, but being denied payment,” wrote ENA legal counsel in the claim. While the Broadband Access Study Committee will work in the shadow of that litigation and the implosion of IEN, Malek said he doesn’t share Schmidt’s concern that the committee could fail to deliver clear recommendations to the Legislature. “Are you asking me if I’m surprised a politician is skeptical?” he said. “I’m confident. I think this will be a very collaborative process.”

condition that needs to be treated. Prisons that continue to ignore that medical reality are putting themselves at extreme risk of liability.” Whelan added the alleged IDOC “cover-up” could lead to strong sanctions, or worse. “An intentional cover-up of prison conditions from the special master is shocking,” she said. “You need to remember that the appointment of a special master is only done at prisons that are truly failing to provide constitutionally adequate medical care. And if the prison disregarded that authority, the Idaho officials are effectively saying, ‘We don’t care what the court says. We don’t respect their authority.”

This story brought to you by BW Watchdogs. To learn how you can help, visit boiseweekly.com/boise/BWWatchdogs/Page

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CITIZEN

BILL BONES

Boise’s top cop on major changes to his department and policing in America

JE

GEORGE PRENTICE

RE

M

Y

N LA

NI

NG

HA

M

The yearlong rash of excessive force incidents, injuries and even deaths at the hands of police officers in several American cities has had a wide-reaching effect across the nation—Boise included. “Any police chief in the nation who cares cringes,” Boise Police Chief Bill Bones told Boise Weekly. “Even if it happens somewhere else, it damages Boise.” Just this month, the police commissioner of Baltimore was fired in the wake of riots throughout the city, which were triggered by the death of 25-year-old black man Freddie Gray while in police custody. Meanwhile, the FBI has opened a probe into the 2013 police shooting death of a Broward County, Fla. man; a special prosecutor has been named in cases investigating the deaths of unarmed civilians at the hands of New York police officers; and the U.S. Justice Department found police response to the unrest in Ferguson, Mo. following the fatal police shooting of unarmed 19-year-old black man Michael Brown only worsened tensions. “I get a sick, pit-in-my stomach feeling, just talking about it right now,” Bones said. “When we see that excessive force, there’s no way that some of this is acceptable. We see those incidents and know that someday, it’s going to happen to you, and you better have years of experience under your belt, where your community knows that those actions have nothing to do with who you are or what your department is.” Bones, 47, is already a 22-year veteran of the Boise Police Department but in many ways, his job is only now beginning. He started 2015 as the city’s new top cop, taking the corner office after it was vacated by ex-Chief Mike Masterson, who stepped down after 10 years on the job. BW sat down with Bones to cover a variety of topics, including his family’s law enforcement roots, his ongoing attempt to further diversify his force, the department’s relationship with Boise’s homeless community, and the soon-to-happen reintroduction of police precincts and first-ever introduction of police body-cameras to the streets of Boise.

I want to take you back to last Dec. 22, the day Boise Mayor Dave Bieter announced that you were his choice to be the next chief. He said, “For at least the past 10 years of his 22 years in the department, Deputy Chief Bones has been grooming himself to be chief. He could have been a chief somewhere else, but we’re happy that he’ll be the new chief here.” I’m presuming that all of that is true. I must admit to being too driven on goals. A lot of this was timing, a big part of it is the luck of the draw. I recognize that, but I did decide to work toward becoming a chief about five years in, when I first became a sergeant. But you recognized that there was also a good chance that you would end up being a chief somewhere else? For years, a number of people thought I was going to leave Boise. Yes, I’ve had different agencies come and talk to me but soon enough, I decided that I would stay in Boise until I retired. I prepped thoroughly for the chief interview process, but I wasn’t stressed at all. I knew that if I hadn’t got the job, they would have picked a great chief, and I would be a great deputy chief.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

Did Chief Masterson leave anything for you when he retired? He left me a list. It’s about three pages long. How are you doing with that? I’m working on it. I’m probably a better manager than Mike was, and I’m pretty good at seeing the future impact of policies, but Mike was phenomenal about seeing the opportunity in things you would never think about. Maybe the best example of that is the George Nickel incident [Nickel, a decorated veteran who survived a bombing in Iraq, struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder and, in 2009, went gun barrel-togun barrel with police at a Boise apartment complex. Instead of pushing for his prosecution, Masterson and Nickel became friends, and Nickel is a leader of the Idaho Veterans Network]. I’m assuming that the night Nickel was nearly killed by Boise police, and the events that followed, affected serious change to this department. It changed the way we interact with veterans, for one. More importantly, it was a foundation to have a greater focus on mental illness.

BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 9


CITIZEN Let’s talk for a moment about the science vs. the art of police work. I know that you and your force need your decisions to be fact-driven, but there must be some evolution in the way you’re responding to 21st century incidents. We’re always looking at the data and statistics, seeing what’s effective. But it almost always comes down to the art of policing and having an understanding of your community. Does that come with experience? How about the 20-something rookies on your force? In fact, we can learn a lot from them. Younger officers have newer and, quite often, better ways of thinking. Social media, for example: That’s second nature to them. The day is coming very soon when an officer will be communicating with the public, getting the word out on emergencies or missing persons by pushing a picture out on Instagram instead of knocking door-to-door. Let’s talk a bit about you. Law enforcement is in your blood. I’m the son and grandson of Oregon state troopers, also named William Bones. So, was it a foregone conclusion that you would wear a badge someday? Not at all. I had no intention of being a police officer. I saw my dad work long hours for low pay. I remember him racing out the door in the early 1980s to join the hunt for Claude Dallas [the infamous killer of two Idaho game wardens]. I saw the hours he worked, the nights and weekends, and the stress. It was pretty hard. What were your professional intentions at the time? I went to school for business and econom-

10 | JANUARY 21–27, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

ics. I put myself through school at Oregon State University by fighting fires for the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service each summer. Plus, I worked full-time while I was taking classes. So, what changed? It was my senior year in college. I was about to graduate and, honestly, it was one of those epiphany moments. I didn’t want to go into business. The CIA was recruiting economics majors, but my dad said, “No. Whatever you do, don’t go in the CIA.” I thought about the Oregon state troopers, but they weren’t hiring. So I started looking at the Treasure Valley, which I always loved. Did that bring you to Boise? Actually, I interviewed with the Payette and Boise police departments on the very same day. The interviews were night and day. I was 23 years old. When you chose the Boise Police Department, what did your dad have to say? He didn’t say anything. But I could sense his pride. It meant a lot to him. How long have you been married? Twenty-two years. That’s as long as you’ve been on the force. I was still in the POST [Peace Officer Standards and Training] academy. We got one evening a week to leave the academy. So I was set up on a date. I told my daughter never to do this, but I met my wife in November, proposed to her in December and got married the next May. Can I assume that your wife [Jennifer] is your better half?

We’re total opposites. She hates the spotlight. She’s the creative one. For years, she worked to decorate offices, homes and parties. Plus, she worked in a florist shop. For years, we would build houses on the side. We would put a lot of work into them, she would decorate them to perfection and we would get a great selling price. We haven’t done that in years. And your daughter? Has she struggled being the daughter of a cop? Just the opposite. She said, “Dad, not a problem.” I’m so impressed with her generation’s acceptance on so many things, particularly gender identity, faith, race. It’s a different world than what you or I grew up in. Which brings us to diversity. Nationwide, U.S. police departments are not even close to representing the communities that we serve. That has to be reset through hiring practices. Yes? I think a lot of agencies are trying to hire a diverse workforce but simply aren’t attracting that diversity. But the numbers, nationwide, are horribly skewed to white males. Who’s testing here in Boise? I’ve got 92 percent white male applicants. We’re at 17 percent diversity right in Boise. The community is 11 percent diverse. We would love to be at 27 percent. You’re a lot lower with women on the force. We’re at 11 percent right now. Nationally, we’re at 17 percent. Talk to me about encouraging more

women and minorities to join the Boise police force. You’re going to see a change in our images—photos and videos—coming from the department. People have to see themselves in uniform. We need to actively recruit from the military and especially Boise State, where we’ve been under-recruiting for years. What do you tell people you’re looking for? Customer-oriented individuals, but you have to be willing to walk through “that door.” You know, that dark door, where someone with a gun is on the other side, and they’re going to shoot. You have to put other people’s lives first. Speaking of going through that door, let’s talk about body cams. I’m asked about them all the time, and more than a few people are shocked when I say I absolutely love them. They’re an incredible tool for accountability and training. Are prosecutors anxious for Boise police to have body cams? Not exactly. Because of the oversight they require? Especially redaction issues. We’ll need at least one, maybe two full-time people. We’re looking at a base budget of $250,000 a year. Is that what’s preventing you from getting them? Cost is a big factor. The technology of the redaction is another, but we’re going forward anyway. I hope you can appreciate our concerns about privacy protections. Idaho is one of the states that hasn’t been

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CITIZEN too progressive on this. Yes, we should release information, but we shouldn’t be compromising the privacy of someone caught in a bathrobe when they answer the door. I’m sure you’re aware that the second media outlets publish those videos, the images will last forever. We’re talking with manufacturers about our ability to turn off the video and keep the audio, especially if we’re simply interviewing someone in their home because they’re a possible witness. When might we see the body cams in Boise? You’ll probably see me make an announcement in about a week about our presentation to the City Council. You’re certainly going to be seeing them within the next year. Does that mean this is in your next budget? We’ve submitted for federal grant money. Plus, we’ll probably use some of our funds from savings. Another big change in the works is decentralization and the reintroduction of precincts to neighborhoods. We’ve waited for years, mostly due to the lack of facilities. I’ve heard that there is some downtown property that you have your eyes on. Three different options. We’re moving forward with what we call a micro-district for downtown. Maybe it’s just a small station that we’ll work out of until we secure a larger station. Define downtown. The St. Luke’s/Broadway area all the way west to the Whitewater Park. We’ll capture the state buildings around State Street and then go all the way south to Boise State and its area of impact. The first pieces of this will be up and running this fall. The only place I know that is immediately available is the little office on the first floor of City Hall. If we have to, we’re going to remodel that office to get things going, but we’re looking at a couple of other locations. Can you tell us where they are? Not yet. There are some politics involved. We really see a precinct as a catalyst for new development and construction in the downtown area.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

Speaking of downtown, how would you best characterize your department’s relationship with those people who are without a home? One hundred times better than most cities. We have a much higher interaction with them than our general population. They’re on the streets and they’re much more vulnerable. Plus, they’re preyed upon by people who take advantage of them. We’re seeing some new folks coming in from out of town who are exploiting that advantage. Where do you start with something like that? Enforcement is always our last option. It’s 100 degrees [outside], and that can be a concrete jungle. A year ago at this time, scores of homeless individuals were escaping the heat under the bridge on Americana Boulevard, near Rhodes Park. Now, that area is destined for a high-profile, million dollar overhaul. It started that there was some panhandling nearby. More people started waiting around there. It grew and grew, and then one or two people had some hoarding issues. But you swept that area clean. We cleaned it multiple times. We worked for months to get people alternative places, because we knew the Rhodes Park development was coming. Are you saying there hasn’t been much friction because of that change? It’s all fenced off now. We did it slowly and we did it right. We didn’t have any big confrontations. But aren’t they simply being pushed elsewhere? The need for services for that part of the population has never been greater. We’re the third-lowest spending state in the nation for mental health service. People are falling through the cracks. Who’s being asked to catch them? Police. That’s not how to deal with this. We have to get people out of the incarceration cycle. Our officers want to help, but there are simply too few services. Is that the big thing that Boise needs that it doesn’t have now? It’s Boise. It’s Idaho. My department is very lucky. Our city council funds us, and we have great community support. If we didn’t have that, we wouldn’t have much. And we’d be in the same position that a lot of other police departments find themselves right now.

BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 11


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JULY 15 Festivals & Events CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET— Wednesdays through Sept. 23. 3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com. SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE—If you’re into the rough-and-tumble action of cowboy sports, there’s no better time to make the trip to the Ford Idaho Center. That’s because the Nampa rodeo is celebrating its 100th birthday with nonstop action and a jam-packed slate of related events. Visit the website for a complete schedule. 7:30 p.m. $10-$38. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-4681000, snakeriverstampede.com. VISITING AIRCRAFT AT THE WARHAWK AIR MUSEUM—For a limited time the Warhawk Air Museum has two rare airplanes on

display, the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG15 and the Grumman F4F Wildcat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $4-$10. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-4656446, warhawkairmuseum.org.

On Stage ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. OUTLAW FIELD: THE DECEMBERISTS—The Portland, Ore.-based indie folk rock band drops by the Idaho Botanical Garden’s outdoor stage on their tour supporting What A Terrible World, What A Beautiful World, their first album since 2011. With Calexico. 6:30 p.m. $31-$36. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, decemberists.com. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: CALAMITY JANE—Through Aug. 15. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, JULY 15-18

Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Art CRAIG CULLY: SINGULAR MARVELS—Through July 31. Noon-4 p.m. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com. DEFYING GRAVITY: INTERVENTIONS IN CLAY—Through Sept. 18. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. GROUP F/64: REVOLUTIONARY VISION—Photography by Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Brett Weston, Willard Van Dyke and Edward Weston. Through Oct. 25. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

MARCIA MYERS: RICHES OF REMEMBRANCE—Through Aug. 2. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com. PAUL VEXLER: RIBBONS—Seattle sculptor Paul Vexler has created an undulating ribbon of wood more than 40 feet in length for a site-specific installation at BAM. Through May 8, 2016. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. RICHARD C. ELLIOTT: LANGUAGE OF LIGHT—Dick Elliott was a nationally recognized mixed-media artist who lived and worked in Ellensburg, Wash. Exhibit includes objects that span his career, along with photo murals, DVDs and a book. Through Oct. 4. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Talks & Lectures

SATURDAY, JULY 18

AUTHOR DEWAYNE WILLIAMS: ON BECOMING AN ARTIST—The creator of Montana’s official centennial book will share a slideshow and stories from his artistic endeavors. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org/victory.

SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE—7:30 p.m. $10-$38. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, snakeriverstampede.com.

THURSDAY JULY 16

BLT: THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER—Through July 18. 7:30 p.m. $6-$9. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

Festivals & Events

ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

DCI ADULT NIGHT: THE SCIENCE OF TWO WHEELS—Enjoy an evening steeped in the science of Boise’s favorite mode of transport. There’ll be live music, Dutch Bros. coffee, wine and Sockeye beer, food trucks, and Ben and Jerry’s ice cream. 6 p.m. $12-$15. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org.

On Stage

MCCALL FOLKLORE SOCIETY ROSEBERRY SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL—Line-up features DangerMuffin, YARN, Dead Winter Carpenters, Matt Flinner Trio, Finnders and Youngberg, Innocent Man and many more. Visit the event website for a complete list of performers at this three-day festival. Through July 18, 6-11 p.m. $15-$50 adv.,

SUNDAY, JULY 19

KURT STIENKE - SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE RODEO

This isn’t Nampa’s first rodeo.

SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE

Dust off your western wear and find that George Strait cassette tape: It’s rodeo time. The Snake River Stampede is the time when rodeo goers can whoop, holler and stomp their cowboy boots as they watch barrel racing, bull riding and roping. Celebrating its 100th anniversary, the Stampede draws 60,000 attendees over the course of the five-day event. Boasting a $400,000 purse, this quintessential western event offers more to competitors and attendees than it did a century ago, when it began with a couple of cowboys riding broncos in a dirt lot. Round up you friends and family and take advantage of the one time a year it’s OK to wear that oversized cowboy hat taking up space in the closet. FREE-$38. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, snakeriverstampede.com. 12 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

Hey, you guys!

MOVIES UNDER THE STARS: THE GOONIES

In the 1985 classic movie The Goonies, a group of kids in Astoria, Ore., try to save their homes from being demolished by developers. After finding an old pirate map in the attic, Mikey (Sean Astin) convinces his friends and jerky older brother (played by a crazy-young Josh Brolin) to hunt for One-Eyed Willy’s hidden treasure. Along the way, The Goonies must stay one step ahead of the evil Fratellis as well as navigate countless booby-traps to claim the priceless loot. Relive the fun of The Goonies at a free screening in Julia Davis Park as part of Boise Parks and Recreation’s Movies Under the Stars Summer Series. Kids can enjoy games and crafts provided by Parks and Rec before the movie begins. 7 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., parks.cityofboise.org.

Blues power.

2015 BOISE BLUES FESTIVAL

In the 2012 music documentary Life of Riley, blues legend Riley Ben “B.B.” King said, “There are so many sounds I still want to make, so many things I haven’t yet done.” The King of Blues died on May 14, at the age of 89, but had been touring up until mid2014—still exploring the art form he helped define. A little more than two months after his death, it only seems fitting to do some blues exploration of our own with the 22nd annual 2015 Boise Blues Festival at Julia Davis Park. Sponsored by the Boise Blues Society, settle in for six hours of live music featuring renowned guitarist Matthew Curry, along with Freudian Slip, Hoochie Coochie Men and the Ben Rice Band. Admission is three cans of food, benefiting the Idaho Foodbank. Noon-6 p.m., by donation. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., boisebluesfestival.com. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR $17-$55 door. Roseberry Townsite, 2598 E. Roseberry Road, McCall, McCall Chamber 800-260-5130 or 208-634-7631, thesummermusicfestival.com. STAGE COACH: I BET YOUR LIFE—Through July 25. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE— Through Aug. 22. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-4625523, starlightmt.com.

Literature GHOSTS AND PROJECTORS: ALLAN PETERSON, MARTIN CORLESSSMITH AND MEGAN LEVAD—Poet Allan Peterson will read with Martin Corless-Smith and Megan Levad on The Cabin’s back lawn. 7:30 p.m. $2 suggested donation. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000.

Talks & Lectures THE LORAX—This interactive presentation will highlight the presence of trees in literature, focusing on Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax. A representative from the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge will describe ways that people are both harmful and helpful to wildlife. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org/victory.

FRIDAY JULY 17 Festivals & Events HANDS AROUND THE CAPITOL—Celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act with civil rights speakers, music, food, resource booths, photo booth, games and other activities. Special guest Kelly Buckland. Sign language interpreters will be available. 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE—7:30 p.m. $10-$38. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, snakeriverstampede.com.

On Stage BLT: THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER—Through July 18. 7:30 p.m. $6-$9. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN CARLOS MENCIA—Laugh it up with one of today’s most popular entertainers and comics, who demonstrates an extraordinary ability to connect with a wide and diverse audience. 8 p.m. $33. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 800-594-TIXX (8499), carlosmencia.com. DAISY’S MADHOUSE: AN INFINITE ACHE—A couple sees the possibilities of their future together just as they say good night. From their first kiss to their first child, from a horrible tragedy to a second chance, each moment moves with breathtaking speed. 8 p.m. $10. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-918-1351, daisysmadhouse.org. IMPROV COMEDY CAGE MATCH—8 p.m. $7. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Get Your

Tickets

MCCALL FOLKLORE SOCIETY ROSEBERRY SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL—6-11 p.m. $15-$50 adv., $17-$55 door. Roseberry Townsite, 2598 E. Roseberry Road, McCall, McCall Chamber 800-2605130 or 208-634-7631, thesummermusicfestival.com.

Student Packages Now!

STAGE COACH: I BET YOUR LIFE—8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Dial “M” for Murder By Frederick Knott

Sponsored by Hawley Troxell and Idaho Public Television

The Tempest

STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: CINDERELLA—Through July 17. 8 p.m. $9$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

June 4–July 24

By William Shakespeare

Sponsored by Parsons Behle & Latimer and Scene/Treasure Magazines

The Secret Garden

July 3–Aug 30

Book and lyrics by Marsha Norman, music by Lucy Simon, based on the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Food STE. CHAPELLE WINERY AFTER HOURS—The winery stays open late every fourth Friday so you can enjoy great live music, wine and light appetizers. Every fourth Friday through Oct. 30. 6-10 p.m. $10. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-453-7843, stechapelle.com.

May 29–Aug 2

Sponsored by Truckstop.com and Boise Weekly

King Lear

Aug 7–27

By William Shakespeare

Sponsored by ArmgaSys, Inc. and Boise State Public Radio

The Fantasticks Photo Credit: Colton Ryan, Giovanna Layne, The Secret Garden (2015). Photo by DKM Photography.

Season Sponsor

Season Partners

Season Media Partners

Sept 4–27

Book and lyrics by Tom Jones, music by Harvey Schmidt

Sponsored by Holland and Hart LLP and 107.1 K-HITS

Check out our website at

idahoshakespeare.org or call 336-9221 M–F, 10 am to 5 pm BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 13


CALENDAR SATURDAY JULY 18 Festivals & Events BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-3453499, seeyouatthemarket.com. CRUX BAZAAR VENDOR MARKET—9 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3213. MOUNTAIN MAMAS ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR—The 39th annual fair will feature more than 140 artists and craftspeople from throughout the Northwest. The fair will take place near the junction of Scenic Byways 21 and 75. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Stanley, 1-800-878-7950, stanleycc.org. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square, 14th and Front streets, Nampa. SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE—Noon and 7:30 p.m. $10-$38. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, snakeriverstampede.com. WALKABOUT BOISE DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR—11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $10. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, 208-4245111, preservationidaho.org/ walkaboutboise.

Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com. DAISY’S MADHOUSE: AN INFINITE ACHE—8 p.m. $10. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-918-1351, daisysmadhouse.org. ISF: THE SECRET GARDEN— Through Aug. 30. 8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. MCCALL FOLKLORE SOCIETY ROSEBERRY SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL—6-11 p.m. $15-$50 adv., $17-$55 door. Roseberry Townsite, 2598 E. Roseberry Road, McCall, McCall Chamber 800-2605130 or 208-634-7631, thesummermusicfestival.com. RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: A MOST CURIOUS EVENING—Don’t miss RLVS’s only full-length show this summer. There’ll be aerial silk dancing and aerial pole dancing, fan dancing, burlesque and more. Plus a silent art show auction with Tarot-inspired art by 13 local artists, with proceeds benefiting Surel’s Place. 7:30 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Crooked Flats, 3705 Idaho Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-258-6882, redlightvarietyshow.com. STAGE COACH: I BET YOUR LIFE—8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stage-

coachtheatre.com. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—Through Sept. 12. 8 p.m. $9$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com. STEVE EATON ISU BENEFIT CONCERT—Idaho State University alumnus Steve Eaton performs for alumni and Boise area friends. Appetizers provided. Beverages available for purchase. Gates open at 5 p.m. 6 p.m. $20. Stonehouse, 665 Park Blvd., Boise, 208-282-3755, isu.edu/alumni/eaton.shtml.

Sports & Fitness BASQUE SOCCER FRIENDLY—A professional friendly soccer match featuring La Liga’s Athletic Club de Bilbao and Liga MX’s Club Tijuana Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente. You can purchase your tickets online at ticketmaster.com or from the Boise State Athletic Ticket Office. Proceeds benefit the Basque Studies Foundation and Idaho Youth Soccer. 7 p.m. $35-$255. Boise State Broncos Albertsons Stadium, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4264737, basquesoccerfriendly.com.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

WATERSHED WEEKEND: RIVER LIFE—Explore the complex web of vegetation, invertebrates, fish, mammals and birds that make up the Boise River ecosystem. 10 a.m.1 p.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise. 208-608-7300, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

On Stage BLT: THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER—Through July 18. 2 p.m. $6-$9. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. BOISE’S FUNNIEST PERSON 2015—The biggest, funniest event of the summer is back at Liquid Laughs. Boise’s Funniest Person takes 20 amateurs and turns them into stand-up comics in just four weeks. Contestants perform live each Saturday night. The champion will take home $1,000 and the title of Boise’s Funniest Person. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379. boisesfunniestperson.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—ComedySportz Boise has new digs and is ready to bring the funny. Two teams of comics battle for your laughs. All ages. 7:30 p.m. $9.99. ComedySportz Boise, 4619

14 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 15


CALENDAR BOISE WOMEN’S CLASSIC HALF MARATHON, 10K, 5K—Participants will enjoy a great course, post-race fruit and juice bar, and live music from Boise’s very own country music group Soul Patch. Proceeds benefit the City Light Women’s Shelter. 7:30 a.m. $40-$75. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisewomensclassic.com.

Citizen PADDLE OUT CANCER—Check-in begins at Barber Park at 11:30 a.m., with launch to follow at 1 p.m. End up at the Ann Morrison Old Timer’s shelter for food by P. Ditty’s Wrap Wagon, beverages by Crooked Fence, silent auction, kids activities and live music. 1-6:30 p.m. $10-$20. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 N. Americana Blvd., Boise, riverdiscovery.org.

STAGE COACH: I BET YOUR LIFE—2 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Sports & Fitness TAMARACK WILD ROCKIES MTB ENDURO RIDE— This family-friendly event offers something for every rider. Riding the chairlift is optional ($25). Online registration for the event includes raffle and refreshments. USA Cycling members receive a $5 rebate. 9 p.m. $25-$40. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy. 55, Donnelly, 208-325-1000, tamarackidaho.com.

MONDAY JULY 20

Kids & Teens

Festivals & Events

MOVIES UNDER THE STARS: THE GOONIES— Enjoy FREE games and crafts for kids provided by Boise Parks and Recreation, with the movie to follow at dusk. 7 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise.

MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2015—SummerFest 2015 is a weeklong festival of classical chamber music and jazz concerts held at multiple venues in and around McCall. For a full concert schedule and general admission tickets, visit the event website. 7:30-9:30 p.m. FREE-$65. McCall Community Congregational Church, 901 First St., McCall, 208634-5430, mccallmusicsociety.org.

SUNDAY JULY 19 Festivals & Events 2015 BOISE BLUES FESTIVAL—Take the whole family for six hours of great live music, featuring guitarist Matthew Curry, along with Freudian Slip, Hoochie Coochie Men and Ben Rice Band. Admission is three cans of food for the Idaho Foodbank. At the park’s picnic area 1, by the tennis courts. Noon-6 p.m. By donation. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. boisebluesfestival.com.

On Stage STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmtn.com.

TUESDAY JULY 21 On Stage

ALLEY REP: PLAYS FROM THE ALLEY—The annual summer playreading series dedicated to premiering new scripts from local, emerging playwrights is back. Sobornost by Philip Atlakson; July 28: T.B.H. (To Be Honest) by Evan Sesek. 8 p.m. $10, $20 3-show pass. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297. alleyrep.org. BROADWAY IN BOISE: THE BOOK OF MORMON—SOLD OUT. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110, mc.boisestate.edu. ISF: THE SECRET GARDEN—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. OUTLAW FIELD: THIRD EYE BLIND—Expect to hear songs from their latest release Dopamine, when the San Francisco rock band makes a tour stop at the Idaho Botanical Garden. With Dashboard Confessional. 6:30 p.m. $34.50-$39.50. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, thirdeyeblind.com. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt. com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

MOUNTAIN MAMAS ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR—9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Stanley, 1-800-878-7950, stanleycc. org. OLD-FASHIONED ICE CREAM SOCIAL—Enjoy ice cream, lemonade, iced tea, croquet and French ring toss lawn games, face painting, and music. Proceeds benefit The Friends of The Bishops’ House. 1-4 p.m. $1 scoops. Bishops’ House, 2420 E. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-342-3279, thebishopshouse.com/events.

On Stage ISF: THE SECRET GARDEN—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. LIQUID COMEDY SHOWCASE— 8 p.m. $7. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

16 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


KE L S E Y HAWES

GROWING ANTICIPATION

RECREATION

Countdown to the Basque Soccer Friendly JESSICA MURRI

Everyone has had anxiety dreams: You show up to school and you haven’t studied for the test; you’re running from something but your legs feel like they’re made of lead; your teeth are inexplicably falling out. Argia Beristain dreams she walks into a stadium, and the grass is dead. Not just any stadium, though, and not just any grass. Beristain dreams of Albertsons Stadium and the sod that has been placed over its Boise State University’s famous “Smurf Turf” might have gone green, but at least it’s Kentucky bluegrass. iconic blue turf to make way for the first-ever Basque Soccer Friendly. Beristain has spent the past two years of On Thursday, July 16, Beristain will be at the That caused a hiccup in the sod installation. her life planning the soccer match, which will airport to greet Athletic Club de Bilbao’s 50 playJB Instant Sod was double booked. pit world-class Athletic Club de Bilbao against ers. She’s hoping to put together a welcome party “Our installation crew was also doing an Club Tijuana Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente on and autograph signing with the team. instillation in Seattle, then they had to come Saturday, July 18 at 7 p.m. Beristain is only a “Of course the Basque community did offer here to do this, then they have to go back to few days away from seeing her work pay off, Seattle, then come back here to remove the sod,” to host the entire team,” she said with a laugh, but the nightmares persist. Beristain said. “We had not planned to have the “but they’ll be staying in a hotel.” “Once the sod is installed, I think I’ll be Beristain hopes to give the team a tour of the sod laid a week in advance.” able to sleep better at night,” she said, a few Basque Block on Friday afternoon, sharing with In order to keep the grass from dying during days before the grass was rolled over the field. them the history of Basques in Boise. the week leading up to the game, Cloverdale The sod is one of the most intriguing and “Hopefully we can show them why they flew Nursery put in temporary irrigation systems and complicated elements of this soccer match. all the way here,” she said. “We want to show monitored the grass with a watering truck. It required removing the football field goal them why there are so many of us that are so Changing the date of the game caused Beriposts, laying 85,000 square feet of plastic event excited to see them come. [Our Basque history] stain some heartache, since hundreds of people decking, placing 47 sheets of plywood, then isn’t something that’s taught over there, so unless already purchased their tickets, covering it all with a layer of bought airline tickets and booked you have family members that come here, you double-sided tarp. It took 117 BASQUE SOCCER don’t know about it.” hotels for July 29. Plus, it served five-gallon buckets to hold FRIENDLY Athletic Club de Bilbao, which was founded as the perfect kick-off to Jaialdi, the tarps in place before the 117 years ago and is ranked 32nd in the world, which occurs once every five sod arrived from Cloverdale Saturday, July 18, 7 p.m., $39-$94. Albertsons Stayears—Jaialdi 2015 runs Tuesday, has never played in North or South America. Nursery, transported in 4-foot dium, 1910 University Drive, July 28-Sunday, Aug. 2—and tra- Their opponents, Club Tijuana Xoloitzcuintles by 60-foot rolls. 208-426-4737, basquesocde Caliente—from Baja California, Mexico—has ditionally attracts nearly 40,000 The sod installation team, JB cerfriendly.com been around for eight years and ranks 143rd. Basques from all over the world. Instant Sod, covered the Smurf Club Tijuana’s 36 players fly in on Friday, “We’ve experienced a number Turf with 2 1/2-inch-thick grass of refunds,” Beristain said. “But for every refund July 17, and Beristain hopes to organize a similar on July 11. welcome party. we’ve had to give, someone else has purchased Turning turf into a field of luscious grass After it’s all over, the sod will be transplanted tickets, so it’s picking up.” was only one complicated part of planning She estimates about three-quarters of the seats into Ann Morrison Park, where two of the soccer the Basque Soccer Friendly. Fewer than two fields need to be redone. Beristain wants to see a have been sold, and she’s expecting many more months before the game was scheduled to be plaque beside the field, proclaiming that it is the walk-up ticket sales. played—originally it was set for Wednesday, very grass on which the inaugural Basque Soccer “I know lots of friends and families that July 29 to coincide with the Jaialdi Basque Friendly was played. aren’t going to be able to come to the game festival—the Basque team lost a match to FC After several more days of Jaialdi celebrations, because they have their flights booked for Jaialdi, Barcelona, changing their entire schedule for performances, volunteering and hosting her own but that’s just the way it goes,” Beristain said. the summer. Since Athletic Club de Bilbao couldn’t make “There’s also the diehard Athletic Club de Bilbao family from the Basque Country, Beristain wants to go on vacation. the July 29 date, Beristain had a new challenge: fans of the Basque community that are flying “We call Jaialdi the Basque Tsunami,” she here for the weekend, then going back home, Change the date of the game to Saturday, July said. “There’s a Basque hangover afterward.” then coming back for Jaialdi.” 18—a week earlier than planned. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 17


LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY JULY 15 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: THE FAR WEST—5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza BRAD AGGEN AND LYLE ‘POP’ EVANS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

THE FAR WEST, JULY 15, GROVE PLAZA

Posting or answering Craigslist ads can have negative consequences, but for The Far West vocalist/guitarist Lee Briante, it paid off big time. He posted a video of Waylon Jennings with a note: “Looking to do something like this.” Before long, he was joined by like-minded musicians Brian Bachman, Aaron Bakker, Robert Black and Michael Whiteside and The Far West was born. With a handful of albums under its collective belt, The Far West has set a strong foundation to build on, gaining fans and garnering some sweet words. The LA Weekly wrote, “When they rev up, The Far West recall any number of the ‘70s cosmic cowboy rockers, but when they break down, well that’s the real good stuff,”and Given and Taken in Ink claimed “The Far West do gutwrenching country better than just about anybody.” —Micah Drew With locals Lounge On Fire. 5 p.m., FREE, Grove Plaza, 850 W. Front St., thefarwestband.com.

18 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

PAMELA DEMARCHE AND FRIENDS—7 p.m. FREE. The Owyhee Penthouse PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel MILLER, HILL AND WEISMAN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill RYAN WISSINGER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

DAVID ANDREWS BAND—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

FRIDAY JULY 17

FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

ANNALISE EMERICK—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

GABE HESS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

BILLY BRAUN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel DECEPTION PAST—10 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

DAVID ANDREWS—8 p.m. $10$12. Sapphire Room

BRANDON PRITCHETT—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

SOUL SERENE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

CHARLES ELLSWORTH—7 p.m. $5. The Crux

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: IAN MCFERON BAND—6:30 p.m. $6$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THROUGH THE GATES—9:30 p.m. $5. The Crux

HIGHWAY 16 LIVE: KORBY LENKER—6 p.m. FREE. Crooked Flats

DECEMBERISTS—6:30 p.m. $31$36. Idaho Botanical Garden FABULOUS FLOYD STANTON—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato GOV’T MULE—8 p.m. $15-$59.50. Revolution

THURSDAY JULY 16

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE ADARNA—With Leverson. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

MARRIAGES—7 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux

THE ATARIS—With Ancesters and Telescopes As Time Machines. 8 p.m. $15-$17. Crazy Horse

MICHAELA FRENCH—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s NEEDTOBREATHE—7 p.m. $35$45. Morrison Center

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers BLACK BREATH—With Theories, Infinite Waste and Swamp Shrine. 8 p.m. $10. The Shredder

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KLEINER PARK LIVE: SWEET BRIAR—5:30 p.m. FREE. Kleiner Park ROSEBERRY MUSIC FEST— Through Saturday, July 18. 11 p.m. $15-$55. Roseberry SHANNON AND THE CLAMS—7 p.m. $12-$14. Neurolux SHON SANDERS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SOUL SERENE—10 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s STEVE AND GRACE WALL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JELLY BREAD—10 p.m. $5. Reef JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOSH ABBOTT BAND—8 p.m. $12$20. Knitting Factory JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KAHUNA BEACH PARTY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Village at Meridian MIKE CRAMER—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar NEW TRANSIT—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar RANDOM CANYON GROWLERS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MUSIC GUIDE RYAN WISSINGER—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

LUCKY TONGUE—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

SHON SANDERS—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar

THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TUESDAY JULY 21

SLIM CESSNA’S AUTO CLUB—7 p.m. $10-$13. Neurolux

SNOW THA PRODUCT—8 p.m. $14-$25. Knitting Factory

BERNIE REILLY—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

SATURDAY JULY 18

MONDAY JULY 20

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ANDREW MCBRIDE—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue

ABIGAIL WILLIAMS—9 p.m., $TBA, Shredder

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

ALEXANDRA SJOBECK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

CAMP—With Spectacular Spectacular, Rogue Gallery and English Language. 9 p.m., $TBA, Shredder

CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DIMESTORE PROPHETS—10 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GROOVE AND JONES—4 p.m. FREE. Artistblue JOEL KASSERMAN AND THE ELEMENTS—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

LEE PENN SKY AND THE OLIPHANTS—7 p.m. $5-$8. Bridge Event Center

FRNKIERO ANDTHE CELLABRATION—6 p.m. $15. The Crux JACOB CUMMINGS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye JOHNNY SHOES, BROOKE FAULK—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar THE LONESOME HEROES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THIRD EYE BLIND—6:30 p.m. $34.50-$39.50. Idaho Botanical Garden RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: GOOD OLD WAR—With Pete Hill and Flagship. 7:30 p.m. $15. Neurolux

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

ANGEL CEBALLO S

JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LIKE A ROCKET—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow THE LIKE ITS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Fairview OPHELIA—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s PILOT ERROR—10 p.m. $5. Reef THE RENEWING—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District SCOTT KNICKERBOCKER—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar SMOOTH AVENUE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio SWEET BRIAR—8 p.m. FREE. Six Degrees Nampa SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TASTY JAM—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar TOY ZOO ALBUM RELEASE—7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

SUNDAY JULY 19 BOISE BLUES FESTIVAL—12-6 p.m. By donation. Julia Davis Park CES CRU—With Illest*Lyricists and $wa-G. 7 p.m. $14-$16. Neurolux CLAY MOORE QUARTET—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar JOHNNY SHOES—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar KORBY LENKER—5 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

THE DECEMBERISTS, JULY 15, IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN

In 2011, The King Is Dead (Capitol Records) earned The Decemberists their first No. 1 album, debuting in the top spot on the Billboard 200. Four years later, the indie-folk band from Portland, Ore., returns with its seventh full-length LP, What A Terrible World, What A Beautiful World (Capitol Records, Jan. 2015). In the band bio, frontman Colin Meloy talks about working on the new album: “There’s something very freeing about working on music with absolutely no agenda and just letting the songs become themselves. In some ways this album was four years in the making. We were on hiatus, so we had all the time we could want—no schedule, no tours, no expectations.” That freedom resulted in What A, an inspired album of lush, folksy ballads laced with narrative tales in a way that is somewhat new, yet is still quintessentially The Decemberists. It will be exciting to see what the band does with this evolved sound live. —Keleah Pinto With Calexico. Gate 5 p.m., show 6:30 p.m., $31-$36. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 19


BOOZEHOUND SMALL BATCH GINS

LEOPOLD’S AMERICAN SMALL BATCH GIN, $35.60 Instead of distilling its botanicals in the same still, Leopold’s “distills juniper, coriander, pummelo, orris root and Valencia orange separately to extract the best flavors.” Heavy on the juniper, Leopold’s also boasts plenty of citrus on the nose, which one taster described as “the essence of orange juice.” It has a smooth palate and dry finish, which led one taster to call it “great lawn mowing gin.” CATOCTIN CREEK WATERSHED GIN, $37.45 Distilled in the foothills of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains, Catoctin Creek is crafted from organic rye and wheat. It has a fair amount of heat on the nose, with spicy notes of cardamom and cinnamon followed by a waft of juniper and mild hint of chlorine. With a full body and a substantial boozy bite, tasters claimed this gin “will put hair on your chest.” JUNIPERO GIN, $39.45 From craft beer pioneers Anchor Distilling Co. in San Francisco, Junipero is created in a small copper pot still using more than a dozen botanicals. It has a higher proof (98.6) than the other gins we sampled, and the extra heat makes itself known on the nose. The booziness dissipates on a viscous palate with a pleasant sweetness and dry, pine needle-y coolness that lingers nicely. One taster compared it to “melted snow in a pine forest.” —Tara Morgan 20 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

FOOD

GANGNAM KOREAN RESTAURANT

TAR A MORG AN

On the rocks or with a splash of tonic, gin is the perfect summer sipper. The liquor’s bright citrus flavors are tempered by the cool, piney bite of juniper, making it a refreshing choice when the temperature is in the triple digits. We sampled three small batch gins that all stand up solidly to the summer heat.

New Korean hot spot brings banchan to the Bench TARA MORGAN

Banchan, or “side dishes,” are an essential component of any Korean meal. The small plates boast everything from squiggly japchae to spicy kimchi to savory pancakes, and they’re set in the middle of the table to share. Like any good Korean joint, Gangnam doesn’t skimp on the banchan. echoing from an adjacent room, playing Eric Gangnam Korean Restaurant (303 N. OrClapton’s “Wonderful Tonight.” I knew then this chard St.) opened at the end of June in the space meal would be awesome. that formerly housed Wasabi Japanese Cuisine. The first dish to arrive was a stainless steel bowl Gangnam has the same layout and owners as of bibimbap ($11), which is rice topped with neat Wasabi—Sukie and Hee Cheong—but a new piles of veggies, ground meat and a raw egg. In Korean chef: Sukie’s sister, Helena Jeong. On a recent visit, my date and I ordered a few the past, I’ve had bibimbap served in a blistering hot stone bowl that crisps the rice and cooks main dishes to share. As we closed our menus, the egg as it sits. This version an assortment of vibrant was cold, but the flavors and banchan appeared: Two types GANGNAM KOREAN RESTAURANT textures were right on. Silky of kimchi—a fiery Napa 303 N. Orchard St., 208-323-882, bean sprouts played off earthy cabbage variety that had gangnamboise.com shiitake mushrooms, while been aging since May and sesame oil-licked spinach a cucumber version; a thin scallion pancake; marinated bean sprouts; japchae complimented chewy strands of gosari, or bracken fern stems. Walnuts added a nice crunch and a (glass noodles with vegetables in sauce) with carrots and spinach; broccoli in a slightly sweet, salty heap of gochujang, or Korean pepper paste, lent sauce; and a warm bowl of soupy black soybeans. the dish a pervasive smoky flavor. Unlike the bibimbap, the soondubu (soft tofu) While sampling the spread fanned out in front of us, the familiar notes of a live saxophone began soup ($11) was extremely hot, both tempera-

Step a-side, imitators. Gangnam is bringing the banchan.

ture- and spice-wise, and not much of a looker. Clumps of soft white tofu and wisps of egg white swirled around in an oily red broth that concealed green-lipped mussels, shell-on shrimp, tiny scallops and bits of pork. Grains of white rice added a hearty texture to the soup, which I enjoyed much more than I expected at first glance. The show-stealer was the grilled trout ($13), scattered with a blanket of green onions and hot-pepper coins. Though the fish had plenty of tiny bones to contend with, the moist, flaky meat bathed in a lightly sweet and spicy sauce more than made up for the extra extraction efforts. Gangnam still offers a few Japanese options on its menu, like tonkotsu ramen, teriyaki salmon bento and tempura veggies. But I plan to stick with the spot’s unique Korean fare and get my Japanese fix when Wasabi reopens at 2325 S. Apple St., in the former Noodle Korea space.

FOOD/NEWS CAPITOL BAR OPENS, BOISE BREWING EXPANDS

State Street is now home to a new watering hole, Capitol Bar (6100 W. State St.), which took over former Shotsie’s space. Capitol Bar opened quietly at the end of June and features a prominent stainless steel bar, a smattering of inside tables and a small, fenced patio strung with cafe lights. The pub offers a selection of 14 beers on tap—everything from Bud Light and Blue Moon to Sockeye’s Galena Gold and Cascade Lakes’ Hopsmack IPA—and also features a healthy wine list with Proletariat wines on draft. “We’ve had a lot of requests for local wines and beers so we’re going to get more of those,” said bar manager Francine Hopper, who relocated to Boise from Albuquerque, N.M., with her husband to run the space. “We’ve got a lot of the breweries coming in and visiting with us.” In addition to beer and wine, Capitol Bar also has a small but focused cocktail menu that celebrates the classics—everything from gin martinis to Manhattans to mint juleps. The best part is the price: $4 for wells, $5 for calls

and $6+ for premium spirits. Capitol Bar also offers a selection of free bar snacks, like chili lime peanuts and white cheddar popcorn, but also plans to get its kitchen operating soon. “Our cook is starting next week to get the bar menu up and running, so it’ll be a week or two until we start serving food,” said Hopper Hopper and her husband are planning a grand opening party for the first weekend of August. For more info, visit thecapbar.com. In brews news, Boise Weekly’s next door neighbor, Boise Brewing, just completed a substantial expansion. In addition to installing a new garage door at the front of its Broad Street building, the brewery also acquired two brand new 30-barrel fermenters, which will double its brewing capacity. Along with its new fermenters, Boise Brewing received a shipment of 425 new kegs and bottled its first brew, Roosevelt Red Rye, using Woodland Empire Ale Craft’s bottling line. —Tara Morgan B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


SCREEN

Ian McKellen plays the deliciously deductive Sherlock in Mr. Holmes, wearing a fedora, straw hat and even a top hat but (sigh) no deerstalker cap.

MR. HOLMES: AN ART OF DEDUCTION AND SEDUCTION Ian McKellen is the elementary choice for the super sleuth GEORGE PRENTICE The name and the face was familiar, but the trappings were missing. “The deerslayer cap? I’m afraid that was an embellishment of an artist. I’ve never worn one,” says the 93-year-old Sherlock Holmes, played to delicious precision by Ian McKellen. “And the pipe? I prefer a cigar.” His Holmes prefers a top hat and morning coat but as soon as we see him stalk a suspect through the streets of London, all is as it should be, and we settle in for a splendid summer mystery in Mr. Holmes, adapted from the 2005 bestseller A Slight Trick of the Mind, by American author Mitch Cullin, and directed by Bill Condon (Dreamgirls, The Fifth Estate), who teamed with McKellen before in 1998’s Oscar-nominated Gods and Monsters. This is not your grandparents’ Sherlock Holmes: Basil Rathbone portrayed the sleuth in 14 films from 1939 to 1946. It is not your parents’ Sherlock Holmes: Jeremy Brett played Sherlock in a hit British TV series from 1984 to 1994. It is not even your yours or children’s, for that matter: Benedict Cumberbatch, Robert B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

decades-old death of the woman, and the pace Downey Jr. and Jonny Lee Miller all currently fill the detective’s shoes on screens big and small. of the film matches Holmes limited mobility. One particularly delightful scene in Mr. Holmes is Some may consider the film sedate or slow. I watching McKellen’s Sherlock slip into a London would argue Mr. Holmes is stately and rather beautiful. Tobias Schliessler’s cinematography nickelodeon to watch a screen adaptation of and Martin Child’s production design glow, himself. Astute viewers may want to note that framing Holmes against the the fictional Sherlock, preening English countryside, the streets aplenty in his over-the-top perof London and a war-ravaged formance, is played by Nicholas MR. HOLMES (PG) Tokyo (that’s all you get on Rowe, who himself played a Directed by Bill Condon that plot twist). The film’s drift younger version of the sleuth in Starring Ian McKellen, Laura matches Holmes’ memory 1985’s Young Sherlock Holmes. Linney struggles but, ultimately, we are McKellen’s Holmes scoffs at the rewarded with loose ends tied big-screen interpretation and Opens Friday, July 17 at The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., 208neatly with affection and grace. slinks from the theater. 342-4288, theflicksboise.com “Is that him?” whispers one Perhaps the biggest mystery woman to another as Holmes of Mr. Holmes is a case from 30 emerges from a steam locomoyears prior that caused Sherlock tive, wondering if they’re in the presence of to retreat from London to a seaside cottage in Kent where he quietly tends to his bee collection. the great detective. It is, my dear readers. And in McKellen in the title role, Mr. Holmes is a He occasionally pulls out a folder of secretender, whimsical mystery that lands somewhere tive notes and an even-more mysterious faded photograph of a woman. Holmes, now struggling between myth and memory. It’s a lovely summer adventure. with severe memory loss, attempts to solve the

Waxing by Lisa 20+ years experience Full Body Waxing, Eyebrow Design, Bikini To Brazilian, Male Body Waxing, Airbrush Make-up Artist

208.342.1003 • 1025 Main Street On the corner of main & 11th Tues–sat 9–6 BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 21


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

SERVICES

SERVICES

CRISIS

CLASSES

IDAHO TAEKWONDO TRAINING CENTER

Buy 1 month of lessons and get a free uniform and unlimited classes! 386-9408 • boisemartialarts.net 1804 Broadway Ave • Boise

NYT CROSSWORD | START AGAIN ACROSS

1

2

3

4

5

18

6

10

28

37

32

45 50

53

89

47

68

42

43

72

73

48

57

84

58

62

63

69

64

85

77

78

86

71 79

87

91 94

99

100 104

95

96

97 101

98 102

106

109

110

116

117

118

121

122

123

125

126

111

112 119

113

120 124

127

128

74 Collared one 75 Miss Woodhouse of Hartfield 76 Stand-up comic’s need 79 Echo tester’s word 80 Car-care brand 83 Paul Newman title role 85 Lionel trains? 88 Mesabi Range excavation 91 Oscar winner Garson 92 Big butcher purchase 93 Group planning a hostile takeover of Swiss Miss? 98 “Here’s an idea …” 99 Facebook profile feature 100 Plywood sheet 101 Nail-removing tool 103 Driveway sealant 104 Become tainted 106 Former SAG president Ed 107 “That’s my last trip to the store, ever!”? 112 Indicates, as a gauge 116 Letup 117 Reserve 118 One who’s pretentious as hell? 121 Study too much, say 122 No-show in Hubbard’s cupboard 123 Fictional resort in a 1988 #1 hit 124 Washed up, careerwise 125 Stands abuse? 126 Flexible Flyer, e.g. 127 Climber’s spike 128 Wet blanket?

DOWN

92

105

22 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

65

70 76

93

108

56

61

90

103

17

35

75 83

16

30

41

55

74

88

26

15

52

67

82

14

25

46

60

81

13

22

40

54

66

57 Bath bathroom 58 Prey for a dingo 59 Coat of arms element 60 1969 Nabokov novel 61 Don Everly’s singing brother 63 Reaction to a slug 66 Guarantee 68 Harry’s 1948 Dixiecrat opponent 70 Horror film featuring Ghostface

21

51

59

12

34 39

44

11

29

33

38

49

107

9

24

31

80

8

20

27

36

7

19

23

39 Raced with runners 41 “You can stop explaining” 44 Tree with samaras 45 “La Bohème” song in which Rodolfo regrets saying too much to his lover? 49 Except for 51 Site of Italy’s Blue Grotto 52 Barclays Center player 53 “I’ll obey your medical advice!”?

23 Bird involved in French government affairs? 25 Fulminate 26 Come together 27 Leading the pack 28 Glittering ballet costume? 31 Brings up 34 Was nosy 35 “Prince ____” (“Aladdin” song) 36 Flipper?

1 Hamlet 5 Possible cause of red eyes 10 Collared one 14 Poker in a western 18 College sports’ ____ Valley Conference 19 Disease spread by bats 21 Nefarious 22 “Casablanca” role

BY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

114

115

1 Florida city, for short 2 “Ain’t gonna happen” 3 “Dirty” dish 4 Track vehicle 5 Back again 6 Youth 7 Provides a hideaway for, maybe 8 Undisturbed, after “in” 9 Qualifying race 10 Breach of trust 11 Skirt 12 Having no flex 13 Entreaty 14 Buck, in old slang

15 More-than-adequate supply 16 Like Goodwill wares 17 “Dagnabbit!” 20 Half-witted 24 Classical performance hall 29 Utah Valley University city 30 Soft rock? 32 Dennis the Menace’s mom 33 Holiday Inn rival 36 Oil source for Asian cooking 37 Exploit 38 Lobbying org. formed in 1944 39 “Yeah, I bet,” e.g. 40 Intertwined 41 Digs in the Arctic 42 List entry 43 “Whatever Gets You ____ the Night” (Lennon song) 46 Device once sold in a U2 Special Edition 47 Unwelcome bit of mail 48 Prefix with metric 50 Consume 54 The olden days 55 Actress in “Selma,” familiarly 56 Chi-____ (Christian symbol) 62 Sinful 64 Diez menos dos 65 Neck lines? 67 Law-school course 69 Network owned by Showtime 71 Children’s heroine with the dog Weenie 72 Runner-up in every 1978 Triple Crown race 73 Perambulates, western-style 75 Source of four great rivers, in the Bible 77 “Law & Order: SVU” actor 78 Ruler entombed in the Great Pyramid

108 1980s auto 109 Dies down 110 Blender setting 111 Polynesian idol 113 ____-by-the-Sea, N.J. 114 Rat Pack nickname 115 Multitude 119 Coverage provider, for short 120 Particle in seawater

80 Sets (on) 81 Dressage gait 82 Western city named after a Shoshone chief 84 Card game from Mattel 86 Grimm figure 87 Hatch in the Senate 89 Important people 90 Tabloid show beginning in 1991 94 Given a start 95 Not working as a volunteer 96 Favored by fortune 97 Radio-era dummy 102 Religious doctrines 104 Cylindrical holder 105 Lying flat 106 Berkshire racecourse site 107 Indistinct shape L A S T K I N S H A S A G L A S S D E N Y

R I M O K O M O K E B A N A A Y C A M Y S T R E O T E C R K O N H I A N D S C Y E I P A S A G A N R O U N D C A U D S I S T I A N P H E R I C Y D B R I A R S E N O K E N G O I D E A E T C O S T E A H Y O U S A S S

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

O M A H A R S T T A E L

T H E M A N O F T H E P E O P L E

R E D I N K E W W

B O S T W N I O C S K

U R A L

S O M E W H P A O T N Y A D N E O E P P O A S T T T A U L

A N S W E R S S D S H E R O O F S A N J U A N H I L L

A I R I R E S A M P E D

T H E G R E A T E M A N C I P A T O R

H A V E W H A M I T O S L O W I S H

A R I L

I D L I N E G S T A T B R L A E S S T R A S A N C A A T A M

H O M E O F M O U N T R U S H M O R E

A N I S

T E T S

D I G I T

A S S N S

A T T I T U D E

E V A N S T O N

B O IS E WE E KLY. C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY OFFICE HOURS

C A RE E RS

COMMUNITY

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

BW CAREERS CLERICAL PERSONNEL NEEDED Clerical Personnel needed to help reduce my work load. We need someone that can work Monday through Friday, also be reliable, responsible and organized. Computer skills needed/ good with organization. Salary/Weekly Rate: $530. Interested person(s) Should contact: lisa2055@hotmail.com for more info. HELP WANTED Part-Time Appointment Setter Wanted. Must Have Good Phone Etiquette. $8 Per Hour, 20 Hours Per Week. Please Call Rob 8303381. MAKE $1000 Weekly!! Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience Required. Start Immediately. www.theworkingcorner.com MCCALL- HAIRSTYLISTS NEEDED ASAP Dahlia’s Beauty Parlor is looking for experienced hairstylists. Booth rental OR commission. Hotel McCall Courtyard. Call Kilmeny 208315-1015

FIND

RISK: GAME OF THRONES EDITION GAME

Winter will have come and gone in the real world by the time we return to Westeros and find out whether Jon Snow is actually KIA (though judging by Kit Harington’s still-flowing locks, you could bet a bag of Silver Stags that he’ll return through some form of witchery). In the meantime, Fire and Ice aficionados can scratch their itch for intrigue with the Risk: Game of Thrones Edition Game, from USAopoly, Hasbro and HBO. Hold your destriers, though, the game isn’t scheduled for release until August. However, the Wall Street Journal’s “Speakeasy” blog published a detailed “exclusive look” at Risk: GoT on July 7. Based on the preview, it should be more than sufficient to wile away a few hundred hours waiting for season six. In keeping with the epic nature of both the Game of Thrones series and the Song of Fire and Ice book series that spawned it, Risk: GoT is sprawling. Its 650 pieces include two game boards depicting Westeros and Essos; enough troops to fill the armies of seven Houses; seven player boards; and 28 character cards including Daenerys Targaryen, Cersei Lannister and, presumably, all the usaopoly.com $74.99 other usual suspects. Beyond that, there are territory cards, maester cards, objective cards to help you on your way to the Iron Throne, an in-game currency and special unit tokens for use in deploying Stannis Baratheon-level stratagems. Choose from several game scenarios, including a three- to fiveplayer War of the Five Kings in Westeros, a two-player war between Ghiscari slavers and House Targaryen and a seven-player world war that brings together both boards and the Houses of Baratheon, Ghiscari, Lannister, Martell, Stark, Targaryen and Tyrell. As they say among the speakers of High Valyrian, “All men must die.” They should also say, “All men (and women) must play.” —Zach Hagadone B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

MASSAGE

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com MARSHMALLOW: I’ve sweetened up in my foster home—ask how you can see s’more of me.

MINERVA: I’m a purr-ific, fun, and verbose little sweetie. Let’s chit-chat ’n’ cuddle.

Come meet our wonderful and cute kittens—all ready to go home with you.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. JESSIE: 2-year-old, female, border collie mix. Loves to play fetch and play in the kiddie pool. Knows all her basic commands. (Kennel 311#20956313)

CHLOE: 8-year-old, female, purebred boxer. Still active and strong. Sits and shakes hands. Eager to please. Highly motivated by treats. (Kennel 416#28166068)

ALICE: 4-year-old, female, longhair Chihuahua mix. Enjoys walks and resting in your lap. Will appreciate a settled home with adults or older kids. (Kennel 314#28137253)

PILATES

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT GABBY: 6-year-old, female, purebred Persian. Will need regular grooming. Prefers to live as an only cat in her home. Must live indoors. (Kennel 07#28525035)

STUD MUFFIN: 2-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Independent and self sufficient, but enjoys attention. Likes to have his back scratched. (Kennel 14- #27795038)

BANDIT: 4 1/2-month-old, male, domestic shorthair. Enjoys batting around his toys. Will benefit from gentle handling and slow introduction to other pets. (Kennel 08-#28536375)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 23


RELIABLE HOUSEKEEPER-NANNY WANTED I am looking for a housekeeper for this Summer to clean, do laundry, dishes, etc. Also need her to migrate to nanny this August for the new school year. I live in Nampa off Midland- must have own vehicle, be good with kids ages 8 and 10. Pay is given weekly. 775388-2757 TELEPHONE REPS WANTED We are currently looking to fill parttime positions Mon-Thurs 4pm8pm. Potential for full-time and advancement for the right candidate. This is cold calling, with a defined and established script. Experience is a plus but not necessary, but you must be comfortable / have a presence on the phone. If you have a good work ethic and a positive attitude, give us a call. Also looking for those with management/shift supervisor experience, but must be willing to start on the phones. Casual work environment/Daily Prizes and Bonuses. 208.629.7260.

BW CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 EARN $500 A DAY As Airbrush Makeup Artis For: Ads, TV, Film, Fashion, HD . Digital 35% OFF TUITION - One Week Course. Taught by top makeup artist & photographer. Train & Build Portfolio. Models Provided. Accredited. A+ Rated. AwardMakeupSchool.com.

HOUSING BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com

PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY MIND BODY SPIRIT BW BODY WORKS ULM Inc. 340-8377.

BW ENERGY HEALING OPENING DOORS Energy balancing & Chakra cleansings. Call 208-724-4901.

BW HEALTH FITNESS FLOWERING FIST TAI CHI I teach Yang Style, traditional form and TaijiFit, fitness moves that use Tai Chi positions and flow. It is similar to aerobics. Classes in Star at The Dance Academy from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. 907-7752751.

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. Male Only. Private Boise studio. MC/ VISA. massagebyeric.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Enjoy a relaxing massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard. Call or text Richard at 208-6959492.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

COMMUNITY

LEGAL

BW GRAY MATTERS

BW LEGAL NOTICES

HOME CARE Trusted home care for in the Treasure Valley. Home Helpers Boise. Making Life Easier. Call today 208-322-2068.

LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly. com or call 344-2055 for a quote. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Stephanie L Schmid. Legal Name

BW MUSIC LESSONS PIANO LESSONS! Dedicated piano teacher seeking new students. Located off Marigold in Garden City, Beginner-Intermediate. Contact Peggy: 941-4080 or pianopeggy0@gmail.com.

BW NEED COMPOST Refugee farmer needs compost of any kind. I have a truck & will pick up. Grass clippings... 409-3563. Thanks!

Case No. CVNC 1510112 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Stephanie L Schmid, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Stephanie Leslie McCall. The reason for the change in name is: Family Name. A hearing on the petition is

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Stop Making Sense was originally the name of the film—and soundtrack—produced by the Talking Heads in the 1980s, and now it is the central theme of your horoscope. I think your brain would benefit from a thorough washing. That’s why I invite you to scour it clean of all the dust and cobwebs and muck that have accumulated there since its last scrub a few months back. One of the best ways to launch this healing purge is, of course, to flood all the neural pathways with a firehose-surge of absurdity, jokes and silliness. As the wise physician of the soul, Dr. Seuss, said, “I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When you read a book that has footnotes, you tend to regard the footnotes as being of secondary importance. Although they may add color to the text’s main messages, you can probably skip them without losing much of the meaning. But I don’t recommend this approach in the coming days. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, footnotes will carry crucial information that’s important for you to know. I mean this in a metaphorical sense as you live your life as well as in the literal act of reading books. Pay close attention to the afterthoughts, the digressions and the asides.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The English word “quiddity” has two contrary definitions. It can refer to a trivial quibble. Or it can mean the essential nature of a thing—the quality that makes it unique. I suspect that in the coming weeks you will get numerous invitations to engage with quiddities of both types. Your first task will be to cultivate an acute ability to know which is which. Your second task: Be relentless in avoiding the trivial quibbles as you home in on the essential nature of things.

few days of this productive mayhem and you may be eligible for inclusion in the Guinness Book of World Records. I could see you being selected as “The Soul Wrangler with the Craziest Wisdom” or “The Mythic Hero with the Most Gorgeous Psychospiritual Wounds.” But it’s my duty to let you know that you could also just walk away from it all. Even if you’re tempted to stick around and see how much more of the entertaining chaos you can overcome, it might be better not to. In my opinion, you have done enough impossible work for now.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “A poet must not cross an interval with a step when he can cross it with a leap.” That’s an English translation of an aphorism written by French author Joseph Joubert. Another way to say it might be, “A smart person isn’t drab and plodding as she bridges a gap, but does it with high style and brisk delight.” A further alternative: “An imaginative soul isn’t predictable as she travels over and around obstacles, but calls on creative magic to fuel her ingenious liberations.” Please use these ideas during your adventures in the coming weeks, Cancerian.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “People who have their feet planted too firmly on the ground have difficulty getting their pants off,” said author Richard Kehl. That’s good advice for you in the coming weeks. To attract the help and resources you need, you can’t afford to be overly prim or proper. You should, in fact, be willing to put yourself in situations where it would be easy and natural to remove your pants, throw off your inhibitions and dare to be surprising. If you’re addicted to business as usual, you may miss opportunities to engage in therapeutic play and healing pleasure.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): July is barely half over, but your recent scrapes with cosmic law have already earned you the title of “The Most Lyrically Tormented Struggler of the Month.” Another

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “A failure is a person who has blundered but is not able to cash in on the experience,” wrote American author Elbert Hubbard. In light of this formulation, I’m pleased to

24 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

announce that you are likely to achieve at least one resounding success in the coming weeks. At this juncture in your destiny, you know exactly how to convert a past mistake into a future triumph. A gaffe that once upon a time brought you anguish or woe will soon deliver its fully ripened teaching, enabling you to claim a powerful joy or joyful power. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The poet Mary Ruefle describes reading books as “a great extension of time, a way for one person to live a thousand and one lives in a single lifespan.” Are there other ways to do that? Watching films and plays and TV shows, of course. You can also listen to and empathize with people as they tell you their adventures. Or you can simply use your imagination to visualize what life is like for others. However you pursue this expansive pleasure, Scorpio, I highly recommend it. You are set up to absorb the equivalent of many years’ experience in a few short weeks. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian rapper Nicki Minaj is not timid about going after what she wants. She told Cosmopolitan magazine that she’s “high-maintenance in bed.” Every time she’s involved in a sexual encounter, she demands to have an orgasm. In accordance with the current astrological omens, Sagittarius, I invite

you to follow her lead—not just during your erotic adventures, but everywhere else, too. Ask for what you want, preferably with enough adroitness to actually obtain what you want. Here’s another critical element to keep in mind: To get exactly what you want, you must know exactly what you want. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A college basketball player named Mark Snow told reporters that “Strength is my biggest weakness.” Was he trying to be funny? No. Was he a bit dim-witted? Perhaps. But I’m not really interested in what he meant by his statement. Rather, I want to hijack it for my own purpose, which is to recommend it as a meditation for you in the coming weeks. Can you think of any ways that your strength might at least temporarily be a weakness? I can. I suspect that if you rely too much on the power you already possess and the skills you have previously mastered, you may miss important clues about what you need to learn next. The most valuable lessons of the coming weeks could come to you as you’re practicing the virtues of humility and innocence and receptivity. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone with the Wind, Rhett Butler delivers the following speech to Scarlett O’Hara: “I was never one to patiently pick up broken fragments and

glue them together again and tell myself that the mended whole was as good as new. What is broken is broken—and I’d rather remember it as it was at its best than mend it and see the broken places as long as I lived.” Your oracle for the near future, Aquarius, is to adopt an approach that is the exact opposite of Rhett Butler’s. Patiently gather the broken fragments and glue them together again. I predict that the result will not only be as good as new; it will be better. That’s right: The mended version will be superior to the original. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Australian actress Rebel Wilson has appeared in several successful movies, including Bridesmaids, Bachelorette and Pitch Perfect. But she didn’t start out to be a film star. Mathematics was her main interest. Then, while serving as a youth ambassador in South Africa at age 18, she contracted malaria. At the height of her sickness, she had hallucinatory visions that she would one day be “a really good actress who also won an Oscar.” The visions were so vivid that she decided to shift her career path. I foresee the possibility that you will soon experience a version of her epiphany. During a phase when you’re feeling less than spectacular, you may get a glimpse of an intriguing future possibility.

B O IS E WE E KLY. C O M


scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Aug 25, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: June 17, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB July 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2015. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV 15 1605, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CANYON, Discovery Pointe Subdivision Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. David Terry and Lesli Terry, Defendant. TO: DAVID TERRY You have been sued by Discovery Pointe Subdivision Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Third Judicial District in and for Canyon County, Idaho, Case No. CV 15 1605 C. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Canyon County Courthouse, 1115 Albany, Caldwell, Idaho 83605 Telephone: (208) 454-7300 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-6294567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY

advise you in this matter. DATED this 17 day of June, 2015. CLAKE, DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB July 1,8,15,22, 2015. Superior Court Of the State of The People of the State of California in and for the county of Shasta IN MATTER OF THE ADOPTION PETITION OF: WYATT JAMES PRINDIVILLEMORERO Adopting Parent Case No.: 14A5547 CITATION TO PARENT THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO: GINGER YOUNG By order of this court you are hereby advised that you may appear before the judge presiding in Department 11 of this court on 9/16/2015 at 4:00 p.m. then and there to show cause, if any you have, why WYATT JAMES PRINDIVILLE-MORERO should not be declared free from your custody and control for the purpose of freeing WYATT JAMES PRINDIVILLE-MORERO for placement for adoption. The following information concerns rights and procedures that relate to this proceeding for the termination of custody and control of said minor as set forth in Family Code Section 7860 et seq.: 1. At the beginning of the proceeding the court will consider whether or not the interests of the minor child require the appointment of counsel. If the court finds that the interests of the minor do require such protection, the court will appoint counsel to represent him, whether or not he is able to afford counsel. The minor will not be present in court unless he requests or the court so orders. 2. If a parent of the minor appears without counsel and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless the parent knowingly and intelligently waives the right to be represented by counsel. The court will not appoint the

same counsel to represent both the minor and his parent. 3. The court may appoint either the public defender or private counsel. If private counsel is appointed, he or she will receive a reasonable sum for compensation and expenses, the amount of which will be determined by the court. The amount must be paid by the real parties in interest, but not by the minor, in such proportions as the court believes to be just. If, however, the court finds that any of the real parties in interest cannot afford counsel, the amount will be paid by the county. 4. The court may continue the proceeding for not more than thirty (30) days as necessary to appoint counsel to become acquainted with the case. Date: JAN 16 2015 PUB July 15, 22, 29 and August 5,2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Shawn Dale Hansen. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1511200 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Shawn Dale Hansen, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Shannon Marissa Hansen. The reason for the change in name is: This name better suits my identity. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Sept. 08, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against

the name change. Date: May 11, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB July 15,22,29 and August 5, 2015.

live 1-on-1 HOT phone Chat. Calls in YOUR city! Try FREE! Call 1-800-261-4097

ADULT

BW FOR SALE ADULT BW ADULT

VIAGRA 100mg, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement! Discreet Shipping. Save $500. Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1-800-404-1271

MEET SEXY SINGLES Send Messages FREE! Straight 208-345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-4722200. Use FREE Code 3187, 18+.

BW CHAT LINES

ADULT

Curious About Men? Talk Discreetly with men like you! Try FREE! Call 1-888-779-2789 www. guyspyvoice.com Feel the Vibe! Hot Black Chat. Urban women and men ready to MAKE THE CONNECTION. Call singles in your area! Try FREE! Call 1-800-305-9164 ¿Hablas Español? HOT Latino Chat. Call Fonochat now & in seconds you can be speakingto HOT Hispanic singles in your area. Try FREE! 1-800-416-3809 MEET SEXY SINGLES Browse & Reply FREE! 208-3458855. Use FREE Code 3188, 18+. WHERE HOT GUYS MEET Browse Ads & Reply FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 2619, 18+. Where Local Girls Go Wild! Hot, Live, Real, Discreet! Uncensored

JEN SORENSEN HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 25


PAGE BREAK

TOP 10

FORECAST

Countries with the highest prison populations

“ Whenever we have a crisis in Idaho, it’s ever ybody ’s crisis .”

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

Advice for those on the verge

1. United States of America: 2,217,000 2. China: 1,657,812 3. Russian Federation: 667,546

#boiseweeklypic

— GOV. C .L. “BUTC H ” OT TER TA LKING TO REP O RTERS WHILE TO URING THE CA PE HORN F IRE IN NO RTH IDA HO ON JULY 9.

4. Brazil: 607,730

Dear Minerva, I have been dating a wonderful man for one year now. He loves me and often tells me so. I return the verbal sentiment, although I know I am not being genuine when I say it back. This man has done so much for me. I just do not see myself being with him. He is gentle and fragile. I am terrified of breaking his heart because I know how much he loves me. It literally makes me sick to my stomach. Hoping for some friendly advice.

5. India: 411,922 6. Thailand: 304,916

“It’s a feeding frenz y.” — TE X T OF A SIGN HELD UP O N CA LDWELL BO ULE-

7. Mexico: 256,941 8. Iran: 225,624

—Foot in Her Mouth 9. Indonesia: 167,163

Dear Foot, Here’s some friendly advice: STOP LYING TO HIM. While he has being doing so much for you and falling in love with you, you have been taking his help and leading him on. I am sure there are a hundred ways this might have happened but instead of being honest about it, you have said, “I love you”—three little words that have caused so many things in the world to go right and so many things to go horribly wrong. You need to break it off if you can’t see any future with him. Yes, it is going to hurt him, but he deserves better than deception and false affection. Do it as soon as you can before it blows up into a “Lifetime Movie” scenario.

VA RD IN NA MPA , WHERE PROTESTERS RECENTLY DEMON STR ATED AGA IN ST PREDATORY PR ACTIC ES BY PAYDAY LEN DERS Twilight Criterium. Taken by Instagram solitary bestofidaho.

10. Turkey: 165,033

Source: prisonstudies.org

“It’s really astonishing .”

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

—BOISE AT TORN E Y A N DRE W SC HOPPE ON RE VEL A TIO N S THAT O F F IC IA LS WITH THE IDA HO DEPA RTMENT OF C O RRECTION SY STEMATICA LLY A LTERED FORMATION A N D WO RKED

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

Time served by Paul Geidel, arrested for murder in July 1911 and released in May 1980— the longest sentence ever served in the U.S.

Good: 27.95% Bad: 49.6% Neutral: 22.36%

PRISON ER MEDICA L IN TO C OVER UP THE

68 YEARS, 245 DAYS

What has been your experience with the Boise Police Department?

E VIDENC E

D i s clai mer: Th i s onli ne p oll i s not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of loc al, statewi d e or nati onal op i ni on.

83

83

8 YEARS

2.5 MILLION

8,000

2.7 YEARS

45 YEARS

Age of Egyptian-born actor Omar Sharif, star of Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago, when he died on July 10

Age at death of Olga Ivinskaya, the lover of Doctor Zhivago author Boris Pasternak and inspiration for the character of Lara, played by Julie Christie opposite Omar Sharif in the 1965 film

Amount of time served by Olga Ivinskaya in the Soviet Gulag due to her association with Boris Pasternak

Number of inmates in the Gulag at its height in 1950

Approximate number of inmates in the Idaho Department of Correction’s 10 prisons and four community re-entry centers

Average time spent in prison for inmates serving term sentences in Idaho

Amount of time Ronald Macik has been behind bars in Idaho, serving a life sentence in connection with the 1971 death of a fellow inmate, making him the state’s longest-serving inmate

(BBC News)

(The New York Times)

26 | JULY 15–21, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

(The New York Times)

(New York Review of Books)

(National Park Service)

(Idaho Department of Correction)

(IDOC)

(Associated Press)

B O IS E WE E KLY. C O M


shop here

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY CAREERS

FAMILY

CAREER TRAINING

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | JULY 15–21, 2015 | 27


HEALTHCARE

IN MOTION At St. Luke’s, we believe healthcare can be so much more

than sick care. That’s why we support the Boise GreenBike program and make it easier for you to get the most out of it. When your body is in motion and your car remains

parked for short, local trips, everyone lives and breathes a little better. So the next time you enjoy Boise GreenBike, remember you’re not just having fun–you’re playing an active part in your health.

Get onboard today at Boise.GreenBike.com!

Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue 04  

Idaho’s Prison Scandal Escalates

Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue 04  

Idaho’s Prison Scandal Escalates