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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

F E B R UA RY 2 5 – M A RC H 3 , 2 0 1 5

VO L U M E 2 3 , I S S U E 3 6

“I love hearing from people who don’t hate me, even if they tell me I’m going to Hell.”

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‘A Lot of Stories’ Mystery and sorrow surround the

officer-involved shooting of Michael Casper

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Oversight, Out of Mind As communities beef up police oversight, Boise mulls part-time ombudsman

COPE 4

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Low Fuel

A new plan to protect the SalmonChallis National Forest from wildfire FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com Associate Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Marcia Franklin, David Kirkpatrick, Tara Morgan, John Rember, Ben Schultz Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com Ian Roth, ian@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jenny Bowler, jenny@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2014 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE DO WE NEED POLICE OVERSIGHT? ASK SPOKANE Otto Zehm wanted a Snickers bar. That’s why the 37-year-old janitor stopped by a Spokane, Wash.-area Zip Trip shortly after sunset on March 18, 2006: to buy a snack. As he waited on foot at a drive-up ATM, two 18-year-old girls parked at the machine got nervous about his presence and pulled away, even though one of them had already entered her PIN. As Zehm accessed the ATM, one of the girls called police, worried that he was stealing her money. She also told a dispatcher that Zehm—who was mentally disabled—seemed high. Shortly thereafter, police responded to the “suspicious circumstance.” Zehm was inside the gas station, holding a two-liter bottle of soda, when a Spokane police officer hit him twice with a baton, bringing him to the ground, then fired on him with a Taser. As Zehm crawled away, the officer hit him several more times. A total of eight officers ultimately fell on Zehm, who was Tased again and hog-tied. He died two days later in a local hospital. He hadn’t stolen any money, nor were any drugs or alcohol found in his system. That incident still haunts Spokane, and marked a low point for relations between the community and its police. To help work through the trauma—and ensure civilian oversight of the police— the city of Spokane established its Office of Police Ombudsman in 2008. Then-Boise Ombudsman Pierce Murphy traveled to the Eastern Washington city to brief city council members on police transparency—something he was well respected for, having come from a city where, according to a 2008 report in the Inlander, things had been “even worse” a decade before. Seven years later, after a string of high-profile police-involved deaths across the country, the role of civilians in overseeing the police has grown in prominence. Meanwhile, in Boise, the city is considering winding down the ombudsman’s job from a full- to part-time position. Two stories in this week’s paper deal with police oversight: on Page 6, Boise Weekly News Editor George Prentice sifts through the conflicting stories surrounding an officerinvolved shooting that took place on Feb. 16. On Page 10, Staff Writer Harrison Berry takes an in-depth look at the past, present and future Boise’s Office of the Community Ombudsman. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Luz Camarena TITLE: “Carajo/Shit” MEDIUM: Mixed Media ARTIST STATEMENT: From the series of Racial Epithet Vignettes, a body of work that examines the overlap or racism and immigration. “Carajo” expresses the anger toward words that shouldn’t have been pronounced. *Artwork was cropped to fit the cover, see full piece on Page Break, Page 30.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM

OPINION

What you missed this week in the digital world.

TRAIN DANGER IN THE WA KE OF THE FIERY DER AILMENT OF A CRUDE OIL-L ADEN TR AIN IN WEST VIRGINIA , THE FEDER AL GOVERNMENT IS WA RNING THAT MORE DER AILMENTS ARE TO BE E X PECTED. FUEL-HAULING TR AINS COULD DER AIL AN AVER AGE OF 10 TIMES PER YE AR, PUT TING HUNDREDS OF LIVES AT RISK AND CAUSING M O RE THAN $4 B ILLIO N IN DA MAGE. MORE ON CIT YDESK.

STATE OF SNOW It might seem like a mild winter in the Treasure Valley, with unseasonably warm weather and a dearth of snow, but data shows statewide snowpack is actually looking pretty good. More on Citydesk.

TREEFORT LINEUP In case you’ve been locked in a lead-lined box for the past few months, the Treefort Music Fest is around the corner and has released its full lineup of bands, venues and times. Details on Cobweb.

OPINION

4 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

FUZZY MATH The governor’s 2016 executive budget predicts the state will end up with a $3 million balance. The Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy begs to differ. See the numbers on Citydesk.

ASK BILL ABOUT IT This letter makes me itch like crazy BILL COPE Hi, Willy Billy. It’s Anonymous again. Your favorite fan from the Cope’s-Latest-Column Discussion Group. Did you notice I called you Willy Billy? Isn’t that funny? I didn’t think of it until I remembered I had a goat in my stuffed animal collection when I was a teenager and his name was Willy Billy Goat. He got chewed up to pieces by my schnau-poo I had once named Barbra after Barbra Streisand, even though Barbra was a boy, but I remembered them both the other day, Willy Billy Goat and Barbra, and it reminded me of you. Not that you look like a goat. But I thought that would be a good name for you, Willy Billy. Isn’t that funny? But that’s not what I’m writing about. You can probably tell I didn’t catch Ebola. I have always been lucky that way, not catching diseases they have in places like Africa and Hawaii, and it looks like I dodged another germ bullet. We have even started having Cope’s-Latest-Column Discussion Group meetings again, especially after that one where you said you went to Heaven. That one caused even more discussion than usual. My friend Dottie said that even if you don’t go to Hell over all the other columns, you will certainly go to Hell over that one because it was blasphemy she says, and God will put up with a lot of naughty things, but blasphemy is not one of them. Old Mr. Hamperstein said he thought you were just joking around, but Dottie said, “If God had a sense of humor, then why did he create icy sidewalks?” and old Mr. Hamperstein who broke a hip two years ago on an icy sidewalk couldn’t answer that one. But that’s not what I’m writing about, either. I am worried about measles. Especially the getting them part. I cannot remember if I’ve ever had measles and there is no one left to ask, since both Mom and Dad went to Heaven years ago, and my big sister Connie is in an assisted living place and can’t remember where she leaves her dentures let alone if I ever had measles. Do you think I should get a vaccination shot in case I never had them? But if I did have them and I get a vaccination shot, do you think the shot could cancel out the immunity I can’t remember whether or not I already have, and then I will get measles again? And if I didn’t ever have them and get the vaccination shot, do you think I will get autism, which I can’t remember if I’ve ever had, either? And which is worse, autism or the measles? I’ve heard autism is pretty bad, but at least you don’t itch like crazy. Except with my luck, I would get autism and the measles both so that I would itch like crazy, anyway, but not be able to tell anybody about it. Or is that chicken pox where you itch like crazy? Anyway, the way I see it, a person just doesn’t know what to do anymore. You hear this and then you hear that, and everybody’s telling you something different, and sometimes, I just feel like curling up in a ball with a cuddly wuddly bear. Which I think I would do if I had any stuffed animals left after Barbra got through with chewing them all up to pieces. I used to get so mad at him for doing that, but then he went to Heaven too. Anyway, so that is my question, Willy Billy. And don’t you think that name is funny? I laugh every time I say it. Willy Billy, Willy Billy, Willy Billy. Ha ha, isn’t that funny? —Yours Truly Forever, Anonymous ••• Ah, Anon, it’s good to hear from you again. I love hearing from people who don’t hate me, even if they tell me I’m going to Hell. I’m delighted you didn’t catch Ebola, and am pleased that Cope’s-Latest-Column Discussion Group is active again, as it encourages me to know there are people I can turn to for an explanation whenever I have no idea, myself, what I am talking about. But on to your question. Or questions, as it were, for you actually asked several, none of which I can answer. I am not a doctor. Back in the ’80s, I did have a thin, white sports coat that did make me look a little like a doctor, but sadly, it didn’t help me know more about human immunology, nor did it make me look more like Don Johnson. (Incidentally Anon, have you ever had a dream about having Don Johnson as your gynecologist? I know it’s none of my business, but I’ve had so many women tell me they had this same dream, that now I’m wondering if it may be one of those Jungian, universal... oh, never mind.) But back to your worries over measles and vaccinations and autism and such. I wish I could help you, but I’m neither qualified to answer medical questions, nor insured against medical malpractice. However, I can give you one general piece of advice that might guide you through any number of future concerns. I suggest that whenever you’re given a choice between believing what a great preponderance of trained professionals are saying on any particular matter, and wild, unsubstantiated crap you’ve read on the Internet, I’d go with the pros if I were you. After all, we know what modern science has accomplished for humanity in the past five centuries, while from what I hear, 90 percent of what you see on the Internet is coming out of some guy living in an abandoned school bus someplace in Nevada (I read it on the Internet). BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION DOUR OLD MEN And dour old women in drag JOHN REMBER Nietzsche famously said that if you stare into the abyss long enough, the abyss will stare back. He was referring to what it feels like to gaze into a universe too complex and too indifferent for humans to make sense of. Most of us agree with Nietzsche whether we’ve read him or not. A meaningful life requires a more predictable world than the one quantum theory and existentialism describe. Human vanity requires that we ignore the facts that our sun is one of a hundred billion in our galaxy, and our galaxy is one of a hundred billion in the universe. Similarly, our moralities strive to reduce the world to a collection of comfortable dualities: Democrat or Republican, gay or straight, Christian or infidel, white or non-white, good or evil. Never mind that mitochondrial studies show all humans to have a common ancestor, one recent enough to make us all incestuous brothers and sisters. Never mind that the people most worried about the sexual identities of others are unable to face ambiguity in their own sexuality. Never mind that Democrats and Republicans are two sides of the same debased coin. Never mind that Christianity is one of many true religions, each with its apostates and non-believers. And never mind that what stares back from Nietzsche’s abyss is a lost part of ourselves. Often enough we’ve lost it for a reason, but there it is, staring back at us, waving in recognition, like an old friend. Or fiend. I’ve taken Nietzsche’s words as a caution. My study of the abyss has been conducted through proxies, mostly. I stayed out of the abyss of Vietnam, but friends who went there came home unable to unsee what they’d seen, and often it made them crazy. I’ve stayed out of the abyss of politics, but I’ve watched my students who became politicians go from young idealists to corruptible middle-aged pragmatists on their way to becoming morally decrepit old nihilists (some of them got there early). Probably the best way to view the abyss at a safe remove is through the study of literature. I don’t mean “God’s in his Heaven, and All’s Right with the World” literature. I do mean Hawthorne, Melville, Dostoyevsky and Camus, who wrote about what happens when humans come face-to-face with their own disowned natures. Human beings don’t emerge happily from these confrontations. Anyone who ends a mortal existence with a sunny disposition and a kind nature hasn’t experienced humanity the way Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown has. Anyone with a cheerful outlook hasn’t sought revenge upon creation like Melville’s Captain Ahab. Anyone with a wake-up-get-dressed-eat-breakfast BOISE WEEKLY.COM

unselfconsciousness hasn’t fought an endemic human plague like Camus’ Dr. Rieux. Then there’s Dostoyevsky’s Grand Inquisitor. Consider the Jordanian pilot burnt to death by ISIS. The Islamic State will have to burn lots more people to catch up with what the Catholic Church did from the 12th century, when it murdered the Cathar people for resisting papal authority, to 1826, when the Inquisition conducted its final execution, hanging a Spanish schoolteacher for teaching Enlightenment philosophy. In between, papal authorities ordered more than 3,000 people to be burned at the stake. Dostoyevsky used his Grand Inquisitor to show how religious leaders had come to value worldly power over salvation, wealth over righteousness, cynical wisdom over innocence. The Grand Inquisitor saw himself protecting his flock from Satan in all His tempting, devious forms, even as Satan devoured him from within. If this transformation sounds familiar, that’s because when dour old men seize the reins of an organized religion, the original divine spark—the event or person who started the religion in the first place—gets lost. Lust for power becomes a given, and when people disagree with power, it becomes necessary to kill them to keep everyone’s outlook simple and uncluttered. But it’s hard to imagine Christ being overjoyed at the Inquisition or the Christian sack of Constantinople. It’s hard to imagine the Prophet Muhammad approving of the murders of Shia by Sunni, and of Sunni by Shia. It’s hard to imagine the Buddha smiling at Buddhists as they burn Islamic villages in Burma. It’s all malignant foolishness, but it’s human foolishness, and it will forever exist in uncomfortable counterpoint to the best humanity has to offer. It doesn’t just surface in religion, either. A family, a business, a university, a government, a non-profit—all can become arenas for the exercise of power by dour old men and dour old women in drag. Hierarchies get established, lines of succession are laid down, rules are posted, people are punished, species are destroyed, continents are laid waste, sexuality comes to be seen as something to be regulated into nonexistence if it can’t be owned outright. Humor and irony are exiled to enemy territory. Nietzsche’s abyss, in the end, gazes at all of us in triumph. Nietzsche himself succumbed to mute psychosis after watching a man beat an exhausted horse to death. Critics use his insanity to show his writings are insane as well, but it’s worth remembering that the bloody, maddening dance of the powerful and powerless is a familiar enough sight for any of us. BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 5


CITYDESK

FIGHTING FOR THE FLEET Mike Pape was nervous. The administrator of the Idaho Transportation Department Division of Aeronautics attended a Feb. 19 press conference at the Boise Airport, where officials including Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter, U.S. Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch, U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador, Boise Mayor Dave Bieter and Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce Director Bill Connors voiced concerns about the possibility of the U.S. Air Force pulling the Idaho Air National Guard out of Gowen Field. The Idaho Army National Guard would remain at the field, however. “We could lose the entire [Air National] Guard unit here,” Pape told Boise Weekly. “We need the Guard in Boise. It provides thousands of jobs.” According to the city of Boise, Gowen Field accounts for about $210 million a year pumped into the area economy. The Air Force is retiring its fleet of A-10 Thunderbolt jets next year, which would mean taking them out of Gown Field. The problem is, Gowen doesn’t yet have an aircraft to replace the outgoing fleet. Pape said the military is scaling back, “and now we have to stand in line like everybody else,” referring to other Guard units in the country. Gathered in the Boise Airport food court, Otter, Crapo, Risch, Labrador, Bieter and Connors discussed the retirement and the future of Idaho National Guard at Gowen. The Air Force has proposed moving the Idaho Air National Guard from Gowen Field to the Mountain Home Air Force Base—something all six leaders said they don’t want to see happen. The elected officials and a handful of business owners and community members met with Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James, who flew to Boise from the Pentagon for two days of meetings prior to the press conference. Their goal was to show her how important the Gowen Field National Guard Base is to both Boise and to the safety of the United States. “We are hopeful that the future of Gowen Field is a bright one,” Bieter said, explaining that Gowen Field participated in a competitive process to receive the Air Force’s next generation of aircraft—the F-35 air superiority fighter— and that Gowen ended up among the top three on that list. While controversy has dogged the F-35 program for years—the jets make twice as much noise as the F-16 (pushing 105 7 decibels) and cost around $150 million each to produce—Boise was passed up in 6 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

GEORGE PRENTICE

The A-10 Thunderbolt is scheduled to be retired in 2016.

NEWS THE LIFE AND MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF MIKE CASPER Too much sorrow, too many questions GEORGE PRENTICE Amanda Casper needed to clear her head. As she walked by a Boise pawn shop Feb. 23, the violent death of her brother, Michael Casper, only one week prior, was still fresh in her mind and heavy on her heart. “And I saw a skateboard in the pawn shop. I just had to buy it,” Amanda said. “I rode it at a local skatepark today, and I just knew if I fell, Michael would catch me. I felt Michael was with me today.” As she spoke, two skateboards sat a few feet away, propped against a wreath of daisies wrapped in a white sash with the words, “In loving memory of Michael Casper.” The back room of the Idaho Building, which comfortably accommodates 15 people, was packed with about 50 mourners on the afternoon of Feb. 23. A line of nearly 50 more people, young and old, snaked out the door, down a hallway and onto Eighth Street. Some were fellow skateboarders, some were former co-workers and quite a few were members of Casper’s extended family. “My son looks just like Michael,” said Amanda. Turning to look at the photo of her late brother, she began to sob. “Whoever was with him that night he was shot should have stayed him him,” Amanda said, her voice rising. “None of this would have happened.” She then fell into the arms of Pastor Renee McCall, who presided over the memorial. Amanda’s next words were clearly audible. “Damn it, Chris,” she said. Chris McIntire may have the most to say about what exactly happened to Michael Casper in the early morning hours of Feb. 15, when the 26-year-old was fatally shot by Boise police following an early morning disturbance at his duplex. “To be honest, there’s still a lot of conjecture and hearsay,” McIntire told Boise Weekly. “I was

About 100 friends, family and acquaintances gathered at the Idaho Building on Feb. 23 to honor the memory of 26-year-old Michael Casper, who was killed in a police-involved shooting at his home on Feb. 16.

with him that night. I think I can say exactly what happened. But the reasons should remain between him and his family.” That’s quite different from the stance McIntire took in the days after the incident, when he took to Facebook to welcome any and all people curious about the events of leading to Casper’s death to contact him directly. “If anyone has questions about Michael Casper and his death, please contact me,” wrote McIntire. “I was with him the night of the shooting and was the last person to speak to him. We became brothers, and a part of me is now gone. There is much confusion surrounding the events of that night. I am grieving and my heart is heavy, but he needs the air to be cleared. Call me day or night.” The Facebook post, which included McIntire’s personal phone number, has since been deleted. The sparse details of the incident—the who, what, when and where—may satisfy the curious, but none of the information eases the grief of the tragedy. The circumstances surrounding the death of Casper, shot by a Boise police officer, remain a mystery; and what has followed has been a mini social-media firestorm. Pastor McCall, who is also Casper’s aunt, cautioned those attending his memorial service. “[Don’t] pay any attention to the nastiness that has been printed in the newspapers,” she said. “What they’re saying about Michael isn’t true.” McIntire agreed. “Objective, my ass,” he said, referring to previous media accounts of the Feb. 16 incident. “There are a lot of stories out there, and I believe

it will make more sense a year from now. For now, his family and I have to do some soulsearching to come to terms with everything.” According to those friends and family BW spoke to, Casper had everything to live for. No one knew that more than his mother, Fran Gough, who gave birth to Casper on Oct. 12, 1988. “Mikee—that’s what all of his family called him—Mikee was always dreaming big,” said Gough. “He never spoke negatively about anybody. He was always there with grace when someone wanted something. He’ll live on in a lot of people’s hearts.” Casper, who took his last name from father, Ron Casper, also of Boise, was the middle child of three: his sister Laura the oldest, his sister Amanda the youngest. By the time Casper graduated from Boise High School in 2007, he had already moved into his own apartment and was working as an order selector at the Winco Distribution Center in southeast Boise. Over the next several years, Casper acquired and sold some property and a few months before his death, he founded Idaho Solar Power, a Boise-based alternative energy firm. “He had more hopes and dreams than anyone I ever knew,” said Gough. “He was going everywhere. He never sat still.” Casper was on the fast track. He would park his Harley-Davidson motorcycle inside, telling family and friends that being “able to park your Harley in the front room” was one of the perks of being single. 7 “But skateboarding was his absolute passion. He would skateboard at City BOISE WEEKLY.COM


NEWS Hall, behind schools and anywhere with stairs,” said Gough, adding that her son gravitated to the mountains in the winter. “And snowboarding. Oh my, yes, snowboarding.” Gough was eager to share memories of happier days, but she took a long pause as she looked at the clock. “I have to go pick up Mikee’s ashes,” she said. “He’ll be staying with his mother from now on.” Gough didn’t talk much about the questions surrounding her son’s death, but she’s certain that there are too many inconsistencies with the events of Feb. 16. “I think there was somebody else involved. The cops say there wasn’t, but I truly think somebody was with him,” she said. McIntire later told BW he was certain that Casper’s choices that fateful night—including the fact that Casper was brandishing a weapon— were not “suicide by cop.” “I wanted to clear the air a little bit,” McIntire said. “There are a lot of stories that the police are trigger-happy. I can dispel that myth. I would appreciate it if a lot of people on Facebook would leave it alone.” McIntire’s on-again, off-again desire to disclose the details of what happened doesn’t sit well with a few other of Casper’s close friends, including Matthew Moss, who said that he was puzzled by how anxious McIntire was to “get his story out,” at least initially. “Did you see that Facebook post?” asked Moss, who met Casper when the two worked together at Winco. “It’s a little overboard, the way he’s trying to put his stuff out. Chris [McIntire] calls me out of the blue on the night after the shooting and proceeds to tell me his side of the story.” Standard protocol indicates the public will not get the results of the full investigation for months, but this is what we do know: Casper and McIntire were together on the night of Feb. 15 and into the early morning hours of Feb. 16. They had gone to a bar and returned to Casper’s home in a duplex at Malad and Gourley streets on the Bench. Moss told BW that McIntire and his girlfriend had an argument earlier that evening, and McIntire had asked to spend the night at Casper’s place. What happened between the time the two returned to Casper’s from the bar and a short time later when Casper was fatally shot by a Boise police officer is still being investigated. The Ada County Critical Incident Task Force is taking the lead in the probe. The task force includes members of the Garden City, Meridian and Boise police departments; the Ada County Sheriff’s Office; and the Idaho State Police. Following the shooting, an official statement from the Boise Police Department said officers heard a crashing sound and what sounded like gunshots coming from inside Casper’s home.

CITYDESK

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BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Officials don’t know what will replace the A-10 fleet at Gowen Field after the jets are retired.

Mike Casper was remembered as a “lovely young man” who “was going everywhere. He never sat still.”

Police also said bullet holes were later discovered in a home across the street and in a nearby car. BPD officer Jason Green, a six-and-a-half-year veteran of the force, was the first on the scene after neighbors alerted police to the sound of smashing glass. The police report indicated Green attempted to contact Casper, but when he pointed a gun at another officer, Green fired, striking him in the chest. The following day, Ada County Coroner Dotti Owens, (who was sworn into her new position a few weeks ago), ruled that Casper died of a gunshot wound to the chest. “Chris [McIntire] said Mike [Casper] was acting real weird and depressed, which is completely untrue, because we all talk to him regularly and he’s happier than hell, and there’s a whole bunch of things to back this up,” said Michael Burns, who had known Casper since the young man was 18 years old. “I believe [McIntire’s] story fits very well for the police,” he told BW in a phone conversation Feb. 20, “because they don’t want my story to be true, which is that these two got in an altercation, [McIntire] wanted in the house, and he acted like a maniac. Mike went to get his gun and started shooting—the guy’s breaking his windows out. Mike shoots out at him, hits the car and the house across the street, and the guy leaves. The cops come back and see him waving the gun and shoot him. “That’s what I believe. Something along those lines, and they don’t like that story, because it kind of makes them look bad a little bit, instead of maybe talking to [Casper] first.” Sadness, frustration and even anger hung heavy over the Feb. 23 memorial. More than a

few mourners had their own theories on what might have happened to their friend, but the one thing they all had in common was a deep sorrow. “I’ve been crying for three or four days… hard,” said Burns in an earlier conversation. “He was such a lovely, lovely young man.” One by one, tearful family and friends stood next to the memorial skateboards, wreath and photograph of Casper. A montage of images was projected on a far wall, chronicling his 26 years: photographs of him as a baby; as a boy at beaches and county fairs; playing make-believe in an oversized cowboy hat and boots; celebrating Christmases and Halloweens; and multiple pictures of Casper aboard his beloved skateboard. As one image dissolved into another, “Godspeed” by the Dixie Chicks was played: “Oh my love will fly to you each night on angel’s wings / Godspeed / Sweet dreams.” A few days after first speaking with BW, Burns stood at the front of the memorial service for Casper, who had lived with Burns’ family for four years. “We talked all the time. And we usually talked about God, girls and love. There wasn’t ever a conversation that the two of us had that didn’t end with us saying ‘I love you’ to one another,” said Burns, who also read letters from his two children—a 10-year-old and a 6-year-old—saying how much they missed Casper. Before he could read through the letters, Burns also dissolved into tears and was unable to finish his words. Additional reporting by Zach Hagadone.

favor of Luke Air Force Base in Glendale, Ariz. for housing the mission in 2012. 6 According to Col. Tim Marsano, public information officer for the Idaho National Guard, “of course there is a possibility,” that F-35s could be stationed in Idaho, “but it would be impossible to know for sure. … [A]s more come off the assembly line, they need more places to base them.” Still, Idaho officials, from the governor to Bieter and the state’s congressional delegation, hold out hope that the high-tech jets will someday be assigned to the Gem State, specifically at Gowen. When that might happen is anybody’s guess. “The Air Force has put out its timeline,” Risch said. “It’s a timeline we don’t agree with as a delegation, and we want to see it adjusted.” He explained that the Air Force plans to retire the A-10s around this time next year, but it may take anywhere from two to six years to receive the F-35s. “It’s the dovetailing of the retirement of the A-10 and the implementation of the F-35 that we think is not on the right time scale,” he added. Members of the delegation said they showed James the benefits of Boise as a location for a National Guard base. The infrastructure is already in place; the experience of the Guard here is strong; and combining the Guard with the Air Force base in Mountain Home may hurt recruitment, as many who live in Boise would not be willing to drive more than an hour to go to work. Another perk: Boise doesn’t have the same encroachment laws around the airport that other cities have, which is good news for planes as loud as the F-35. “To me, one of the most important things about this visit is that she [James] has now been here on the ground in Idaho,” Crapo said. “She sees the commitment we have, she sees the strength of Gowen Field.” After the press conference, Pape told BW he felt encouraged by what he heard from the congressmen. “We’re being a squeaky wheel,” Pape said. “Sometimes Idaho gets forgotten about. We’re reminding Washington D.C. what we have, which is good airspace and experience and the support from the community.” —Jessica Murri BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 7


CITIZEN I get accepted into UNLV and I start pursuing a music education degree. And then I auditioned for my first opera. I was cast as a cover, and the girl I was covering dropped out, and so I had to learn the role really, really quickly and go on stage for her. And ever since then, it’s just been … I love it. Immediately after graduating from UNLV, I got hired at Opera San Jose as a professional artist, and … gosh, I did nine roles there, so that was better than any grad school.

J E RE M Y L A N N I N GHA M

CECILIA VIOLETTA LOPEZ Anything but a diva MARCIA FRANKLIN Cecilia Violetta Lopez is proof you can start later in a profession and still be successful. Raised in the Magic Valley community of Rupert, Lopez attended Idaho public schools and worked in Minidoka County fields in the summer. She initially worked as a medical technician for several years, but her love was always singing. After being encouraged to go back to college and study music, Lopez found herself enamored with opera—and very good at it. Now the 32-year-old single mother is a rising star in that field. She recently won the Freddie Award for Excellence in Opera for her “star is born” performance as Violetta in Verdi’s La Traviata when she was a student at the prestigious Martina Arroyo Foundation in New York. The best is yet to come: beginning Friday, March 13 and running through Sunday, April 12, Lopez will sing the iconic role of Violetta in the Virginia Opera production of La Traviata, with performances in Norfolk, Fairfax, Richmond and Virginia Beach. Shortly after this interview, Lopez auditioned for New York City’s Metropolitan Opera Company. The next day, she was offered a contract and will understudy the role of Sylvianne in the Met’s production of The Merry Widow, beginning Friday, April 24. “I’m on cloud nine,” she told Boise Weekly. “I can’t believe it happened to me.” You worked in the fields in the summer, yes? Yes … my mom started us at a very, very young age. We were hoeing beets. Oh, my gosh; we hated it. My brother and I were like, “Oh man, here we go again.” But as annoying as it was, those moments; I think they’re memories. I just remember a lot of bonding I did with my older brother, and that’s where my mom taught us how to sing and she instilled in us the love of music. It was all the old Mexican classics, all the Ranchera music. So that’s what I grew up listening to and singing along with my mom, doing harmonizing. Eventually you were singing in mariachi bands. Where did you sing? Weddings, quinceaneras. In Rupert there was a rodeo that was basically Latino-based. And either my mom would be like, “You should go sing with the mariachi,” or people would call me days before to set it up. 8 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

Did you think you might sing as a career? I never really had that thought in my head growing up thinking, “I’m going to pursue this and become a famous mariachi singer.” It was never like that. It was just something that I liked to do. What about opera? Had you heard much of it? Never. I think the first time I heard opera was when I watched Sesame Street as a kid—and that’s how I learned English. Sesame Street used to have opera singers make cameo appearances back then, and Beverly Sills was the one who came on. And I just remember listening and watching and going, “That’s strange. That’s very strange music, but whatever.” And I kind of put it on the back burner and that was that. It wasn’t until I went to UNLV … back then my husband told me, “You should pursue a career in music. That’s what you love to do. Why don’t you do it?” And I said, “OK, we’ll see.” So

What about the acting part? You’re not just singing up there. You have to become the character, for sure. This is actually funny. Getting my degree at UNLV, taking acting courses was not part of the curriculum for vocal performance. And actually Miss Irene Dallas at Opera San Jose, who was a big Metropolitan Opera star … she called me into her office once and said, “Where did you go to school? Did you go to a fancy conservatory? What theater courses did you take?” And jokingly, I was like, “I didn’t, but maybe because I’m Hispanic and I watched all those [tele]novelas with my mom growing up, maybe that’s what it is.” And she just laughed at the joke, too. I mean, the characters in the opera … they’re real people, and for me it’s so easy to be able to connect to whoever the person is I’m trying to portray. Even when they’re old-fashioned characters? I mean Gilda, whom you’ve played in Rigoletto, is locked inside her house by her dad. Weirdly enough, yes. My parents are very protective of me. Being the oldest girl [they said], “No, you’re not allowed to date.” So that I can relate to. But then it gets me every time, whenever we get to that final scene [of Rigoletto] … just picturing me in my dad’s hands, just holding me as I’m dying. And having to tell him, “Hey, I made a really stupid mistake. I love this boy, and I decided to give my life for him and to save you, too, so here I am dying in your arms.” Just the whole thing, just right now I’m giving myself goose bumps just thinking of that. To me just every opera character is a real person. And I think that’s the way to be able to connect with audiences and to keep opera alive. I think opera is for everybody. What do your parents think about all of this? At first my parents were like, “Oh, well, you’re an opera singer. That’s really weird. I mean, what do you do with it?” Because it’s not anything like ranchera, mariachi music. And I’m like, “Well, it’s a job. I mean, I audition; I get rejected a lot. And then I’ll get contracts, and we’ll go from there.” I got a standing ovation for Butterfly, and at BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN the end my parents met me in the lobby and she goes, “This is a job. This is a job and we’re so proud of you.” I think that was one of the few times my dad has ever spoken in English to me—“I’m so proud of you.” It was really cute. I was like, “Aw, Dad.” I understand your daughter has been with you this whole journey. She’s been with me since the beginning. I started my undergrad and she was barely walking. She’s 9 years old now. She would go to rehearsals with me, she’d sit through performances and watch the shows. There were times when I was cramming to memorize a role [so] instead of reading a bedtime story, I would read her my role, and put her to sleep pretty quickly. She learns stuff by rote … I’ll sing the words and she’ll do the accompaniment. It’s super cute. Tell me about your name. Because Cecilia is the patron saint of music, and Violetta is the name of the lead female in La Traviata. So that’s a pretty cool combination for a singer. It was all done by accident. My grandfather’s name is Cecilio, but then my mom and dad really liked the name Cecilia. The middle name— Violeta in Spanish is spelled with one “t.” It’s a flower. But my dad somehow messed up and put a double “t” Instead. Which I never really thought anything of it, until I went to UNLV and realized, “Oh, my middle name is really Italian.” It’s all by accident, but it works. How would you describe your voice? I don’t know. I’ve always thought very little of my voice. I’ve never thought it to be grand. In fact I always think it’s a work in progress, but then whenever I go to my teacher she says, “No, you’re a star. You’re a star. Just wait.” I’m like, “OK.” But for me, I’m my worst critic. I’m always judging myself. Is there something that makes it unique? I like to keep the upper extension pretty fresh and “there.” ’Cause a lot of singers, they lose their upper extensions. So what I’ve been told is that I have a warm, lyric soprano sound, but I have this very strange upper extension that usually the smaller, soubrette sopranos have, but it’s bigger sounding, meaning I can hit the higher notes and they’re big and present.

production of sound to cut through an orchestra. I could do like Placido Domingo. He sings his opera, and then occasionally does his mariachi concerts, miked. Do you have a favorite role yet? I really like Madama Butterfly–her whole story of being in love, and not being loved back, and then being betrayed and then having to give up her son at the end. I had a little 5-year-old boy with me at the time when we staged it and I could not look at him and sing my last aria and sing, “Look at my face and remember me” without busting into tears [tears up]. What’s it like being up there? It’s so empowering to me. To think—I’m this small little vessel and maybe, maybe just maybe for every performance, I can move one person in the audience. And that for me is just a reward and satisfaction all in itself. What’s next? I actually have a contract at Virginia Opera coming up. I will be singing the lead role of Violetta in La Traviata again, so that’s exciting. It’s nine performances, so if anyone’s in Virginia, they should go. What’s your dream? My dream, ever since I started this, is just being able to sing at the Met. To sing at the Met and all the other opera stages like La Scala and Vienna, the [Wiener] Staatsoper and even like the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. I think, “Why not? Let’s bring it home.” [Shortly after this interview, Lopez auditioned for, and secured a contract with, the Met.] You don’t seem like a diva. It makes me so uncomfortable whenever I witness it. I just want to hide under a rock. Like the other day, I got dropped in rehearsal. And the maestro is still conducting the music, and I didn’t want to miss my entrance, so I’m laying on the ground, and I’m singing. I just laughed it off, and I had some other cast members say, “Had you been another person, they would not have laughed it off.” What do you like to do other than sing? I like to go to movies. I’m a foodie. I’m a vegetarian, but I like all sorts of foods.

How is singing Mariachi different from opera? Vocally, it’s very different. Mariachi music consists of a lot of what we would call belting … so it’s a little harder on the vocal cords.

Your mom has a restaurant in Rupert. What’s its name? Loncheria “El 20”—that name was chosen because the village we lived in Mexico was called El Veinte, “The Colony of the 20th of November.”

Could you go back to singing Mariachi? It would be difficult for me to go back, because I’m so used to producing the “healthy”

What’s your favorite dish? I think Fridays my mom makes chiles rellenos, and those are the best.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 9


sCINEMAS sCAFE sVIDEOS sFUN

Inside: Special Events & March-May Film Schedule !DDITIONALFILMSNOTLISTEDMAYBESHOWN #HECKWWWTHEFLICKSBOISECOM

Schedule is subject to change. 6/, ./

Opens February 27 Writer/director !NDREY:VYAGINTSEV won Best Screenplay at Cannes for this story about a Russian family opposing a corrupt mayor who plans to demolish their home along the Barents Sea. Superb acting, stunning cinematography and a mesmerizing score by 0HILIP'LASSare highlights. Academy Award Nominee, Best Foreign Language Film. “Stunningly shot and superbly acted, this is film-making on a grand scale.� PETER BRADSHAW, GUARDIAN

Opens March 6

David CronenbergS SATIREABOUTLONGINGFORFAMEIN(OLLYWOODSTARS Academy AwardWINNERJulianne Moore ASAN AGINGSCREENDIVA Robert PattinsonASANACTOR WITHATEMPORARYGIGASALIMODRIVERANDMia WasikowskaASADIRECTORIN WAITING “So crisply directed, furiously paced and gleefully performed, that you go along for the ride.� */.&2/3#( THE ATLANTIC

MAPS

Opens March 6 Sonny ($EV0ATEL) is ready to expand his Jaipur hotel empire after a rocky start a few years ago. With his first hotel full of regulars (played by *UDI$ENCH -AGGIE 3MITH "ILL.IGHY $IANA (ARDCASTLE #ELIA)MRIE), he must now find room for the likes of 2ICHARD'ERE, who will have all the ladies buzzing. *OHN-ADDENdirects.

TO THE

STARS Opens March 13

4HISBEAUTIFULLYFILMED STORYOFASUB 3AHARANHERDERANDHISFAMILY WHOSELIVESAREDISRUPTEDBYFOREIGNJIHADISTSWAS NOMINATEDFORANAcademy Award for Best Foreign Language Film$IRECTORAbderrahmane Sissako OFFERSUSAWINDOWINTOAWAYOFLIFEALIENTOUS LIVEDBYPEOPLEMORELIKEOURSELVESTHANWECOULD HAVEIMAGINED “The film throbs with humanity, and abounds in extraordinary images ...� */%-/2'%.34%2. WALL STREET JOURNAL

TIMBUKTU

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Opens March 20

Opens March 20

4HELONGAWAITEDSEQUELTOWRITER DIRECTORJohn Boorman’s Academy Award NOMINATED Hope and GloryWHICHPLAYED AT4HE&LICKSIN PICKS UPAFTER77)) WHENTHE YEAR OLDPROTAGONIST ISELIGIBLEFORTHEDRAFT (ISCOMINGOFAGE INCLUDESINSIGHTSINTO THEMILITARY WOMEN FAMILYANDFRIENDSHIPS Callum Turner, Richard E. Grant, David Thewlis AND Tamsin EgertonSTAR

WASONEOFTHEWORSTYEARSFOR hTHETROUBLESvIN.ORTHERN)RELAND 4HECONFUSIONABOUTWHOTOTRUSTAND WHOTOFEARISPERSONIFIEDINAGRIPPING PERFORMANCEBYJack O’Connell (Unbroken WHOPLAYSAYOUNGSOLDIER INTENDINGTOKEEPTHEPEACEBUT DURING HARROWINGHOURS ISSWEPTUPINVIOLENCEAND DECEPTIONATEVERYTURN Yann DemangeWASSELECTEDAS Best Director, British Film Awards. Jack O’Connell WONTHE Rising Star AwardAT"!&4!

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 1


Treefort Film Fest

Playing With Fire

-!2#( 

02%3%.4%$"9!'%.#9 &/2.%7!-%2)#!.3 !02),s0The Taliban banned women from acting in Afghanistan in 1994. This documentary about the bravery of six women who defy that order exposes the erosions of women’s rights and the power of the creative spirit. This multi-award winning film was directed by !NNETA 0APATHANSSIOU. Not Rated, subtitled. A discussion will follow the screening. Tickets are $12.

Treefort Film Fest brings a weekend of the best in emerging independent cinema to Boise. The inaugural 2014 festival featured (+./ ('56 Sundance 2014 winners Rich Hill and Yearbook, SXSW 2014 winner Damnation, and Oscarnominated Missing Picture, among others. TFF also presents compelling Q&A’s and workshops with filmmakers. For information on this year’s festival: http://treefortmusicfest.com/

Get G e t your tickets, sstudent t u d e packages, & gi ggift i f certificates online! J. Todd Adams*, Much Ado About Nothing (2013). *Member Actors’ Equity. DKM Photography.

www.idahoshakespeare.org or call 208-336-9221

As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being. - CG Jung

Idaho Friends of Jung Environment, Ego, and Self with Scott Hyder February 27, 2015 Jung on the Evolution of Consciousness with Dr. Bill Renwick and Prof. Elton Hall March 20-21, 2015 The Second Axial Age with Dr. Richard Tarnas April 24-25, 2015 Events by donation to Idaho Friends of Jung, a non-profit.

www.idahofriendsofjung.org

Inspired to Ride

Lunafest 2015 02%3%.4%$"93/2/04)-)34 ).4%2.!4)/.!,s!02),!4 This season’s program of eight selected films will compel discussion, make you laugh, tug at your heartstrings and motivate you to make a difference in your community. Lunafest is united by a common thread of exceptional storytelling by, for and about women. Not Rated. $15 tickets are on sale now at The Flicks. To read about each short, please go to: http://www.lunafest.org/the-films

s!02), Inspired to Ride follows a handful of cyclists from around the world as they race unsupported in the first Trans Am Bike Race — 4,233 miles across the USA. Shows are at 7 pm and 9 pm. Tickets are $12 and are available in advance at The Flicks box office. Q&A with the director and race winners will follow the shows.

Rossini’s

The Barber of Seville

Il barbiere di Siviglia sung in Italian

Jason Detwiler as Figaro

May 8 & 10 The Egyptian Theatre

www.operaidaho.org Tickets starting at $22 Call now: 208-387-1273

The Perfect Present ...

Is A Work of Art!

Fearturing handcrafted jewelry, art glass, and furniture from over 125 American artists.

415 S. 8th Street - in BoDo (208) 385-9337 www.rgreygallery.com 2 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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classically trained locally inspired

'ALLERYs#LASSES 3UPPLIESs%QUIPMENT 14 Varieties of Take-n-Bake Lasagnes Gourmet EntrĂŠes & Desserts U Dine-In or Take Out 1504 Vista Ave. U Boise U (208) 345-7150 www.cucinadipaolo.com

%LLEN3T"OISE'ARDEN#ITY %LLEN3TISACROSS#HINDENFROMTH

 

(RS4UES &RI 3AT 

Opens March 27 .ATURALIST Judy Irving SundanceANDEmmy WINNINGDIRECTOROF The Parrots of Telegraph Hill TELLSTHESTORYOF A#ALIFORNIABROWN 0ELICANWHOGOTLOST ANDSTOPPEDTRAFFIC ONTHE'OLDEN'ATE "RIDGE!.EW9ORK 4IMES#RITICS0ICK “The fate of these birds, which, the film tells us, could live into their 40s, becomes as engrossing as many a human drama.�

208.472.1463 cafĂŠvicino.com 808 fort st.

Opens April 3

This road movie set in 1966 follows a teacher who uses "EATLES lyrics to teach English. When he finds out *OHN,ENNON will be in Spain to shoot a movie, he decides to drive to Almeria. Along the way he picks up two teenagers who could use a kind adult in their lives. *AVIER#AMARA stars; $AVID 4RUEBA directs. In Spanish with English subtitles; not rated, suitable for teens and adults. Winner of 6 Goya‘s, including Best Picture. “Smart and delightful.� TOM KEOGH, SEATTLE TIMES

-)#(!%,/35,,)6!. WASHINGTON POST

Opens April 10

Opens April 10

"EN3TILLER and .AOMI7ATTSplay married filmmakers who try to keep maturity at bay by spending time with young hipsters, played by !MANDA3EYFRIED and !DAM $RIVER. #HARLES'RODIN co-stars. .OAH"AUMBACH wrote, directed and produced this timely comedy.

Ethan HawkeDIRECTS THISLOVINGPORTRAITOFPIANISTSeymour Bernstein !HUGESUCCESSATTHESELECTIVETelluride Film Festival BEINGUNFAMILIARWITHTHISDELIGHTFUL GENIUSWILLNOTHAMPERYOURENTHUSIASMFOR THEFILM

“A consistently funny, acutely observed look at a couple dragging their feet into middle age.�

“Hawke’s film is very well crafted, tightly edited and elegantly photographed. The acute musical selections only add to our appreciation of Seymour’s selfless devotion to his art.� 34%0(%.&!2"%2 HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

PETER DEBRUGE, VARIETY

Opens April 3

Gabe Polsky’s DOCUMENTARYTELLSTHESTORYOFTHE /LYMPICSh-IRACLEON)CEvFROMTHE PERSPECTIVEOFTHE3OVIET2ED !RMY(OCKEY4EAM4EAM CAPTAINSlava Fetisov WHO WENTFROMNATIONALHERO TOPUBLICENEMY PROVES TOBEANINCREDIBLY CHARISMATICMAN “With dark humor and an epic sweep characteristic of Executive Producer Werner Herzog, Red Army sides not with nations or ideologies but with the transcendent powers of sport.� !.$2%7,!0). .02

Opens April 17

Winner of 10 Argentinian Academy Awards, this group of six short films on the theme of revenge was directed by $AMIAN3ZIFRON. Infidelity, road rage and other bad behavior are justly punished inventively and humorously. In Spanish with English subtitles.

“Riotously funny.� DAVID ROONEY, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

WHILE WE’RE Young BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 3


ROLF STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION

ADMISSION Bargain Matinees (before 6:00) ...................$7 Regular Prices: General Admission ...............$9 Children, Students with ID, Senior Citizens 65+ ...................................$7 Active Military .............................................$7 Flicks Card (10 admissions for 1 or 2 persons) ...........$65 Unlimited Annual Pass (for one person) ...$250 Gift Certificates available in any amount.

MINIMIZING PAIN. MAXIMIZING POTENTIAL.

PAM BLACKLEDGE 208.473.1019 pam@rolfboise.com

710 Franklin Boise rolfboise.com

)NTHISSCIENCEFICTION MYSTERYDomnhall GleesonSTARSASACOMPUTER GEEKSENTTOVISITHISGENIUS#%/Oscar Isaac WHOREQUIRESHIMTORUNA4URINGTESTONAFEMALE ROBOTPROTOTYPETOSEEIFSHEISPROGRAMMEDWELL ENOUGHTOPASSFORHUMAN7RITERAlex Garland (28 Days Later, Sunshine DIRECTS Alicia Vikander CO STARS

Opens April 17

Based on .AOMI /RESKES and %RIK#ONWAYSinsightful book, Merchants of Doubt exposes the methods used by “spin doctors� to shape public opinion regardless of the truth. Using humor as well as scientific information, director 2OBERT+ENNERenlightens us about the tactics used to skew the facts about topics such as tobacco and climate change.

Opens April 24

Opens April 24 or May 1

“Alex Garland’s brittle, beautiful directorial debut is a digital-age ‘Frankenstein’ refashioned as a battle of the sexes.�

“This enthralling film is as fascinating as it is horrifying.�

Jonah HillANDJames FrancoRECREATETHESTORY OFTHEDISGRACEDNew York TimesREPORTERMichael FinkelANDACCUSEDKILLER Christian Longo,WHO PRETENDEDTOBE&INKEL WHILEONTHERUNFROM THELAW3EPARATINGFACT FROMFICTIONCREATESA COMPELLINGTRUECRIME TALE Felicity JonesAND Gretchen MolCO STARFOR DIRECTOR Rupert Gold Michael FinkelWROTE THESCREENPLAY

COMING IN MAY

'59,/$'% VARIETY

KENNETH TURAN, L.A. TIMES

4 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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WHO WATCHES THE WATCHMEN?

Advocates want Boise’s Office of the Community Ombudsman position filled sooner rather than later, but Mayor Dave Bieter is in no hurry HARRISON BERRY

In the early morning hours of Feb. 16, Boise police responded to a report of a man using a crowbar to break out the windows of a duplex in the Depot Bench neighborhood at the corner of Malad and Gourley streets. Officer Jason Green was the first on the scene and tried to make contact with the man as more officers arrived. According to initial reports, the man, later identified as Michael Casper, 26, of Boise, fired gunshots inside the residence, then reached outside the window and pointed a pistol at another officer. Green fired his weapon at Casper, who died from a gunshot wound to the chest (for more on the shooting, see News, Page 6). An investigation by the county-wide Critical Incident Task Force (CITF) continues, but upon its completion, a separate investigation will be conducted by the Boise

10

| FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

Office of the Community Ombudsman led by Dennis Dunne, who has held the position on a part-time basis since July 2013, when Pierce Murphy, who was the full-time ombudsman for 14 years, left Boise to perform similar duties in Seattle. Along with police oversight, it’s the ombudsman’s job to review internal police investigations and look into “critical incidents,” in which police use force that results in injury or death. The ombudsman also regularly reports to the Boise City Council on incidents of concern and law enforcement trends that may be of interest to the Council and the public. The “interim” in Dunne’s job title worries some, including Dunne. Many remember the spate of police-involved shootings that spurred the creation of the office in 1999,

and they fear independent police oversight will go by the wayside if a permanent replacement for Murphy isn’t found soon. At City Hall, a nationwide search for a new ombudsman has stalled, and Mayor Dave Bieter is considering asking the City Council to downsize the position from full-time to part-time, suggesting there’s little rush to fill the vacancy by citing the low number of complaints the ombudsman has received in recent years. Ultimately, the ombudsman’s role may shrink, and that’s a move that some say would undermine one of the institutions that helped rebuild community trust in the BPD for more than 15 years. “I think the ombudsman’s office is in a great space right now,” Murphy told Boise Weekly from his new office in Seattle. “But you can’t say you no longer have need for the systems that got us here.”

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


‘THE RUNAROUND’ As a community relations specialist, Melissa Baker knew that one of her principal jobs would be to educate Boiseans on the systems Murphy was referring to. Baker, who lives in Charleston, S.C., applied for the top job at Boise’s Office of the Community Ombudsman in the fall of 2014 and consulted regularly with Murphy. Out of those talks, she came to understand that should she land the position, she’d need to show the community what an ombudsman is, what the office does and why it’s important. “One thing [Murphy] said that was really important to me, he felt like cases or reports were down because he felt like the position had been vacant for so long that people didn’t think it was there,” Baker said. “That indicated to me that right out of the gate, I’d be doing a lot of education and outreach to the community.” The number of complaints lodged with the ombudsman against BPD officers and the number of critical incidents have declined in recent years. In 2012, Murphy investigated 92 cases, including four critical incidents and 13 complaints. The next year, the office investigated 64 cases including two critical incidents and eight complaints. In the 2014 mid-year report, the office investigated 21 cases, with one complaint. Baker has experience with the mentally ill, child abuse and fair housing investigations, police disciplinary review, and strategic community relations, and she is a member of the National Association of Human Rights Workers. She relished the thought of putting those skills to use in Boise. Baker said the city offered her the ombudsman position, but negotiations snagged on the cost of moving her family to Boise and on what Baker described as an “invasive” series of background checks. When rumors began circulating about Bieter looking into reducing the ombudsman’s position to part-time, Baker began considering a lawsuit against the city for rescinding its original employment offer. “[The city] hasn’t given me a legitimate business reason,” she said. “Honestly, I feel like I’ve been getting the runaround because I’m getting so many answers.” Baker learned about the ombudsman’s position in Boise from a brochure and letter mailed to her by a California recruiter. After two phone interviews, the city flew her from Charleston to Boise. During her stay Oct. 19-22, 2014, she had an in-person interview with a panel of executive staff, including Chief Deputy City Attorney Steve Rutherford; then-BPD Officer (now Chief) Bill Bones; City Human Resources Director Shawn Miller; Stephanie DeMars from Human Resources; and Mayoral Administrative Assistant Jade Riley. Baker had a separate interview with Mayor Bieter, during which Baker said he assured her that the job would be a full-time position. City staff told Baker that they would have an answer for her by the first week of November 2014. November came and went. On Jan. 5, 2015, Baker received a phone call from Bieter, who said the position had initially been offered to another candidate who had declined. Now, he was offering it to her. She told him she was honored and, the next day, she received a conditional offer of employment in the mail. Once Human Resources had completed a background check, she’d be given a start date and her annual salary would be $95,000. She was elated by the offer, but parts of the agreement worried her: The letter stated she would be reimbursed $6,400 for moving costs—it was going to cost her more than twice that to ship her possessions to Boise. She made a counter offer of $23,000 for moving expenses and requested her first paycheck be remitted to her upon her arrival in Boise. Baker told BW that If she took the job, she would be a single mother moving across the country who hadn’t had a paycheck in six weeks. When she heard that the mayor balked at her moving expenses, she was furious. “I don’t know many Americans who could go six weeks without a paycheck and move,” Baker said. “I don’t know how the mayor lives, but my sense is that he’s not living like the rest BOISE WEEKLY.COM

of America, let alone the fact that I never brought up that I’m a including ombuds and citizen review boards, in the United States. single parent. Does that mean he wants a wealthy person?” Between two and five are established every year, many of them in A private investigator arrived in Charleston on Jan.19 to small and medium-size cities like Boise, while larger cities have conduct a background check on Baker. She described the probe longer histories with these organizations. New York City has the as exhaustive and invasive, with the investigator speaking to her largest, with more than 100 staff members investigating civilian friends and co-workers about her personal and professional life. complaints, commendations and incidents involving officer-relatHe examined an incident in which Baker and her family were ed use of force. Los Angeles has an ombudsman’s staff of about 30. victims of a crime. She wouldn’t go into detail about the crime Some cities get their oversight from offices like Boise’s, others use itself, describing it as “very personal,” but she said it resulted in panels, working groups or commissions. a grand jury investigation and stressed that the case reflected no There is no one-size-fits-all approach to civilian oversight, as criminal wrongdoing on her part. Baker believed she passed with every community has different needs and resources. Ferguson, flying colors. Mo., is in the process of establishing a citizen review board in “[Shawn Miller] got back to me and he told me, ‘You have a the wake of race demonstrations following the shooting death of lot of fans.’ He said, ‘You are very highly respected both personally Michael Brown, a black suspect shot and killed by a white police and professionally,’” she told BW. officer in August 2014. Some communities have prosecutoWhile Baker was in regular contact with the city’s Human rial oversight, in which district attorneys or other non-civilian Resources Department, she was getting mixed or no signals from individuals or agencies watchdog the police. But according to Bieter’s office. Then she received word that the mayor had rejected NACOLE President Brian Buchner, civilians are uniquely posiher counter proposal for moving costs—and she hadn’t been given tioned to bridge the gap between the police and the communities a start date. they serve. “Did I pass the fingerprints? Did I pass the background check? “I think there’s something special about civilian oversight, but He said yes. Why don’t I have a start date? I got a lot of different we recognize that’s not the only way a police department might answers: The mayor was going in a different direction with the become more accountable. Any effort that doesn’t include civilian position; ‘he had problems with relocation,” Baker said. oversight is missing out on a critical link to the community,” Baker said that the process made her feel as though the city’s Buchner said. right hand didn’t know what its left hand was doing. Though she There are few ways to measure the effectiveness of civilian overtold BW she was still interested in the job, adding that Miller was sight. In part, because the public’s faith in law enforcement is diffihelpful and supportive, cult to quantify. Another her experience with the hurdle is the many ways “I DON’T KNOW HOW THE MAYOR LIVES, BUT MY in which hard data can mayor left her feeling as though other areas of SENSE IS THAT HE’S NOT LIVING LIKE THE REST be read. Commonly used city government may metrics like the number of have been unaware of the OF AMERICA . ... DOES THAT ME AN HE WA NTS A civilian complaints against conflict happening in her a police department may WE ALTHY PERSON [ TO BE OMBUDSMAN ] ? ” pursuit of the position. reflect the public’s faith “It appeared to me that its concerns will that [the Boise City Council] didn’t seem to know what my side be addressed, rather than lack of faith in law enforcement itself. of the story was, what I had been told and what I was going Buckner said that policy recommendations and community through. I’m not sure if they were part of the decision,” Baker outreach improve police outcomes and higher public trust, but said. the ultimate value of consistent oversight of police is the way The mayor’s office doesn’t comment on personnel issues, but they spur law enforcement to respond to community problems Communications Director Mike Journee said Bieter is considproactively, identifying and addressing systemic issues before them ering asking City Council to reduce the position from full- to become chronic and difficult to correct. Reducing public overpart-time because of a drop in the number of complaints made sight, even at a time when there are few complaints made against to the ombudsman’s office as well as the unsuccessful attempts police, is more complicated than shrinking a job due to a smaller to fill a full-time position. Currently, Journee said, there’s no workload: It’s relaxing pressure on police departments to address particular urgency to take Dunne out of the role of interim omcommunity concerns. budsman, and shrinking the job could be seen as a move toward “Oversight plays a general role in providing independent greater fiscal responsibility at City Hall and a less adversarial perspective. To limit or downsize an office—there’s the serious risk relationship with BPD. of losing that independent voice,” Buchner said. “This position will continue; it’s just a matter of being a proper For Reno News & Review Editor Brian Burghart, who collects steward of public resources and making sure that the workload nationwide reports of police-involved shootings on his website, and the position match,” Journee said. “The importance of having fatalencounters.org, the effects of shrinking civilian oversight are a position like this is so people can understand police operations, tangible. Reducing the capacity of an ombudsman “decreases the what happens and why.” ability to do the job when there’s a crisis.” “That’s exactly the opposite of what you want,” Burghart said. “That’s why you have downtime sometimes, so you’re staffed for ‘LOSING THAT INDEPENDENT VOICE’ crisis,” The city is considering reducing the ombudsman’s position at a time when communities elsewhere are strengthening civilian oversight of the police. The role played by community ombudsmen— WATCHING THE WATCHERS and the larger conversation about law enforcement oversight—has There are a number of reasons why city and police leadership been center stage during the past year, after high-profile incidents in Boise may have a hot-and-cold relationship with civilian overlike the police-involved deaths of 43-year-old Eric Garner in sight, but a historical source of tension has been the multi-agency Staten Island, NY, and 19-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Critical Incident Task Force, which was most recently activated Mo. According to the National Association for Civilian Overafter the Feb. 16 shooting of Michael Casper. sight of Law Enforcement, there are more than 200 such entities, The problem, according to Burghart, is that task forces like 12 BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 |

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CITF aren’t oversight so much as cops overseeing other cops. According to Burghart, police departments sometimes push back against ombudsman offices because they don’t like “somebody who’s not their boss looking over their shoulder.” “Their friends investigate them, and the case goes to the district attorney, who’s really just the top cop,” he said. While police investigations into officer-involved shootings are kept local, so are reports of such shootings in the media. Since events in Ferguson, Mo. increased media attention has been given to instances of police-involved violence, but Burghart said such incidents are so common that they nearly always remain unreported at the national level. Based on his research, he estimates that if the Associated Press ran a story about every officer-involved homicide, there would be three of them every day, and that “probably 600 people have been killed since Mike Brown.” “Our nation has had its consciousness raised on this topic, and it’s still not news. It is so common that it’s not a national story,” he said. Burghart’s crusade began in May 2012, when, on his way home from work, he saw a group of police cars near the Truckee River in Reno, Nev. When he got home, he flipped open his laptop and started investigating. The police had pulled over a stolen car and shot and killed the driver, Jace Herndon, 41. After looking at news reports of the incident, he realized that none of them had information about how many police killings had taken place over a year in Nevada’s Washoe County. After more digging, Burghart learned there was no single database of all police-related shootings nationwide, let alone one with the data broken down by state, county or city. The news and reports are out there—“I’m no conspiracy theorist,” he said—but nobody’s collecting that information, which is why he started the Fatal Encounters database, which now has more than 4,500 recorded entries of citizens who have been killed or wounded by police nationwide. Burghart said that’s a fraction of the real number of police-involved shootings. In part, he said, there’s little market for stories about policeinvolved shootings in the United States. In Boise, however, it was increased public attention given to police-involved homicides that paved the way for civilian oversight. 11

‘A DIFFERENT STYLE OF POLICING’ Boise’s ombudsman position was the product of a growing desire for community oversight of what was increasingly being seen as a police force spinning out of control. In the mid-1990s, several longtime Boise police officers retired and were replaced by officers with law enforcement experience in major metropolitan areas along the West Coast, including Seattle; Portland, Ore.; San Francisco; and Los Angeles. According to Murphy, they brought a “different style of policing to Boise,” one that was more aggressive and force oriented, resulting in a culture shift within the BPD.

some evidence had been collected “in order to defend the officer’s Tactics used by this new batch of police officers gave the deactions either in the public eye or in the event of a third-party partment a reputation among the public and the media for being investigation.” Then-BPD Chief Masterson fired back against the trigger happy: In the 23-months leading up to the 1999 creation implication that members of his department and CITF investigaof the Office of the Community Ombudsman, Boise police were tors may have behaved unethically or unprofessionally. involved in seven shootings, including the Sept. 1997 shooting “This is unwarranted speculation on the part of the ombudsthat led to Boise Police Officer Mark Stall being killed in the line man. There is simply no evidence to support his personal conjecof duty. During that 23-month period, several people who were ture and I question his reasons for resorting to such speculation,” shot by police were unarmed at the time. Masterson wrote in a response issued to the Boise City Council. “Boise had gone from having one [shooting] once every five The Jones Report is an anomaly in the mostly collegial years or so and not a history of fatalities, to this cluster in that relationship between the ombudsman’s office and the BPD. Of time period,” Murphy said. “There was significant community the hundreds of reports investigated by Murphy over the years, conversation and angst.” comparatively few of the allegations were sustained against BPD At first, the ombudsman’s office consisted of Murphy and officers. Between 1999 when the ombudsman’s office was crea secretary. Another full-time investigator was added in 2000. ated and the release of its 2010 annual report, there were 905 In 2003, the staff grew to include a deputy ombudsman and a allegations leveled against Boise law enforcement officers ranging part-time investigator. Murphy said in his 14 years as ombudsfrom abuse of authority to unnecessary use of force to rudeness. man, he saw a downward trend in the number of police-involved Murphy reported that 741 of those allegations were unfounded or shootings and complaints lodged against the BPD through his not sustained, while 130 of them yielded evidence of fault on the office. In 1999, the ombudsman’s annual report to Boise City part of the officer. Council showed that Murphy’s office handled 45 allegations and The Jones Report further serves as an example of the many inquiries regarding the BPD, including 10 alleged instances of use hats an ombudsman must wear to perform the job effectively. It of force. In 2005, he logged 210 commendations, complaints and contains detailed analyses of crime inquiries, as well as eight critical scene evidence, radio logs, witness incidents in which officers or statements, forensic data and legal suspects were injured or force was “I THINK THE Y NEED TO FIND A arguments. Murphy and his team used in a police interaction (those RE PL ACEMENT FOR ME. [ DENNIS ] logged hundreds of hours compilincluded three shootings and one ing, collating and examining piles incident involving a Taser stun DUNNE IS JUST A PL ACEHOLDER.” of information. As significant as gun). In 2010, there were 29 usecritical incidents are, Murphy of-force allegations made against said the ombudsman is most effective when the staff can conduct the BPD—only one was sustained. investigations, like those into Jones’ death, while being able to In 2012, when Murphy presented his last annual report to the perform the other duties of the office. Boise City Council, his office handled 13 complaints and four “I think they need to find a replacement for me. Dunne is just critical incidents. He credited two new police chiefs—Don Pierce a placeholder. The urgency I have is that as good a job as Dennis (2000-04) and Mike Masterson (2004-15)—with transforming has done, he doesn’t have the time to focus on building up the the BPD by recruiting people without prior background in law capability of the office or engage in ongoing education or training enforcement and expanding the department’s diversity. for himself, working on prospective policy work, community rela“Masterson made a lot of changes to both the training of new tions. All that is laying fallow, going on 20 months,” Murphy said. officers to be more in line with the concept of police as a public Baker told BW she felt that urgency among some executiveservice, and to reflect the values of the needs of the community,” level City Hall employees, too, and hoped that Bieter shared their Murphy said. commitment to civilian oversight of the police. Personnel changes and a shift in philosophy didn’t immu“I think there are people on the executive staff who are very nize BPD against controversy or conflict with the ombudsman, committed to this position. For other people, it’s not a priority however. In December 2004, a Boise police officer shot and killed whatsoever,” she said. “I looked the mayor in the eye and I asked 16-year-old Matthew Jones when Jones advanced on the officer him, and he assured me it was an imporwith a bayonet-equipped Japanese WWII-era rifle. The shooting tant position.” was widely reported in the media, raising questions about how the incident had been handled. In a 60-page report issued in July 2006, Murphy took issue with how evidence was collected This story brought to you by BW Watchdogs. To learn and handled in the post-incident investigation, implying that how you can help, visit boiseweekly.com/boise/BWWatchdogs/Page

PROACTIVE PROBLEM-SOLVING NEW BPD POSITION DESIGNED TO BETTER TRAIN FOR MENTAL HEALTH INTERACTIONS Beyond investigating allegations of officer misconduct, Boise’s Office of the Community Ombudsman also analyzes police trends and critical incident reports to create policy recommendations. Of the scores of such recommendations made by former Ombudsman Pierce Murphy during his 14-year tenure, one from a report following the 2004 shooting death of Matthew Jones has born fruit.

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The report called on BPD to create a Critical Intervention Team to enhance service to those suffering mental illness, emotional disturbance and substance abuse crises. Almost exactly 10 years later, the department has established a mental health coordinator. At a Feb. 11 forum on police issues at Boise State Public Radio, incoming BPD Chief Bill Bones unveiled the new position, indicating that a dedicated BPD employee with expertise in mental health issues could better equip officers with information they need to address these issues in the field, connect members of the community

| FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

with mental health resources, and mobilize community stakeholders around programs and policies that address mental illness. “There are so many people in our community that suffer from mental health issues, and police officers are running into those people on a daily basis,” Bones later told Boise Weekly. Bones said he expects the position, which will likely pay between $54,000-$81,000 per year, to be filled in March or early April by someone with work experience in the mental health field and familiarity with programs and resources in the Boise area. The job will not require a law enforce-

ment background. The mental health coordinator position is the result of several BPD policies and initiatives designed to help police officers better respond in the field to people suffering from mental illness. “Instead of being reactive to calls for service, it’s trying to be proactive about getting people the services and the health they need,” he said. “We’re constantly trying to improve the way that the skills, tools and manner in which we deal with those who have mental illness and the service we can provide.” —Harrison Berry

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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY FEB. 25 Festivals & Events FAMILY OF WOMAN FILM FESTIVAL—The annual Family of Woman Film Festival confronts issues that affect women and girls around the world. Screenings and events take place mostly in Sun Valley, but also at Boise State University and Idaho State University. For more info and a complete schedule of events, visit familyofwomanfilmfestival. org. Through March 1. $15, $60 festival pass. READ ME TREASURE VALLEY: MUSIC OF THE VIETNAM ERA—Share your period music on vinyl and thoughts on the influence of music during the Vietnam years. Members of the Vinyl Preservation Society of Idaho will be facilitating this lively event and can offer expertise on value. Refreshments available. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, readmetv.com.

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On Stage BLOODY, BLOODY ANDREW JACKSON—Boise’s own HomeGrown Theatre takes on the Tony-nominated production that, like Jackson, has had its share of supporters and detractors for its portrayals of Old Hickory as a hotbodied, hot-headed hellion. Weird and wonderful. Through March 7. 8 p.m. $5-$10. Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., Boise. facebook.com/ HGTheatre. COMEDIAN JOHN CONROY—With Mikey Pullman and guests. 8 p.m. $10. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux. com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: PROOF—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

Workshops & Classes 2015 SERVE IDAHO CONFERENCE—The Serve Idaho Conference is two days of sessions, led by experts in their fields covering a variety of volunteering topics. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $50-$170. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208.332.3578, ext. 4174, serveidaho.gov.

FRUIT TREE PRUNING— Knowing how and when to prune for fruit is much different than pruning an ornamental tree. Instructor Matt Perkins is an arborist and manager of the Laura Moore Cunningham city arboretum. Register online at parks.cityofboise. org. 6-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844076, boisepubliclibrary.org. TORTILLA PATATAS AND RED BEAN-CHORIZO SOUP—Tortilla Patatas, the famous egg and potato omelet of Spain, may seem intimidating to make, but with a few easy tricks, you will be making them just like Amuma. RSVP required. 5:45 p.m. $40. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com. WINTER 2015 COMMUNITY EDUCATION CLASSES—MondaysThursdays through March 19. For more info or to register, visit boiselearns.org/pub. Prices vary.

Art

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

ALEXANDRA GRANT: A PERPETUAL SLOW CIRCLE—Ochi Gallery is pleased to present this survey of the Los Angeles-based artist’s “nimbus” series, made from 2004 to 2014. Make an appointment to see the exhibition, which runs through March 8. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com. THE BRAIN: A BIG IDEA MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROJECT—The Brain is a community-wide conversation about recent advances in neuroscience as well as a celebration of its wonder and mystery. For a complete list of related events, visit the SVCA website. MondaysFridays through April 17. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org. IDAHO WATERCOLOR SOCIETY CAPITOL ROTUNDA ART SHOW— Enjoy (and maybe buy) fine art by more than 90 Idaho artists. Through March 7. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-853-1456, idahowatercolorsociety.wildapricot.org. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

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CALENDAR IN TRANSLATION: MARIA-MERCE MARCAL—This interdisciplinary collaboration features an unusual and haunting intersection of words and images based on themes in the poetry of Catalan cult poet Maria-Merce Marcal, with photography by Maria V. Garth and poetry translated by Clyde Moneyhun from the book Witch In Mourning by Marçal. Through March 28. For more info, visit mmmintranslation. com. Mondays-Sundays through March 28. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1246, mmmintranslation.com. KAREN WOODS: SHIFT—Longtime Boise artist Karen Woods captures the beauty of the everyday experience, such as the trail of a raindrop sliding down a windshield. She has recently begun exploring new interpretations of these scenes, inspired by 18th century Japanese artists Ike Taiga and Tokuyama Gyokuran. Tuesdays-Saturdays through Feb. 28. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208433-0593, stewartgallery.com.

LAUNCH: 2015 ANNUAL STUDENT JURIED EXHIBITION—Featuring work chosen by juror Alice Vinson, visual artist and assistant professor of Visual Communication at the College of Idaho. MondaysThursdays through March 18. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4263994, boisestate.edu/art. LISA BOWER: FROSTED—Lisa Bower’s show, Frosted, will be showing Tuesdays-Saturdays through February. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Crossings Winery, 1289 W. Madison Ave., Glenns Ferry, 208366-2313, crossingswinery.com. LIU BOLIN: HIDING IN THE CITY— Chinese artist Liu Bolin creates compelling works that combine performance art, photography and protest. His most popular images are from his “Hiding in the City” series of photographic works that began as performance art in 2005. BAM’s exhibition highlights 52 performances from Beijing, Hollywood and New York. Tuesdays-Saturdays

THURSDAY, FEB. 26

through May 24. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. RED CIRCLE PRESS: TRANSLUCENCY—Student and alumni printmakers dissect the concept of translucency through a series of prints. Through July 12. Through July 12. FREE. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242, finearts.boisestate.edu.

Food PAYETTE BREWING TAP ROUNDUP—Drop by Tilted Kilt for a Tap Round-Up of eight different Payette Brewing Company beers. 6 p.m. Tilted Kilt, 1555 S. Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-338-5458. payettebrewing.com/events.

THURSDAY FEB. 26 Festivals & Events FAMILY OF WOMAN FILM FESTIVAL—Screenings and events take place mostly in Sun Valley, but also at Boise State University and Idaho State University. For a complete schedule, visit familyofwomanfilmfestival.org. Through March 1. $15, $60 festival pass. WOMEN’S BUSINESS SYMPOSIUM—Enjoy a day of engagement around tools and resources to start, build and take your career and organization to the next level. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. $79. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-4263875, business.idahosbdc.org.

FRIDAY, FEB. 27

Out-of-body experience.

On Stage

Talks & Lectures

ALTON BROWN LIVE: THE EDIBLE INEVITABLE TOUR—If you dare, request a seat in the “poncho zone.” 8 p.m. $35-$100. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise. 208-4261110, boisestatetickets.com.

INTRO TO REMOTE VIEWING—Learn what the practice involves, see some examples of RV work and hear how profoundly life-changing its daily practice can be. Presented by Mark Murdock of Right Hemispheric, a diverse group of Remote Viewers spread out across the U.S. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, righthemispheric. com/remote-viewing-talk-boise.

COMEDIANS BRIAN MCKIM & TRACI SKEENE—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com.

Citizen

Art NEW EAGLE ART GALLERY OPENING—Check out this fresh new art presence in Eagle. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Eagle Art Gallery, 50 2nd St., Eagle, 208-938-6626, eagleartgallery.net.

DOING WHAT WE CAN FEBRUARY MEETING—Meet up with other citizens working to solve the climate crisis. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-4843241, doingwhatwecan.org.

SATURDAY, FEB. 28

Now you see it...

Winning in the West.

INTRO TO REMOTE VIEWING

JAY OWENHOUSE: ‘DARE TO BELIEVE’

MERIDIAN SYMPHONY: “WILD WILD WEST”

In the 2009 film The Men Who Stare at Goats, George Clooney’s character trains soldiers in “parapsychological” techniques— from invisibility and dematerialization to killing with psychic energy. One of those techniques was also “remote viewing”—the ability to cast one’s mind out-of-body to spy on enemies anywhere. Asked how he remote views, Clooney’s character says, “I drink. And I find classic rock helps.” Specifically, “Boston. Boston usually works.” Though fictional, Goats was based on a real government program to train “psychic spies.” Mark Murdock, a remote viewer with Right Hemispheric, will be in Boise to give a presentation on what remote viewing is and isn’t, provide some examples of how it works (not including booze or Boston, we presume) and show its life-changing properties. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, righthemispheric.com

Self-proclaimed “authentic illusionist” Jay Owenhouse would definitely be an Alliance-approved magician if he walked onto the set of Arrested Development. Instead, he’s apparating onto the stage of the Morrison Center on Friday, Feb. 27 for a magic show titled “Dare to Believe.” Make no mistake: they’re not tricks, they’re illusions. “Dare to Believe” promises the classics, from bodies floating in mid-air, to sawing someone in half. Under Owenhouse’s spell, audience members can predict the future and disappear entirely. The show also features Bengal tigers Shekinah, a rare white tiger, and her sister, Sheena. Owenhouse’s passion for magic started at age 4, when his parents hired a magician for his birthday party. Today, Owenhouse’s four children—ages 9 to 23—help with his performances. 8 p.m., $33-$73, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1110, jayowenhouse.com

Feel the spirit of the early pioneers as the Meridian Symphony continues its 25th season celebration with “Wild Wild West.” It’s a night of performances including Aaron Copland’s 1948 suite, “The Red Pony,” originally written as the soundtrack for a film adaptation of John Steinbeck’s novel of the same name, and John Williams’ (Star Wars) soundtrack for the 1972 film The Cowboys, starring John Wayne. The orchestra will also perform the world premiere of the “Rocky Mountain Suite” by Colorado-based composer Jonathan Peters. Peters, who lives in the Rockies, found inspiration for the suite not only in his own backyard but also in the works of writers such as poet Charles Edwin Hewes (“Of Elk and Beaver”) and author Zora Neale Hurston (“Water Leaves the Divide). 7:30 p.m., $8-$10, $25 family. Centennial High School Performing Arts Center, 12400 W. McMillan Road, 208-891-2721, meridiansymphony.org.

14 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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CALENDAR FRIDAY FEB. 27 Festivals & Events MUSICIAN’S DEVELOPMENT SESSION SERIES— “Music Is Your Real Job” will be the topic of discussion, featuring a panel of community members who work in the music industry. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Boise Hive, 3907 Custer Drive, Boise, 208-3444994, boisehive.org.

On Stage COMEDIANS BRIAN MCKIM & TRACI SKEENE—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. ILLUSIONIST JAY OWENHOUSE: DARE TO BELIEVE—You’ll not only witness the magic, you’ll experience it. You’ll see audience members float in mid air, get sawed in half and predict the future. 8 p.m. $32.50-$72.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261110, mc.boisestate.edu.

OFF CENTER DANCE: CULTURAL OMNIVORES—Check out Off Center Dance’s sixth contemporary show of new works by local dancers and choreographers. 8 p.m. $15$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-8699355, offcenterdance.org. REX’S EXES—This deliriously funny Southern-fried farce finds the Verdeen cousins of Sweetgum, Texas—Gaynelle, Peaches and Jimmie Wyvette—teetering on the brink of disaster again. Fridays, Saturdays through March 14. 8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise. 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org/current-season.

SUREL’S PLACE EXHIBITION & ART TALK—Wayne State University Professor Millee Tibbs will be bringing her unique photography that integrates physical manipulation of the paper itself. 6:30-9 p.m. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-4077529, surelsplace.org/tibbs.

Literature WORD READING: ALAN MINSKOFF AND JUDITH MCCONNELL STEELE—Local authors Alan Minskoff and Judith McConnell Steele will read from their work. 7:30 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org.

Art MFA THESIS EXHIBITION OPENING RECEPTION—Meet Boise State Master of Fine Arts candidates Kelly Cox, Rachel Lambert and Eric Mullis. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, boisestate.edu.

SATURDAY FEB. 28 On Stage COMEDIANS BRIAN MCKIM & TRACI SKEENE—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

JOSEPH HALL’S ELVIS ROCK ‘N’ REMEMBER TRIBUTE—7:30 p.m. $26. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com. MERIDIAN SYMPHONY: WILD WILD WEST—7:30 p.m. $8-$10, $25 family. Centennial High School Performing Arts Center, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-891-2721, meridiansymphony.org. MURDER MYSTERY DINNER: FIST FULL OF QUARTERS—6:30 p.m. $16.50-$37.50. AEN Playhouse, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, aenplayhouse.com. OFF CENTER DANCE: CULTURAL OMNIVORES—4 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-869-9355, offcenterdance. org.

Literature GHOSTS & PROJECTORS POETRY READING SERIES—Featuring Ana Bozicevic of New York, with Sharli Turner and Cheryl Maddalena of Boise. 7 p.m. $2 suggested donation. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-629-9066, ghostsandprojectors.com.

Talks & Lectures RETHINKING IDAHO LANDSCAPES—Experts offer design tips for home gardens, outdoor living spaces, and recommendations for plants

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

suited to Idaho’s climate and soils. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $30-$40. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Citizen HEARTS OF HOPE GALA—Join the Family Justice Center Foundation for their 11th annual fundraiser. For tickets, call 208-8592519. 6 p.m. $50. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter. com. WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED BENEFIT CONCERT SERIES—Six shows are planned for the series, with proceeds benefiting charities selected by the featured artist. First up is David Andrews and Hearts for Hadley. 8 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297.

SUNDAY MARCH 1 On Stage COMEDIANS BRIAN MCKIM AND TRACI SKEENE—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com.

Art LAND & PEOPLE: PHOTOS BY HEATHER RAE—Idaho native and award-winning independent film producer Heather Rae reveals her exciting new photography project March 1-8. Rae will be in attendance for an exhibition reception on March 5 at The Coffee Grinder from 12-2 p.m. FREE. Coffee Grinder, 421 E. 4th St., Ketchum, 208-726-8048.

MONDAY MARCH 2 Kids & Teens CODE IT MAKE IT—Build robots, learn computer programming, go behind the scenes of web development, take over the world. For ages 12-18. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

TUESDAY MARCH 3 Workshops & Classes DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Informal workshop is open to writers who wish to hone their skills, work on character development, overcome writer’s block and be inspired. Poet Danny Stewart hosts with a brand-new prompt to help you write into new spaces, plus time to share your work and invite critique. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org.

Literature

Boise State Student Union Simplot Grand Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 4 Festivals & Events SUN VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL—Watch a full slate of cutting-edge independent films, premieres, children’s programming and previews of new television premieres from National Geographic and others. Venues in Sun Valley, Ketchum and Hailey. For more info on featured films, times and ticket prices, visit sunvalleyfilmfestival.org. March 4-8.

BOISE STATE CAMPUS READ: TERRIE WILLIAMS—Wildlife biologist Terrie Williams will be on campus to provide a fascinating glimpse into the situation in her book, The Odyssey of KP2: An Orphan Seal, a Marine Biologist, and the Fight to Save a Species. 7 p.m. FREE.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 19


sCINEMAS sCAFE sVIDEOS sFUN

Inside: Special Events & March-May Film Schedule !DDITIONALFILMSNOTLISTEDMAYBESHOWN #HECKWWWTHEFLICKSBOISECOM

Schedule is subject to change. 6/, ./

Opens February 27 Writer/director !NDREY:VYAGINTSEV won Best Screenplay at Cannes for this story about a Russian family opposing a corrupt mayor who plans to demolish their home along the Barents Sea. Superb acting, stunning cinematography and a mesmerizing score by 0HILIP'LASSare highlights. Academy Award Nominee, Best Foreign Language Film. “Stunningly shot and superbly acted, this is film-making on a grand scale.� PETER BRADSHAW, GUARDIAN

Opens March 6

David CronenbergS SATIREABOUTLONGINGFORFAMEIN(OLLYWOODSTARS Academy AwardWINNERJulianne Moore ASAN AGINGSCREENDIVA Robert PattinsonASANACTOR WITHATEMPORARYGIGASALIMODRIVERANDMia WasikowskaASADIRECTORIN WAITING “So crisply directed, furiously paced and gleefully performed, that you go along for the ride.� */.&2/3#( THE ATLANTIC

MAPS

Opens March 6 Sonny ($EV0ATEL) is ready to expand his Jaipur hotel empire after a rocky start a few years ago. With his first hotel full of regulars (played by *UDI$ENCH -AGGIE 3MITH "ILL.IGHY $IANA (ARDCASTLE #ELIA)MRIE), he must now find room for the likes of 2ICHARD'ERE, who will have all the ladies buzzing. *OHN-ADDENdirects.

TO THE

STARS Opens March 13

4HISBEAUTIFULLYFILMED STORYOFASUB 3AHARANHERDERANDHISFAMILY WHOSELIVESAREDISRUPTEDBYFOREIGNJIHADISTSWAS NOMINATEDFORANAcademy Award for Best Foreign Language Film$IRECTORAbderrahmane Sissako OFFERSUSAWINDOWINTOAWAYOFLIFEALIENTOUS LIVEDBYPEOPLEMORELIKEOURSELVESTHANWECOULD HAVEIMAGINED “The film throbs with humanity, and abounds in extraordinary images ...� */%-/2'%.34%2. WALL STREET JOURNAL

TIMBUKTU

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Opens March 20

Opens March 20

4HELONGAWAITEDSEQUELTOWRITER DIRECTORJohn Boorman’s Academy Award NOMINATED Hope and GloryWHICHPLAYED AT4HE&LICKSIN PICKS UPAFTER77)) WHENTHE YEAR OLDPROTAGONIST ISELIGIBLEFORTHEDRAFT (ISCOMINGOFAGE INCLUDESINSIGHTSINTO THEMILITARY WOMEN FAMILYANDFRIENDSHIPS Callum Turner, Richard E. Grant, David Thewlis AND Tamsin EgertonSTAR

WASONEOFTHEWORSTYEARSFOR hTHETROUBLESvIN.ORTHERN)RELAND 4HECONFUSIONABOUTWHOTOTRUSTAND WHOTOFEARISPERSONIFIEDINAGRIPPING PERFORMANCEBYJack O’Connell (Unbroken WHOPLAYSAYOUNGSOLDIER INTENDINGTOKEEPTHEPEACEBUT DURING HARROWINGHOURS ISSWEPTUPINVIOLENCEAND DECEPTIONATEVERYTURN Yann DemangeWASSELECTEDAS Best Director, British Film Awards. Jack O’Connell WONTHE Rising Star AwardAT"!&4!

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 15


Treefort Film Fest

Playing With Fire

-!2#( 

02%3%.4%$"9!'%.#9 &/2.%7!-%2)#!.3 !02),s0The Taliban banned women from acting in Afghanistan in 1994. This documentary about the bravery of six women who defy that order exposes the erosions of women’s rights and the power of the creative spirit. This multi-award winning film was directed by !NNETA 0APATHANSSIOU. Not Rated, subtitled. A discussion will follow the screening. Tickets are $12.

Treefort Film Fest brings a weekend of the best in emerging independent cinema to Boise. The inaugural 2014 festival featured (+./ ('56 Sundance 2014 winners Rich Hill and Yearbook, SXSW 2014 winner Damnation, and Oscarnominated Missing Picture, among others. TFF also presents compelling Q&A’s and workshops with filmmakers. For information on this year’s festival: http://treefortmusicfest.com/

Get G e t your tickets, sstudent t u d e packages, & gi ggift i f certificates online! J. Todd Adams*, Much Ado About Nothing (2013). *Member Actors’ Equity. DKM Photography.

www.idahoshakespeare.org or call 208-336-9221

As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being. - CG Jung

Idaho Friends of Jung Environment, Ego, and Self with Scott Hyder February 27, 2015 Jung on the Evolution of Consciousness with Dr. Bill Renwick and Prof. Elton Hall March 20-21, 2015 The Second Axial Age with Dr. Richard Tarnas April 24-25, 2015 Events by donation to Idaho Friends of Jung, a non-profit.

www.idahofriendsofjung.org

Inspired to Ride

Lunafest 2015 02%3%.4%$"93/2/04)-)34 ).4%2.!4)/.!,s!02),!4 This season’s program of eight selected films will compel discussion, make you laugh, tug at your heartstrings and motivate you to make a difference in your community. Lunafest is united by a common thread of exceptional storytelling by, for and about women. Not Rated. $15 tickets are on sale now at The Flicks. To read about each short, please go to: http://www.lunafest.org/the-films

s!02), Inspired to Ride follows a handful of cyclists from around the world as they race unsupported in the first Trans Am Bike Race — 4,233 miles across the USA. Shows are at 7 pm and 9 pm. Tickets are $12 and are available in advance at The Flicks box office. Q&A with the director and race winners will follow the shows.

Rossini’s

The Barber of Seville

Il barbiere di Siviglia sung in Italian

Jason Detwiler as Figaro

May 8 & 10 The Egyptian Theatre

www.operaidaho.org Tickets starting at $22 Call now: 208-387-1273

The Perfect Present ...

Is A Work of Art!

Fearturing handcrafted jewelry, art glass, and furniture from over 125 American artists.

415 S. 8th Street - in BoDo (208) 385-9337 www.rgreygallery.com 16 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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classically trained locally inspired

'ALLERYs#LASSES 3UPPLIESs%QUIPMENT 14 Varieties of Take-n-Bake Lasagnes Gourmet EntrĂŠes & Desserts U Dine-In or Take Out 1504 Vista Ave. U Boise U (208) 345-7150 www.cucinadipaolo.com

%LLEN3T"OISE'ARDEN#ITY %LLEN3TISACROSS#HINDENFROMTH

 

(RS4UES &RI 3AT 

Opens March 27 .ATURALIST Judy Irving SundanceANDEmmy WINNINGDIRECTOROF The Parrots of Telegraph Hill TELLSTHESTORYOF A#ALIFORNIABROWN 0ELICANWHOGOTLOST ANDSTOPPEDTRAFFIC ONTHE'OLDEN'ATE "RIDGE!.EW9ORK 4IMES#RITICS0ICK “The fate of these birds, which, the film tells us, could live into their 40s, becomes as engrossing as many a human drama.�

208.472.1463 cafĂŠvicino.com 808 fort st.

Opens April 3

This road movie set in 1966 follows a teacher who uses "EATLES lyrics to teach English. When he finds out *OHN,ENNON will be in Spain to shoot a movie, he decides to drive to Almeria. Along the way he picks up two teenagers who could use a kind adult in their lives. *AVIER#AMARA stars; $AVID 4RUEBA directs. In Spanish with English subtitles; not rated, suitable for teens and adults. Winner of 6 Goya‘s, including Best Picture. “Smart and delightful.� TOM KEOGH, SEATTLE TIMES

-)#(!%,/35,,)6!. WASHINGTON POST

Opens April 10

Opens April 10

"EN3TILLER and .AOMI7ATTSplay married filmmakers who try to keep maturity at bay by spending time with young hipsters, played by !MANDA3EYFRIED and !DAM $RIVER. #HARLES'RODIN co-stars. .OAH"AUMBACH wrote, directed and produced this timely comedy.

Ethan HawkeDIRECTS THISLOVINGPORTRAITOFPIANISTSeymour Bernstein !HUGESUCCESSATTHESELECTIVETelluride Film Festival BEINGUNFAMILIARWITHTHISDELIGHTFUL GENIUSWILLNOTHAMPERYOURENTHUSIASMFOR THEFILM

“A consistently funny, acutely observed look at a couple dragging their feet into middle age.�

“Hawke’s film is very well crafted, tightly edited and elegantly photographed. The acute musical selections only add to our appreciation of Seymour’s selfless devotion to his art.� 34%0(%.&!2"%2 HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

PETER DEBRUGE, VARIETY

Opens April 3

Gabe Polsky’s DOCUMENTARYTELLSTHESTORYOFTHE /LYMPICSh-IRACLEON)CEvFROMTHE PERSPECTIVEOFTHE3OVIET2ED !RMY(OCKEY4EAM4EAM CAPTAINSlava Fetisov WHO WENTFROMNATIONALHERO TOPUBLICENEMY PROVES TOBEANINCREDIBLY CHARISMATICMAN “With dark humor and an epic sweep characteristic of Executive Producer Werner Herzog, Red Army sides not with nations or ideologies but with the transcendent powers of sport.� !.$2%7,!0). .02

Opens April 17

Winner of 10 Argentinian Academy Awards, this group of six short films on the theme of revenge was directed by $AMIAN3ZIFRON. Infidelity, road rage and other bad behavior are justly punished inventively and humorously. In Spanish with English subtitles.

“Riotously funny.� DAVID ROONEY, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

WHILE WE’RE Young BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 17


ROLF STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION

ADMISSION Bargain Matinees (before 6:00) ...................$7 Regular Prices: General Admission ...............$9 Children, Students with ID, Senior Citizens 65+ ...................................$7 Active Military .............................................$7 Flicks Card (10 admissions for 1 or 2 persons) ...........$65 Unlimited Annual Pass (for one person) ...$250 Gift Certificates available in any amount.

MINIMIZING PAIN. MAXIMIZING POTENTIAL.

PAM BLACKLEDGE 208.473.1019 pam@rolfboise.com

710 Franklin Boise rolfboise.com

)NTHISSCIENCEFICTION MYSTERYDomnhall GleesonSTARSASACOMPUTER GEEKSENTTOVISITHISGENIUS#%/Oscar Isaac WHOREQUIRESHIMTORUNA4URINGTESTONAFEMALE ROBOTPROTOTYPETOSEEIFSHEISPROGRAMMEDWELL ENOUGHTOPASSFORHUMAN7RITERAlex Garland (28 Days Later, Sunshine DIRECTS Alicia Vikander CO STARS

Opens April 17

Based on .AOMI /RESKES and %RIK#ONWAYSinsightful book, Merchants of Doubt exposes the methods used by “spin doctors� to shape public opinion regardless of the truth. Using humor as well as scientific information, director 2OBERT+ENNERenlightens us about the tactics used to skew the facts about topics such as tobacco and climate change.

Opens April 24

Opens April 24 or May 1

“Alex Garland’s brittle, beautiful directorial debut is a digital-age ‘Frankenstein’ refashioned as a battle of the sexes.�

“This enthralling film is as fascinating as it is horrifying.�

Jonah HillANDJames FrancoRECREATETHESTORY OFTHEDISGRACEDNew York TimesREPORTERMichael FinkelANDACCUSEDKILLER Christian Longo,WHO PRETENDEDTOBE&INKEL WHILEONTHERUNFROM THELAW3EPARATINGFACT FROMFICTIONCREATESA COMPELLINGTRUECRIME TALE Felicity JonesAND Gretchen MolCO STARFOR DIRECTOR Rupert Gold Michael FinkelWROTE THESCREENPLAY

COMING IN MAY

'59,/$'% VARIETY

KENNETH TURAN, L.A. TIMES

18 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY FEB. 25

PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

4ONTHEFLOOR—8 p.m. $5. Whiskey Jacques

GO DEEP #3 CLUB NIGHT—10 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse

STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SWING IS THE THING WITH PAMELA DEMARCHE—6 p.m. $5. Sapphire Room

BRIAN BEATTIE: IVY AND THE WICKER SUITCASE—See Noise, this page. 7 p.m. $5. The Crux

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—10 p.m. $5. Tom Grainey’s

COMEDIAN JOHN CONROY—With Ryan Noack, Mikey Pullman and guests. 8 p.m., $10 GRANGER SMITH AND EARL DIBBLES—8 p.m. $15-$22. Knitting Factory HALLOWED OAK—With Braided Waves and Clarke and The Himselfs. 8 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HOKUM HI FLYERS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow KUNG FU—See Listen Here, Page 21. 10 p.m. $8. Reef

JOHNNY SHOES—7 p.m. FREE. Kind

TERRY JONES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MARTIN SEXTON—8 p.m. $25$45. Knitting Factory

WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM—Hosted by For Blind Mice. 8 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

TERRY JONES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THURSDAY FEB. 26 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CANDY LEE—10 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

WAYNE WHITE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

FRIDAY FEB. 27 208 MUSIC HIP-HOP FRIDAY—8 p.m. FREE. The Crux

CANDY LEE AND ANNA MORENO—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District CHICKEN DINNER ROAD—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill CLAY MOORE TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DJ MALLWALKER—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

JUCIFER—With Maladroids and Dos Ojo Terceros. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. 127 Club NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DJ MANIK—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

REBELUTION—With Gondwana. 8:30 p.m. $22.50 adv., $25-$50 door. Knitting Factory

DOUGLAS CAMERON—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

RICH KILFOYLE—6:30 p.m. FREE. High Note

EARL GRAY—7 p.m. FREE. Kind

THIS END UP—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

FAUXGAZI (FUGAZI TRIBUTE BAND)—With False Idle. 9 p.m. $5. The Shredder FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TOM TAYLOR—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TWIDDLE—10 p.m. $5. Reef

SATURDAY FEB. 28 BESSIE—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s BREAD & CIRCUS—10 p.m. $5. Tom Grainey’s CANDY LEE—6 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing; 7:30 p.m. FREE. The District CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers COLIN MULDOON—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue DJ STARDUST LOUNGE PRESENTS: DISCOLUX—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NOISE One of the biggest catalysts, though, was Pan Alley pop and other genres, Ivy tells the story meeting Grace London, a 14 year-old musician of Ivy Wire, a 10 year-old girl living in Texas in DQGIULHQGRI %HDWWLH·VGDXJKWHU%HDWWLHÀUVWKHDUG 1938. When the bank threatens to foreclose on London sing at an elementary school talent show her family’s farm, Ivy journeys through Heaven when she was 9. DQG+HOOWRÀQGDZLFNHUVXLWFDVHIXOORI PRQH\ “She had all the depth of casual singing and that was lost when her no-account father (played real hollering,” Beattie said. “Absolutely in a casual by country-western singer James Hand) died. Along the way, she gets into a singing-songwriting way—no thought involved in the joy of singing. I contest with “The Big Boss,” aka the devil (played couldn’t believe it.” Beattie changed the protagonist of his story to by Daniel Johnston), and plays rock-paper-scissors a girl and made her a precocious musician. Once with “Everything,” aka God (played by Bill CalKH·GÀQLVKHGWKHVFULSWIRUIvy, he showed it to lahan). In music and spirit, IvyUHÁHFWV%HDWWLH·VYLVLRQ London, who agreed to take the lead role. London makes a perfect Ivy: her vocals have the strength of Austin, where he has lived since 1979. and assurance of a performer twice or three times “Austin is so many different things,” Beattie Think The Divine Comedy set in the Dust Bowl with better music, less preaching and Daniel Johnston as the devil. said. “People who write about Austin in Austin, her age. Ivy pulls together other threads from Beattie’s the thing they think it is has always been different life and career in Austin. In addition to the live from what I’ve thought it was. The thing that people from outside of Austin think about Austin show’s crankies, Fowler designed a 64-page book of illustrations that suppleis different from what I think BRIAN BEATTIE ments the album. Beattie it is. Mostly, it’s just like any With Wooden Feels and Addam persuaded Sheff, Johnston town that’s nice. … There’s Chavarria. Thursday, Feb. 26, 7 p.m., and Callahan to contribute a friendly kind of attitude $5. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., BEN SCHULTZ their efforts thanks to his about people who like to be facebook.com/thecruxcoffeeshop. work producing, engineerin a place that has a few more Brian Beattie came up with a unique way to start features performances by Daniel Johnston, Bill ing and mixing albums for them in the past. Ivy each show on his latest tours. Before he plays Callahan, Okkervil River’s Will Sheff and others— trees than a lot of other Texas cities.” also features performances from Kathy McCarty This modest, friendly attitude comes through songs from his concept album/musical Ivy and was named the best Austin album of the year by in Ivy’s genial whimsy. Beattie turns the mythologi- and Scott Marcus, who played with Beattie in the the Wicker Suitcase (Earmovie Music, 2014), he The Austin Chronicle’s Greg Beets. Pitchfork’s Jason ’80s-’90s post-punk band Glass Eye. recites an 8-minute epic poem describing the main Heller declared that “the scale, ambition and mad cal three-headed beast Cerberus into Mr. Kirby, %HDWWLHVSHQWÀYH\HDUVGHYHORSLQJDQGSHUIHFW+HOO·VKDUULHGFKLHI DGPLVVLRQVRIÀFHU SOD\HGE\ character’s backstory. The Austin, Texas-based joy of creation behind Ivy and the Wicker Suitcase Will Sheff). Johnston’s endearing quirkiness under- ing the sound effects that give Ivy its cinematic musician-producer admitted taking a perverse is well worth the immersion—and the imaginacuts The Big Boss’s menace and hubris. Callahan’s feel. Performing solo presents a new set of chalpleasure in how the poem surprises audiences. tion—needed to experience it.” lenges—prior to this album, he’d never sung much “I just have so much fun,” Beattie said, Boiseans will get to experience it when Beattie Everything is a somnolent goof—Ivy’s arrival in on his own—but a dream he had keeps him going. Heaven wakes Him up from a nap. chuckling. “Because I want it to be entertaining brings Ivy to The Crux on Thursday, Feb. 26. “There was an annoying teenager in the dream Beattie drew inspiration for Ivy from a few and everything, and [the album] is sort of like an (Local acts Wooden Feels and Addam Chavaradventurous, epic poem kind of thing. People ria open). His set will feature “crankies”—scrolls different sources. One was a childhood nightmare that was really smug and self-assured,” he said. “He told me that if I wanted to live a lot longer, I involving a deserted carnival, which Beattie used don’t expect that.” illustrating scenes from the story—designed and should sing a lot more. And I was so annoyed at Ivy has surprised and delighted a number of operated by his wife, artist Valerie Fowler. Locals as the basis for the song “Ivy’s Dream.” Beattie also became fascinated with Depression-era movie that annoying, smug teenager that ever since then, listeners since its release in January 2014. The Wooden Feels and Addam Chavarria will open. I’ve sung a lot more.” musicals after the stock market crashed in 2008. self-described “movie for your ears”—which With songs that mix blues, country, rock, Tin

HEAVEN, HELL AND AUSTIN

Brian Beattie takes Ivy and the Wicker Suitcase on the road

20 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE JACK LAYDGISH—7 p.m. FREE. Kind JOHN MARTINEZ—4 p.m. FREE. Artistblue JOSEPH HALL’S ELVIS ROCK ‘N’ REMEMBER TRIBUTE—7:30 p.m. $26. Nampa Civic Center MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. 127 Club

TUESDAY MARCH 3

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

CHUCK SMITH AND DAN COSTELLO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WEDNESDAY MARCH 4

DAN COSTELLO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TRAVIS WARD—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

PATRICIA FOLKNER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

HOWLIN’ RAIN—With Blank Tapes and 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

WAVEPOP PRESENTS: PSYCHIC RITES—With CAMP and Star Warrior. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

JAZZ AT THE RIVERSIDE—Featuring Kevin Kirk and music educators. 7:30 p.m. $5-$7. Sapphire Room

PSYCHILLSIS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOSEPH LYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE ROOSTER AND THE RAM— 6:30 p.m. FREE. High Note

JOSHUA RADIN—With Cary Brothers. 7:30 p.m. $20 adv., $25-$40. Knitting Factory

J COLE—With Bas, Cozz and OMEN. 8 p.m. $30-$65. Revolution

RYAN WISSINGER—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper SOUL SERENE—10 p.m. $5. Reef

KARAOKE TUESDAYS WITH DJ BONZ—9 p.m. FREE. Crazy Horse

ANDY BYRON’S AMERICANA MUSIC SERIES: WILLY PORTER— 7:30 p.m. $25-$35. Sapphire Room BRANDON PRITCHETT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. 127 Club STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SWEET BRIAR—8 p.m. FREE. Cylos

MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. 127 Club

YOUNG DUBLINERS—8:30 p.m. $14-$30. Knitting Factory

OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

TERRY JONES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

RYAN BAYNE AND THE HANDME-DOWNS—6:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

THE YOUNGEST—With The Oliphants and Innocent Man. 8 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse

SUNDAY MARCH 1 BOISE JAZZ SOCIETY: THE CLAYTON DUO—7 p.m. $45. Sapphire Room CANDY LEE—11 a.m. FREE. High Note FAIRY BONES—With Faded Leroy, Leverson and Coma Throne. 8 p.m. $5. The Crux

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

NOCTURNUM! INDUSTRIAL GOTH DJS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY MARCH 2 B. DOLAN—With Rubedo and Wheelchair Sports Camp. 9 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Crazy Horse CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GUTTERMOUTH—WIth Counterpunch and Upinatem. 7 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. Neurolux KEVIN KIRK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

KUNG FU, FEB. 25, REEF We’ve all seen those bands we love and felt the thrill of hearing our favorite songs transformed into a 10-minute jam session. Those moments make it clear that the music runs in the musicians’ blood and they’re so in-tune with each other, they could play on forever. Connecticut-based Kung Fu is the quintessential funk-jam band, with each song taking their listeners on a journey filled with swaying and head-bobbing. The members of Kung Fu created and named a genre especially for their music, called “Nu-sion,” incorporating funk, electrofusion, jazz, rock and EDM. Each song melts into the next, making for a giant, danceable jam sesh. —Jessica Murri 9:30 p.m., $8, 21 and older only. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., 208287-9200, reefboise.com.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 21


WINESIPPER GRUNER VELTLINER

2013 BROADBENT GRUNER VELTLINER, $11.99 This wine offers enticing aromas of fresh-grown spring greens that’s typical of the variety (think mesclun mix). There’s a nice floral element, as well, that includes pear and raspberry soda. The palate is ripe and round with fresh lime, apple and pear flavors. Food friendly acidity comes through on the finish. This is an excellent value for an over-sized, one-liter bottle 2013 COUNT KAROLYI GRUNER VELTLINER, $11.99 The nose is a fruity mix of peach, pear, apricot and apple with touches of flint, mint and herb. Lots of bright citrus comes through in the mouth, especially on the mid-palate. The finish is crisp and clean with an attractive mineral component. 2012 FRED LOIMER GRUNER VELTLINER, $16.99 This wine opens with a gorgeous array of aromas including succulent apple and apricot, spring greens, blood orange, lime and a hint of buttery garlic. This is an exceptionally well-balanced wine that’s oh-so-smooth on the palate. The flavors are bright and lively with lime and tangerine fruit up front, and gooseberry and mineral on the long, lovely finish. —David Kirkpatrick 22 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

FOOD

TAR A M O RG A N

Gruner veltliner sounds like it might be the name of a European high-speed train or a German Bundesliga football team, but this Austrian grape variety produces one of the most versatile, food friendly wines around. It goes great with seafood, pork, poultry and pasta with white sauce. It also holds up to spicy Thai food and other Asian cuisine. Think asparagus makes for an impossible wine pairing? Think again. Gruner even works with it. And if that weren’t enough, it’s delicious on its own. Here are the panel’s top three picks:

THE GOODNESS LAND Ample Arabic platters TARA MORGAN As muffled cheers from a TV soccer game echoed in the distance, Salam Bunyan skewered hunks of raw chicken, slabs of lamb and citrus coins onto a large spit. Spinning the block of meat slowly with one hand, he shaved off thin slivers with the other to form a cylinder, packing the excess bits on top of the pile as he went. The mshakal combo platter at The Goodness Land is as piquant as it is generous. Bunyan owns The Goodness Land, an Arabic restaurant that opened in the Boise International Though the ful wasn’t much to look at—a couple of plump falafel and a basket of blistered Market in mid-December, and prides himself on flatbread appeared at the low table. The hummus mush of fava beans, onions and jalapenos—it making everything from scratch. packed a wallop of rich, lemony flavor. The same had a strong tahini tang and a streak of paprikaSince Bunyan said the shawarma wouldn’t be was true for the Iraqi ground lamb kebab and the laced oil that lent it just the right hint of flavor. ready until the following day, we opted for his But the falafel was the star—the deep brown ovals boneless, skinless Turkish chicken, or shish taouk, other recommendation, the mshakal ($14.99), a which were also bathed in a medley of spices. had a lovely crunch and smooth, pillowy texture combo platter consisting of one Iraqi kebab, one Though the chicken was a tad dry, a plunge in the with a mild kiss of cumin. Turkish chicken skewer, three pieces of falafel More falafel came with our side of creamy garlic sauce, or toum, remedied the and an assortment of charred issue. The only miss in the meal was a side of fried main meal, which, as Bunyan tomatoes, peppers and onions. THE GOODNESS LAND had warned, was a ton of food. potato coins dusted with paprika that resembled We also ordered a plate of 523 W. Franklin Rd., Boise, 208chips, but had a limp, soggy texture. Jostling dishes to the side, we Egyptian ful in hot oil ($6.99) 917-0772, thegoodnessland.com Stuffed beyond measure, we watched Bunyan made just enough room for a and dolmas ($3.99), which ceramic pot of strong mint tea still artfully whittling away at the shawarma Bunyan warned would be alongside dainty gold-rimmed glasses and saucers, and resolved to return. Though it might take more than enough food for two people. Shimmying off our shoes in front of the yellow a large plate of ful, the over-stuffed combo platter multiple visits due to the insane portion size, I picket fence that encloses the restaurant’s elevated and another basket of flatbread. Once everything have my eye on the fried whole pompano fish had settled, Bunyan checked if we still wanted the ($16); the fattoush salad ($5.99) with diced seating area, we crossed the burgundy carpets dolmas. “Next time,” we muttered, mouths full of veggies, fresh herbs and hunks of pita; and the to a corner “booth,” comprised of tasseled floor makhlama ($8.99), an Iraqi breakfast dish with ful and moist, yellow biryani topped with shards cushions and arm rests. Soon, a plate of creamy eggs and spicy ground lamb. of fried vermicelli noodles. hummus flecked with whole garbanzo beans, a

FOOD/NEWS OF BOURBON AND BEARDS Scrawled on a sign near the bar at Saint Lawrence Gridiron are the words: “Pray for bourbon.” On Monday, March 9, those boozy prayers will be answered. “The plan from the time we conceived of the restaurant was to have liquor, specifically bourbons and American brown liquors—bourbons, ryes, whiskeys and all that good stuff,” said owner Brian Garrett. “It’s just taken us a long time to find a license to purchase or lease.” Garrett recently signed a lease for a liquor license and is now working his way through the permitting process, adding that this is the third time SLG has sought a liquor license. He said the tagline for his burgeoning bar program is, “Yes, this is your grandfather’s bar.” “We’re not trying to reinvent the wheel with cocktails; we’re trying to do the best we can with cocktails,” Garrett added. The spot will serve classics like Manhattans, Old Fashioneds, Sidecars, Negronis and Sazeracs, along with a handful of original cocktails. Modern Hotel

Bartender Ashley Roshitsh will take over as SLG’s bar manager. “We never envisioned this to be a quick-serve, drunk spot,” said Garrett. “We’ve always envisioned it more as a lower key, kind of lounge-y restaurant that does serve liquor.” That said, Garrett plans to push the restaurant’s hours later, experimenting with midnight closings seven days a week to start, and is considering altering the space to accommodate more patrons once the bar program launches. “I think it will complete us,” said Garrett. In local accolade news, two Boiseans were recently named 2015 James Beard Award Semifinalists. Chef Nate Whitley of The Modern Hotel and Bar was nominated in the Best Chef Northwest category, while baker Mike Runsvold of Acme Bakeshop got a nod in the Outstanding Baker category. Restaurant and Chef Award finalists will be announced Tuesday, March 24, and the winners will be honored at an awards gala in Chicago Monday, May 4. —Tara Morgan BOISE WEEKLY.COM


SCREEN SVFF: ‘THE SWEET MIX’

Sun Valley Film Festival… take 4 GEORGE PRENTICE Who can say what the script looks like for a perfect film festival? Cannes, Sundance and Telluride claim international notoriety, superstars and top-tier films. I’ve attended all of the above film festivals and more; and when asked to recommend one over the other, I offer caveats that begin with two questions: “How many thousands of dollars do you plan on spending?” and, “How do you feel about standing in line for four hours to see a 90-minute film?” The film festival experience, like other high-profile events such as the Olympics or the Super Bowl, can turn out to be a slog and can be glaring examples of the growing chasm between the haves and have nots. Then there’s the Sun Valley Film Festival. Still in its infancy (this is its fourth year), SVFF has struck a unique balance of accessibility and SVFF Director Candice Pate (right) on Clint Eastwood, inaugural recipient of the festival’s Lifetime Vision Award: “He affordability, along with more than its share of keeps besting himself, and he has a career that has had so many peaks. I’m sure that he’ll have another peak five glitz and glamour. SVFF Director Candice Pate years from now. Buf for now, we have him.” likes to call it a “sweet mix.” “We certainly own the things that make the Eastwood was nominated for another Oscar festival unique, but there’s also the significant truly celebrate filmmaking.” for the current box office sensation American factor of the capacity of Sun Valley. With a More than 60 films, curated from hunSniper. The film won the Best Sound Editing Os- dreds of entries, will be showcased on screens few years under our belt, I’m realizing that it’s car, with a team of technicians giving a shout-out throughout the Wood River Valley, with a sweet mix of both,” Pate told Boise Weekly. to Eastwood during their acceptance speech. And something new coming to some place old: The “Hopefully our choices reflect that, with the when Eastwood arrives in Sun Valley, he’ll receive Sun Valley Opera House. Just in time for this films that we choose and the talent that we bring. It still remains to be seen, but it sure feels SVFF’s inaugural Lifetime Vision Award. year’s festival, the Opera House has undergone a “[Eastwood] keeps besting himself, and he has $60,000 projection and sound upgrade. pretty good right now.” a career that has had so many peaks,” said Pate. There are significant milestones in the life “It’s a world-class experience juxtaposed in “I’m sure that he’ll have another peak five years of a film festival. In Sun Valley, the first was an historic opera house. It’s a huge investment the 2013 appearance of two-time Oscar winner from now. But for now, we have him.” by the [Sun Valley] resort,” said Pate. Through its highly popular Jodie Foster, who cautioned As for visitors, Pate said, “What really blows “Coffee Talks,” SVFF will also attendees to, “Remember how me away is that I’ve been watching our sales of SUN VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL allow attendees to get some it is now. Years from now, the festival passes come in from Italy, Alaska, New 2015 face-time with Bruce Dern (Ne- York, New Jersey, Georgia, you name it. I want lines may be longer, and you’ll Wednesday, March 4braska, Coming Home) and Bill think back.” (BW, Screen, to email each one of them and ask, ‘How did Sunday, March 8 Paxton (Titanic, Apollo 13, Big “SVFF Will Only Become More you hear about us?’” sunvalleyfilmfestival.org Love), who will pull double duty Successful,” March 20, 2013). It turns out that SVFF spends little on by hosting a 20th anniversary SVFF’s next major landmark national advertising, instead investing in its will undoubtedly be this year’s internal communications/public relations arm screening of Apollo 13. appearance of four-time Oscar winner Clint to help tell its story. “I really felt that getting some higher-profile Eastwood. “Word of mouth is a big part of it. Honestly, talent this year would help us get on the radar “I can’t tell you everything about how we some of that comes from reading your articles of folks in the industry and certainly attendees,” secured Mr. Eastwood, but he made a film or blogs in Boise Weekly,” Pate said. “A lot of said Pate. “Getting to spend time with all this here [1985’s Pale Rider, filmed in the Boulder people who come to explore the festival feel like talent, actors, Oscar-nominated screenwriters and Sawtooth mountains], and he loves Sun they’re the ones that discovered it.” and directors, that’s the intimacy part of our Valley,” said Pate. “I know that he gets requests festival. When I visit other festivals, part of me is The trailblazing resumes Wednesday, March to be honored 17 times a day, but I think the envious of their infrastructure and huge sponsors, 4, and with Clint Eastwood at the end of this reason he said ‘yes’ to us is that he really gets year’s trail, it’s certain there will more “explorbut what we offer is our special guests—and atwhat we’re doing.” tendees can interact in a relaxed environment and ers” at SVFF 2015. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

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BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 23


BOGUS BASIN PRESENTS:

EVERY FRIDAY & SATUR DAY

RECREATION

6 P.M. AT THE SIMPLOT LODGE

THE LINE-UP: FRIDAY, 27 FEB. 27 FRIDAY, FEB.

6-9 P.M. 6-9 P.M.

TH TH

HILLFOLK NOIR (ALT-FOLK JUNKERDASH) (ALT-FOLK // JUNKERDASH)

SATURDAY, 28THTH FEB. 28 SATURDAY, FEB.

5-8 P.M. 5-8 P.M.

BOISE ROCK SCHOOL (ROCK ROLL) (ROCK NN ROLL)

FRIDAY, MAR. 66THTH FRIDAY, MAR.

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JEFF REFUGEES THE REFUGEES CROSBY && THE JEFF CROSBY (ALTERNATIVE ROCK) INDIE ROCK) ROCK // INDIE FOLK ROCK (ALTERNATIVE // FOLK

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FRIDAY, 13THTH MAR. 13 FRIDAY, MAR.

DOWN NORTH DOWN NORTH

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24 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

SALMON VALLE Y STE WARDSHIP

LIVE MUSIC

THINNING THE TINDER New USFS initiative restores Salmon-Challis National Forest area for wildfire protection JESSICA MURRI According to U.S. Forest Service officials, the timberland around the Upper North Fork River looks “red and dead.” The area north of Salmon near the Idaho-Montana border hasn’t burned in more than 100 years, which means when the next wildfire does go ripping through, there’s a high risk of it showing extreme behavior. That fire, according to Salmon-Challis National Forest Supervisor Charles Mark, is “inevitable.” In an effort to protect the area, Mark and his colleagues submitted a proposal to the U.S. Forest Service to be part of the Chiefs’ Joint Landscape Restoration Partnership. The agency received more than 40 proposals from across the country and Mark’s was one of the 15 chosen. Undersecretary for Natural Resources and Environment Robert Bonnie unveiled details of the partnership at a press conference in Boise on Feb. 19. He said the Forest Service is investing $37 million this year to help the 15 nationwide projects. The most important part of the undertaking is the collaboration among the Forest Service, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and local environmental groups. While Forest Service dollars go support work on public lands, the NRCS funds will go toward helping private landowners restore their land. “This allows us to work across a larger landscape,” Bonnie said. Mark said that the Upper North Fork River Project in Idaho’s Lemhi County will focus on reducing wildfire risks. The 700-acre project will protect 41,000 acres of forest, U.S. Highway 93 corridor and surrounding communities, and the Lost Trail Ski Area. He was pleased with the collaboration needed to make the project a success. “We’re going to put prescribed fire out in the landscape, conduct treatments at the wild-andurban interface, accomplish aquatics restoration, restore aspen and generate white bark pine,” Mark said. “But it’s the relationships that have been created between the local government, environmental groups, individuals, Forest Service and folks that care about the Salmon-Challis

Forest managers say it’s “inevitable” that a large fire will tear through the dry timberland north of Salmon.

National Forest that is the most important success out of this project because it not only enables us to move forward on the Upper North Fork Project, it’s the future. This is what’s going to enable us to be successful in the future.” Lost Trail Ski Area, which sits on the border, has a special stake in this project. The 1,800acre ski resort leases Forest Service land on a special use permit. Its owners, Sadie and Scott Grasser, made the decision to embark on a similar project within the boundaries of their resort in 2012. They called it a “sanitation and salvage” project, where they removed dead, dying and diseased trees on 236 acres of the resort to reduce fire hazard, then they heavily reseeded the areas to bring back its aesthetic qualities. Sadie fought fires for the Forest Service for 12 years, so she understands the severity of an uncontrollable fire like the one that could strike the Upper North Fork River area if fuels aren’t reduced. “It always weighs heavily on us,” she told Boise Weekly. “But we feel like at this point, we have more tools in our chest now, with a good fire plan and buffers in place.” Sadie said these extreme tinder box-like conditions for the surrounding forests is a new problem that’s cropped up in the past decade. She said the mountain pine beetle epidemic is to blame. When they harvested the dead trees from their resort, they found many of them were so damaged, diseased and dry that they couldn’t even be sold as timber. The Grassers came up with another idea to use the non-salable timber as biomass fuel to

generate power and heat for the resort, which is completely off the grid. They’re in the midst of a feasibility study for the proposal now. Sadie said the Forest Service’s Upper North Fork River Project is still several ridges away from the resort—with lots of heavy fuel between there and the ski area—but she said it would help slow a fire heading their direction. There’s evidence that this kind of forest restoration does slow wildfires. The Salmon Valley Stewardship took part in work with several other agencies and environmental nonprofits to execute the Hughes Creek Hazardous Fuels Reduction Project from 2008-2012, which included prescribed burns, timber harvesting and thinning of 13,000 acres of forest near the North Fork. When the Mustang Complex Fire burned more than 340,000 acres along the North Fork of the Salmon River in the summer of 2012— spurring the evacuation of 400 homes—it was the Hughes Creek drainage that finally stopped the blaze. “The fire team said, ‘Finally, this is an area where we can actually fight the fire,’ instead of just saying, ‘Oh, onto the next ridge,’” said Gina Knudson, executive director of the Salmon Valley Stewardship. She called the Hughes Creek project “training wheels” compared to this new project. “We’re fortunate that during this design phase, we didn’t get another fire that took care of that 41,000 acres for us,” she told BW. The Upper North Fork River Project is slated to start this summer, and will take about five years to complete. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BW OFFICE HOURS

ADOPT-A-PET

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com OLLIE: Want a steady gentleman with whom to spend your evenings? I’m your man.

QUINCY: I’m as furry as I am fun and sweet—come see for yourself what I mean.

ELLIOTT: Let me be your one-and-only and I’ll pay you back with purrs and rubs.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. BUDDY: 4-year-old, male, dachshund/miniature pinscher mix. Confident and independent. Best with adults or teenaged children. (Kennel 208#24922006)

MANNY: 8-month-old, male, Dalmation/Australian cattle dog mix. Will thrive in a calm home. Still a puppy, needs plenty of toys and exercise. (Kennel 219- #24907064)

SCOOBY: 2-year-old, male, boxer mix. Lovable and athletic. Best with female dogs and older kids. Loves belly rubs. Needs a cat-free home. (Kennel 324- #18832721)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT A-PAWD: 3-year-old, male, domestic medium hair. Huggable and snuggly, soaks up love and pets and then asks for more. (PetSmart Store on Eagle Rd.- #24933539)

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOZLEY: 1-year-old, male, domestic longhair. Great looks and personality. Mellow, but friendly. Dazzling green eyes. Loves to purr. (Zamzows on Eagle Rd.-#24954673)

EEYOR: 1-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Sweet and shy. Timid at first, but very appreciative of love once he warms up. Beautiful green eyes. (Kennel 01- #24940647)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 25


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY HOME SERVICES

C A RE E RS

CLASSES

BW CAREERS Associate Transformation Scientist 2, J.R. Simplot Company, Boise, ID. Conduct transformation experiments independently w/ minimal supervision; dvlp, optimize & improve transformation methods & protocols. Prepare tissue plant chemical stocks & plant issue media. Propagate plant stock material, perform explant transfers, participate in proof-of-concept & commercial production transformations; record, document & present data. Bachelor’s Deg or equiv in Agriculture, Agronomy, or Science related field. Min. 3 yrs exp in job or related research position or a

NYT CROSSWORD | FLIP-FLOPS ACROSS

23 Narrator of “Amadeus” [go to bed] 24 Pet food brand [recover lost ground] 26 Compassionate [finally become] 28 City of Light creator at the 1893 World’s Fair 29 Welles of “The Third Man” 30 Dunderhead 31 Attaches, in a way

1 Furnishes 8 Bit of body art, for short 11 “St. ____ Fire” (Brat Pack film) 16 Book reviewer? 19 Expel, as from a club 20 Historical chapter 21 Turnpike turnoffs [intimidate, in a way] 1

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65 What each group of shaded words in this puzzle does 69 Dark looks 73 Get some Z’s 74 Subtle emanation 75 Concert poster info 79 Comic actress Catherine 80 Four-legged orphans 83 Activity done in front of a mirror [clearly define] 85 Office trash [resign] 87 Start of many rapper names 89 Upset stomach [consume] 90 Loud and harsh [start crowding the crotch] 91 ____ Tree State (Maine) 92 Like March Madness teams 93 Contentment 95 Theater giant? 96 Establishes 97 Release tension, possibly 102 Big tank 104 What sarongs lack 108 Finnish outbuilding 109 Control of one’s actions [fall in great quantities] 114 Granite dome in Georgia [moderate] 117 Converses à la Tracy and Hepburn [pay in advance] 119 Athens landmark [arise] 120 Retro music collection 121 Do without a radiator 122 Over there 123 Brought on 124 Stan of Marvel Comics 125 Lectures

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53 Point at the ceiling? [misbehave] 55 She’s not light-headed [amass] 57 Embarrassing putts to miss 59 Cosmic balance? 60 Lit group 61 Film library unit 63 Guy’s partner 64 Storied voyager

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Master’s of Science Deg or equiv in Agriculture, Agronomy, or Science related field plus 1 yr pre/ post degree research exp. Exp must incl researching molecular Biology, working in a laboratory dealing w/ bio-hazardous waste containment & conducting short term (days to weeks) experiment using theoretical basis. Must possess technical & analytical exp with complex biotechnology related issues; ability to work independently. Mail resumes to Gino Carrillo, Global Mobility Mgr, J.R. Simplot Company, 999 Main St, Ste 1200, Boise, ID 83702. AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, Boeing, NASA and others- start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 800-725-1563.

DIRECTV IS CURRENTLY RECRUITING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITION IN BOISE: Field Engineer If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/careers. EOE. $$HELP WANTED$$ Earn Extra income, assembling CD cases. Call our Live Operators NOW! 800-267-3944 Ext 3090. www. easywork-greatpay.com. MAKE $1000 Weekly!! Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience Required. Start Immediately. www.theworkingcorner.com.

BY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

32 Barbershop sound 36 Dealer’s enemy 38 Ridicule 41 Country with the longest coastline 44 Comic strip dog 45 Skateboarder’s safety item [salaam] 51 Goodbyes [abate] 52 Flagman?

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

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1 Super Bowl highlights, to some 2 House on campus 3 Precamping purchase 4 Luxury hotel chain 5 Barrel racing venue 6 Printmaker Albrecht 7 Mixes up 8 Appetizer with puréed olives 9 Fuego extinguisher 10 Balustrade location 11 Physicist Rutherford after whom rutherfordium is named

12 Radiation shield material 13 Hosts, for short 14 Muesli tidbit 15 Electoral map division 16 Setting for a castle 17 Painter Uccello 18 City on the Nile 22 They’re all in the same boat 25 “____ Late” (Ricky Nelson hit) 27 Banquet V.I.P.’s 31 Wild guess 32 Strikers’ replacements 33 “Taxi” character Elaine 34 Greenlandic speaker 35 Glazier’s supply 37 Estrangement 39 Detach (from) 40 Misfortunes 42 Fitting 43 Team with a mascot named Orbit 46 Firth of “The King’s Speech” 47 Mattress size 48 Mr. ____ (soft drink) 49 Gillette brand 50 Like a dull party 53 Go across 54 Actress Swinton 56 Hanes purchase, informally 58 Slack-jawed 62 Big leap forward 64 Courters 65 Woodsy picnic spot 66 Brace 67 Divided houses 68 #4 for the Bruins 69 Plants in a field 70 I.M.’ing session 71 Longship propellers 72 Summons, e.g. 75 Bamboozles 76 Brief digression

77 Fundamental principle 78 Quaint oath 80 Writer Richard Henry ____ 81 Goes (for) 82 Nickname for a lanky cowboy 84 ____ Jemison, first African-American woman in space 86 Sport with double touches 88 To one way of thinking 91 Unseen danger 94 Nevertheless 97 English assignment 98 Knife brand 99 Iroquoian tribe 100 Before long 101 Boutonniere’s place 103 Keyboard abbr. 105 Swinging occasion? L A S T B U S S T O P

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106 “West Side Story” heroine 107 Unfriendly dog sound 109 One of a bridge foursome 110 Smelly 111 Check mark 112 Book of Mormon prophet 113 Brisk pace 115 Brother of Shemp 116 Getting on 118 ____-pitch Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

D R I V E L

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O B I G T H A R A R O N E S A M S E A D E T O R E U M S L G S A O R E N U C H O I S U E R Y N S A G E A S A V R M O N E Y L A B O R I T O I S F T E R T E S A T E H O W L D I S T A B E G E R J L O M D

H E R O

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L A D Y I R E E E T T A I R R P S O N E T I E E S T D L E G E N D I N A P E T

I V E S I S A P S L O G C A B I N S

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FIND PONOPLAYER Pono, an mp3 music player, is the brainchild of music icon Neil Young, whose name and fame likely helped the PonoMusic team raise $6.2 million via Kickstarter, making it the third mostfunded project in Kickstarter’s history. The PonoPlayer has a three-button control panel and small-screen interface in a rubberized, goldenrod-yellow housing that is the isoscelestriangle shape of a Toblerone candy box. It fits nicely in the palm of your hand but is impossible to shove in a pocket. The tiny screen is also difficult to navigate. Looks aren’t everything, though. The Pono concept—and fruition—is a device dedicated to playing high-quality mp3s, instead of the compressed music files most of us are used to listening to. Mp3s are often sampled at 16 bit/44.1kHz while Pono songs play at 24 bit/192kHz. It’s a simple equation: more data equals higher quality. It also equals a higher price tag. The Pono retails for $399-$499 and the remastered $399-$499 songs available at the PonoMusic ponomusic.force.com store (ponomusic.force.com) cost therecordexchange.com $18-$24 per album. In a non-scientific test, Boise Weekly put the same songs (and headphones) on a PonoPlayer up against an HTC One phone that uses Beats audio technology. As with many PonoPlayer reviews, we found the difference in quality wasn’t dramatic enough to justify the purchase. But there is a difference. The songs on the Pono (many of which are Neil Young tunes, natch) were richer and felt, somehow, more present. You can test drive and buy a PonoPlayer at Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St.). Just don’t try to make any calls with it. —Amy Atkins BOISE WEEKLY.COM

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Eve Ellen Barilleaux Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1500227 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Eve Ellen Barilleaux, now residing in the City of Kuna, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Evie Lynne . The reason for the change in name is: for artistic reasons. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) MAR 03 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date JAN 16 2015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 4, 11,18 & 25, 2015. Legal Notice Summons By PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 1410724, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Riverside Village Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Rod Finlayson and Betty Finlayson, Defendants. TO: ROD FINLAYSON AND BETTY FINLAYSON You have been sued by Riverside Village Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho Case No. CV OC 1410724. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form including the case number., and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse 200 W. Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702-7300 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on

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the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FORTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-3921400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 23rd Day of January, 2015. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By:/s/ Sean Murphy, Deputy Clerk Pub. Feb. 4, 11, 18, & 25, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT A. KELLER, Deceased. Case No. CV IE 1500490 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Charles Vincen has been appointed personal representative of the estate of the above-named Decedent. All person having claims against the Decedent or his estate are required to present their claims

within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. Charles Vincen Personal Representative c/o IVER LONGETEIG 5304 N. Turret Boise Idaho, Idaho 83702 February 2, 2015 Pub. Feb. 11, 18, 25, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Lynnsey Hope Van Dyke Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1501401 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Lynnsey Hope Van Dyke, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Lynnsey Hope Escobedo. The reason for the change in name is: to restore my maiden name following divorce.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Lately your life reminds me of the action film Speed, starring Sandra Bullock and Keanu Reeves. In that story, a criminal has rigged a passenger bus to explode if its speed drops below 50 miles per hour. In your story, you seem to be acting as if you, too, will self-destruct if you stop moving at a frantic pace. I’m here to tell you that nothing bad will happen if you slow down. Just the opposite, in fact. As you clear your schedule of its excessive things-to-do, as you leisurely explore the wonders of doing nothing in particular, I bet you will experience a soothing flood of healing pleasure. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): One of the most dazzling moves a ballet dancer can do is the fouetté en tournant. The term is French for “whipped turning.” As she executes a 360-degree turn, the dancer spins around on the tip of one foot. Meanwhile, her other foot thrusts outward and then bends in, bringing her toes to touch the knee of her supporting leg. Can you imagine a dancer doing this 32 consecutive times? That’s what the best do. It takes extensive practice and requires a high degree of concentration and discipline. Paradoxically, it expresses breathtaking freedom and exuberance. You may not be a prima ballerina, Taurus, but in your own field there must be an equivalent to the fouetté en tour-

nant. Now is an excellent time for you to take a vow and make plans to master that skill. What will you need to do? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you’re a martial artist and you want to inject extra energy into an aggressive move, you might utter a percussive shout that sounds like “eee-yah!” or “hyaah!” or “aiyah!” The Japanese term for this sound is kiai. The sonic boost is most effective if it originates deep in your diaphragm rather than from your throat. Even if you’re not a martial artist, Gemini, I suggest that in the coming weeks you have fun trying out this boisterous style of yelling. It may help you summon the extra power and confidence you’ll need to successfully wrestle with all the interesting challenges ahead of you. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The prolific and popular French novelist Aurore Dupin was better known by her pseudonym George Sand. Few 19th-century women matched her rowdy behavior. She wore men’s clothes, smoked cigars, was a staunch feminist and frequented social venues where only men were normally allowed. Yet she was also a doting mother to her two children, and loved to garden, make jam and do needlework. Among her numerous lovers were the writers Alfred de Musset, Jules Sandeau and Prosper Mérimée,

28 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

as well as composer Frederic Chopin and actress Marie Dorval. Her preferred work schedule was midnight to 6 a.m., and she often slept until 3 p.m. “What a brave man she was,” said Russian author Ivan Turgenev, “and what a good woman.” Her astrological sign? The same as you and me. She’s feisty proof that not all of us Crabs are conventional fuddy-duddies. In the coming weeks, she’s our inspirational role model. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It seems you’ve slipped into a time warp. Is that bad? I don’t think so. Your adventures there may twist and tweak a warped part of your psyche in such a way that it gets healed. At the very least, I bet your visit to the time warp will reverse the effects of an old folly and correct a problem caused by your past sins. (By the way, when I use the word “sin,” I mean “being lax about following your dreams.”) There’s only one potential problem that could come out of all this: Some people in your life could misinterpret what’s happening. To prevent that, communicate crisply every step of the way. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In English and French versions of the word game Scrabble, the letter Z is worth 10 points. In Italian, it’s eight points. But in the Polish variant of Scrabble, you score just one point by using Z. That letter is rarely

used in the other three languages but is common in Polish. Keep this general principle in mind as you assess the value of the things you have to offer. You will be able to make more headway and have greater impact in situations where your particular beauty and power and skills are in short supply. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Learn all you can from the mistakes of others. You won’t have to make them all your yourself.” So said Alfred Sheinwold in his book about the card game known as bridge. I think this is excellent advice for the game of life, as well. And it should be extra pertinent for you in the coming weeks, because people in your vicinity will be making gaffes and wrong turns that are useful for you to study. In the future, you’ll be wise to avoid perpetrating similar messes yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Love her but leave her wild,” advised a graffiti artist who published his thoughts on a wall next to the mirror in a public restroom I visited. Another guerrilla philosopher had added a comment below: “That’s a nice sentiment, but how can anyone retain wildness in a society that puts so many demands on us in exchange for money to live?” Since I happened to have a felt-tip pen with me, I scrawled a response to the question posed in the second comment: “Be in

nature every day. Move your body a lot. Remember and work with your dreams. Be playful. Have good sex. Infuse any little thing you do with a creative twist. Hang out with animals. Eat with your fingers. Sing regularly.” And that’s also my message for you, Scorpio, during this phase when it’s so crucial for you to nurture your wildness. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Don’t worry, even if things get heavy, we’ll all float on.” So sings Modest Mouse’s vocalist Isaac Brock on the band’s song “Float On.” I recommend you try that approach yourself, Sagittarius. Things will no doubt get heavy in the coming days. But if you float on, the heaviness will be a good, rich, soulful heaviness. It’ll be a purifying heaviness that purges any glib or shallow influences that are in your vicinity. It’ll be a healing heaviness that gives you just the kind of graceful gravitas you will need. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “What I look for in a friend is someone who’s different from me,” says science fiction novelist Samuel Delany. “The more different the person is, the more I’ll learn from him. The more he’ll come up with surprising takes on ideas and things and situations.” What about you, Capricorn? What are the qualities in a friend that help you thrive? Now is a perfect time to take an inventory. I sense that although

there are potential new allies wandering in your vicinity, they will actually become part of your life only if you adjust and update your attitudes about the influences you value most. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): At the turn of the 19th century, Russian laborers constructed thousands of miles of railroad tracks from the western part of the country eastward to Siberia. The hardest part of the job was blasting tunnels through the mountains that were in the way. I reckon you’re at a comparable point in your work, Aquarius. It’s time to smash gaping holes through obstacles. Don’t scrimp or apologize. Clear the way for the future. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The British rock band the Animals released their gritty, growly interpretation of the song “The House of the Rising Sun” in 1964. It reached the top of the pop music charts in the U.S., Canada, U.K. and Australia, and was a hit with critics. Rolling Stone magazine ultimately ranked it as the 122nd greatest song of all time. And yet it took the Animals just 15 minutes to record. They did it in one take. That’s the kind of beginner’s luck and spontaneous flow I foresee you having in the coming weeks, Pisces. What’s the best way for you to channel all that soulful mojo? BOISE WEEKLY.COM


A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) MAR 17 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date JAN 30 2015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB FEB. 11, 18, 25 & MAR. 4, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Riley Kae Riggs-Hurren Legal name of child Case No. CV NC 1501074 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Riley Kae Riggs-Hurren, a minor, now residing in the City of Eagle, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Rylee Kae Riggs. The reason for the change in name is: to omit her 2nd surname (Hurren). A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) MAR 17 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date JAN 302015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 11, 18, 25 & Mar 4, 2015. LEGAL NOTICE SECTION 45-805 LIEN SALE/VEHICLE Northstar Asset Management LLC for Braniff RV Storage, 390 W. Crestline Dr, Boise, ID 83702. 208860-0447. VIN/LIC: 1GBJP37W6K3313524/1AH782M, YEAR: 1989, Make: GEOR, Model: TK, Body: MOTORIZED

B OISE W E E KLY

HOME, LEGAL OWNER (Reg/ Titled): William Shawn Cannon, LIEN AMOUNT: $1500. Owners of vehicle may claim vehicle within 10 days of this publication date by paying the Lien amount before 12:00PM on March 6, 2015. Lien sale: March 6, 2015 1:00pm. Lien Sale Location: 2450 E. Braniff, Boise, ID 83716. PUB. FEB. 25 & MAR 4, 2015 . LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS FOR PUBLICATION. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF, THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, In the Matter of the Estate of: MELINDA CROGHAN, Deceased, Patrick Croghan, Personal Representative. Case No. CV IE 1502095. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 20th day of February, 2015. Patrick Croghan c/o James K. Ball, MANWEILER, BREEN, BALL & DAVIS, PLLC P.O. Box 937 Boise, ID 83702 (208) 424-9100 PUB. FEB. 25, Mar. 4 & 11, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: April Nicole Davis Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1502023 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name

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of April Nicole Davis, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to April Nicole McConnell. The reason for the change in name is divorce. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) March 24, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date February 12, 2015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 25, Mar. 4, 11 & 18, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the matter of the application of: ANTHONY I. SEITZ, for change of name. CASE NO. CVNC 1422943 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Anthony I. Seitz, a minor, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Ashley Kayy Spencer. The reason for the change in name is the minor child is transitioning her gender and desires to change her first and middle name to reflect this transition. The minor child desires to change her surname to reflect that of her siblings. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p. m. on March 24, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Dated this 12th day of February, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

Christopher D. Rich By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB FEB 25, MAR 4, 11, 18, 2015. LIEN SALE 2000 FORD FOCUS VIN.# 1FAFP3636YW416996 Location of Sale: STEVE’S AUTOMOTIVE & TOWING IMPOUND LOT 916 W. Sherwood St. Boise, ID 83706 208-257-3614 DATE: March 9th, 2015 at 10:30 AM PUB. Feb. 25 & March 4, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Brandon Gregory Brown Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1501534 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Brandon Gregory Brown, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Brandon Jeffrey Gehman. The reason for the change in name is: to take the name of the man who raised me my entire life. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) March 24, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change.

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Date FEB 12, 2015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB FEB. 25, MAR. 4, 11, & 18, 2015.

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BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | 29


PAGE BRE AK TOP 10

ON THE COVER

Best-selling albums at the Record Exchange, week ending Feb. 22:

“CAR A JO/SHIT” MIXED MEDIA BY LUZ CAMARENA

1. Smoke + Mirrors, Imagine Dragons 2. Shadows in the Night, Bob Dylan 3. Happy Prisoner: The Bluegrass Sessions, Robert Earl Keen 4. Terraplane, Steve Earle and the Dukes 5. Terminal Current, The Ravenna Colt 6. Hozier, Hozier 7. Onward & Sideways, Joshua Radin 8. Lost in the Dream, The War on Drugs 9. I Love You, Honeybear, Father John Misty 10. Wallflower, Diana Krall (Source: therecordexchange.net)

READER COMMENTS From our most-commented on Facebook post, Feb. 18-24, “Poll: Do You Support the Legalization of Marijuana in Idaho?”: Shane R Anderson: As well, I am a non-smoker and fully support it. For medical usage, hemp resources and millions in additional taxes for our state and roads, the financial implications are undeniable. Time for change and time to move Idaho forward.

don’t want it to happen… Kameron Horrorjunkie York: If we legalized it Idaho would Tim Tuttle: You need a poll to do so much better with find out what Boise Weekly money coming in we could fix readers think about legalup our roads, we could save izing pot? How ’bout a poll to the buildings in downtown see if readers think the sky Nampa, parks could look betis blue. ter. We could do a lot. Plus a lot of medical usage. So I say Kris Franklin: Maybe if we could convince Butch that there’d move forward Idaho it won’t be extra income to waste on hurt and also GET BUTCH OTfighting gay marriage… Bet TER OUT OF OFFICE!!!!!!!!! he would bend the rules to Ted Kielley II-e: Problem is, the get it legalized in the state bloodsucking lobbyists for then… So dumb! the private prison system

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“ You c an’t sel l u s a h or se and then deliver a pig in the mud, then tell us how good the pig in the mud is and why we sh ou l d keep it .” —SEN . TO DD L A KE Y, RNAMPA , SPE AKING ON A BILL TO REPE A L LEGALIZED HISTORIC HORSE R ACING

“ It c annot be done in pregnancy simply bec au se wh en you swal l ow a pil l, it wou l d not end up in the vagina.” — DR. JULIE MA DSEN RESP ONDING TO A QUESTION FROM DALTON GARDENS REPUBLICAN REP. VITO BA RBIERI ABO U T WHE TH E R “ SWALLOWI NG A CAMER A” WOULD HELP A DO CTOR DE TERMIN E “ WHAT THE SITUATION IS” WITH A PREGNANCY.

0% 1%

6%

5%

“Beautiful day in the neighborhood” taken by instagram user beewisegoods

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT “Do you support the legalization of marijuana in Idaho?”

Strongly oppose: 345 votes (5.93%) Somewhat oppose: 66 votes (1.13%) Don’t know: 20 votes (0.34%) Somewhat support: 300 votes (5.15%) Strongly support: 5,090 votes (87.44%) Disclaimer: This online poll is not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

STATS & DIGITS 36.6 MILLION

31.7 MILLION

Number of viewers 18-49 who tuned into the 2015 Academy Awards, down 17 percent from last year (deadline.com)

Number of viewers 18-49 who tuned into the 2015 State of the Union address—the second-lowest SOTU viewership since 1993 (politico.com)

30 | FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 3, 2015 | BOISEweekly

112.2 MILLION Average number of viewers who tuned into Super Bowl XLIX, making it the most-watched TV broadcast in U.S. history (money.cnn.com)

5

0

3.8 MILLION

47%

26%

Minimum number of times Fox News TV personality Bill O’Reilly has claimed he saw combat as a journalist in the Falkland Islands War in 1982 (Mother Jones)

Number of U.S. journalists who were allowed to reach the war zone during the Falklands War between the U.K. and Argentina (Mother Jones)

Combined number of viewers who tuned into the Feb. 20 broadcasts of The O’Reilly Factor on Fox News (tvbythenumbers. zap2it.com)

Percentage of “consistently conservative” viewers who say their main source for “news about government and politics” is Fox News (Pew Research Center)

Percentage of Americans 87% who incorrectly answered a survey question from the National Science Foundation about whether the Earth revolves around the sun (npr.org)

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Profile for Boise Weekly

Boise Weekly Vol.23 Issue 36  

Oversight, Out of Mind As communities beef up police oversight, Boise mulls part-time ombudsman.

Boise Weekly Vol.23 Issue 36  

Oversight, Out of Mind As communities beef up police oversight, Boise mulls part-time ombudsman.