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“My mother told me, ‘Disturb the peace.’”

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PeopleThePushers harsh truth about human trafficking in Idaho

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ProjectTheCensored top 10 under- or badly reported news stories of 2014

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INSIDE

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2 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com Associate Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Tara Morgan, John Rember, Ben Schultz Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com Ian Roth, ian@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jenny Bowler, jenny@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2014 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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EDITOR’S NOTE FIT TO PRINT As a rule, journalists have a host of well-known vices, including excessive boozing, unhealthy eating, poor sleeping and Internet addiction. The overworked, underpaid cynic sacrificing his or her mind and body for The Truth is (mostly) a cliche, but it satisfies our powerful martyr complex. One bad habit we all share is the compulsion to read and think dire things about our own industry. As in, when budding journalists ask for career advice, those of us who’ve been doing this for a while often respond with, “Don’t do it.” We like to blame the Internet—which, paradoxically, we rely on all day every day—and we like to blame corporations, the economy, even readers. We like to blame pretty much anything and anyone other than ourselves for the perceived sorry state of journalism. As Megan McArdle described it in a recent article on bloombergview.com, we see ourselves in a “brave new world of journalism, where there are more ways to do great reporting than ever before, and fewer and fewer ways to pay for it.” While we wring our hands over changing revenue models, we often lose sight of the part of the equation where we “do great reporting.” It’s out there, and in quantities never before seen. Case in point: our fellow alt-weekly, Willamette Week, in Portland, Ore., whose reporting on influence peddling in the office of Gov. John Kitzhaber led to his resignation earlier this month. Not every great story gets reported, of course, and even when they’re reported they don’t always get the attention they deserve. That’s why we make it a point to republish Project Censored (see Page 10), which counts down the top stories that were badly, under- or simply unreported in the previous year. From ocean acidification to FBI suppression of Occupy Wall Street to the real story behind the ongoing crisis in Ukraine, it’s a sampling of the news that was fit to print but wasn’t... or at least not in the way it should have been. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Martin Wilke TITLE: “Year of the Sheep” MEDIUM: India ink on archival paper ARTIST STATEMENT: I draw objects that people have seen before but I attempt to present them in ways that haven’t been seen. My favorite comment about my work is, “I’ve never seen anything like it,” and it’s the comment I most often hear. As soon as I find myself doing what someone else is doing, I’ll know that it’s time to take up something else. Right now it’s a toss-up between televangelist and pro bowler. See more at martinwilke.com.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

NOT SO BLACK-AND-WHITE DURING THE VALENTINE’S DAY WEEKEND, FIF T Y SHADES OF GRE Y B RO KE REC O RD S AT THE BOX OFFICE, E A RNING $81.7 MILLION. IDAHO COA LITION AG A INST SE X UA L A ND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE E X ECUTIVE DIRECTOR KELLY M ILLER IS NOT SO E XCITED ABOUT THE HOT- AND -HE AV Y PLOT, SAYING THE FILM “CELEBR ATE[ S ] AND LEGITIMIZE[ S ] SE XUAL VIOLENCE.” MORE ON C OBWE B.

WHOA, NELLY On Feb. 17, the Idaho Senate heard a third reading of the historical horse racing bill and debated repealing the law that allows slot machine-like betting stations. Join the debate on Citydesk.

KITCHEN REMODEL Life’s Kitchen, a nonprofit devoted to helping at-risk youth gain commercial kitchen experience, is getting a new home in 2017. Find out how the new facility will let Life’s Kitchen grow on Citydesk.

FUN IN THE SUN (VALLEY) Sun Valley Film Festival organizers held a party at The Modern Hotel on Feb. 15 to preview some of the films screening at the festival March 4-8. More on Page 30 and Cobweb.

OPINION

4 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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OPINION DIRECTOR’S CUT

It’s about good, it’s about bad, and it’s about ugly BILL COPE utan to Joe Kidd to the high plains drifter to Josie Wales to William Munny to the guy with the El Camino... no actor has pulled more box office gold out of a squint. Not that I would ever call him a bad actor. Let us just say “limited,” though it’s never stopped him from being an apBoise Weekly has a movie reviewer and a fine one at that. With George Prentice around, there pealing and commanding presence on the screen. It is in the directing where Mr. Eastwood has is no need or point of me ever doing a review proven himself an enduring artist. Even his first myself. Besides, when I watch a movie, it’s usually long after the thing was released. Rather than effort, Play Misty For Me (1971), was memorable, and he just got better from there. The leaving the comfort of my home and joining a movies grew ever more multidimensional, more crowd to watch a flick, I wait until it shows up nuanced, more convincing. How can Eastwood on television or in a big red box somewhere. However, for this week’s column, I’m review- not consider moral ambiguity and still turn out movies such as Mystic River (2003) and Unforing a movie—American Sniper—on which everybody feels compelled to have an opinion. I, given (1992). One had the sense he was using violence in the latter to renounce the violence he too, feel compelled to have an opinion on it, so had capitalized on in so many earlier roles. I am joining the crowd. Hopefully, my opinion With Gran Torino (2008) and Million Dolof American Sniper will be somewhat different than all of the other opinions, but it will be hard lar Baby (2004), he painted subtle portraits of petrified old assholes transcending themselves, to avoid sounding like someone else. It will be hard to avoid. That’s the problem with joining a softened with rediscovered empathy—a feat crowd, isn’t it? It’s tough to not sound like you’re that would have turned to farce in less talented hands. So there is no reason for me to believe just one of the crowd, when you are. he’d be a superlative artist for the last four deIt’s likely there is only one thing that will set cades, then turn into John Wayne so late into his my assessment apart from everyone else who’s career. (For a real example of a pro-war, jingoist written a formal review of this movie—that being: I haven’t seen it. I will, eventually. Probably. piece of propaganda crap, I refer you to The Green Berets [1968].) At some later date, well after all the controversy But if American Sniper is, as I suspect, another has boiled off, I will almost certainly watch multidimensional, nuanced Eastwood film, American Sniper. In the meantime, let me just say I’ve heard Bradley Cooper did a bang-up job in which he’s dramatizing the hell of war in a convincing restatement of the eternal truism of acting in it, which is no surprise. There is no “War is Hell,” it won’t mean anything like that reason to believe Cooper would be a superlato one-dimensional, nuance-deaf idiots—Texas tive actor in Silver Linings Playbook (2012) and state leaders come to mind—who could never American Hustle (2013), then turn into Adam understand it as anything beyond a glorification Sandler for this latest movie. So let’s agree that of misplaced heroism and mythologized murder. whatever is fomenting all the controversy over There have been reports of such barbarianthis film isn’t Bradley Cooper’s acting skills. wannabes expressing—on the Internet, where There’s no mystery where all the controversy else?—their latent lust to partake in the slaughter is coming from, is there? Simply put, is it a prowar movie, or is it anti-war? More viscerally, does in the same manner as the character in the it make the act of killing such a thrilling prospect movie, e.g. from a safe distance with a powerful weapon against unsuspecting targets, a la Charles that impressionable idiots would fantasize that Whitman. (For a real example of another famous they, too, could blow away human beings with sniper’s work, I refer you to the University of impunity, or does it portray the sickening realities of what such slaughter does to the minds and Texas bell tower, 1966.) So, is Michael Moore right about American souls of the soldiers doing the slaughtering? Sniper? And Bill Maher? And all the others who I don’t know. Like I said, I haven’t seen it. regard it as praise for a sociopathic killer? Or is But I have come to trust the man who made Michelle Obama right? And George Prentice the movie—at least, when it comes to making (BW, Screen, “The War at Home,” Feb. 4, 2015). films, if not to making one-sided conversation And all those who understand that putting with an empty stool. Clint Eastwood has been something horrifying on screen doesn’t mean a peripheral part of my world since well before you’re suggesting horror is something to be I started growing hair on my face. From Rowdy admired. Yates to the gunslinger with no name to Dirty I don’t know. Like I said, I haven’t seen it. Harry to Bronco Billy to the guy with the orangIt’s a hell of a thing, killing a man. You take away everything he’s got and everything he’s ever gonna have.—William Munny (Clint Eastwood) in Unforgiven.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

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BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 5


OPINION FOR ALL YOU VALENTINES And all you lizards JOHN REMBER Julie and I talk about reincarnation a bunch, usually when we’re wondering how it came to be that we met each other, fell in love, got married and stayed married through the thick and thin of two decades. I’ve decided we had some sort of illicit love in a past life, and the cosmic-powersthat-be decided we would have to overcome major hurdles in order for us to ever again hang out on the same planet at the same time. Julie’s arrival on Earth was deliberately delayed by sullen, joy-hating bureaucrats in the Cosmic Birth Office. The result was that the first class I taught in college was the first class Julie took in college. I’d like to say that we recognized each other immediately, but it took a couple of years before we discovered that whatever had made us transgress in another lifetime was worthy of more transgression. Julie thinks we must have yearned for each other across a church aisle in Puritan Massachusetts, each of us married to cruel and uncaring spouses. Or worse, we were stoned to death for adultery in 15th century Afghanistan. Or she may have been a duchess in revolutionary France and I, a devoted servant, catching a last glimpse of her face above the tumbril as she rode through the bloodthirsty mob to the guillotine. We’ve also had the logical but disturbing thought that our deep tie through the ages might not be one of love. One of us might have been unspeakably cruel to the other, and our togetherness this time around is dedicated to the small, step-by-step reductions of an enormous wrong, a turn toward kindness and love by one of us, a turn toward forgiveness and love by the other. So far, it’s been hard to figure out who did what to whom. That’s one of the merciful things about reincarnation. The mind doesn’t get to know what you’ve done in past lives. The soul does, of course, but the soul keeps its secrets. The depth psychologist James Hillman made a successful career pointing out that the needs of the soul are essentially contrary to the needs of the mind, and that the soul long ago decided to remain inarticulate in the face of such an unreasonable and demanding adversary. Hillman wrote a detailed and thoughtful but not terribly uplifting book explaining how suicide is one of the few acts where we humans can observe the soul in action. This assertion didn’t exactly land Hillman on the New York Times’ best-seller list. Anyway, another merciful thing about reincarnation is that we don’t know from whom or what we are reincarnated. The universe is a big place, full of other planets orbiting other stars. If even a tiny portion of those have life, chances 6 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

are we’re reincarnated from the flatworms of Deneb VII or the bipedal lizards of Tau Ceti II rather than from honest 17th century earthbound Scandinavian peasants. In fact, the dogged, devout souls of those Scandinavian peasants probably reside right now in the machine intelligences of Procyon V, patiently reconstructing a planetary biosphere destroyed by an extinct humanoid species, one given over to atom bombs and shopping. One more not-so-merciful thing about reincarnation: it obscures the fact that there aren’t enough souls to go around, and on a planet undergoing a population explosion, a lot of people get born without one. For example, I’m certain that George W. Bush was born without a soul. That’s why, when he looked into Vladimir Putin’s also-soulless eyes, he didn’t know what to look for. What Bush thought was a soul was really a bipedal lizard looking for food. What he mistook for deep understanding and a capacity for suffering was only Putin’s brain going, “See bug. Eat bug.” This sort of thing explains more geopolitics than any number of political-science Ph.D. dissertations. It explains leaders who act like lizards. It explains the ability of people to dehumanize their enemies. It explains serial murderers and right-wing talk-show hosts and the narcissistic twerkings of reality-show stars. It explains people who purchase political candidates. It explains political candidates who are purchasable. None of these people have souls. They have no hope of getting one. Just a barely-imagined lizard or flatworm existence, until, pfffft. The end. I didn’t bring up these ideas during Valentine’s dinner with Julie, but I did ask her if she’d be up for another shared reincarnation in a hundred years or so. It wasn’t the first time I’d asked that question. Usually she says yes, which I take to mean that she thinks we are happily attracted to each other rather than clinically obsessed with each other, that we’re kind to each other out of virtue rather than guilt, and that this life has been full enough of adventure and happiness to stand a repeat. I do this because I’m determined to make it to our 50th wedding anniversary. Trouble is, it’s scheduled for August of 2046, and I can read the actuarial tables as well as anybody. This year, as I asked Julie the question, an understanding flashed between our souls. As best I can tell, it was about love and joy, and loss and pain, and how the four are always knotted up with each other. It has taken our souls decades, if not lifetimes, to figure that out. “I’ll get back to you on that,” Julie said. “Give me another 20 years.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


GEORGE PRENTICE

THE VIEW FROM HERE

NEWS

CITYDESK

Idaho legislators engage citizens on their own turf Boise Bike Share is eyeing an April rollout.

GEORGE PRENTICE Forrest Gump would feel at home at a town hall with Idaho legislators: Just like his box of chocolates, you never know what you’re going to get. Through the years, Boise Weekly has sat in on several legislative town halls, watching lawmakers bring their constituents up to speed on Statehouse strategies and shenanigans. We’ve witnessed some ill-attended evenings, where more lawmakers than constituents showed up and, on more than a few occasions, we’ve watched lawmakers fight back yawns as their long day’s journey at the Capitol stretched into a nighttime neighborhood forum. Something was different Feb. 11 as District 19 legislators stood in front of a fully-engaged audience at Riverglen Junior High School on the far west edge of their district. There was even extra zip that evening as they covered a wide variety of Statehouse issues, in spite of the fact that the Democratic trio had already clocked a 12-plus hour day at the Capitol. In a matter of seconds, the constituents started peppering the lawmakers with the issues. “I want to talk about our aging infrastructure,” said one woman. “We’ve got to talk about our teachers being paid an adequate wage,” said another. “I have a big problem with the way the state of Idaho has been awarding contracts,” shouted a man from the back of the room. “Wow,” said Sen. Cherie Buckner-Webb. “You know how some people complain about how uninformed voters are? Well, that’s clearly not the case tonight. You guys obviously came prepared, and we love it.” “We” included Buckner-Webb and her Democratic District 19 colleagues in the House, Reps. Matt Erpelding and Melissa Wintrow. For the better part of two hours, the legislators spoke openly and candidly about how they spend their days—and more than a few nights—each winter.

ADD THE WORDS Wintrow cut her legislative teeth mere days after being sworn in as a freshman member of the Idaho House. As an appointed member of the House State Affairs Committee, Wintrow became fully-entrenched in the Add the Words debate, which played out in a series of historic hearings in January that ran night-and-day before the committee voted 13-4 along party BOISE WEEKLY.COM

A BICYCLE BUILT FOR 25,000

District 19 legislators Sen. Cherie Buckner-Webb (left) and House members Matt Erpelding (center) and Melissa Wintrow (right) took questions and gave answers at a recent town hall meeting .

lines to defeat the bill that would have added the words “gender identity” and “sexual orientation” to Idaho’s human rights law. “I can’t tell you how proud I was of Melissa. Did you watch her during those hearings?” asked Buckner-Webb, to which the audience nodded its collective head. “People who know me would tell you that I speak my mind and as a new legislator, I really wanted to make a point to tell the truth while keeping a bridge open to a colleague who may disagree with me,” said Wintrow, adding that she reached out to Republican Reps. Ken Andrus and Linden B. Bateman. “I can tell you for a fact that Andrus and Bateman were really struggling by the end of that hearing.” Buckner-Webb said, “As for the possibility of an Add the Words bill resurfacing this year, well…” After a long pause, she continued. “Well, we’re working on it. I asked House Speaker [Scott] Bedke if he would entertain a second hearing and he said, ‘Absolutely not.’ But we’re re-working, re-wording and we’re showing it to as many people as we can.” Erpelding said Idaho lawmakers need look no further than District 19 for the ever-evolving diversity of the Gem State. “Just in our district, we have a mosque, a Greek Orthodox church, a Russian Orthodox church and a synagogue, all within a close proximity of one another,” he said.

‘CONSTITUTIONAL CARRY’ On Saturday, Feb. 21, proponents of Idaho House Bill 89, aka the “constitutional carry” measure, will take to the steps of the Idaho Capitol to support the bill which would allow all citizens to carry weapons anywhere in the state.

“But let me put you at ease right now. I just don’t think this bill is going anywhere,” Erpelding said. “I just can’t imagine that there are enough legislators who would support the idea of anyone being able to carry any weapon anywhere they want. In my opinion, it’s unlikely to even make it to the House floor.” The purpose of the “constitutional carry” bill, supporters said, was to give citizens the same privilege as Idaho legislators, who are not required to secure a concealed carry permit to carry a weapon. Erpelding said, in fact, he was prepared to support a measure that would revoke that privilege from legislators. “I want to see a law that says legislators should be carrying a permit,” he said.

PUBLIC LANDS A different rally was happening on the steps of the Idaho Statehouse on Feb. 12: hundreds of citizens had gathered to oppose the idea of Idaho taking control of federal public lands. More than a few Idaho Republican lawmakers have floated the idea of Idaho pursuing its legal options to transfer ownership of federal lands to the state. “I was asked to be a member of the interim committee to explore this issue,” Erpelding said. “We went to Eastern Idaho and didn’t hear much pushback. We went to Southern Idaho and didn’t hear much there. But then, we went to Kamiah [in north-central Idaho], and we heard all of this anti-federal government talk. “They think this is about jobs,” he added. “It’s not about jobs. This is posturing. If they were serious about jobs, 8 there’s a lot of other things we ought to be talking about.”

In September 2014, Boise Bike Share Program Director Dave Fotsch dropped by BWHQ to show off a demo bike. It had three speeds, a dynamo drive, a cushy seat and a rollout date of sometime before Treefort Music Fest (March 25-29, 2015). Now, its launch is being delayed by a massive dock workers lockout that has stalled overseas imports. Fotsch and Boise Bike Share—a program that would put bike rental stations across downtown Boise—have faced setbacks before: at a meeting of the Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho in 2013, members of the Ada County Highway District reallocated $326,000 in FY2015 funding that would have gone to the program. Still, Fotsch said he expects to see bikes hit the streets sometime in April, but “right now, the bikes are on a boat coming from China.” That’s the bad news. The good news is, BW has obtained a mockup of the new bikes. They will be painted Saint Luke’s blue and Select Health green, the colors of BBS’ corporate sponsors, and they’ll be emblazoned with the program’s new name: “Boise GreenBike.” BGB is now looking to rent space downtown to house repair and maintenance operations and will interview applicants for an open service manager position (the position closes Friday, Feb. 20). Now, Fotsch is “geotagging” kiosk and station locations, logging them with the GPS tracking devices that will be affixed to each bike. The idea is to charge patrons extra for parking the bikes at non-geotagged areas like bike racks and fences. Meanwhile, the number of kiosks where users can rent bikes has doubled from five to 10, thanks to approximately $57,000 in funding from the city. Bikes will be parked at 14 stations around the downtown Boise area. Despite the obstacles, Fotsch still has optimism—and a sense of humor—about BGB Year 1. His goal for 2015 is to see riders make 25,000 unique trips using BGB bikes to match the number of trips taken on GREENBikes in Salt Lake City. “We should be able to reach that number if we roll out by September,” Fotsch joked. —Harrison Berry BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 7


Dr

CITYDESK xi

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Di

Boise River

Sedimentation Basin

Negotiations over the Dixie Drain are unplugged.

JES SICA MURRI

NEWS

ain

HUMAN TRAFFICKING 101 Yes, it’s happening here JESSICA MURRI

DRAIN CLEARED A treatment system meant to keep the Boise and Snake rivers clean is back on track after the city of Middleton withdrew its appeal of a conditional use permit for the so-called Dixie Drain Phosphorous Offset Project (BW, News, “Whistling Dixie (Drain),” July 30, 2014). Located near Parma, the Dixie Drain is intended to remove phosphorus from the Boise River before its confluence with the Snake River by diverting water into a three-phase treatment facility (BW, News, “Water, Water, Aug. 3, 2011). Water flowing out of the drain would help Boise and surrounding communities better meet Clean Water Act standards. Untreated, the Boise River contains about 4,000 micrograms of phosphorous per liter. At the current treatment level, it contains about 350 micrograms of phosphorous per liter. The Dixie Drain is expected to bring the river closer to Environmental Protection Agency compliance: 70 micrograms of phosphorous per liter. The cities of Greenleaf and Middleton both appealed Boise’s application for a conditional use permit, alleging that the project would impact their ability to grow, and raising concerns that excess downstream phosphorous would lead to tighter restrictions from the EPA. They also took aim at the project’s cost, which was initially expected to be $12 million. The city of Boise agreed to assist both cities with upgrades to their wastewater treatment plants in an agreement to drop appeals against the project. Greenleaf gave its OK to the Dixie Drain in late January, but Middleton officials waited until Feb. 13 to sign off on the agreement. A final cost figure, including the Greenleaf and Middleton upgrades, has yet to be released. “Residents of both cities will benefit from the agreement. Middleton appreciates Boise’s effort to recognize the impact of Boise’s permits and projects on water quality near Middleton,” wrote Middleton Mayor Darin Taylor in a press release. Now that Middleton has withdrawn its appeal, the Dixie Drain project is set to move forward with construction in the early spring. —Harrison Berry 8 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

According to Merikay Jost, there was nearly a 100 percent chance that a sex trafficking transaction was happening at a local hotel on the same evening she and Maricela Artalejo, with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, gave a presentation to the Boise branch of the American Association of University Women. Each month, the Boise AAUW chapter hosts speakers on topics ranging from refugee resettlement to the Idaho Food Bank. On Feb. 11, the topic was human trafficking and the audience in the banquet room of Boise’s Twin Dragon restaurant sat in stunned silence as they listened. “We’re pulling the wool over our eyes,” Jost told the crowd. “We’re not addressing what is happening here.” She noted the different kinds of human trafficking that regularly take place in the Gem State: labor trafficking, organ trafficking and domestic minor sex trafficking, in which children are sold for sex by guardians in their own homes. One of the biggest problems in Idaho, according to Jost, is the state’s inability to handle sex trafficking cases. Jost said she only knows of two detectives in Idaho who know how to handle these cases, and the state is greatly underequipped to protect these victims. “There are over 3,000 animal shelters in the United States but less than 300 beds for sex trafficking victims that are children,” Jost said, drawing gasps from the audience. Jost said there was really nowhere for the children—mostly girls—to go once they’re rescued.

TRANSPORTATION A number of constituents were anxious 7 to hear about how Idaho lawmakers might tackle an approximate $250 million transportation shortfall, hastening the deterioration of Idaho roads and bridges. “This one is going to hurt. Even if we were to raise the gas tax by a dime and increase vehicle registrations by a whopping 50 percent, we wouldn’t get close to the money we need,” Erpelding said. “But we have a bigger debate going on when it comes to transportation,” he added. “Talk to

Human trafficking awareness advocate Merikay Jost (left) addressed the Boise branch of the American Association of University Women with Maricela Artalejo, of the Idaho Department of Health and Wellfare.

They can’t go to shelters for women and children unless accompanied by an adult, and foster care isn’t always an appropriate option because many of the girls are runaways from foster homes. Jost said it’s these issues that often prevent law enforcement and prosecutors from taking on human trafficking cases. “If we have law enforcement go and find these victims, we’re going to be in so far over our heads,” Jost said. “We have nowhere to put them.” Even finding victims of human trafficking can be extremely difficult because they don’t come forward, Jost explained. She said victims are “brainwashed” by pimps to distrust law enforcement and made to feel scared for their safety should they try to get away. Jost kept pointing out to the Boise AAUW group that sex trafficking was indeed happening in this community, not just in Los Angeles or New York. In fact, she said, Boise is part of a circuit that includes cities throughout the West. Boise Weekly has followed several local sex trafficking cases, including the 2014 arrest

and sentencing of Derrick Hicklen and Gypsie Akers, who ran a prostitution ring out of hotels near the Boise Airport (BW, Feature, “Absence of Choice,” April 2, 2014). Those selling sex and those buying it are treated much differently. Prostitutes are usually arrested, johns usually are not. “Who is the typical john today?” asked Jost. “He’s male, 28-64 years old, married with children, from all walks of life, usually non-violent. Regular men with regular jobs. They are our husbands, our brothers, our uncles, our fathers, the guy at the pulpit, the guy in the legislature, the guy in the police department. No one is slapping their hands.” Jost said she hoped that the communityminded group would support legislation that protects trafficking victims and help raise awareness of the issue. “I talk to at least 1,000 people every year on this topic,” Jost told BW. “It’s only in the last three years that audiences even have an inkling of what I’m talking about.”

somebody in rural Idaho and they want to talk about a bridge. Well, here in the Treasure Valley we have a connector that comes to a standstill every day at 4:45 p.m. We have this urban versus rural debate in so many issues.”

of Ada.’ Well, Ada and Canyon counties represent almost 43 to 46 percent of the population, and we’re only getting bigger, yet we don’t necessarily have that type of representation, at least not yet. I truly believe that the rise of the urban community is coming to Idaho. It’s only a matter of time.” Wintrow added that she’s ready to “fight the good fight” but remembered her mother’s words of caution. “She used to tell me to try to be the most reasonable person in the room,” Wintrow said. “Really?” asked Buckner-Webb. “My mother told me, ‘Disturb the peace.’”

URBAN VS. RURAL Erpelding returned to the “urban vs. rural” debate a few times through the course of the town hall. “The Boise Metro Area is a place of a lot of economic activity,” he said. “I’m sure you’ve heard some rural legislators refer to us as the ‘Great State

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN because they see there is a lot of local input in state politics. That’s why we wish more people would watch.

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JEFF TUCKER

With Idaho in Session, Idaho Public Television’s director of content brings the Legislature into focus JESSICA MURRI Jeff Tucker, the director of content services at Idaho Public Television, is a short guy with a salt-and-pepper colored beard and a tremendous amount of energy and enthusiasm. He sprints through the hallways of the Idaho Statehouse shouting out a friendly “Hello” to legislative staff, lobbyists, journalists and scores of others for whom the Capitol Building is a home-away-fromhome for three—sometimes more—months out of the year. Tucker gave Boise Weekly a tour of Idaho In Session’s headquarters: a dark room in the basement of the Idaho Capitol that houses half a dozen editing bays. There part-time employees watch all the live feeds and, using joysticks, run 14 cameras throughout the Statehouse, including in the House and Senate chambers, the Lincoln Auditorium, a handful of committee rooms and the Idaho Supreme Court. The footage is broadcast live on IdahoPTV and online. It’s a job he loves.

How long have you been in public television? A long time. How long? Mmm, since high school. What is it that you do here exactly? All we do [at Idaho In Session] is follow the ball. We don’t editorialize, we won’t shoot somebody rolling their eyes somewhere or leaving the floor—just who’s talking. It’s all neutral. This is raw. That’s why it can be very boring sometimes but if you want to understand and know how the process works, you can follow a bill [from the] beginning all the way through to the end. How does Idaho In Session work? We operate under rules given to us by the Legislature. It costs [IDPTV] over $200,000 a year just to cover the Legislature. Another thing Idaho In Session does, we provide the media for other news organizations. We do pool coverage BOISE WEEKLY.COM

of the inauguration. Idaho In Session streams it, and we allow the rest of the media to get it. The State of the State and State of the Budget, that’s our pool coverage. We’re Switzerland, and we let other media take it. Who runs the control boards? It’s a mix. Sometimes it’s high-school and college students, or professionals looking for something else to do, or retirees looking for a part-time job. It’s different from the 30-second news package. You really have to get into it. Some people get too incensed with what’s going on, instead of just sitting back and going, “OK, this is the political process, this is what it’s about.” It’s fun to see the personalities come out. Almost everyone who has come to work here has no political experience at all or real understanding of how the system works, and then they get exposed to it and then it really changes the way they look at government. A lot of times, they have a desire to be involved

Are we seeing everything that goes on in the legislative rooms equipped with cameras? Some committees don’t want their meetings streamed. It’s an opt-out program. Last year, there was a sensitive issue involving Health and Welfare and a minor, and they were having a committee hearing about it. The committee chairman deemed it wasn’t appropriate for the committee to be streamed anywhere. They just wanted to keep it in that room. It was still a public meeting, and the public was still invited, but they didn’t stream. We actually get a lot of calls when something isn’t streamed because it’s weird when it’s not. People expect everything to be streamed from here. But it’s not that there’s any nefarious activity going on. Can you tell how many people are viewing at a time? Yes. [During the “Add the Words” bill hearing on Jan. 27], we had 5,000 pageviews. That’s high traffic for Idaho In Session. We get about 100,000 pageviews in a year. Can you tell where people are watching from? A lot of internal state government. We joke—I think we’ve saved the state a lot of money because people don’t leave their desks to come to the meetings. They stay and listen to it and still work. We have a large number of state workers from all over the state [who stream Idaho in Session live]. Usually about a third of people streaming online are outside of state government, two-thirds are in. When it’s really inside baseball, it’s usually just specific agencies watching. Since you’re immersed in this Statehouse footage, do you think you’re one of the more in-tune people when it comes to Idaho politics? No, no, not at all. There’s so much going on, but the process is really interesting. It’s not a football game, right? That’s the problem with national politics: It’s becoming ESPN-ified, where you have commentators and you pick sides and you root for your sides. I don’t think it should be a football game. It’s going to be messy and muddy like a football game but for the most part, once a bill is passed, there had to be a lot of thought put into that. What comes out you might not like, but there was a lot of thought that went into it. That’s the one thing you get to see when you listen. If you have the patience to watch a bill all the way through, you understand that more. BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 9


Ocean acidification tops the annual list of important stories ignored by the mainstream media JOE FITZGERALD RODRIGUEZ

1. OCEAN ACIDIFICATION INCREASING AT UNPRECEDENTED RATE Our oceans are acidifying—even if the nightly news hasn’t told you yet. As humanity continues to fill the atmosphere with harmful gases, the planet is becoming less hospitable to life as we know it. The vast oceans absorb much of the carbon dioxide we have produced, from the Industrial Revolution through the rise of global capitalism. Earth’s self-sacrifice spared the atmosphere nearly 25 percent of humanity’s CO2 emissions, slowing the onslaught of many severe weather consequences. Although the news media have increasingly covered the climate weirding of global warming— hurricane superstorms, fierce tornado clusters, overwhelming snowstorms and record-setting global high temperatures—our ocean’s peril has largely stayed submerged below the biggest news stories. The rising carbon dioxide in our oceans burns up and deforms the smallest, most abundant food at the bottom of the deep blue food chain. One vulnerable population is the tiny shelled swimmer known as the sea butterfly. In a few short decades, the death and deformation of this fragile and translucent species could endanger predators all along the oceanic food web, scientists warn. 10 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

This “butterfly effect,” once unleashed, potentially threatens fisheries that feed more than 1 billion people worldwide. Since ancient times, humans fished the oceans for food. Now, we’re frying ocean life before we even catch it, starving future generations in the process. Largely left out of national news coverage, this dire report was brought to light by a handful of independent-minded journalists: Craig Welch from the Seattle Times, Julia Whitty of Mother Jones and Eli Kintisch of ScienceNOW. It is also the top story of Project Censored, an annual book and reporting project that features the year’s most underreported news stories, striving to unmask censorship, self-censorship and propaganda in corporate-controlled media outlets. “Information is the currency of democracy,” Ralph Nader, the prominent consumer advocate and many-time presidential candidate, wrote in his foreword to this year’s Project Censored 2015. But with most mass media owned by narrow corporate interests, “the general public remains uninformed.” Whereas the mainstream media poke and peck at noteworthy events at single points in time, often devoid of historical context or analysis, Project Censored seeks to clarify understanding of real world issues and focus on what’s important. Context is key, and many of its “top censored” stories highlight deeply entrenched policy issues that require more

explanation than a simple sound bite can provide. Campus and faculty from more than two dozen colleges and universities join in this ongoing effort, headquartered at Sonoma State University in California. Some 260 students and 49 faculty vet thousands of news stories on select criteria: importance, timeliness, quality of sources and the level of corporate news coverage. The top 25 finalists are sent to Project Censored’s panel of judges, who then rank the entries, with ocean acidification topping this year’s list. (For more on the other 15 top censored stories, go to projectcensored.org.) “There are outlets, regular daily papers, who are independent and they’re out there,” Andy Lee Roth, associate director of Project Censored, told us. Too many news outlets are beholden to corporate interests, but Welch of the Seattle Times bucked the trend, Roth said, by writing some of the deepest coverage yet on ocean acidification. “There are reporters doing the highest quality of work, as evidenced by being included in our list,” Roth said. “But the challenge is reaching as big an audience as [the story] should.” Indeed, though Welch’s story was reported in the Seattle Times, a mid-sized daily newspaper, this warning is relevant to the entire world. To understand the impact of ocean acidification, Welch asks readers to “imagine every person on earth tossing a hunk of BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CO2 as heavy as a bowling ball into the sea. That’s what we do to the oceans every day.” Computer modeler Isaac Kaplan, at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration office in Seattle, told Welch that his early work predicts significant declines in sharks, skates and rays, some types of flounder and sole and Pacific whiting, the most frequently caught commercial fish off the coast of Washington, Oregon and California. Acidification may also harm fisheries in the farthest corners of the earth: A study by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme outlines acidification’s threat to the Arctic food chain. “Decreases in seawater pH of about 0.02 per decade have been observed since the late 1960s in the Iceland and Barents seas,” the study’s authors wrote in the executive summary. And destroying fisheries means wiping out the livelihoods of the native peoples of the Arctic. Acidification can even rewire the brains of fish, Welch’s story demonstrated. Studies found rising CO2 levels cause clown fish to gain athleticism, but have their sense of smell redirected. This transforms them into “dumb jocks,” scientists said, swimming faster and more vigorously straight into the mouths of their predators. These Frankenstein fish were found to be five times more likely to die in the natural world. What a fitting metaphor for humanity, as our outsized consumption propels us toward an equally dangerous fate. “It’s not as dramatic as, say, an asteroid is hitting us from outer space,” Roth said of this slowly unfolding disaster, which is likely why such a looming threat to our food chain escapes much mainstream news coverage. Journalism tends to be more “action focused,” Roth said, looking to define conflict in everything it sees. A recently top-featured story on CNN focused on President Barack Obama’s “awkward coffee cup salute” to a Marine, which ranks only slightly below around-the-clock coverage of the president’s ugly tan suit as a low point in mainstream media’s focus on the trivial. As Nader noted, “‘Important stories’ are often viewed as dull by reporters and therefore unworthy of coverage.” But mainstream media do cover some BOISE WEEKLY.COM

serious topics with weight, as they did in the wake of the police officer shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. So what’s the deciding factor? As Roth tells it, corporate news focuses on “drama, and the most dramatic action is, of course, violence.” But the changes caused by ocean acidification are gradual. Sea butterflies are among the most abundant creatures in our oceans, and are increasingly born with shells that look like cauliflower or sandpaper, making this and similar species more susceptible to infection and predators. “Ocean acidification is changing the chemistry of the world’s water faster than ever before and faster than the world’s leading scientists predicted,” Welch said, but it’s not getting the attention it deserves. “Combined nationwide spending on acidification research for eight federal agencies, including grants to university scientists by the National Science Foundation, totals about $30 million a year—less than the annual budget for the coastal Washington city of Hoquiam, population 10,000.” Our oceans may slowly cook our food chain into new forms with potentially catastrophic consequences. Certainly 20 years from now, when communities around the world lose their main source of sustenance, the news will catch on. But will the problem make the front page tomorrow, while there’s still time to act? Probably not, and that’s why we have Project Censored and its annual list. It’s well known that burning fossil fuels in the form of coal, oil, and natural gas releases carbon dioxide (CO2) into the air. Less understood is that a quarter of this carbon dioxide—about twenty trillion pounds, every year—is absorbed by oceans. Writing for the Seattle Times, Craig Welch invited us to “imagine every person on earth tossing a hunk of CO2 as heavy as a bowling ball into the sea. That’s what we do to the oceans every day.” As Welch and others reported, this carbon dioxide is changing the ocean’s chemistry faster than at any time in human history, in ways that have potentially devastating consequences for both ocean life and for humans who depend on the world’s fisheries as vital sources of protein and livelihood. 12 BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 11


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2. TOP 10 US AID RECIPIENTS PRACTICE TORTURE

Sexual abuse, children kept in cages, extra-judicial murder. While these sound like horrors the United States would stand against, the reverse is true: This country is funding these practices. The U.S. is a signatory of the United Nations’ Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, but the top 10 international recipients of U.S. foreign assistance in 2014 all practice torture, according to human rights groups, as reported by Daniel Wickham of online outlet Left Foot Forward. Israel received more than $3 billion in U.S. aid for fiscal year 2013-2014, according to a Congressional Research Service report. Israel was criticized by the country’s own Public Defender Office for torturing children suspected of minor crimes. “During our visit, held during a fierce storm that hit the state, attorneys met detainees who described to them a shocking picture: In the middle of the night dozens of detainees were transferred to the external iron cages built outside the IPS transition facility in Ramla,” the PDO wrote, according to The Independent. The next top recipients of U.S. foreign aid were Afghanistan, Egypt, Pakistan, Nigeria, Jordan, Iraq, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda—all countries that were accused of torture by human rights groups such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch. Kenyan police in Nairobi tortured, raped or otherwise abused more than 1,000 refugees from 2012-2013, Human Rights Watch found. The Kenyan government received $564 million from the United States in 2013-2014. When the U.S. funds a highway or other project that it’s proud of, it plants a huge sign proclaiming “your tax dollars at work.” When the U.S. funds torturers, the corporate media bury the story, or worse, don’t report it at all.

3. TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP, A SECRET DEAL TO HELP CORPORATIONS The Trans-Pacific Partnership is like the Stop Online Piracy Act on steroids, yet few have heard of it, let alone enough people to start an Internet campaign to topple it. Despite details revealed by WikiLeaks, the nascent agreement has been largely ignored by the corporate media. Even the world’s elite are out of the loop: Only three officials in each of the 12 signatory countries have access to this developing trade agreement that potentially impacts over 800 million people. The agreement touches on intellectual property rights and the regulation of private enterprise between nations, and is open to negotiation and viewing by 600 “corporate advisers” including big oil, pharmaceutical and entertainment companies. Meanwhile, more than 150 House Democrats signed a letter urging President Obama to halt his efforts to fast-track negotiations and allow Congress 12 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

the ability to weigh in now on an agreement only the White House has seen. Many criticized the secrecy surrounding the TPP, arguing the real world consequences may be grave. Doctors Without Borders wrote, “If harmful provisions in the U.S. proposals for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement are not removed before it is finalized, this trade deal will have a real cost in human lives.”

4. CORPORATE INTERNET PROVIDERS THREATEN NET NEUTRALITY This entry demonstrates the nuance in Project Censored’s media critique. Verizon v. Federal Communications Commission may weaken Internet regulation, which Electronic Frontier Foundation and other digital freedom advocates allege would create a two-tiered Internet system. Under the FCC’s proposed new rules, corporate behemoths such as Comcast or Verizon could charge entities to use faster bandwidth, which advocates say would create financial barriers to free speech and encourage censorship. Project Censored alleges corporate outlets such as The New York Times and Forbes “tend to highlight the business aspects of the case, skimming over vital particulars affecting the public and the Internet’s future.” Yet this is a case where corporate media were circumvented by power of the viral web. John Oliver, comedian and host of “Last Week Tonight” on HBO, in late 2014 gave a stirring 13-minute treatise on the importance of stopping the FCC’s new rules, resulting in a flood of comments to the FCC defending a more open Internet. The particulars of net neutrality have since been thoroughly reported in the corporate media. But, as Project Censored notes, mass media coverage only came after the FCC’s rule change was proposed, giving activists little time to right any wrongs. It’s a subtle but important distinction.

5. BANKERS REMAIN ON WALL STREET DESPITE MAJOR CRIMES Bankers responsible for rigging municipal bonds and bilking billions of dollars from American cities have largely escaped criminal charges. Every day in the U.S., low-level drug dealers get more prison time than these scheming bankers who, while working for GE Capital, allegedly skimmed money from public schools, hospitals, libraries and nursing homes, according to Rolling Stone. Dominick Carollo, Steven Goldberg and Peter Grimm were dubbed a part of the “modern American mafia,” by the magazine’s Matt Taibbi, one of the few journalists to consistently cover their trial. Meanwhile, disturbingly uninformed cable media “journalists” defended the bankers, saying they shouldn’t be prosecuted for “failure,” as if cheating vulnerable Americans were a bad business deal. “Had the U.S. authorities decided to press criminal charges,” Assistant U.S. Attorney General Lanny Breuer told Taibbi, “HSBC [a British bank] would almost certainly have lost its banking license in the U.S., the future of the institution would have been under threat

and the entire banking system would have been destabilized.” Over the course of decades, the nation’s bankers transformed into the modern mafioso. Unfortunately, our modern media changed as well and are no longer equipped to tackle systemic, complex stories.

6. THE ‘DEEP STATE’ OF PLUTOCRATIC CONTROL What’s frightening about the puppeteers who pull the strings of our national government is not how hidden they are, but how hidden they are not. From defense contractors to multinational corporations, a wealthy elite using an estimated $32 trillion in tax-exempt offshore havens are the masters of our publicly elected officials. In an essay written for Moyers & Company by Mike Lofgren, a congressional staffer of 28 years focused on national security, this cabal of wealthy interests comprise our nation’s “Deep State.” As Lofgren writes for Moyers, “The Deep State is the big story of our time. It is the red thread that runs through the war on terrorism, the financialization and deindustrialization of the American economy, the rise of a plutocratic social structure and political dysfunction.” This is a story that truly challenges the mass media, which do report on the power of wealth, in bits and pieces. But although the cabal’s disparate threads are occasionally pulled, the spider’s web of corruption largely escapes corporate media’s larger narrative. The myopic view censors the full story as surely as outright silence would. The problem deepens every year. “There are now 854,000 contract personnel with top-secret clearances—a number greater than that of top-secret-cleared civilian employees of the government,” Lofgren wrote, of a group that together would “occupy the floor space of almost three Pentagons—about 17 million square feet.”

7. FBI DISMISSES PLOT AGAINST OCCUPY AS NSA CRACKS DOWN ON DISSENT Nationally, law enforcement worked in the background to monitor and suppress the Occupy Wall Street movement, a story the mainstream press has shown little interest in covering. A document obtained in a Freedom of Information Act request by David Lindorff of WhoWhatWhy from the FBI office in Houston, Texas, revealed an alleged assassination plot targeting an Occupy group, which the FBI allegedly did not warn the movement about. From the redacted document: “An identified [DELETED] as of October planned to engage in sniper attacks against protestors (sic) in Houston, Texas if deemed necessary. An identified [DELETED] had received intelligence that indicated the protesters in New York and Seattle planned similar protests in Houston, Dallas, San Antonio and Austin, Texas. [DELETED] planned to gather intelligence BOISE WEEKLY.COM


against the leaders of the protest groups and obtain photographs, then formulate a plan to kill the leadership via suppressed sniper rifles.” Lindorff confirmed the document’s veracity with the FBI. When contacted by Lindorff, Houston police were uninterested and seemingly (according to Lindorff), uninformed. In Arizona, law enforcement exchanged information of possible Occupy efforts with JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, according to a report by the Center for Media and Democracy titled “Dissent on Terror.” The CEO meant to evade possible protests, and local law enforcement was happy to help. Law enforcement’s all-seeing eyes broadened through the national rise of “fusion centers” over the past decade, hubs through which state agencies exchange tracking data on groups exercising free speech. And as we share, “like” and “check-in” online with ever more frequency, that data becomes more robust by the day.

8. IGNORING EXTREME WEATHER CONNECTION TO GLOBAL WARMING In what can only be responded to with a resounding “duh,” news analyses have found mainstream media frequently report on severe weather changes without referring to global warming as the context or cause, even as a question. As Project Censored notes, a study by Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting found extreme weather events in 2013 spurred 450 broadcast news segments, only 16 of which even mentioned climate change. National news outlets have fallen on the job as well, as The New York Times recently shuttered its environmental desk and its “Green” blog, reducing the number of reporters exclusively chasing down climate change stories. Unlike many journalists, ordinary people often recognize the threat of our warming planet. Just as this story on Project Censored went to press, more than 400,000 protested in the People’s Climate March in New York City alone, while simultaneous protests erupted across the globe, calling for government, corporate and media leaders to address the problem. “There is a huge mismatch between the magnitude of the challenge and the response we heard here today,” Graca Machel, the widow of former South African President Nelson BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Mandela, told the United Nations conference on climate change. “The scale is much more than we have achieved.”

9. U.S. MEDIA HYPOCRISY IN COVERING UKRAINE CRISIS The U.S. battle with Russia over Ukraine’s independence is actually an energy pipeline squabble, a narrative lost by mainstream media coverage, Project Censored alleges. Russian President Vladimir Putin has drawn fire from the media as a tyrant, without complex analyses of his country’s socio-economic interests, according to Project Censored. As the media often do, they have turned the conflict into a cult of personality, talking up Putin’s shirtless horseback riding and his hard-line style with deftness missing from their political analysis. As The Guardian UK’s Nafeez Ahmed reported, a recent U.S. State Department-sponsored report noted “Ukraine’s strategic location between the main energy producers (Russia and the Caspian Sea area) and consumers in the Eurasian region, its large transit network, and its available underground gas storage capacities,” highlighting its economic importance to the U.S. and its allies.

10. WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION SUPPRESSES REPORT ON IRAQ IMPACTS The U.S.’s legacy in Iraq possibly goes beyond death to a living nightmare of cancer and birth defects, due to the military’s use of depleted uranium weapons, a World Health Organization study found. Iraq is poisoned. Much of the report’s contents were leaked to the BBC during its creation. But the release of the report, completed in 2012 by WHO, has stalled. Critics allege the U.S. is deliberately blocking its release, masking a damning Middle East legacy rivaling the horrors of Agent Orange in Vietnam. But Iraq will never forget the U.S. intervention, as mothers cradle babies bearing scars obtained in the womb, the continuing gifts of our invasion.

Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez worked for the San Francisco Bay Guardian until it closed in late 2014. He is now a staff writer at the San Francisco Examiner and SF Weekly. BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 13


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY FEB. 18 Festivals & Events 22ND ANNUAL BUY IDAHO CAPITOL SHOW— This is Buy Idaho’s signature trade show, with up to 100 booths in the Capitol Rotunda showcasing Buy Idaho members, products and services. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705, buyidaho. org/event-908887.

On Stage COMPANY OF FOOLS: PROOF— David Auburn’s compassionate and knowing play is about a young woman, Catherine, who must confront a number of long-denied feelings and fears on the death of her brilliant but insane mathemati-

cian father. She must adjust not only to his death, but come to grips with her fear that his genius, which she has inherited, comes with a dreadful price and that she may be fated to the same degeneration as her father. Through Feb. 28. 7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org. FATA MORGANA—Brace yourself for this world premiere by Jeni Mahoney set at the edge of a toxic lake in the Mojave Desert, where Tori and Jack have built a quiet new life. But the silence is broken when the life they left behind comes knocking. Through Feb. 21. 8 p.m. $16-$32. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org.

Art ALEXANDRA GRANT: A PERPETUAL SLOW CIRCLE—Wednesdays through March 8. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 18-MARCH 18

“The Last Supper,” by Spencer Hattabaugh, ready for Launch (and lunch).

LAUNCH: 2015 ANNUAL STUDENT JURIED EXHIBITION AT BOISE STATE VISUAL ARTS CENTER Student art exhibits are enlightening in that you get a sense of the overall creativity brewing in a given institution. When they’re part of a class’ curriculum, though, they aren’t discretionary: everyone who took the class displays his or her work, regardless of innovation or quality. Launch at Boise State’s Visual Arts Center is comprised of student work, but only work chosen by juror Alice Vinson, visual artist and assistant professor of Visual Communication at the College of Idaho. Application to the exhibition was open to any student enrolled in classes offered by the Boise State Art Department and, of the 139 entries, Vinson chose 31 works by 25 artists. Launch is a chance to not only see how creative Boise State art students are but to see what heights some of them have reached. Fridays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and Mondays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1910 University Drive, boisestate.edu/art. 14 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

THE BRAIN: A BIG IDEA MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROJECT— Mondays-Fridays through April 17. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. INTERNATIONAL VIDEO ART EXHIBITION—Monday-Friday through Feb. 18. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, boisestate.edu. KAREN WOODS: SHIFT—Tuesdays-Saturdays through Feb. 28. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-4330593, stewartgallery.com. LAUNCH: 2015 ANNUAL STUDENT JURIED EXHIBITION—Monday-Friday through March 18. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, boisestate. edu/art.

LIU BOLIN: HIDING IN THE CITY— Tuesdays-Saturdays through May 24. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. RED CIRCLE PRESS: TRANSLUCENCY—Through July 12. FREE. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, 208426-1242, finearts.boisestate.edu.

Literature BLACK HISTORY MONTH: BOOKS BY BLACK WOMEN—Celebrate Black History Month by discussing a number of incredible books written by black women. You’ve heard of some of the authors, such as Toni Morrison and Alice Walker, but you might also discover some new writers and titles to add to your reading list. A variety of books will be available for checkout following the program. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, boisepubliclibrary.org.

FRIDAY, FEB. 20

Talks & Lectures THE ECONOMICS OF THE WAR ON DRUGS—Boise State’s Students for Sensible Drug Policy, in partnership with the BSU Economics Association, hosts Dr. Bruce L. Benson of Florida State University to talk about “The Economics of the War on Drugs.” For more info, visit facebook.com/ BSUEA. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State SPEC, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. IDEA OF NATURE LECTURE SERIES—Guest speaker Maria Tatar, Harvard’s John L. Loeb Professor of Folklore and Mythology, will present “The Wolf Trap: Entering the Woods Through Fairy Tales,” the first of three lectures in the Arts and Humanities public lecture series. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800.

the U.S. into the war. Walker is a military historian with an interest in the history of the Cold War. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844076, readmetv.com. SVCA THE BRAIN: BROWN BAG LECTURE—Impulse control and self-regulation help us keep our thoughts and feelings from initiating impulsive or destructive actions. Annie Warberg, supervisor of district-wide behavioral interventions and supports for Blaine County School District, explains why some people manage impulses better than others and how we can make improvements through specific brain management practices. 12:15 p.m. FREE. St. Luke’s Clinic-Hailey, 21 E. Maple St., Hailey, 208-788-3243.

READ ME TREASURE VALLEY LECTURE SERIES—Boise State University History Professor David Walker will offer a talk on the Gulf of Tonkin incident, which propelled

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, FEB. 20-22

“If you don’t know where you are going any road can take you there.”

The genuine Idaho Stanley Cup.

SCORE THE CLASSICS: ALICE IN WONDERLAND

STANLEY WINTERFEST

The magic of Alice in Wonderland is undeniable, from Alice’s tumble down the rabbit hole, to the fantastical characters and creatures who inhabit the surreal dream land young Alice finds herself in. The 1915 big-screen adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s tale is especially interesting in that without animation, CGI or sound, the silent black-and-white film seems almost as curious as Alice’s adventures—the Internet Archive, calls it “a special delicacy, an early silent film masterpiece that silent film fans shouldn’t miss.” Miss it you won’t: Join musician Sean Dahlman and special guests as they provide live piano and stringed instrument accompaniment to a screening of this bit of cinema history at Rediscovered Books. (The full film is available at archive.org/details/ AliceinWonderland1915.) 6 p.m., FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., 208376-4229, rdbooks.org.

In the summertime, tourists pour into the mountainous town of Stanley by the thousands, but once the cold hits, Stanley’s population drops below 100. Only the hardiest folks withstand the bitter winters in the snowy Sawtooths. The sixth annual Stanley WinterFest attracts those who are not afraid of the frigid for a weekend of partying. The event kicks off on Friday evening with a Glow in the Dark Beach Party at the Stanley Club. Saturday’s events include a fat-tire bike race, a “Howling Wolf Raft Ride”—whatever that is—a cross-dress foot race run in snowshoes, an outhouse race and live music. The fest finishes up on Sunday with a triathlon in which costumes are “highly recommended,” a ski clinic and a movie day at the Stanley Library. Various times, most events FREE. Stanley, 208-774-3411, stanleycc.org.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR THURSDAY FEB. 19

COMEDIANS DEREK SHEEN AND BRYAN COOK—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

On Stage BIG FISH: THE MUSICAL NW PREMIERE—Centennial and Eagle High Schools present the Northwest premiere of the Broadway musical Big Fish, by Andrew Lippa and John August. Buy tickets online at chsmeridian.seatyourself.biz. 7 p.m. $7-$12. Centennial High School Performing Arts Center, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-9391404, chs.meridianschools.org. BOISE STATE VOCAL JAZZ FESTIVAL CONCERT WITH JOHN PROULX—Singer, pianist and composer John Proulx kicks off the 2015 Boise State Jazz Festival. 7:30 p.m. $7. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, boisestate.edu.

FATA MORGANA—Brace yourself for this world premiere by Jeni Mahoney set at the edge of a toxic lake in the Mojave Desert, where Tori and Jack have built a quiet new life. But the silence is broken when the life they left behind comes knocking. Through Feb. 21. 8 p.m. $16-$32. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org.

READ ME TREASURE VALLEY LECTURE SERIES—Boise State Asian Historian Shelton Woods present a slideshow on Cambodia and the Vietnam War. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, boisepubliclibrary.org.

FRIDAY FEB. 20

Literature

Festivals & Events

AUTHOR KELLY JONES— Local author Kelly Jones will read, sign and talk about her newest book, Lost and Found in Prague. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

SIXTH ANNUAL STANLEY WINTERFEST—Don’t miss your opportunity to experience Stanley in the winter. The festivities start Friday night with a beach party and go all weekend. Kids and parents a like will love this event. Check out the Stanley Winterfest Facebook page for information and updates on all events. 6 p.m.-12 a.m. FREE. Stanley, 208-774-2286.

Talks & Lectures

FRIDAY, FEB. 20-MARCH 7

On Stage BIG FISH: THE MUSICAL NW PREMIERE—7 p.m. $7-$12. Centennial High School Performing Arts Center, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-939-1404, chs. meridianschools.org. BOISE PHILHARMONIC: THE HEARTBEAT OF ROMANCE—8 p.m. $21.20-$42.40. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208467-8790, nnu.edu/brandt. BOISE STATE VOCAL JAZZ FESTIVAL—More than 30 junior-high and high-school jazz choirs will perform jazz selections. Open to the public. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub.boisestate.edu.

President Sexy-Pants like you’ve never seen him.

BLOODY, BLOODY ANDREW JACKSON What do emo music and Old Hickory have in common? Nothing, which is part of why the Broadway rock musical Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson is such an irreverent, innovative and incredible show. BBAJ creators Michael Friedman and Alex Timbers are no Rodgers and Hammerstein—that’s not an insult. Instead, we can look to the partnership of Parker and Stone (The Book of Mormon) for a comparison: BBAJ takes our seventh president’s role in the formation of the Democratic party, his views on populism, and his treatment of Native Americans and views them through the lens of a blood- and sex-filled kaleidoscope trained on Jackson’s tight jeans and set to a soundtrack of emo-rock. Boise’s own HomeGrown Theatre takes on the Tony-nominated production that, like Jackson, has had its share of supporters and detractors for its portrayals of Old Hickory as a hot-bodied, hot-headed hellion. Weird and wonderful. 8 p.m., Feb. 20: pay what you want preview; Feb. 21-March 7: $10 general, $5 on Thursdays. The Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., hgtboise.com, facebook.com/HGTheatre. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

COMEDIANS DEREK SHEEN & BRYAN COOK—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMIC CINEMA REMIX: SHORT CIRCUIT—Get your sentient robot killing machine in gear and go see comedians Brett Badostain, Chad Heft and Dylan Haas remix the classic 1986 Steve Guttenberg film live. This goround, the CCR gang will be joined by the 92.3 morning DJ duo Cory Mikhals and Jen Adams. 9 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, comiccinemaremix.com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: PROOF—8 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org. FATA MORGANA—8 p.m. $16-$32. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 15


CALENDAR IDAHO JAZZ SOCIETY PRESENTS JOHN PROULX—Don’t miss your chance to hear Grammy Award-winning jazz musician John Proulx, whose singing style has elicited comparisons to a young Chet Baker. 7 p.m. $17-$22. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208343-1871, brownpapertickets.com/ event/1142854. JIM BRICKMAN: LOVE AROUND A PIANO—Experience the sounds of award-winning hit-maker, pianist and recording artist Jim Brickman as he celebrates his 20-year musical journey in the entertainment industry. FREE parking. 7:30 p.m. $29-$49. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, boisestatetickets.com/event/jimbrickman. SCORE THE CLASSICS: ALICE IN WONDERLAND—Local musician Sean Dahlman and guests will provide musical accompaniment to the silent film Alice in Wonderland, featuring live piano and string instruments. 6 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Talks & Lectures POLITICS FOR LUNCH: RACE AND GENDER IN HISTORY AND LAW— Featuring Caroline Helman of Occidental College. An optional lunch is served at 11:30 a.m. Reservations required; RSVP to Cathe Scott at cathescott@boisestate.edu or call 208-426-3784. 12 p.m. FREE, $12 lunch. Boise State Andrus Center in BODO, 301 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3777, andruscenter.org. READ ME TREASURE VALLEY LECTURE SERIES—Thanh Van Tran, co-founder and executive director of Children of Vinh Son Orphanage, shares a presentation about the Boise nonprofit. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, readmetv.com.

Food ST. MICHAEL’S LENTEN LUNCHES—Menu features clam chowder, salad or slaw, cheese bread and beverage. Sponsored by the Episcopal Church Women of St. Michael’s Cathedral. Through March 27. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $6.50. St. Michael’s Episcopal Cathedral, 518 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-5601.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

SATURDAY FEB. 21 Festivals & Events CRUX BAZAAR VENDOR MARKET—Every third Saturday, the Crux will fill with vendors of local products for your shopping pleasure. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3213, facebook.com/ events/350298218503280. DREAMING OF SPRING EXPO & BE THE MATCH BONE MARROW REGISTRATION—Are you a match that could save someone’s life? There is no cost to join, but donations are welcome and accepted. The whole process, including a quick cheek swab, takes only about 20 minutes. Then, when you are done, check out all the more than 75 local artisans and businesses that are supporting this event. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-724-9061, facebook.com/ events/1514701168805322. FAMILY FIELD TRIP SATURDAY— Enjoy an affordable day of fun and educational programs focused on conserving birds of prey. Visitors will see live bird demonstrations, tour the Archives of Falconry, participate in family-friendly crafts and activities, and spend time outdoors on the scenic interpretive trail. Sponsored by Larry H. Miller Subaru Boise. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $7 adult, $6 senior, FREE 16 and younger. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-3628687, peregrinefund.org. IDAHO ARTISTRY IN WOOD SHOW—Competitors submit wood carving, turning, scroll work, fine wood working, gourd art and pyrography entries for public display and judging. The show features demonstrations, vendors, raffles, an auction and banquet, as well as the opportunity for artists to sell their work. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $3. Boise Hotel, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-343-4900, idahoartistryinwood.org. WATERSHED WEEKEND: ENGINEERING YOUR ENVIRONMENT—Design and create projects from candy towers to magnetic slime. Early learners will love the building stations, and older kids will enjoy the hands-on Deconstruction Lab at 10:30 a.m. See wastewater engineering in action during the wastewater treatment plant tour. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-608-7300, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

On Stage BIG FISH: THE MUSICAL NW PREMIERE—7 p.m. $7-$12. Centennial High School Performing Arts Center, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-939-1404, chs. meridianschools.org.

16 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

BOISE PHILHARMONIC: THE HEARTBEAT OF ROMANCE—Cleveland International Piano Competition winner Martina Filjak returns to perform Rachmaninov’s second piano concerto. Anton Bruckner’s memorial to Richard Wagner, Symphony No. 7, is a monumental work teeming with hushed woodwind chorales and bombastic brass fanfares. This marks the Boise Philharmonic’s premiere performance of this work. 8 p.m. $22-$70. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110, boisephilharmonic.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

COMEDIANS DEREK SHEEN & BRYAN COOK—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: PROOF—$15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-5789122, companyoffools.org. FATA MORGANA—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $16-$32. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org. LES BOIS JUNIOR BALLET: A GALA EVENING—Enjoy an evening of young dancers bringing their love of ballet to the stage. 6:30 p.m. $11. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

Talks & Lectures FROM MORRISITES TO THE MAP—Rick Just, great-grandson of Emma Thompson Just, will tell the little-known story of the Morrisite War and how it became the defining moment for a pioneer Idaho family. 1 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

SUNDAY FEB. 22

Citizen PLUNGEFEST FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS IDAHO—A unique opportunity for individuals, organizations and businesses to support Special Olympics Idaho athletes by gathering pledges and plunging into a pool full of icy cold water. Or you can be a “Chicken Plunger” and raise money for Special Olympics Idaho without the icy plunge. Live music, a PreFunk beer garden and local food. 11 a.m. Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle, idso.org.

Festivals & Events

STARLIGHT SNOWSHOE BENEFIT—The Starlight Snowshoe Benefit is a homegrown event with proceeds funding research for a cure, better treatments and prevention methods for type 1 diabetes. Featuring live music, food, drinks and raffle in the Nordic Lodge. 4-9 p.m. $11-$16, $53 family. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 801-5300660, www2.jdrf.org.

On Stage

CHINESE NEW YEAR CELEBRATION—Celebrate the 2015 Chinese New Year with cross culture arts and dance. Presented by The Chinese Organization and Northwest Nazarene University. 2 p.m. FREE-$6. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

COMEDIANS DEREK SHEEN & BRYAN COOK—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: PROOF—3 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org. OPEN MIC GONG SHOW—Be prepared to pour your heart out and

then get ridiculed gong show style by your hosts, Olek Szewczyk and Emmanuel Michael Vera IV. But if the audience likes you more than the hosts, you will win prizes, from bar tabs to tattoo certificates. 7 p.m. FREE. Crazy Horse, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-982-4294, crazyhorseboise.com/calendar.

MONDAY FEB. 23 Festivals & Events FAMILY OF WOMAN FILM FESTIVAL—The annual Family of Woman Film Festival confronts issues that affect women and girls around the world. Screenings and events take place mostly in Sun Valley, but also at Boise State University and Idaho State University. For more info and a complete schedule of events, visit familyofwomanfilmfestival.org. Feb. 23-March 1. $15, $60 festival pass.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR On Stage STORY STORY NIGHT: WEIRD SCIENCE—Enjoy an evening of stories about “strange chemistry.” Hosted by Jessica Holmes, with music by Stardust Lounge. 7 p.m. $10. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571. storystorynight.org.

Literature MERIDIAN READS: ANTHONY DOERR—Author Anthony Doerr will read from and sign copies of his new book, All the Light We Cannot See. Part of Meridian Reads, the Meridian Library’s citywide reading initiative. Rediscovered Books will provide copies for purchase at this event. 7 p.m. FREE. Meridian Middle School, 1507 W. Eighth St., Meridian, 208-376-4229, rdbooks. org/event/anthony-doerr-meridian.

Talks & Lectures READ ME TREASURE VALLEY LECTURE SERIES—”PTSD Then and Now,” a discussion about PTSD, including history and modern treatment therapies, with Julie Sharrette, psychologist and program lead for PTSD Clinical Team, and Dr. Melissa Dreffin, psychologist for PTSD Tele-Mental Health of the Boise VA Medical Center. 9 a.m. FREE. Eagle Public Library, 100 N. Stierman Way, Eagle, 208-9396814, readmetv.com.

TUESDAY FEB. 24 Festivals & Events 2015 SERVE IDAHO CONFERENCE—The Serve Idaho Conference is two days of sessions, led by experts in their fields covering a variety of volunteering topics. Service projects include the Ronald McDonald House, putting together pre-kindergarten literacy bags and cleaning up along the Greenbelt. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $50-$170. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-332-3578, ext 4174, serveidaho.gov/Events/ ServeIdahoConference.aspx.

Literature AUTHOR KATE KAE MYERS— Author Kate Kae Myers will read from, talk about and sign copies of her new book, Inherit Midnight. Myers will talk about the process of getting published, how she wrote the book, and have a Q&A with audience members. She’s also graciously offered to provide snacks and drinks. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise. 208-376-4229, facebook. com/events/600529856714147.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

MERIDIAN READS: ANTHONY DOERR—Author Anthony Doerr will read from and sign copies of his new book, All the Light We Cannot See. Part of Meridian Reads, the Meridian Library’s citywide reading initiative. Rediscovered Books will be on hand with copies for purchase. 7 p.m. FREE. Meridian High School, 1900 W. Pine Ave., Meridian, 208-376-4229, rdbooks. org/event/anthony-doerr-meridian.

Talks & Lectures CITY CLUB FORUM: CAN IDAHO IMPROVE ITS STANDARD OF LIVING?—How can public policy help Idaho ensure a more balanced opportunity for its citizens to be self-sufficient and less dependent on government assistance? Featuring speakers Rod Gramer, executive director of Idaho Businesses for Education; Dr. Ted Epperly, CEO of Family Medicine Residency Clinic; and Jeff Sayer, director of the Idaho Department of Commerce. 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. $5-$25. The Owyhee, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-371-2221, cityclubofboise.org.

WEDNESDAY FEB. 25 Festivals & Events 2015 SERVE IDAHO CONFERENCE—8 a.m.-4 p.m. $50-$170. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-332-3578, ext 4174, serveidaho.gov/Events/ ServeIdahoConference.aspx. READ ME TREASURE VALLEY: MUSIC OF THE VIETNAM ERA—Share your period music on vinyl and thoughts on the influence of music during the Vietnam years. Members of the Vinyl Preservation Society of Idaho will be facilitating this lively event and can offer expertise on value. Refreshments available. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, readmetv. com.

On Stage COMEDIAN JOHN CONROY—With Mikey Pullman and guests. 8 p.m. $10. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux. com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: PROOF—7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 17


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY FEB. 18

WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM—Hosted by For Blind Mice. 8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THURSDAY FEB. 19

KAYLEIGH JACK AND BARBARA LAING—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MOTION CITY SOUNDTRACK—7:30 p.m. $17.50-$35. Knitting Factory

BOISE STATE VOCAL JAZZ FESTIVAL CONCERT WITH JOHN PROULX—7:30 p.m. $7. Boise State Student Union

STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TERRY JONES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE UNION TRADE—With Darling Rollercoaster and Bliiss. 8 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse

FRIDAY FEB. 20

JOSH AND HANNAH—6:30 p.m. FREE. High Note

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

KEVIN KIRK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

WENDY MATSON—7 p.m. FREE. Buzz

BOISE STATE VOCAL JAZZ FESTIVAL—More than 30 juniorhigh and high-school jazz choirs perform. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union

PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—With BellyUp. 10 p.m. $5. Reef

DJ FOOSE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

REBECCA SCOTT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

DYLAN ANITOK AND JOSEPH LYLE—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District

REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

FRANK MARRA— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JIM BRICKMAN—7:30 p.m. $29$49. Morrison Center

SHADES OF INTERPRETATION— With Discarded, Brutal Season and The Acrotomoans. 7 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOHANN HELTON—7 p.m. FREE. Kind

SKY COLONY—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

GARTH OLSON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TITLE WAVE—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

HIP-HOP SHOW—9:30 p.m. $5. Liquid LEFT COAST COUNTRY—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s RUSS MARTIN—7 p.m. Free. Kind TENSION OF OPPOSITES—With Villain Corp. 8 p.m. $3. Crazy Horse TERRY JONES SOLO PIANO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KARAOKE WITH DJ BONZ—6:30 p.m. FREE. Six Degrees Nampa WILLISON ROOS—With Charlie on fiddle and Scott on cajon. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

JOHN PROULX—7 p.m. $17-$22. Sapphire Room

RAVENNA COLT ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—With Sleepy Seeds. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

TRACTOR BEAM—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill

NOISE

(L-R) Nate Munger, Don Joslin, Eric Salk and Eitan Anzenberg don’t want to Trade this Union.

A LABOR (UNION) OF LOVE The Union Trade goes instrumental and on tour BEN SCHULTZ Guitarist Don Joslin, bassist Nate Munger and guitarist-pianist Eric Salk espouse the ideals of a DIY collective. It’s a principle they’ve stayed true to since they formed San Francisco-based The Union Trade in 2006, but it hasn’t always been easy. “We do all of our own work, PR and releasing, [instead of ] just playing in the band and writing songs,” said Joslin. “We got a little burnt out, basically, after five years of putting our all into it.” After losing two drummers and releasing the EP Why We Need Night (2011), the group went 18 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

on a three-year hiatus. During that time, Joslin checked the sales records of his Tricycle Records label—which has released all of The Union Trade’s albums—and found a surprise: “Everyday Including Holidays,” an instrumental track on the band’s debut LP Everyday Including (2008), was still selling even though the band had stopped playing live. “It sort of made me realize that what I had always wanted to do … was to create a full album of instrumentals,” Joslin said. “I felt like from day one of the band, that’s what we were the best at.”

The Union Trade’s new album, A Place of Long Years (2015), supports Joslin’s belief. A few subdued guest vocals from singer Ann Yu aside, the group’s somber, melodious guitar lines and stately drumming (courtesy of new recruit Eitan Anzenberg) dominate the record. The Union Trade will bring its haunting blend of shoegaze and post-rock to Boise on Wednesday, Feb. 18, when the band plays Crazy Horse with local openers Bliiss and Darling Rollercoaster. Joslin described The Union Trade’s formation as an organic process: The members had all played with one another in other groups before forming their own. Joslin’s Tricycle Records, also formed in 2006, grew UNION TRADE in a similar With Darling Rollercoaster and Bliway. Joslin iss. Wednesday, Feb. 18, 9:30 p.m., considered it $5. Crazy Horse, 1519 W. Main St., just a name 208-982-4294, crazyhorseboise. com. to attach to his band’s releases until he met photographer Julie Schuchard. “She said, ‘Oh, I’m very connected in the music industry, and I’ve always wanted to start a label,’” Joslin recalled. “So on a drunken night, I said, ‘Oh yeah, let’s start a label.’ And then the next day, she emailed and it actually happened.” Groups signed to Tricycle include Everyone is Dirty, which is on the 2015 Treefort Music Fest roster. The label has also put out releases by electropop group Geographer (also scheduled to play this year’s Treefort), which Spin featured in its 2008 article, “Three Undiscovered Bands You Need to Hear Now.” The Union Trade plans to tour behind A Place of Long Years for a couple of (long) years. “It’s not a one-listen kind of album,” Joslin said. “The more you listen to it, the more you get it and like it.”

SATURDAY FEB. 21 ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Neurolux AMELIA HYDE AND AARON RODRIGUEZ—7:30-9 p.m. FREE. The District ANDREW MCBRIDE—4 p.m. FREE. Artistblue AUDIO/VISUAL DJ—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement AUSTIN MARTIN—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue CLAY MOORE TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DAN COSTELLO’S ALL-STAR BIRTHDAY CONCERT—With Ben Burdick, Scott Reusser, James Monson, Rebecca Scott, Rob Hill, Debbie Sager, Anne McDonald, Mike Rundle and Bob Nagel. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. Sapphire DENNIS FEENEY ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—6:30 p.m. FREE. High Note ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GREAT BAIT—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s HECKTOR PECKTOR—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s METH DAD AND MICHAEL PARALLAX—With Leafraker and Sword of a Bad Speller. 9 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse PILOT ERROR— 10 p.m. $5. Reef POLYRHYTHMICS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s SHON SANDERS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SWEET BRIAR—8 p.m. FREE. The Drink TAUGE AND FAULKNER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s WALTER EGO BAND—8 p.m. $3. AEN Playhouse WOOLY BUGGERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

SUNDAY FEB. 22 AUDIO/VISUAL DJ—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s HIP-HOP SUNDAY—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE KARAOKE NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. The Crux NOCTURNUM! INDUSTRIAL GOTH DJS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid OPEN MIC GONG SHOW—7 p.m. FREE. Crazy Horse THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GRANGER SMITH AND EARL DIBBLES—8 p.m. $15-$22. Knitting Factory HALLOWED OAK—With Braided Waves and Clarke and The Himselfs. 8 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HOKUM HI FLYERS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SWING IS THE THING WITH PAMELA DEMARCHE—7 p.m. $5. Sapphire Room TERRY JONES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM—Hosted by For Blind Mice. 8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

KUNG FU—10 p.m. $8. Reef

MONDAY FEB. 23 BLAZE AND KELLY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 CATHARSUS—With Mortal Ashes and Scorch the Fallen. 8 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse

PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

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CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MONDAY NIGHT KARAOKE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid RIFF RAFF—8 p.m. $22.50 adv., $25 door. Knitting Factory

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THE RAVENNA COLT, FEB. 19 AND 20, THE RECORD EXCHANGE AND NEUROLUX Some people will long be haunted by the past (ahem, Monica Lewinsky), while others will always be trying to snag another ride on the fame comet (sigh, Corey Feldman). Then there are those who are grateful for where they’ve been but keep their focus on the present. Case in point: John “Johnny Quaid” McQuade. The former My Morning Jacket guitarist (1998-2004) wouldn’t change a moment of his time with the band or its fans, who he describes as an “extended family,” he just didn’t want to use them to further his career. “Being a part of My Morning Jacket is something I’m definitely proud of, but I wouldn’t want people to think I’m entitled,” Quaid said. “When I went out on my own, I didn’t want anyone thinking I was clinging to coattails or looking for a leg up.” Quaid (pictured left), who lives in Boise, started a solo/collaborative project, The Ravenna Colt, and has found a happy medium in the years since he left MMJ, being on his own yet still reconnecting with the band—even performing with them occasionally. This week, Quaid celebrates the release of Terminal Current (Karate Body Records, Feb. 10) with a pre-release party at The RX on Feb. 19 and a release party at Neurolux on Feb. 20. Terminal Current is more than just Quaid’s second TRC album: It’s a beautiful collection of tales bound in emotional, honest Americana/country melodies that, like their creator, are wholly “in the now.” See our full interview with Quaid at boiseweekly.com. —Amy Atkins Feb. 19, 6 p.m., FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., therecordexchange.com. Feb. 20, 7 p.m., $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com. BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 19


RECREATION NEWS ‘A NEW, MORE SOPHISTICATED TRACK’ Renovation plans fronted for Rhodes Park JESSICA MURRI No one said the word “homeless” during the Boise City Council work session on Feb. 10, when the Department of Parks and Recreation gave City Council members a presentation on major renovations to take place at Rhodes Park. Rhodes Park, which is on Front Street between 15th Street and Americana Boulevard, is below the same overpass where a large number of displaced people spend their days and nights. The sidewalks and spaces on either side of the park are covered with a collection of mattresses, blankets, milk crates, plastic bottles and bags, clothes, bikes and even a Christmas tree. According to a presentation by Department of Parks and Recreation Director Doug Holloway and landscape designer Christine Harrington, that will all be replaced with a new skatepark and parkour obstacle course by late summer. “In the vision of this park, we wanted to create an active, vibrant, family-friendly park,” Harrington told the City Council. “Given its location and the parameters, it’s going to take some creativity to find the opportunities in this park.” Harrington works for Seattle-based architecture and landscape design firm GGLO, LLC. She presented slide after slide of conceptual designs for the new skatepark, which is being funded with $1.25 million from the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation and $138,000 from the city to dramatically re-landscape the area. Harrington’s slides featured public art opportunities, integrated LED lighting, native plants, stormwater-collecting planters, local stone and solar panels. She said her designs take inspiration from the American car culture of the 1950s and “the idea of individuality and exploration and the American spirit.” “[The park] really needs to be lightened up and made more cheerful and exciting,” Harrington said. Skateboarders have dreamed of having a better skatepark in the City of Trees for a long time. The 1.28-acre Rhodes Park opened in 1994 but today cracks spread across the concrete surfaces and rusting metal ramps dot the area, which has become a gathering place for large groups of the city’s homeless population. In December 2014, Paul Whitworth, co20 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

The city of Boise is aiming to renovate Rhodes Park with nearly $1.4 million in public and private funds, but so far public conversation about the project hasn’t included the word “homeless.”

owner of Prestige Skateshop in downtown Boise told Boise Weekly that he and his business partner started working toward a better skatepark eight years ago. Since then, the Boise Skateboard Association—of which Whitworth is a member— began talking to the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation about its dream of a modern skatepark. The association’s wish came true last year, when the Albertson Foundation announced it would pay for design and construction, then turn the park over to the city of Boise as a gift. Seattlebased skateboard park design company Grindline has already been hired to draw up the blueprints. All of this came only months after Rusty Bitton was beaten to death under the overpass on the night of Oct. 28, following a summer of conflict between police and the homeless community. Holloway told BW in December that the improvements to the skatepark could help “reenergize” the neighborhood. “It will create an area that will be an attraction, where families will be able to gather,” Holloway said. “We think it’s giving the whole area back to the families and children that enjoy that skatepark.” City Council members in the work session asked Holloway and Harrington questions concerning the fast-moving traffic on the streets that border the skatepark, adequate lighting for the area and integrated bike lanes. The next step for the park comes in the form of a detailed landscaping plan that specifies exactly what plants will go where, what sort of public art and lighting will be installed, and what

Boise’s first official parkour obstacle course will look like. Once the City Council approves the plan, construction could start in the late spring. Holloway told BW the park should be completed by the late summer. “It’s a very unique park,” Harrington said to the City Council. “What will people make of this park? I think it’s going to be a really exciting and active location.” While planners enthused over the particulars of the renovation, one detail was left out. During Holloway’s presentation no one said anything about plans for the people—and their belongings—that will need to be pushed out of the area to make way for the facelift. American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho executive director Greg Morris questions the possible underlying motivations for the project. “I think the public clearly understands what is happening here,” he told Boise Weekly. “The city of Boise has found a willing partner to renovate an area where the homeless have been living publicly in order to displace them. … And boy, this project is happening at breakneck speed for City Hall.” Morris said he would rather see “even half of this renovation budget” go toward housing and support services for the homeless. “Boise’s most vulnerable populations continues to be pushed out, criminalized, and considered inferior to public art and amenities,” Morris said. “The next chapter in this administration’s war on the homeless has just taken a new, more sophisticated track.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | 21


BOOZEHOUND REGIONAL BOURBONS A proliferation of small-scale distilleries are popping up across the country. And Idaho isn’t immune to the trend. Companies like 8 Feathers Distillery, Idaho Bourbon Distillers and Northern Pacific Distillery are all making moonshine in Boise and plan to offer bourbon as soon as it’s finished aging. In the meantime, we decided to check out a few small batch bourbons made by some of Idaho’s close neighbors to get a handle on the competition. 4 SPIRITS BOURBON, $27.95 Shaped like a moonshine jug, the 4 Spirits bottle features an illustration of a gun, a helmet and a combat boot. It also comes with a military dog tag imprinted with the company’s logo. But unlike the packaging, this Adair Village, Ore. bourbon is fairly subdued. Mild honey and vanilla notes come through on the nose and the palate is also fairly simple, with just a hint of caramel and crème brulee on the finish. As one taster put it, “This is a whiskey to drink, not think about.” WYOMING WHISKEY, $39.95 If 4 Spirits is a little too mellow, Wyoming Whiskey is the exact opposite. With an aggressive moonshine and “cleaning supplies” nose, this Kirby, Wyo. small batch bourbon doesn’t ease up on the palate. Harsh alcohol heat and barely-there oak character led one taster to proclaim, “I wouldn’t drink this twice.” WILLIE’S DISTILLERY BIG HORN BOURBON WHISKEY, $37.25 This Ennis, Mont. entry is the most classic bourbon of the three. Mild, sweet barrel character comes through on the nose with hints of vanilla and spiced cake. The palate on this 40 percent ABV whiskey has more heat than the first whiff would indicate, but it calms down nicely with a splash of water or an ice cube. —Tara Morgan 22 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

FOOD IDAHO CHEWS ON COTTAGE FOOD BILL

Law could ease regulations on small-scale food producers TARA MORGAN In late 2013, Peaceful Belly proprietress Josie Erskine decided to start selling pickles—everything from a traditional dill to a Chinese turnip with smoked paprika. To make a batch of pickles, Erskine had to haul her supplies—knobby winter squash, plump radishes, vinegars of every color— into a basement commercial kitchen that she rented in downtown Boise. “I did find that I didn’t really get to choose my own hours as an entrepreneur or be as flexible,” said Erskine. “Through the process of doing those pickles, I [learned] that what I was doing was legal in some states to do out of your home. And that’s where I got interested in cottage foods.” At least 45 states have passed cottage food laws in the past few years. These bills ease regulations on small-scale producers making low-risk, or “non-potentially hazardous,” foods in their home kitchens—things like pies, breads, jams, honey, dried herbs or popcorn. Though Idaho doesn’t currently have a cottage food law, a number of people are fighting to change that. The Idaho Organization of Resource Councils, working closely with the Department of Health and Welfare, helped craft a cottage food bill that was introduced into the Idaho House Health and Welfare Committee last week. “This bill that’s been created comes from multiple people from multiple parts of the state that were all creating a cottage food bill at the same time and we all came together,” said Erskine. House Bill No. 106 proposed that home kitchens making non-potentially hazardous foods be exempt from licensing requirements. The bill defined those foods as containing a “water activity value” of 0.85 or less and a pH level of 4.6 or below when measured at 75 degrees Fahrenheit. “In layman’s terms, what that means is it’s a food that will not support rapid and progressive growth of harmful bacteria,” explained Patrick Guzzle, food protection program manager at the Division of Public Health in the Department of Health and Welfare. Prohibited in the bill was “any food of animal

(L-R) Idaho Organization of Resource Councils Board Chair Julia Page and Organizer Doug Paddock spread the word about the proposed cottage food bill at the Boise Farmers Market in December.

origin, either raw or heat treated, and any food of plant origin that has been heat treated or that is raw seed sprouts; cut melons; and garlic and oil mixtures.” The bill also prohibited “low-acid canned foods or acidified foods.” “There are some acidified foods that if you store them and sell them as a refrigerated product, those will be allowed because that refrigeration step acts as a barrier to work against the activation of botulism spores,” said Guzzle. Peaceful Belly’s pickles fall under that refrigerated category. So do fresh salsas. But that doesn’t mean Erskine can whip up a batch of pickles at her house and sell them to local restaurants. HB 106 also specified that cottage foods can only be sold directly to consumers, meaning wholesale transactions are prohibited. The bill intentionally left most details vague, preferring to leave the specifics to the rulemaking process. That didn’t sit well with the Northwest Food Processors Association—a trade group that operates in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. “We have several concerns with the bill,” said NWFPA lobbyist Elizabeth Criner. “We deal with cottage food laws in both Oregon and Washington; we very much support that segment of the industry, but we have food safety concerns that we’re trying to work through with the bill’s sponsors.” Breland Draper, lead organizer with the Idaho Organization of Resource Councils, has been working closely with legislators and Criner to address their concerns and revise Idaho’s cottage food bill so it can be reintroduced to the Health and Welfare Committee by Friday, Feb. 20. “We sat down and worked through the issues that they had, which, truthfully, we agreed with a lot of them,” said Draper. According to Draper, the bill’s new draft will include requirements that cottage food businesses go through a registration process and that any

products containing allergens are labeled. He also said the NWFPA pushed for a cap on the amount of money cottage food purveyors can make. “They do want a sales cap, so annually what they’re pushing for is $25,000 of income from a product, which was a sticky issue for us but I think we’ve negotiated it because they also wanted an in-home inspection, which we got them to drop,” said Draper. According to Erskine, developing uniform kitchen inspection criteria would prove difficult because home kitchen setups vary considerably. Mandating inspections would also add more red tape, when the intention of the bill is to reduce barriers to entry for small-scale producers. But without inspections, how can consumers be sure that foods are being created in clean kitchens? “Our response to that is, ‘It’s direct-to-consumers so ask them if you can see their kitchen,’” said Draper. “It’s more about choice.” “This is what self-regulation looks like,” added Erskine. “If you walk up to somebody’s booth at a farmers market and you don’t feel like their hands are clean or their clothes are clean or their display is clean and you have questions, you get to choose for yourself, ‘Do I support this product or not?’ There’s going to be a handful of people that just cannot wrap their head around that.” Erskine believes that if the bill is passed, it will lead to an explosion of small businesses. “I think you’re going to see quite a big boom where you’ll see a lot of innovation and a lot of baked goods for a few years and then the strong ones will stick around,” said Erskine. “But I think also what you’re going to see is a lot of cottage industry go into just industry—jellies that are so good that they start going to a facility to make them. You’re going to see a lot of products come out of it that they just didn’t know that they were sitting on that recipe or that family secret that really could turn into a business.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


SCREEN EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN, EXTRAORDINARY FILMS Eighth annual Family of Woman Film Festival comes to Boise, Sun Valley MARCIA FRANKLIN There’s a scene in the documentary Sepideh: Reaching for the Stars that should resonate with parents of teenagers everywhere: 16-year-old Sepideh, an Iranian girl, is chastised by her mother for staying out late with her astronomy club, sky-watching. “You need your sleep because you have other important things to do,” the mother scolds. Instead of unleashing epithets as an American teen might do, though, Sepideh unsheathes a sword of rhetoric. “My pain is not the fences around the pond, but to live among fish that can’t imagine the ocean,” she recites, in a quote attributed to Mohammad Mossadegh, the ex-prime minister of Iran ousted in an American-backed coup in 1953. Sepideh’s mother spars back with her own line of poetry: “Even in a world where people steal from the blind, I will keep my optimism and faith in love.” Iranians have come to know such “poetry battles” are endemic to Persian culture; and it’s one of the rites of life director Berit Madsen captures in her poignant documentary about a teenage girl who aspires to be an astronaut despite great odds, including a death threat from a family member. “To me, Sepideh is a film about hope,” says Madsen, a Danish anthropologist who traveled to Iran nine times over five years to document the twists and turns of her subject’s life. “It’s telling us that if we’re willing to fight for our dreams then we might reach further that we ourselves believed.” The film will screen on Wednesday, February 25 as part of the Family of Woman Film Festival at Boise State University’s Special Events Center and again on Friday, February 27 at the Sun Valley Opera House. The tale follows the indomitable and aptlynamed Sepideh (her name means “dawn”) as she pushes back against social norms towards her goal, inspired by Iranian-American private astronaut Anousheh Ansari. Ansari, who paid an estimated $20 million to go to the International Space Station in 2006, BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Nigeria’s pro-democracy movement is explored in The Supreme Price (left); a young Iranian woman dreams of traveling to space in Sepidah (center); and an American teen coordinates protests in Syria in #chicagogirl (right).

Ala’a Basatneh, a Syrian-American living near and who appears in the documentary, will appear Chicago, acts as a kind of global social media on the stage of the Sun Valley Opera House on air traffic controller, linking communications Friday, Feb. 27 to answer questions after the between activist groups in Syria to coordinate proscreening, along with American astronaut and tests, and then sending video of the often-violent Idaho native Barbara Morgan. Morgan will also clashes to journalists around the world. be at the Boise State event, along with Mona The documentary includes harrowing and Rafatzadeh, the film’s assistant director. Indeed, Sepideh’s story has inspired the theme ultimately heart-wrenching footage shot by Bassel Shahade, who was killed while filming in Homs, a of this year’s Family of Woman Film Festival, “Women and Their Dreams,” said festival founder Syrian city under siege in the ongoing civil war. Director Joe Piscatella, who read about BasatPeggy Goldwyn. neh through news reports, says he was inspired by “I like the idea of picking something that’s her and her compatriots. fairly broad, and examining it in many different “When I was growing up we were told that ways,” she told Boise Weekly. you had to wait until you were an adult to make To that end, the festival’s slate also includes a difference,” said Piscatella. “These activists, most The Supreme Price, about Nigerian human rights of whom are students, believe they can change the activist Hafsat Abiola. world now. A teenager, 6000 miles away, using Abiola’s father, Moshood Abiola, ran for president of Nigeria in 1993 and is widely viewed the only tools at her disposal, made a difference in a very difficult part of the world.” to have won. But before taking office, Moshood Both Piscatella and Abiola was arrested, and Basatneh, now 22, will died in prison in 1998. FAMILY OF WOMAN FILM FESTIVAL be in Sun Valley for His wife (and Hafsat’s Monday, Feb. 23 - Sunday, March 1 the Saturday, Feb. 28, mother) was murdered familyofwomanfilmfestival.org screening of their film. in 1996. Despite such Marcia Franklin will moderate discussions followPiscatella is one of danger, Hafsat Abiola ing screenings of Sepideh on Wednesday, Feb. three men with films at has returned to his na25, at Boise State University and Friday, Feb. 27, the event, another being tive land multiple times at the Sun Valley Opera House. Mohammed Naqvi, since 1999 to work on an up-and-coming women’s issues. “I have always had a particular interest in films Pakistani director. Naqvi will talk about his work and show his most recent documentary, Pakistan’s about complex, multifaceted women who defy expectations and create their own destinies rather Hidden Shame, about child sex trafficking in that country on Sunday, March 1, at the Sun Valley than surrendering to circumstances,” said The Opera House. Supreme Price director Joanna Lipper. Goldwyn says she’s enthused to see the work Lipper and Hafsat Abiola will be in Sun Valley for the screening of their film and will travel of male filmmakers in the festival, as well as more male attendees at the event, now in its eighth year. to Boise for screening at Boise State on Friday, “I think it’s fantastic,” said Goldwyn. “We’re Feb. 27. not going to solve these problems until men realize Also screening this year is #chicagoGirl, the story of another determined Muslim female teen. how important it is and they have a buy-in.”

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BALLET IDAHO GLITTERS IN BALANCHINE’S ‘RUBIES’ Paul Boos came to Boise from New York to oversee Ballet Idaho’s production of George Balanchine’s “Rubies,” the middle act of his 1967 ballet, Jewels. Boos was onstage Feb. 13 at the Morrison Center, basking in a standing ovation from the crowd for his efforts. “Rubies” was one of the most challenging dances Ballet Idaho has ever attempted, and it gave Boise audiences a new sense of what heights the dance company can reach. “Rubies” is a work of art in a bottle. Narrativeand character-free, traditional ballet movements have been overlaid with the raw sexuality of the Jazz Age: The ballet opens with thrusting hips and high kicks. At times it looks like the dancers, with their glittering red costumes, are performing in a burlesque show. But unlike burlesque, “Rubies” has no punchline—just virtuoso performances by Andrew Taft and Elizabeth Keller and clockwork movements from the company dancers. Ballet Idaho regulars rarely see Taft in this form. His performances are consistent and precise, but Friday night, he was inspired: His limb extensions were more fluid and he was lighter on his feet. It was one of the most energetic ballets of his career but by its end, he seemed effortlessly composed, as though he hadn’t just spent the previous half hour sprinting and leaping across the Morrison Center stage. The evening began with a work by an undisputed master, but the middle ballet of the evening, “This Mortal’s Mosaic,” was choreographed by Daniel Ojeda, a gifted student. “Mosaic” was an accessible, witty and fun collage of short cuts and vignettes about traditional (and some non-traditional) ballet themes like spurned love and relationships gone awry. Ojeda has already demonstrated his broad dance vocabulary, but here, he showed his mastery of it by expressing an array of feelings in a short amount of time without confusing or burning out the audience. Rounding out the evening was the garrulous “Aaaaargh! Pirates!” by Peter Anastos. After the immense energy of “Rubies” and the substantial “Mosaic,” “Pirates” was a sorbet of sight gags, stage fighting and sexual innuendo. It closed out with an exhilarating pas de deux between Angela Napier Gibson and Nathan Powell, but Taft, who performed in both “Rubies” and “This Mortal’s Mosaic,” again stole the show in the fourth variation of “Pirates.” —Harrison Berry

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ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

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ORGANIC.CHILD SAFE.PET SAFE Plus, local! The best pest control services in the valley. PROTEC, call Brett at 284-1480.

(208) 342-4733

FAX E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com GABRIELLA: Come meet a sweet, chatty gal who will melt your heart.

BRUNO: My best friend is Bowie and we love to play, snuggle and groom each other.

BOWIE: If you adopt Bruno and me, one of us can be free. Can we go together with you?

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. SPARKY: 3-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Loves running, playing. Dives into laps for attention. Eager to learn. Best with schoolaged kids and older. (Kennel 300- #24892306)

ARMANI: 7-year-old, male, pit bull terrier mix. Goofy and social, loves to play with toys. Does well with other dogs and older children. (IHS PetSmart Adoption Center- #17127448)

TOMMY BOY: 2-year-old, male, Chihuahua. Busy and adventurous. Not really a lap dog, Best with adults only. (IHS PetSmart Adoption Center#24832301)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT NESSIE: 12-year-old, female, Scottish/Cairn terrier mix. Spunky senior whose owner went to a retirement home. Gentle. (IHS PetSmart Adoption Center- #24931378)

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BALOU: 3-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Used to living as a housecat. Loves kids. Has lived with dogs and other cats. Playful. (IHS PetSmart Adoption Center- #14120758)

PUMPKIN: 6-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Affectionate. Prefers to be the only feline. Loves to be treated like a princess. (IHS PetSmart Adoption Center- #6965601)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

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TRES BONNE TASTINGS Stop by on Thursday Feb. 12th for Eastern European beer tastiings & wines on Feb. 26th. 5-8pm at tres bonne cuisine, 6555 W. Overland Rd., directly west of the pedestrian overpass. tresbonnecuisine.com for details.

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NYT CROSSWORD | SPLIT ENDS ACROSS

24 Chimes, e.g. 25 Short thing for a diva 26 Big ___ 27 Rarely 29 Long John Silver, for one 31 Not standard: Abbr. 32 Word with coffee or water 34 Bird that’s also the name of an Irish river 35 Sped 36 Canon competitor

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38 Cookies with a ‘‘Golden’’ variety 39 Slowing, in music: Abbr. 40 Audible pauses 41 Knot again 42 Miranda warning receiver, informally 43 Remote button with ‘‘+’’ and ‘‘–’’ 45 Govt. construction overseer 46 Founded, on city signs 11

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26 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

2— 3 Cartoonist who wrote the caption ‘‘Well, if I called the wrong number, why did you answer the phone?’’ 4 Titter sound 5 Backspaces, say 6 Incense 7 Eve who wrote ‘‘The Vagina Monologues’’ 8 Mounted 9— 10 Test ___ 11 Beginning of an attorney’s ending 12 Like four of the eight planets 13 Subjects of apprenticeships 14 Superman, e.g. 15 — 16 Rough position? 17 Ones in the oil field? 18 Historic filer for bankruptcy in 2013 19 Was lovesick, say 28 Blather 30 ___ Exchange 33 Cut (off) 37 April second? 44 Center of activity 45 Physicist Ohm 47 Virgil, for Dante 48 Queen of mystery 50 Flightless bird 52 Org. with the motto ‘‘Not for self but for country’’ 53 Battle of the Alamo, e.g. 54 ‘‘For ___’’ (store sign around Father’s Day) 55 California’s Santa ___ River 56 I.C.U. worker 57 — 58 Most feeble 61 — 62 Map part 63 ‘‘Life ___ Highway’’

64 One given the velvet-rope treatment, for short 65 Sigmoid shape 67 Get in line 68 Kind of question 74 Kernel keepers 76 Prefix with -form 77 Crabby 78 Female with a beard 80 — 81 Stone who co-created ‘‘South Park’’ 82 Cousins of clarinets 84 Little houses on the prairie 85 Indie band whose name means, literally, ‘‘I have it’’ 86 Brace 87 Anaïs Nin and Franz Kafka, notably 89 Straight shooters? L A S T T S G A R P

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90 Family members 93 Please, to a Puritan 96 Sommelier 99 Angles 100 Baseball family name 101 Pompom wielder’s cries 103 Sulking 106 Things found in a pyramid 108 Sacred symbol 116 ___ Library (Austin, Tex., attraction) 117 Atl. Coast state 118 —

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

L A T E O N S E T

C E T G G O I O N S E N D C R U O U P S S H A N E L Y S T M I P S H E E O T T S T A L I E L R S I I O N O N G

O M E R E I L P B O A T R O D Q U U L E L

I T I S S I N T E N T T K O S E W T E D A S X P R E R O O P A S S T H E S E T C S T O O P A W N A E J U D C U P U N S A R T E U L A T K S S

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I.F. STONE’S WEEKLY Coverage in the Feb. 15, 1965 edition of I.F. Stone’s Weekly included a pair of disastrous North Vietnamese raids on U.S. bases; a righteous denunciation of a Mississippi senator who claimed the Civil Rights movement was a communist front; and a plea for a negotiated peace before the war in Vietnam could be widened. Peppered throughout the four-page newspaper—which cost 15 cents and was only available through direct mail—were small boxes with curated excerpts from the Associated Press, New York Times, Washington Post and congressional testimony. Some of the reporting, even 50 years later, could be repurposed with a Baghdad dateline: “Their only hope unzmag.net/Pub/IFStonesWeekly is to involve the U.S. directly in the fighting; that is why they want to ‘widen the war.’ Our military are frustrated because all their highly advertised and chrome-plated ‘counterinsurgency’ has failed.” All this content, produced weekly, came courtesy of one man: Isidor Feinstein Stone, and his body of work—which spanned 751 editions, 3,737 articles and 19 years—is widely considered to be one of the greatest journalistic achievements of the 20th century. A muckraker and consummate investigator with a long journalistic pedigree, Stone wrote stories about Vietnam, in particular, that would have never seen publication otherwise, including some of the most prescient and searing commentary outside the radical underground press. Now every edition of I.F. Stone’s Weekly, from December 1953-December 1971, is available to read online, for free. —Zach Hagadone BOISE WEEKLY.COM

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LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email jill@boiseweekly.com or call 344-2055 for a quote. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Cameron Jon Purvis Legal Name

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Case No. CV NC 1500417 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Cameron Jon Purvis, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Cain Gray Matthews. The reason for the change in name is Harass-

ment from Mother. I have no contact with family. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) MAR 10 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Jan 21 2015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Jan. 28, Feb, 4, 11 & 18, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Eve Ellen Barilleaux Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1500227 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Eve Ellen Barilleaux, now residing in the City of Kuna, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Evie Lynne . The

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): There are many different facets to your intelligence, and each matures at a different rate. So for example, your ability to think symbolically may evolve more slowly than your ability to think abstractly. Your wisdom about why humans act the way they do may ripen more rapidly than your insight into your own emotions. In the coming weeks, I expect one particular aspect of your intelligence to be undergoing a growth spurt: your knowledge of what your body needs and how to give it what it needs. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What is the proper blend for you these days? Is it something like 51 percent pleasure and 49 percent business? Or would you be wiser to shoot for 49 percent pleasure and 51 percent business? I will leave that decision up to you, Taurus. Whichever way you go, I suggest that you try to interweave business and pleasure as often as possible. You are in one of those actionpacked phases when fun dovetails really well with ambition. I’m guessing that you can make productive connections at parties. I’m betting that you can spice up your social life by taking advantage of what comes to you through your work. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 1900, the world’s most renowned mathematicians met at a conference in Paris. There

the German whiz David Hilbert introduced his master list of 23 unsolved mathematical problems. At the time, no one had done such an exhaustive inventory. His welldefined challenge set the agenda for math research throughout the 20th century. Today he’s regarded as an influential visionary. I’d love to see you come up with a list of your own top unsolved problems, Gemini. You now have extra insight about the catalytic projects you will be smart to work on and play with during the coming years.

gather more information and ripen your understanding of the pressing issues. And that could indeed involve getting a good night’s sleep. What happens in your dreams may reveal nuances you can’t pry loose with your waking consciousness alone. And even if you don’t recall your dreams, your sleeping mind is busy processing and reworking the possibilities. I recommend that you make liberal use of the “sleep on it” approach in the coming weeks, Leo. Revel in the wisdom that wells up in you as you’re lying down in the dark.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Spanipelagic” is an adjective scientists use to describe creatures that typically hang out in deep water but float up to the surface on rare occasions. The term is not a perfect metaphorical fit for you, since you come up for air more often than that. But you do go through phases when you’re inclined to linger for a long time in the abyss, enjoying the dark mysteries and fathomless emotions. According to my reading of the astrological omens, that’s what you’ve been doing lately. Any day now, however, I expect you’ll be rising up from the Great Down Below and headed topside for an extended stay.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1962, Edward Albee published his play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? It won numerous awards and is still performed by modern theater groups. Albee says the title came to him as he was having a beer at a bar in New York City. When he went to the restroom, he spied the words “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” scrawled in soap on the mirror. I urge you to be alert for that kind of inspiration in the coming days, Virgo: unexpected, provocative and out of context. You never know when and where you may be furnished with clues about the next plot twist of your life story.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): To make the cocktail known as Sex on the Beach, you mix together cranberry juice, orange juice, pineapple juice, peach schnapps and vodka. There is also an alternative “mocktail” called Safe Sex on the Beach. It has the same fruit juices, but no alcohol. Given the likelihood that your inner teenager will be playing an important role in your upcoming adventures, Scorpio, I recommend that you favor the Safe-Sex-on-the-Beach metaphor rather than the Sex-on-the-Beach approach. At least temporarily, it’s best to show a bit of protective restraint toward the wild and sometimes erratic juvenile energy that’s pushing to be expressed.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Edward III, a medieval English king, had a favorite poet: Geoffrey Chaucer. In 1374, the king promised Chaucer a big gift in appreciation for his talents: a gallon of wine

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In Herman Melville’s short story “Bartleby, the Scrivener,” a lawyer hires a man named Bartleby to work in his office. At first Bartleby is a model employee, carrying out

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): When faced with a big decision, you might say you want to “sleep on it.” In other words, you postpone your final determination until you

28 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

every day for the rest of his life. That’s not the endowment I would have wanted if I had been Chaucer. I’d never get any work done if I were quaffing 16 glasses of wine every 24 hours. Couldn’t I instead be provided with a regular stipend? Keep this story in mind, Libra, as you contemplate the benefits or rewards that might become available to you. Ask for what you really need, not necessarily what the giver initially offers.

his assignments with dogged skill. But one day everything begins to change. Whenever his boss instructs him to do a specific task, Bartleby says, “I would prefer not to.” As the days go by, he does less and less, until finally he stops altogether. I’d like to propose, Sagittarius, that you take inspiration from his slowdown. Haven’t you done enough for now? Haven’t you been exemplary in your commitment to the daily struggle? Don’t you deserve a break in the action so you can recharge your psychospiritual batteries? I say yes. Maybe you will consider making this your battle cry: “I would prefer not to.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.” That’s what American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson advised. Even if you’re not naturally inclined to see the potential wisdom of that approach, I invite you to play around with it for the next three weeks. You don’t need to do it forever. It doesn’t have to become a permanent fixture in your philosophy. Just for now, experiment with the possibility that trying lots of experiments will lead you not just to new truths, but to new truths that are fun, interesting, and useful. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The art of the French Aquarian painter Armand Guillaumin (18411927) appears in prestigious

museums. He isn’t as famous as his fellow Impressionists Paul Cézanne and Camille Pissarro, but he wielded a big influence on them both. His career developed slowly because he had to work a day job to earn a living. When he was 50 years old, he won a wad of free money in the national lottery, and thereafter devoted himself full-time to painting. I’m not saying you will enjoy a windfall like that anytime soon, Aquarius, but such an event is possible. At the very least, your income could rise. Your odds of experiencing financial luck will increase to the degree that you work to improve the best gifts you have to offer your fellow humans. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “It isn’t normal to know what we want,” said pioneering psychologist Abraham Maslow. “It is a rare and difficult psychological achievement.” That’s the bad news, Pisces. The good news is that you may be on the verge of rendering that theory irrelevant. In the coming weeks, you will be better primed to discover what you really want than you have been in a long time. I suggest you do a ritual in which you vow to unmask this treasured secret. Write a formal statement in which you declare your intention to achieve full understanding of the reasons you are alive on this planet.

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reason for the change in name is: for artistic reasons. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) MAR 03 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date JAN 16 2015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 4, 11,18 & 25, 2015. Legal Notice Summons By PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 1410724, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Riverside Village Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Rod Finlayson and Betty Finlayson, Defendants. TO: ROD FINLAYSON AND BETTY FINLAYSON You have been sued by Riverside Village Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho Case No. CV OC 1410724. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form including the case number., and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk

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of the Court, Ada County Courthouse 200 W. Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702-7300 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FORTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-6294567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 23rd Day of January, 2015. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By:/s/ Sean Murphy, Deputy Clerk Pub. Feb. 4, 11, 18, & 25, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT A. KELLER, Deceased. Case No. CV IE 1500490 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Charles Vincen has been appointed personal representative of the estate of the above-named Decedent. All person having claims against the Decedent or his estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. Charles Vincen

Personal Representative c/o IVER LONGETEIG 5304 N. Turret Boise Idaho, Idaho 83702 February 2, 2015 Pub. Feb. 11, 18, 26 & March 4, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Lynnsey Hope Van Dyke Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1501401 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Lynnsey Hope Van Dyke, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Lynnsey Hope Escobedo. The reason for the change in name is: to restore my maiden name following divorce. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) MAR 17 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date JAN 30 2015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB FEB. 11, 18, 25 & MAR. 4, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Riley Kae Riggs-Hurren

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Case No. CV NC 1501074 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Riley Kae Riggs-Hurren, a minor, now residing in the City of Eagle, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Rylee Kae Riggs. The reason for the change in name is: to omit her 2nd surname (Hurren). A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) MAR 17 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change.

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PUT YOUR DAMN PHONE DOWN (I CAN’T)

INSIDE THE S.V. FILM FEST ANNOUNCEMENT PARTY On the evening of Feb. 15, filmmakers, movie-lovers and organizers stood shoulder-to-shoulder at The Modern, watching trailers of movies that will be screened at the fourth annual Sun Valley Film Festival, March 4-8. Judging by the crowd, the festival is catching on. “The Sun Valley Film Festival is for people who love film—any kind of film,” SVFF Programming Director Laura Mehlhaff told Boise Weekly.“We have everything from blockbusters to the obscure, stuff you might not see anywhere else.” sunvalleyfilmfestival.org Big names on this year’s line-up include Scott Glenn in The Barber, which screens on opening night; Billy Bob Thornton in Cut Bank; and Neil deGrasse Tyson, who narrates National Geographic Channel’s Hubble’s Cosmic Journey. Bruce Dern and Bill Paxton will participate in this year’s Coffee Talks and Clint Eastwood will be honored with the festival’s inaugural Lifetime Vision Award. Access to high profile filmmakers “lets people experience film in a way that they don’t normally get to,” Mehlhaff said. Idaho filmmakers were also on hand, including Christian Lybrook, whose project, Zero Point, will premiere at the Magic Lantern Cinema in Ketchum. Zero Point isn’t a movie, however. “It’s the pilot episode to a series,” Lybrook said, which follows a female detective who obsessively investigates a disease she thinks is killing children in a time of oil exploration, climate change and the proliferation of GMOs. The 47-minute pilot asks audiences to consider would happen in a human colony collapse. Lybrook has been working on the show with his creative partner, Gregory Bayne, for two years. It’s a “truly homegrown” project, he said. —Jessica Murri

The background of my iPhone 5 lock screen is a sunset over Quinn’s Pond. I took the picture on a stellar sunset-y evening, when the sky was all the best shades of blue, pink and yellow. I remember it so well because I see it at least 50 times a day. That’s because, like so many Americans, I’m addicted to my smartphone. I hate my phone addiction, by the way. I let the battery die, or trek into areas void of cell service, or set it to “do not disturb” in an effort to keep the damn thing out of my hand. It doesn’t work. I still glance at it constantly. I have to know if anyone had anything to say. A few weeks ago, I found New Tech City, a radio show exploring why we crave the ball-and-chain. NTC launched an experiment in the first week of February called “Bored and Brilliant,” which made the case that because people are always looking at their smartphones, they never get bored anymore. If you’re not bored, you’re not imaginative, and if you’re always consuming, you’re not creating. NTC challenged participants to keep their phones out of sight, and there are health benefits from this, apparently. In his book, The Distraction Addiction, Dr. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang says we unconsciously hold our breath while we wait for our email inbox to update. The next challenge urged smartphone users to go through a whole day without taking pictures. NTC found a study that said Americans take 10 billion photos every month, which scientists think could be harming our memories. Other challenges included deleting the app you spend the most time on (delete Facebook? But, but, but…) and, in perhaps the most challenging challenge of all, taking a day-long break from texting. I didn’t do any of these challenges and I justified it to myself because I need my phone for work, or told myself that a long day earned me some mindless scroll time. Data gathered after the challenge showed no one was very successful at it, either. They still spent about two full hours of their day screen-gazing. That’s insane. Think of what our brains could come up with in that time. Full disclosure: I’ve checked my phone eight times since I started writing this. Hold on, got a text. —Jessica Murri

“Full.” Taken by instagram user ametheystkeaten

READER COMMENTS From Facebook, “Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence Says ‘50 Shades of Grey’ Permits Rape Culture,” Feb. 16: Tara Morris: There is not one rape scene in the books or movie. There is more rape in the Bible perhaps we should [b]an that book. Mary Champie: ... It’s like a coming out party for

everyone who has secretly enjoyed porn but been afraid to admit it. Sarah JoAnn Smith: I didn’t expect to see so many fans of it on this page... *backs away slowly* Niki Krause Black: ... Properly done BDSM is completely consensual and is therefore not rape.

WEEKLY STATS

150

6.5

10 BILLION

Number of times people check their phones per day

Number of minutes between phone checks

Number of smartphone photos taken per month by Americans

30 | FEBRUARY 18–24, 2015 | BOISEweekly

118 Minutes spent every day looking at a phone

5 Number of fewer minutes participants spent checking their phones after taking the NTC challenge BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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Boise Weekly Vol. 23 Issue 35  

Project Censored The top 10 under- or badly reported news stories of 2014

Boise Weekly Vol. 23 Issue 35  

Project Censored The top 10 under- or badly reported news stories of 2014