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t the start of 2010, the staff of Boise Weekly embarked on our most ambitious project yet: To create a year-round guide to Boise and the surrounding area that could serve as the go-to source for everyone from newcomer to native. We wanted to give the community a single reference guide covering everything from dining and nightlife to the arts and recreation. It was no small order, but we are ready to put the first edition of the Boise Weekly Annual Manual out in the world. Inside, you’ll find our ode to Boise, highlighting some of the best aspects of life in this great big valley of ours and celebrating the fact that this is a place of both tradition and change, a place that is at once bold and welcoming. In many ways, creating the Annual Manual was very much like raising a child. First, we decided we were ready to make the commitment, then we began to plan—watching it slowly take form as we imagined what it might someday accomplish. We coaxed it along, filling it with every bit of information we could think of, while trying not to smother it or live vicariously through it as it took its first steps. There was that awkward teenage stage, when despite how much we had invested in it, we wanted to throttle it. Now, we’re ready to cut the publishing strings and let it loose in the world. We just hope it doesn’t call for bail money. The most challenging part of creating the Annual Manual was cramming all of what we saw as absolutely vital information into just 108 pages. As it took shape, we came to realize just how much this area really offers those of us lucky enough to live here. Shoehorning that much information into one publication meant sacrifices had to be made. We’ve tried to limit the information in Annual Manual to what we truly believe is the very best in the area. No doubt we’ve missed a few things, but don’t worry, we’ll do it all over again next year. —Deanna Darr

CULTURE

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WELCOME TO THE WORLD, ANNUAL MANUAL

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COVER ART ERIN CUNNINGHAM CIRCULATION Contributing Writers: Amy Contributing Illustrators: Boise Weekly is owned and Shea Sutton Atkins, Sarah Barber, Bingo Erin Cunningham, Julia Green, operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Shea@boiseweekly.com Barnes, Jaclyn Brandt, Rachael Brian Sendelbach, Ben Wilson Idaho corporation. Man About Town: Daigle, Deanna Darr, Josh Stan Jackson Gross, Jennifer Hernandez, ADVERTISING TO CONTACT US: Stan@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Tara Morgan Advertising Director: Boise Weekly’s office is Editor: Rachael Daigle Lisa Ware located at Boise Weekly prints 30,000 Rachael@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Lisa@boiseweekly.com 523 Broad St., copies every Wednesday and is Managing Editor: Art Director: Account Executives: Boise, ID 83702 available free of charge at more Deanna Darr Leila Ramella-Rader Meshel Miller Phone: 208-344-2055 than 750 locations, limited to Deanna@boiseweekly.com Leila@boiseweekly.com Meshel@boiseweekly.com Fax: 208-342-4733 one copy per reader. Additional Listings: Josh Gross Graphic Designer: Jessi Strong E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com copies of the current issue of calendar@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund Jessi@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Boise Weekly may be purchased Proofreaders: Adam@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman for $1, payable in advance. No Annabel Armstrong, Contributing Photographers: Justin@boiseweekly.com Address editorial, person may, without permission Amy Atkins Colin Clark, Paul Hosefros, Lucas Wacarelli business and production of the publisher, take more than Interns: Philip Alexander, Glenn Landberg, Laurie Lucas@boiseweekly.com correspondence to: one copy of each issue. Rachel Krause, Stephen Foster Pearman, Joshua Roper Jill Weigel Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Jill@boiseweekly.com Boise, ID 83701

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PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com

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The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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WELCOME TO BOISE Deciphering the Treasure Valley DEANNA DARR ILLUSTRATION ERIN CUNNINGHAM PHOTOGRAPHS LAURIE PEARMAN

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he Treasure Valley is not merely a collection of geographic locations with arbitrary names and interchangeable personalities. Each town, and even each neighborhood, has its own history—a combination of geography, population and a heaping spoonful of je ne sais quoi. And while we might not be able to define it, it’s that certain something that draws kindred spirits and creates distinct personalities. Defining those more amorphous qualities is far more difficult than setting a physical boundary, but Boise Weekly is here to help you on both accounts. From all of Boise’s neighborhoods to the farthest reaches of Canyon County, we’re here to decipher the mystery that is the Boise metro area. Here are the basics: The valley is bisected by Interstate 84, which also happens to be the main east-west route (even though it doesn’t go directly east or west). The division between Boise and Meridian is roughly at Eagle Road, although thanks to patchwork annexation, wandering borders make that an inexact science. On the north end of the valley, both Eagle and Boise hug the Foothills, claiming some of the prime real estate in the valley. And while Eagle ends not far south of the Boise River, the City of Boise stretches much farther than most people realize: from the high desert and Lucky Peak Reservoir in the east to nearly the edge of the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in the far south. The capital city includes everything from sagebrush plains and rugged river canyons to lush tree-lined streets. The city’s centerpiece remains the Boise River, which cuts through the middle of town and is flanked by parks, the extensive Greenbelt and some of the most popular summer restaurant patios in town. Further west, the once wide-open farms of Meridian have sprouted housing developments as far as the eye can see. While some have worried about a bedroom community fate for the ’burb, the city is working on plans to reclaim its historic downtown. Further west still, Caldwell and Nampa are both trying to balance their own agricultural heritage in a changing world, while to the north and south, respectively, Star and Kuna are dealing with the same issues, just on a smaller scale. In the following pages, you’ll find more info about each community and their distinct personalities.

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DOWNTOWN BOISE

SIXTH AND MAIN STREETS

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ince the city was founded in 1863, Boise’s downtown area has been the hub of both the economic and cultural life of the area. It added the title of governmental headquarters when it became the capital of the Idaho Territory in 1864. The transfer of the capital from Lewiston in North Idaho was done under the cover of night—when the territorial governor took the official seal, archives and treasury, and fled south. The Capitol reopened in March 2010 after an extensive restoration and expansion. Downtown has undergone massive changes from the time when orchards lined the river and railroad lines brought freight into the heart of the city. That rail stop is now home to swanky stores and restaurants in Bodo and the 8th Street Marketplace. The orchards are gone, too, and in their place is Julia Davis Park, the cultural hub of the valley and home to Idaho State Historical Museum (610 Julia Davis Drive), Boise Art Museum (670 Julia Davis Drive), Idaho Black History Museum (508 Julia Davis Drive), Discovery Center of Idaho (131 Myrtle St.) and

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Zoo Boise (355 Julia Davis Drive). (between Capitol Boulevard and Ninth Street Just across from the park, Boise Public and Front and Main streets), which hosts Main Library (715 S. Capitol Blvd.) and The public celebrations throughout the year, but Cabin (801 S. Capitol Blvd.) keep the popuno more so than in the summer, when Alive lace literate, while the Anne Frank Human After Five puts on a free concert every Rights Memorial (777 S. Eighth Wednesday evening. The summer St.) serves as a remembrance. also means the Capital City PubVITAL STATISTICS Downtown is bisected by the lic Market every Saturday along Don’t let parking Boise River, along which the Eighth Street, where locals stock scare you off. Your first hour is free in Greenbelt ferries bikers, runners up on fresh produce and crafts. downtown parking and walkers. Across the river at On the First Thursday of each garages. At metered spaces, push the meBoise State, football fans, for month, art lovers—and free-wineter’s blue button for whom season tickets are treated and-grub lovers—wander between 20 free minutes. And free spaces can still like gold, outnumber the stugalleries for an evening of local art. be found on some dents on game days. Just west of the downtown side streets. The south side of the river is core is the Linen District, an upalso home to downtown’s largest and-coming area with a smatterpark, Ann Morrison Park, where boaters find ing of restaurants and shops. dry land after floating the river. Kathryn AlDowntown’s historic buildings are also a bertson Park is nearby, and the pedestrianmajor draw, especially the landmark art deco only park is local favorite. Egyptian Theatre (700 W. Main St.). More Though downtown was a ghost town in the often than not, those historic buildings are 1980s, it has been rejuvenated, with residen- now hip restaurants and bars or boutique tial as well as commercial projects moving in. shops, making downtown the place to be. The center of downtown is the Grove Plaza —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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BOISE BENCH

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VITAL STATS It’s been said the Bench was Boise’s first suburb. These days it’s definitely no suburb and it’s definitely the new “it” neighborhood. Things to love: lower home prices and the fact that it’s home to the best selection of ethnic markets and restaurants in town.

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he Central Bench has always been a desirable place for Boiseans to make their homes. Overlooking the Boise River and downtown, homes on the Bench have commanded sweeping views since the earliest days of Boise. In fact, some of the most prestigious homes in the city claim prime spots along the edge of the rim perched high above all the action. Its most famous landmark, the Boise Depot (2603 W. Eastover Terrace), has stood sentinel since 1925 and was once the gateway to the City of Trees. Though the trains are long gone, the depot is still a hub of the community, available for rental to brides with big budgets, as well as for special events. Today the Bench is a neighborhood with a mix of 1950s bungalows and more modern dwellings along quiet residential streets punctuated by commercial corridors and retail hubs. In recent years, the Bench has become the place to go to find an ever-expanding variety of ethnic markets and restaurants. The Bench is also home to the oldest syna-

gogue west of the Mississippi, Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel Synagogue (11 N. Latah St.), in use since 1896. The building wasn’t actually constructed on the Bench but was moved there in 2003 from its original location on the corner of 11th and State streets in downtown Boise. Offering yet more history, the Morris Hill Cemetery is one of the oldest in the city and the final resting place for numerous famous Idahoans including Sen. Frank Church, Gov. Moses Alexander (the first Jewish governor in the country), potato magnate J.R. Simplot and grocery store founder Joseph Albertson. For a little culture on the Bench, check out local community theater groups Prairie Dog Playhouse (3820 Cassia St.) and the once nearly vacant Hillcrest Shopping Center, which is now home to both the Stage Coach Theatre (5296 W. Overland Road) and one of the popular branch public libraries, the Library at Hillcrest (5246 W. Overland Road). Word to the wise: Bench residents are a proud lot, so don’t dis the Bench. —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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EAST BOISE

GREENBELT

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n East Boise, the “E” could stand for “eclectic.” You have your sprawling historic mansions on tree-lined streets. And you have your planned housing communities on the sage-dotted rim above the Boise River catering to tech industry workers. It’s hard to pin down the neighborhood in just a few words. Warm Springs Avenue is one of the historic jewels of the city, and its mix of elegant mansions and period homes were some of the first in the city to have geothermal heat. Hitching posts and stone steps along the curb are lingering reminders that horsedrawn carriages and wagons once ruled the streets. Further to the east, Old Idaho State Penitentiary (2445 Old Penitentiary Road) has gone from housing prisoners to housing history. The now shuttered prison is a draw for those who want to know what solitary confinement or the gallows are like without all the unfortunate incarceration. In the shadows of the prison walls, Idaho Botanical Garden (2355 Old Penitentiary Road) is a lush respite full of native plants and host

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to numerous concerts. The Old Pen is also the curious can get back to nature near the the starting point for hikers heading up to heart of the city in a living museum focused another East Boise landmark: Tablerock. on riparian life. Heading east down Warm Springs Avenue, Throughout the summer, inner tubes and visitors arrive at the city-owned golf course, rafts are some of the most common cargo Warm Springs Golf moving through the Course (2495 Warm area as floaters head Springs Ave.), which for the Barber Park hugs Boise River and launching site for floatthe Greenbelt as they ing the Boise River. continue east. East Boise is also Bown Crossing home to another favoracross the river is the ite summer getaway: newest addition to the Idaho Shakespeare neighborhood. The Festival (5657 Warm urban village-like deSprings Ave.). The velopment is filled with amphitheater is located shops and restaurants in a nature preserve, ROOSEVELT MARKET and thanks to the new making the structure Parkcenter bridge, it’s itself an attraction. tied in to the rest of the Continuing east, VITAL STATISTICS Warm Springs area. you’ll reach Lucky Peak When you’re in East Boise, you can’t miss the lighted cross on top of Tablerock. It was The neighborhood Reservoir, where water built by the Jaycees in 1956, and although is also home to the MK sports rule and where there have been efforts to remove it over the years, supporters have always prevailed. Nature Center (600 the Greenbelt trail ends. S. Walnut St.), where —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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BOISE NORTH END

HYDE PARK

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ew neighborhoods in Boise carry the mystique of the North End. It’s one of the most sought after residential locations in the city for its eclectic mix of craftsman bungalows, Queen Annes, Victorians and stately turn-of-the-20th-century mansions on the area’s tree-lined streets. The North End was one of the first areas of planned residential growth in the city, with new neighborhoods laid out in a grid system as the need for new homes grew. Among those early planned developments was Harrison Boulevard, where many of the city’s most prominent residents built their homes along the wide street, which included the median parkway as far back as 1916. Now, the street is a primer for architectural styles and has been on the National Register for Historic Places since 1980. The North End hit a rough patch through the 1960s and into the 1980s, when many of the now must-have homes fell into disrepair or were subdivided into apartments for student housing. Now though, the North End is back, drawing residents and visitors to places like Hyde

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Park, a quaint collection of boutique stores, nature and the environment. And, of course, businesses and popular restaurants (especial- there’s the always popular Library at Collisly those with summer patios where diners can ter (4724 W. State St.). kick back with friends and their dogs). The North End is the gateway to Bogus BaThe North End is also the jumping off point sin Mountain Recreation Area, which keeps for exploring the Foothills via the well-develskiers and snowboarders happy throughout oped Ridge to Rivers trail system, while the the winter, and mountain bikers and hikers hill at Camel’s Back Park (1200 busy through the summer with a W. Heron St.) has been calling to network of trails. children for generations. One North End landmark VITAL STATISTICS Known as Boise’s The Fort Boise Community stands above all others: the forliberal enclave, the Center (700 Robbins Road) is mer home of Idaho potato baron North End is where you’ll see an exanother neighborhood gatherJ.R. Simplot. While the home pensively renovated ing point, offering programs for (above Bogus Basin Road) was home next door to a haphazard seven-plex children, teens and adults alike. donated to the state to serve as adorned by Tibetan North of the community center, the official governor’s mansion, it prayer flags. North End necessities: the Military Reserve encomremains empty. But the commanda dog, a cruiser, a mountain bike and a passes 479 acres of Foothills land ing, grass-covered hill on which it car that’ll carry it all. that is home to trails as well as an stands is a popular destination for archery range, a military cemetery what may be a uniquely Boise acand one of the city’s newest offtivity: ice blocking, which involves leash dog parks (Reserve Street and Mountain sliding down a hill with your backside planted Cove Road). on a block of ice. Don’t ask us how this got The Foothills are also home to the Footstarted, but we assume it involved a dare. hills Learning Center (3188 Sunset Peak Road), where the public goes to learn about —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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WEST BOISE

MILWAUKEE AND WESTPARK STREETS

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BOISE TOWNE SQUARE MALL

VITAL STATISTICS If you need a recognizable big-box name for a serious shopping spree, you’ll find it in West Boise. But when the endless consumerism wears you out, you don’t have to look too far for a locally crafted beer or a locally churned scoop of ice cream.

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nce upon a time, it was easy to tell where Boise ended and Meridian began. Acres and acres of farmland stood between the two towns with little more than small, two-lane farm roads punctuating the alfalfa fields. Now those two-lane roads are five lane traffic jams, and like a living creature, the two towns have grown together. What was once open farmland has become what is now referred to as West Boise. Stretching across a wide swath of land, West Boise is home to a mix of large commercial developments as well as sprawling housing developments. A few older neighborhoods—including the original Cole townsite— are dotted among the mostly recent homes. What was once a large horse pasture is now the consumerism mecca of Boise: Boise Towne Square Mall (Milwaukee and Franklin streets). Numerous retail business and national chain restaurants have found homes in its shadow. But West Boise isn’t just about buying. Recognizing that an increasing number of Boise residents were calling the west side of the city

home, the City of Boise recently opened City Hall West (333 N. Sailfish Place), which now brings easier access to city services for West Boise dwellers and gives the Boise Police Department a new home. West Boise was also the focus of the Boise Public Library, which opened a branch library in the area. The Library at Cole and Ustick (7557 W. Ustick Road) has quickly become a gathering place in the neighborhood and a prime example of green building. Since the area is home to so many families, there are plenty of parks to be found tucked between various planned subdivisions, including Fairmont Park (7925 W. Northview St.), filled with soccer fields, a tennis court and playground equipment. The city also opened the Charles F. McDevitt Youth Sports Complex (5101 N. Eagle Road), a 10-acre park that is home to multiple baseball diamonds, a fishing pond and a skate park. It’s a combination that keeps teens in the area busy—when they’re not heading to the mall, that is. —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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SOUTH BOISE

WORLD CENTER FOR BIRDS OF PREY

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NEW YORK CANAL

VITAL STATISTICS South Boise was the city’s spare bedroom until things got a little too cramped north of I-84. But South Boise has plenty of elbow room for future growth. That far from the mountains, however, the trees give way to a landscape of sage desert.

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s Boise has expanded, South Boise has evolved from being the location of the city dump to the home of the Boise Airport. Now, increasingly, it’s home to a growing number of Boiseans. Bumping up against the sagebrush-dotted desert, South Boise’s open land and former farm fields have been attractive to both commercial and residential developers. Over the last decade, the area acquired its share of compact housing developments and the commerce they support. The presence of the airport brought Gowen Field, home base for the Idaho Air National Guard, to South Boise, as well as the National Interagency Fire Center, the command post that oversees national wildfire efforts. During heavy fire periods of the summer, giant tanker planes can be easily spotted taking off from the Boise Airport, moving so slowly it seems miraculous that they stay aloft. The military presence continues with the Idaho Military History Museum (4748 S. Lindbergh St.). The museum houses a variety of exhibits highlighting the history of Gowen Field and the presence of the Air Force in

Boise from World War II to present day. The area is also home to the World Center for Birds of Prey (5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane). The world-renowned center serves as the world headquarters for the Peregrine Fund, as well as the group’s captive breeding programs for endangered and threatened birds. The center opens its doors to school groups, as well as the public, with daily tours explaining the center’s work and the world of falconry. Finally, the area is also home to the Idaho Humane Society (4775 Dorman St.), one of the area’s favorite nonprofits. The organization not only serves as the temporary home for animals waiting to be adopted, but it is also the force behind efforts to spay and neuter strays, as well as protect animals from abuse and neglect. For residents who can’t keep their own pet, the Humane Society works with volunteers who do everything from taking dogs for walks in the Foothills to playing with the cats—just the thing for a pet-friendly town like Boise. —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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GARDEN CITY

WESTERN IDAHO FAIRGROUNDS

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SUN-LINER MOTEL

VITAL STATISTICS Garden City: A place where you can buy a cup of joe at a shack staffed by a girl in a bikini after waking up in a semi-seedy motel with a hangover courtesy of a party that started in a winery tasting room and ended at an indie rock concert in an art house.

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arden City is Boise’s red-headed stepchild. But it’s a stepchild that is fighting hard to shake off its ne’er-dowell image of the past. The city—which is completely surrounded by Boise—was named for the gardens of early Chinese immigrants to the area. However for decades, it was also where the upstanding citizens of Boise would go to indulge their vices thanks to things like legal gambling and adult stores. But gone are the days of hourly hotel rates. The main drive, Chinden Boulevard, is still a mix of RV, boat and used-car dealerships, but now, wine, art and upscale condos are moving in, too. The residential area spans the spectrum from modest homes and trailer parks, to expansive riverfront properties. Garden City actually straddles both sides of the Boise River, encompassing the Plantation Golf Club (6515 W. State St.). These days, Garden City is the kind of place where custom metal sculptures are created at Woman of Steel Gallery (3640 W. Chinden Blvd.), while Alley Repertory Theater stages its latest production at Visual

Arts Collective (3638 Osage St.) and Cinder (107 E. 44th St.) and Syringa Winery (3500 Chinden Blvd.) unveil the latest vintages in their tasting rooms. For decades, Garden City has been home to one of the largest and most anticipated events of the summer, the Western Idaho Fair held at Expo Idaho (5610 N. Glenwood St.). The fairgrounds area is also home to Boise’s boys of summer, the Boise Hawks minor league baseball team, which plays at Hawks Memorial Stadium (5600 Glenwood St.). The hub of the community is the Garden City Public Library (6015 N Glenwood St.) providing a gathering place for residents of all ages with extensive programs for children, as well hosting guest speakers, art shows and discussion groups. In the near future, the Ray Neef MD River Recreation Park, now under construction in the Boise River at the end of 36th Street, will be a major draw for kayakers and assorted water lovers who want to play in the yearround whitewater features. —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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EAGLE AND STAR

DOWNTOWN EAGLE

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he towns of Eagle and Star both owe their existence to early homesteading farmers who took advantage of the rich land along the Boise River. In Eagle, those first residents settled on and around Eagle Island, which they named for the numerous bald eagles that nested there, and the name was eventually extended to the township. Star was originally founded in 1863, one mile east of its current location, but for early residents, coming up with a name was a little more challenging. Finally, when the first school in the area was built in the early 1870s, a wooden star was nailed to the door. The landmark became synonymous with the town. Over time, Star and Eagle have shared many parallels, both creating extensive irrigation systems, both benefiting greatly from the electric trolley line that once connected Boise with Nampa and Caldwell via Eagle, Star and Middleton, and both fighting over the location of the first bridge spanning the Boise River west of Boise. Eagle won out due in large part to one Eagle resident who brought voters to the polls with a wagon ride and the promise of a picnic lunch. 24ANNUAL MANUAL 2010-2011BOISEweekly

But in recent decades, the two towns’ praise from audiences. paths have taken decidedly different courses. Each Saturday, the Eagle Farmers Market Eagle, which didn’t incorporate as a town (at Second and State streets) draws shopuntil 1971, has transformed from a pers from around the area to the sleepy farm town people passed downtown core, while mountain through into the honorary home bikers flock to the impressive VITAL STATISTICS of the McMansion. collection of new Foothills single EAGLE To see just how far The town has boomed in tracks at the Eagle Bike Park Eagle has come from its original roots, population as it has gone all (just off Horseshoe Bend Way). stop by the Eagle upper crust, with galleries, posh Of course, people can always Historical Museum (67 E. State St.) and eateries and boutique stores now head back to where it started, peruse the collection filling the downtown area that Eagle Island State Park, but now of historic photographs. was once home to general and there’s the draw of a water slide feed stores. instead of manual farm labor. STAR Diners flock to the river side While Eagle has gone all It’s the kind of place that still celebrates patios and the Greenbelt, which big city, Star has remained a the Fourth of July now links up all the way to Boise. relatively sleepy hamlet, where with a quilt show, a pie contest, a barbeWine lovers make pilgrimages to agriculture and ranching still play cue and a parade. the vineyards springing up north a large role. Of course, there are of town, especially Woodriver also the trophy homes that line Cellars (3705 N. Highway 16), the river, including that of Gov. which regularly hosts outdoor concerts and C.L. “Butch” Otter. The town has been workwine dinners. ing toward developing a riverside path of its The newly opened Eagle River Pavilion own, maybe someday giving bikers a way to (827 E. Riverside Drive) has already been atrack up more miles. tracting both big name performers and high —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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MERIDIAN AND KUNA

KUNA

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hese days both Meridian and Kuna are feeling some transportation growing pains as road construction crews struggle to keep up with the Treasure Valley’s population. But a few decades ago, the success of both towns was based on some very different forms of transit. More than a century ago, Meridian was incorporated with a population of 200, and the small village quickly became a hub of the state’s dairy industry. Thanks in part to the electric railway that connected the valley until 1928, farmers and dairymen were able to easily ship their goods to market. While most of the dairies, orchards and creameries are now gone, the city still marks its rural heritage with the annual Meridian Dairy Days festival. The old Challenge Butter creamery tower was torn down to make room for a new Meridian City Hall (33 E. Broadway Ave.) several years ago. It was a sign of the times for Meridian, which saw its population double between 2000 and 2007. The town was named for the main survey 26ANNUAL MANUAL 2010-2011BOISEweekly

meridian used to map out the state that runs the end of the railway line for miners going through the middle of town. That center point to or from Silver City in the hills south of the is still the center of the commuTreasure Valley. nity, with attractions like summer Agriculture has traditionally stock car racing at Meridian been the backbone of the area, VITAL STATISTICS Speedway (335 S. Main St.) and although more families are living MERIDIAN Meridian is where a the landmark yellow water tower. in Kuna and commuting to work nice family can get a nice house at a The area is also home to the elsewhere in the valley. nice price. Not quite Idaho State Police headquarters And while the reputation Pleasantville, but not far off either. (700 S. Stratford Dr.). may be child friendly, the town Meridian fancies itself a is also known for one heck of a KUNA family-friendly sort of place, and pub crawl as people make their Kuna High School students are known its acres and acres of planned way down Main Street, checking as the Kavemen after communities attest to the popuout bars that haven’t changed in the nearby underground lava tunnel larity of the ’burb. The city’s sumdecades. known as the Kuna mer community movie nights in Still others are likely to be Caves. Although there is an entrance to the Settlers Park (3245 N. Meridian focused on the Indian Creek caves, it’s unofficially Road) offer families a free, familyBMX dirt bike track on the west off limits. friendly outdoor flick. The park end of town on Avenue E or the is also home to one seriously popular skateboard park in Kuna impressive playground. City Park (Main Street and AvIn recent years, Kuna has been transformenue A). The Saturday Kuna Farmers Market ing into a family sort of place as well, with (353 Ave. E) throughout the summer is also a more housing developments replacing farm big draw. fields. When the town was founded, it was —Deanna Darr WWW.B OISEWEEK LY.COM

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NAMPA AND CALDWELL

DOWNTOWN NAMPA

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t the western end of the Treasure Valley—past the never-ending highway construction—are two towns that have seen some major changes in recent years. Nampa and Caldwell were both founded as dedicated farming communities, but each has seen a heavy dose of urbanization as traditional agricultural values were mixed with some big city ideas. Beyond their farming roots, both towns also owe their existence to the railroad. While the Oregon Short Line Railway bypassed Boise when it laid its track between Granger, Wyo., and Huntington, Ore., it went straight through Canyon County. Tracks also spurred out through Murphy in Owyhee County and north to Emmett and McCall. The county was eventually connected to Boise via the electric railway. The area has always been a conservative kind of place. Some of the original homesteaders and landowners refused to sell lots to anyone who planned to build a saloon— that plan didn’t last long. 28ANNUAL MANUAL 2010-2011BOISEweekly

One conservative upstart that became an and vintage shops as well as restaurants. institution is the elementary school that grew Of course, if you want retro, look no further into Northwest Nazarene University (623 than Karcher Mall (1509 Caldwell Blvd.), the Holly St.), now a major private college in the Treasure Valley’s first indoor shopping mall. region. The College of WestBut it’s not just about ern Idaho (5500 E. Opportushopping in the 2C. The VITAL STATISTICS nity Dr.) recently doubled the Idaho Center (16200 Idaho NAMPA Quaint downtown Nampa is the higher-education offerings Center Blvd.) hosts some up and coming popular kid when it in Nampa when it opened in of the largest concerts in comes to hip, local shopping. To cool off in the summer, Canyon County 2009. the area, and the Warhawk residents head to Lake Lowell, which Caldwell has long been Air Museum (201 Municipal is open to boaters mid-April through the end of September annually. home to the College of Way) is the place to check Idaho, formerly known as out an impressive collecCALDWELL Albertsons College of Idaho, tion of military aircraft and An infamous, privately owned billboard in Caldwell welcomes visitors formerly known as the Colmemorabilia. with what are sometimes biting solege of Idaho. C of I is home Canyon County is also cial and political messages. Whether you agree or disagree with their to one of the best planetarihome to a budding wine author, you’re usually guaranteed a ums in Idaho. country, with vineyards and laugh. Where to walk in Caldwell: College of Idaho campus and along the As the population has wineries dotting the rural banks of Indian Creek downtown. grown in recent years, some landscape and offering wine Nampa residents have lovers an easily accessible, dedicated themselves to yet impressively loaded, preserving the historic downtown core. The wine tasting tour. result is a charming area filled with boutique —Deanna Darr

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DELSA’S ICE CREAM PARLOUR

FLYING PIE PIZZARIA

7923 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-377-3700

4320 State St., Boise, 208-384-000; 6508 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-345-0000, flyingpie.com

SMOKY DAVIS 3914 W. State St., Boise 208-344-1885, smokydavis.com

$11.59 PER POUND PORK LOIN

$19.79 PER POUND BEEF JERKY $2 ORIGINAL DOUGH (subtle garlic and onion flavor)

PAMELA’S BAKERY 360 S. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-938-6585, pamelasbakery.com $9.29 PER POUND PEPPERONI

$4.50 TRIPLE SCOOP CONE (raspberry, strawberry cheesecake, huckleberry)

BREWFORIA BEER MARKET 3030 E. Overland Road, Ste. 100, Meridian, 208-888-7668, brewforia.com $7.95 FUDGY FLOURLESS CAKE

$12.98 SMOOTH TRUFFLE GIFT BOX

$400 VILMART GRAND CELLIER

$7.95 SWEETHEART CUPCAKE

$14.50 PER POUND PEANUT BRITTLE

LEE’S CANDIES $8-$24 GROWLER

$7.95 LIME CHEESECAKE

840 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-344-1441, leescandies.com

$12.99 2009 BURGER GRUNER VELTLINER

BOISE CO-OP WINE SHOP 915 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-472-4519, boisecoopwineshop.com

CITY PEANUT SHOP 803 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-433-3931, citypeanut.com

WHAT POTATO? Ditch Idaho’s famous tuber for these Boise food finds DEANNA DARR

S $3.50 PER POUND JAPANESE EGGPLANT

$3 LETTUCE $4 ORIGINAL CARAMEL CORN

ometimes generic grocery store brands don’t cut it. Hell, sometimes the grocery store doesn’t cut it. That’s when it’s time to turn to specialty food retailers. With offerings for those with a sweet tooth to those who want the best cuts of meat, here’s where to shop when you want to charm your dinner guests or just treat yourself to a little sumpin’ sumpin’.

CHOCOLAT BAR $1.50 STROOPWAFFLE

805 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-338-7771, thechocolatbar.com

$4 SALSA

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET

$1.75 AZTEC TRUFFLE

Eighth Street, downtown Boise, April-December

$5.99 PER POUND WASABI SUNFLOWER SEEDS

$3 STRAWBERRIES

$4 BALLARD FAMILY IDAHO PEPPER CHEDDAR CHEESE $25 PER POUND LEMON LAVENDER ALMOND BARK

ZEPPOLE $4 GREEN BEANS

$13 CUCINA DI PAOLO CHUNKY VEGGIE LASAGNA

$3.69 PER POUND FRANK’S VIRGINA REDSKIN PEANUTS

217 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-2149; 983 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-338-1499, zeppolebakery.com

$4.50 ZEPPOLE CIABATTA

FOOD

FOOD

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

Boise Downtown ANGELL’S 909 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-4900, angellsbarandgrill.com One of downtown Boise’s mainstays, Angell’s is known for its steaks and seafood. In warm weather, Angell’s patio is a lush respite in the concrete jungle. Dress it up or go casual. $$$

ASIAGO’S 1002 W. Main St., Boise, 208-323-1469, asiagos.com Innovative Italian pastas, salads, sandwiches, soups and seasonal specials served amid rustic, Italian countryside decor. $$$

BAR GERNIKA 202 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-344-2175, bargernika.com Basque favorites in a dark and cozy little space. Croquettas, chorizo, salomo, paella and a cheese plate that is one of the most popular in town. Don’t forget beef tongue Saturdays. $

THE ORCHARD HOUSE

GET OUT OF TOWN Noteworthy far-flung grub

T

he Treasure Valley is hardly the only place to find great food in Idaho. This short list of restaurants highlights just a few that are well worth a little extra drive time.

Caldwell/Marsing THE ORCHARD HOUSE 14949 Sunnyslope Road, Caldwell, 208-459-8200, theorchardhouse.us When you’ve worked up a hunger wine tasting, this is your food stop. $$

THE SANDBAR RESTAURANT 18 Sandbar Ave., Marsing, 208-896-4124, sandbarriverhouse.com Located on the banks of the Snake River for more than 40 years, the eatery has an extensive menu highlighted by steak and seafood dishes. $$$

PIONEER SALOON 320 Main St., Ketchum, 208-726-3139, pioneersaloon.com Giant steaks, giant bakers and great drinks in a timeless Western joint. $$$

SEGO RESTAURANT AND BAR 131 Washington Ave., Ketchum, 208-928-7878, segorestaurant.com Big-city sophistication in a mountain setting with contemporary American cuisine and a focus on sustainable practices and local products. $$$

McCall THE MILL STEAK AND SPIRITS

Hailey/Ketchum CK’S REAL FOOD 320 Main St., Hailey, 208-788-1223, cksrealfood.com A casual eatery featuring local, organic, sustainable and seasonal fare inspired by world cuisine. $$

324 N. Third St., McCall, 208-634-7683, themillmccallidaho.com Old school meat and potatoes done the right way. $$$

SALMON RIVER BREWERY 300 Colorado St., McCall, 208-634-4772, salmonriverbrewery.com “Brewshi,” Mongolian bowls, brats and burgers. And the big “b”: beer. Made in house, of course. $

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BARDENAY 610 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-426-0538, bardenay.com The beer and liquor selection at the country’s first restaurant distillery has to be seen to be believed. The lively atmosphere and full menu make it all the better. $$

THE BASQUE MARKET 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com One part market, one part deli and a healthy dash of catering, the Basque Market offers tapas and wine happy hours, as well as fantastic lunches with sandwiches and homemade soups. $

BERRYHILL & CO. RESTAURANT 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com Lunch is cosmopolitan comfort food. Dinner pulls out all the stops. It’s all about a nice bottle of wine and relaxing meal from a menu of local and global flavors. $$$

BIG CITY COFFEE 1416 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-345-3145, bigcitycoffeeld.com This coffee shop serves a surprisingly large and creative breakfast and lunch menu as well as bakery items. $

BITTERCREEK ALE HOUSE 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-1813, bittercreekalehouse.com Enjoy a microbrew and gourmet hamburger at this distinguished Northwestern pub focusing on local and sustainable foods. $$

BOMBAY GRILL 928 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-7888, bombaygrillonline.com A smoking deal on a smoking delicious Indian lunch buffet and a full menu at dinner. $$

BRICK OVEN BISTRO 801 N. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3456, brickovenbistro.com This Grove hot spot with everything homemade has some of the best comfort food around. $

CHANDLERS STEAKHOUSE 981 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com Chandlers is for the finediner in you, with melt-in-yourmouth filet mignon, porterhouse and Kobe cuts, as well as an appetizer menu that offers oysters, beef carpaccio and escargot. It’s as popular a stop for cocktails as for dinner. $$$

COTTONWOOD GRILLE 913 W. River St., Boise, 208-333-9800, cottonwoodgrille.com Cottonwood is an upscale yet unpretentious restaurant specializing in scratch-made food infused with local ingredients. One of the best patios in town—it’s on the Greenbelt. $$$

DONNIE MAC’S TRAILER PARK CUISINE 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, donniemacgrub.com Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine may be down-home, but it’s not from the trailer park. Burgers, chicken sandwiches, fries, some very tasty fry sauce, mac ’n’ cheese and breakfast. $

FLATBREAD COMMUNITY OVEN 615 W. Main St., Boise, 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com Woodfired pizza with an impressive list of toppings. Full bar, two happy hours. $$

FRONT DOOR 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9201, thefrontdoorboise.com The pizza is great but wait until you see the selection of import and microbrew taps. $

GOLDY’S BREAKFAST BISTRO 108 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-345-4100, goldysbreakfastbistro.com A constant winner of Boise’s best breakfast destination. Generous portions of eggs, hash, cinnamon rolls and more—even lunch. $$

GUIDO’S ORIGINAL NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA 235 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-345-9011, guidosdowntown.com Fold ’em up by the slice, Big Apple style. Viva la slice o’ white. $

HAPPY FISH SUSHI 855 Broad St., Boise, 208-343-4810, happyfishsushi.com A wide array of sushi rolls, sashimi and more, including several creative vegetarian options. The martini menu at Happy Fish may be bigger than the sushi menu. $$

LA VIE EN ROSE 928 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-4045, lavieenrosebakery.com A European-style bistro and bakery with fresh-baked French pastries, sandwiches, salads and soups. $$

LE CAFE DE PARIS 204 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-336-0889, lecafedeparis.com “Casual French food in a relaxed atmosphere.” The food is among Boise’s best: lush, buttery, delicious. Breakfast, lunch and dinner. $$

FALCON TAVERN

LEKU ONA

705 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-947-3111, falcontavern.com This downtown tavern has become a neighborhood pub. Known for hand-pressed burgers and an ample beer selection, as well as appetizers, soups, salads and sandwiches. $

117 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-6665, iparagon.com/lekuona Step into a little piece of Basque culture for lunch or dinner. It has a sophisticated, old-world feel, set right on the corner of Boise’s Basque Block. $$

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FOOD

MIDDLE EAST MARKET

EXPANDING PALATES Boise’s array of ethnic markets offers culinary options TARA MORGAN

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PHOTOGRAPHS LAURIE PEARMAN

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et’s say you’re ready to whip up a pot of tom kha gai soup, when the recipe throws you a curve ball. Where in Boise do you find fresh galangal? These days, there are an assortment of authentic ethnic food markets sprinkled throughout Boise where you can pick up all the random sundries you need for your culinary forays. Here’s a guide to some of BW’s favorite markets, with a list of not-to-be-passedup steals.

AFRICAN MARKET

THE BASQUE MARKET

561 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-322-0210 Though the African Market may be small, the hidden spot off Orchard has a some interesting finds. You can snag everything from plantain flour to pounded yam flour to locally made teff flour. Other neat items include Ketepa Kenyan tea, cassava leaves, goat meat and frozen mature hens. Don’t miss the ginger-, cardamom- and cinnamon-flavored coffee.

608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com Not only does this Basque Block gem offer some of the best sandwiches and soups in town, it also carries a healthy selection of Basque pantry necessities. The shelves are lined with smoked paprika, salmon-stuffed olives and plenty of wine, while the deli case is filled with Basque cheeses and cured meats. Don’t leave without a frozen batch of homemade vegetarian croquettas. A little known secret: If you call ahead of time, they’ll throw those puppies in the deep fryer for you.

ASIA MARKET 9975 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-4502 Located on Fairview near Five Mile, Asia Market is a good option if you’ve got a hankering for gyoza or spring rolls. In fact, Asia Market has one of the more notable spring roll wrapper selections in town. Other items of interest include 98-ounce cans of coconut milk, shark fin soup, shrimp chips and sweet basil seeds.

BOSNIA EXPRESS (BOEX) MARKET 4846 Emerald St., Boise, 208-433-9955 While the selection might be similar to Little Russia—lots of Eastern European candy, chocolate and cookies—BoEx sets itself apart

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in a number of ways. Not only does it serve hot gyros, the joint also has an accompanying bar and nightclub. And if you’re in the mood for pate, BoEx has everything from pork to chicken to vegetarian. Be sure to pick up a loaf of pillowy house-baked bread to go with it.

CAMPOS MARKET 413 W. Orchard St., Boise, 208-650-0665 If you want Mexican meats, Campos is your carniceria. The meat counter in the back of the store glistens with various shades of red: adobada de Puerco, thinly sliced bistec, carne asada, pigs feet and tons of chorizo. The cerveza selection ain’t half bad either: Sol, Bohemia, Pacifico, Carta Blanca. If you’re grabbing meat for a barbecue, don’t forget the pinata.

CHINA MARKET 3919 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-0292 China Market’s see-your-reflection-clean floors, flooding natural light and softly humming music all make for a pleasant shopping experience. While the store has a less impressive produce selection than Orient Market, it does win on the sauce front. Shelves are stocked with bottles of tamari, shoyu, fish sauce, tom yum paste, Sriracha and peanut sauce. Also, check out the tea selection.

INDIA FOOD 602 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-387-0000 With its humming refrigerated coolers, crowded aisles and wafting tufts of pungent spices, India Food can seem intimidating at first blush. The shelves are crammed with an assortment of dried goods—apricots, white mulberries, whole chickpeas, lentils—while the coolers are stocked with items like frozen samosas, pakoras and ice cream. The real draw, though, is the array of spices, like ground cardamom, cloves, turmeric, white pepper and white chili powder. Don’t miss the best curry powder blend we’ve found anywhere in town. Seriously, this stuff will make you a curry God.

KABUL MARKET 5751 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-322-6660 Don’t let the name fool you, the Kabul Market stocks a wide array of both Indian and Middle Eastern foodstuffs. The small refrigerated case contains sheep’s milk cheeses, cheese spreads and pre-made baklava, while the aisles are lined with bulgur wheat, basmati rice and packaged spices like tandoori seasoning or the intriguing mountain ash tree fruit. If you want to make some killer summer cocktails, pick up a bottle of orange blossom water or quince lemon syrup.

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FOOD AFRICAN MARKET

INDIA FOOD

LACANTINA SOCIALE

ORIENT MARKET

707 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-377-0224, lacantinasociale.com This addition to Boise’s downtown market scene specializes, above all, in Italian wine. The shop’s Sicilian owner Giuseppe Veneziano carries an array of southern and northern Italian wines and offers weekly tastings. After you’ve picked out the perfect barbara d’alba, stock up on unique Italian cheeses, gnocchi, pesto, sun-dried tomatoes, fine olive oils and lady-fingers.

4806 Emerald St., Boise, 208-342-5507 One of the largest Asian markets in town, Orient Market is the best spot to snag hard-tofind Asian produce. Whether you’re looking for yucca, enoki mushrooms, bok choy, lotus root, daikon or bitter melon, Orient Market is the goto place. And in addition to baking flaky bread, Orient Market also boasts a seafood department with heads-on whole fish, quail eggs and even vegetarian kidney.

THANA’S LITTLE WORLD MARKET LITTLE RUSSIA INTERNATIONAL FOODS 10390 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-375-1046 For those with a soft spot for imported sweets, Little Russia is your motherland. The small store has an array of candies and chocolates, all labeled in Russian. The selection meanders to jarred veggie spreads, pickled veggies, mushrooms and an entire aisle of cookies and wafers. The cooler offers a limited quantity of frozen pierogies and kefir, while the deli counter boasts salami and cured meats.

MIDDLE EAST MARKET 5811 W. Franklin St., Boise, 208-890-2183 Every time we’ve swung into the Middle East Market for some inexpensive tahini, there’s a cluster of jovial dudes yacking it up at the cash register. Whether you’re looking for baking dates, grape leaves, packaged bulgur wheat, pistachios, green olives or canned fava beans, the staff at Middle East Market is more than willing to help you find what you need.

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4109 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-331-3033, thanasworldmarket.com Thana’s offers a sizable collection of dried, frozen and fresh goods for every kind of Asian and South Asian cuisine you could attempt. Thana’s is a one-stop ethnic foods destination. Whether you want frozen duck feet, onion paratha, halal breakfast beef, date syrup or Egyptian watermelon seeds, you’re covered.

TRES BONNE CUISINE 6555 Overland Road, Boise, 208-658-1364, tresbonnecuisine.com Barbara and Tom Haines, former owners of Tres Bonne Cuisine, serve up strong brews and meaty Eastern European fare with a delightful dash of sass. In addition to an assortment of Polish, Czech, Croatian, Lithuanian, Austrian, Russian, Estonian, Ukrainian, Belgian and German beers, the market and restaurant also boasts an array of deli meats and packaged miscellany—cookies, candies, crackers, canned goods. Stop by for country-themed dinners on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays.

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FOOD

GLENN LANDB ER G

BAGUETTE DELI

LOCK, STOCK & BARREL

SHIGE

YOI TOMO

1100 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-336-4266, lsbboise.com A Boise staple featuring some of the most well-reputed steaks and prime rib in town. $$$

100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 215, Boise, 208-338-8423, shigejapanesecuisine.com A compound of three restaurants offers traditional rolls in the sushi restaurant; tepanyaki at the steakhouse; and Japanese-style filet mignon on the fine-dining patio. $$

405 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-344-3375, yoitomo.us Best reason to go: all-youcan-eat sushi. $$

SOLID

4903 Overland Road, Boise, 208-424-8890 Andrade’s serves some of the most rave-worthy Mexican fare in town. $

MAI THAI 750 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8424, maithaigroup.com The trendy destination for martinis and plates of pad Thai. $$

MOON’S KITCHEN CAFE 712 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-385-0472, moonskitchen.com Founded in 1955, Moon’s has some of the best breakfast and milkshakes in town. $

PHO NOUVEAU 780 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-367-1111, phonouveau.com Vietnamese comfort food with cha gio, big bowls of pho and deli sands. $$

PIE HOLE 205 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-778, pieholeusa.com Pie Hole is slowly taking over the world with its giant slices. $

PIPER PUB & GRILL 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-2444, thepiperpub.com Perched above Eighth Street, the Piper serves creative pub fare. $$

RED FEATHER LOUNGE 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-429-6340, justeatlocal.com/redfeather A wine haven paired with local driven cuisine and righteous cocktails. $$$

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405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620 Two giant patios for lunch, dinner and late-night breakfast from a Northwest-focused menu. $$

TABLEROCK BREWPUB AND GRILL 705 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-0944, tablerockbrewpub.com Downtown’s only microbrewery pours a selection of handcrafted drafts. Great sandwiches and entrees go with signature brews. $$

TAJ MAHAL RESTAURANT 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 222, Boise, 208-473-7200, tajmahalofboise.com Indian food lunch buffet with Greek options and an impressive beer selection. $$

WILLI B’S SANDWICH SALOON 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com Lunch specials are homemade and include hot and cold sandwiches and sweets. Home of the $4 martini. $

YEN CHING 305 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-384-0384, yenchingboise.com Yen Ching isn’t fancy Chinese food but it has an air of class nonetheless. $

Boise Bench ANDRADE’S

BAD BOY BURGERS 815 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-331-1580 This burger joint offers classic walk-up/drive-thru service plus some tasty surprises. $

BAGUETTE DELI 5204 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-336-2989 Choose from 18 sandwiches, as well as spring rolls and French pastries at the Vietnamese deli. $

CASANOVA PIZZERIA 1204 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-330-3535, casanovapizzeria.com What it lacks in curb appeal, it makes up for with innovative pizza. Order any pie half and half. $$

CHIANG MAI THAI 4898 W. Emerald St., Boise, 208-342-4051 Traditional and authentic Thai food named after the infamous Thai cuisine capital. $$

PATTY’S BURGER TIME 1273 S. Orchard St., Boise, 208-424-5073 The only Idaho Preferred fastfood restaurant and a full menu for all day dining. $ W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

FOOD W W W.B O IS E W E E K LY. COM

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DISTINCTIVE DOZEN Dishes that will keep you coming back for more PHOTOGRAPHS LEILA RAMELLA-RADER

S

ometimes, all it takes is a single dish to inspire undying devotion to a restaurant. Sure, we might make a show out of looking at the menu, but deep down, we know we’re going to order the same thing every time. Here’s a few must-try dishes in the Treasure Valley. If you haven’t had them yet, now’s the time.

ICE CREAM POTATO

FINGERSTEAKS

Westside Drive In, 1939 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-2957, cheflou.com When traveling outside the state, Idahoans have to deal with one response whenever they say where they are from: “Potatoes!” It’s hard to escape the ubiquitous spud, so why not own it? And when we say own it, we mean make it a ridiculous frozen dessert. Westside Drive In’s ice cream potato is the pinnacle of this quest. It starts on a foundation of vanilla bean ice cream formed in the shape of Idaho’s favorite tuber. The faux tater is rolled in cocoa powder, split open, given a dose of chocolate sauce and topped with whipped cream. The result is a dessert in disguise.

Lindy’s Steak House, 12249 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-375-1310 If you ask for a fingersteak anywhere outside of Idaho, you’re probably going to get some funny looks. The Gem State doesn’t have many claims to fame as far as food goes, but the fingersteak proudly holds the title of Idaho original. For those uninitiated in the ways of the fingersteak, they are basically a beef version of chicken strips. First-timers should do it right by heading to Lindy’s Steak House, which uses prime strips of steak coated in seasoned breading, then fried under pressure using a broaster. In true Idaho fashion, fingersteaks are served with cocktail sauce since the horseradish adds just the right kick. Hold your fingersteaks proudly, Idahoans.

MOLCAJETE El Gallo Giro, 482 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-5169, elgallogirokuna.com If a portion of a dish’s appeal comes from presentation, then the molcajete at El Gallo Giro in Kuna is the cuisine equivalent of fireworks on the Fourth of July. The molcajete itself is a three-legged bowl made of volcanic stone. But in this little Ada County eatery, it becomes its own genre of dish, one that arrives so hot that its contents are sputtering and spitting. There’s no disappointment for diners who delve into the depths of the molcajete, where rich sauces that balance earthy and spicy commingle with tender shrimp, chicken, steak or—for the adventurous, tongue—and thick slices of peppers, onions and mushrooms.

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(SPICY) LAMB GRINDER Bar Gernika, 202 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-344-2175, bargernika.com Gernika has three versions of a French dip, each busting at the seams with sliced lamb, bell peppers, mushrooms and onions, sided with a lamb au jus. Those who can’t take the heat get the lamb grinder topped with Swiss. Those who like a swift kick in the gut order the spicy grinder, which punches it up with the help of Pepper jack cheese and jalapenos. For the few who like it to hurt, there’s a “secret” lamb grinder preceded by the words “extra spicy”— the extra comes courtesy of Sambal, crushed red peppers and Sriracha. Better order an extra kalimotxo, too. W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

Red Feather Lounge, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-3119, justeatlocal.com Consider yourself officially let in on a serious foodie secret: oatmeal souffle. The pastry chef at Red Feather Lounge keeps these things in high demand by not only making them liplicking good but by making so few every week that they’ve become highly sought after. In other words, if you dilly dally getting to breakfast, you might be souffle out of luck.

BREAKFAST NACHOS Focaccia’s, 404 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-322-2838, focaccias.com A drizzle of sour cream sauce. Crispy wonton chips. A few simple ingredients turn a frat boy’s hangover helper into gourmet morning repast. Focaccia’s breakfast nachos are an ingenious reconstruction of a dish not often—not ever—associated with fine dining. A large, white, square ceramic bowl holds a base of crispy, pale wonton chips, a generous helping of spicy pot beans, a fluffy pile of scrambled eggs and a cool scoop of pico de gallo, finished off with drizzly lines of tangy sour cream sauce like celebratory white streamers. This is a breakfast dish worth celebrating.

SCONES Merritt’s Country Cafe, 6630 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-9982, merrittscafe.com Sometimes, you need to push away the scrawny, low-fat, no-carb voice in your head and cock your ear toward the greasy, fried, slathered-in-butter belching and bellowing that you’ve been ignoring. At Merritt’s, “Home of the Famous Scone,” the trembly, eatyour-vegetables orders coming from your conscience will be squelched when your eyes land on the air-mattress of fried dough set before you. Your gray matter may try to issue a weak protest in support of your well being, but once you spread the butter and powdered sugar around and add a big glob of honey to your scone, your tastebuds will suddenly be in charge. Don’t fight it.

THE BOURGEOIS Boise Fry Company, 111 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-495-3858, boisefrycompany.com There is something equally decadent and also down-to-earth about a brown paper bag filled with piping hot Yukon gold french fries, cooked in duck fat and liberally sprinkled with black truffle salt. Dip those bad boys in chipotle aioli or blueberry ketchup and you’ll discover how glamorous a simple spud can be.

GRILLED POLENTA Highlands Hollow Brewhouse, 2455 Harrison Hollow Lane, Boise, 208-343-6820, highlandshollow.com OK, nachos are rad, that’s a given. Now imagine a plate of nachos— black beans, diced red onion, sour cream, guacamole, pepper jack W W W.B O IS E W E E K LY. COM

cheese—and replace the tortilla chips with thick, smoky, cheesy wedges of cornmeal polenta and a drizzle of ancho chili sauce. Whoa. This calorie-laden creation is the grilled polenta at Highlands Hollow Brewhouse. Take one gooey bite, wash it back with a glug of housebrewed Hippie Shake and you’ll toss out your gym membership and invest in a pair of elastic sweat pants. Gluttony never felt so righteous.

FOOD

OATMEAL SOUFFLE

BUCKET OF CLAMS Ben’s Crow Inn, 6781 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-342-9669 Whether you’re a Greenbelt biker looking to rest your sweaty legs or a sunburned river rafter fresh out of cold ones, Ben’s Crow Inn is a welcoming respite in the middle of BFE. And, in addition to being known for the patio, classic rock jukebox and horseshoe pits, Ben’s Crow Inn is also renowned for its fresh clams. For those who wince at the thought of consuming shellfish from a biker shack off dusty Warm Springs Road near Boise city limits, regulars have three words: more for us. Ordered in either 1-and-one-fourth pound or the 3-and-a-half pound size, the Bucket of Clams at Ben’s Crow Inn frequently sells out on the weekends. Served up simple—a spray of lemon, a dunk of butter—the BOC also comes with a side of crisp, rulersized potato wedges. If oysters are more your style, be sure to throw back a fresh oyster shooter—if you can fit the massive little monster in your mouth, that is.

TOWER OF TUNA Chandlers Steakhouse, 981 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com If Rapunzel were trapped in a Tower of Tuna, the long-locked lass wouldn’t want a prince charming to rescue her. A cylindrical mound of fresh ahi and hamachi tuna, avocado, red onion and diced tomato garnished with red and green sauce dollops and topped with two brittle sesame crisps, the Tower of Tuna at Chandlers Steakhouse is what foodie fairy tales are made of. Add in the swanky, blue-lit ambience of Chandlers—and a perfectly balanced 10-minute martini from mixologist Pat Carden—and it’s enough for any princess to let down her hair.

THE SHANK Gino’s Italian Ristorante, 3015 W. McMillan Road, Meridian, 208-887-7710 Though “the shank” implies some singular superiority, Gino’s actually offers not one but three varieties of shank, each of which rightly lays claim to the title of “the shank” as if it were the one, the only. Go traditional Italian with the osso buco shank. The lamb choice is familiar territory, but smoked boar is a walk on the wild side. An hours-long slow cook renders the lean shank meat soft like butta’.

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FOOD

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

YOKOZUNA TERIYAKI

SONO BANA

LULU’S FINE PIZZA

303 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-323-8822, sonobanasushi.com Boise’s oldest sushi joint can still hold its own, even with ginger and adzuki bean ice cream. $$

2594 Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-387-4992, ilovelulus.com New York style pie served here, as well as sushi. $$

TANGO’S SUBS AND EMPANADAS 701 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-322-2090, tangos-empanadas.com Boise’s only empanada destination also serves subs and dulce de leche churros. $

1512 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-323-4688 One of the best burrito/fusion/bar joints in town. This Hyde Park eatery is a popular place to chill with friends. $

State Street

YOKOZUNA

FLYING PIE PIZZARIA

824 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-377-3064, yokozunateriyaki.com Contemporary, fast Japanese food including yaki soba and rice bowls. $

4320 W. State St, Boise, 208-384-0000, flyingpie.com A Boise institution with handtossed pies. $$

North Boise CAFE VICINO 808 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-472-1463, cafevicino.com Serving fine, innovative cuisine with a focus on European specialties. Menu changes seasonally. $$$

FANCI FREEZ 1402 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-8661 Shakes, malts and sundaes made Fanci Freez a Boise favorite. $

HIGHLANDS HOLLOW BREWHOUSE 2455 Harrison Hollow Lane, Boise, 208-343-6820, highlandshollow.com Catering to the outdoors crew with in-house taps and one of the North End’s most popular menus. $$

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PARRILLA GRILL

THE GREEN CHILE 5616 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-0103, thegreenchileboise.com Southwestern cuisine that’s all about green and red chili and huge portions. $

MADHUBAN 6390 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-8215, madhubanindiancuisine.com A daily lunch buffet and a huge menu including all the Indian favorites. A great place for vegetarians. $$

MAZZAH 1772 W. State St., Boise, 208-333-2566, mazzah-id.com Visit the Mediterranean over a meal. Gyros, hummus and falafel on the quick. $

SMOKY MOUNTAIN 1805 W. State St., Boise, 208-387-2727, smokymountainpizza.com Traditional pizza and pasta close to everywhere. $$

East Boise BIG JUDS 1289 Protest Road, Boise, 208-343-4439, bigjudsboise.com Burgers as big as your head and a wall of fame for those who dare to down the 1-pound Big Jud. $

BOISE FRY COMPANY 111 Broadway Ave., Ste. 111, Boise, 208-495-3858, boisefrycompany.com One would hope that it has great fries. It does, and the burgers ain’t bad, either. Local favorites include purple fries and bison burgers. $

ONO HAWAIIAN CAFE 2170 S. Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-429-6800, onocafe.net The flavors of Hawaii, from pupus to satays. Plus spam musubi, shoyu poke and kalua pig. $$

TAVERN AT BOWN CROSSING 3111 S. Bown Way, Boise, 208-345-2277, tavernatbown.com Enjoy a bottle of wine and a steak, or sushi and a martini. $$

West Boise CHADDER’S 535 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, 208-658-5053, chaddersusa.com The menu is brief—burgers and a grilled cheese— but the only thing that has ever been frozen is the ice cream for the shakes. $

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FOOD

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

MISS TAMI’S TEA COTTAGE

DELSA’S ICE CREAM PARLOUR 7923 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-377-3700 Start with a burger or a sandwich but save room for homemade ice cream. $

FRESH OFF THE HOOK 507 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, 208-322-9224, freshoffthehookseafood.com Gourmet seafood in a casual setting. It’s a great place for fresh and inexpensive. $$

PIZZALCHIK 7330 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-7757, pizzalchik.com Perfect salads, plus original pizzas and chicken roasted in a stone-hearth oven. $$

PAMELA’S BAKERY

GELATO CAFE

360 S. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-938-6585, pamelasbakery.com In addition to killer weekend breakfast, Pamela’s offers hot and cold sandwiches and salads for lunch. And everything is homemade. $

2053 E. Fairview Ave., Meridian, 208-846-8410, gelatocafeofidaho.net Gelato, coffee, sushi, pizza, sandwiches, gyros, martinis ... pick your poison. $

SEASONS BISTRO 1117 E. Winding Creek Road, Eagle, 208-939-6680, seasonsdelicatering.com Bistro-style lunch and dinner with an emphasis on New Orleans favorites. $$

Garden City

3019 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-658-1533, sockeyebrew.com Sockeye is the serious beer connoisseur’s pub. The menu is pub fare with a healthy bent. $$

Eagle

3132 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-342-4161, stagecoachboise.com A Boise staple. The woodlined bar and restaurant serves strong drinks and big steaks. $$

Kuna EL GALLO GIRO

BELLA AQUILA 775 S. Rivershore Lane, Eagle, 208-938-1900, bellaaquilarestaurant.com The riverside restaurant boasts impeccable attention to detail and serves a selection of Italian fare. $$$

482 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-5169, elgallogirokuna.com Dishes are huge and span Tex-Mex to authentic. $

Meridian

CAFE RUSSIAN BEAR 600 S. Rivershore Lane, Ste. 160, Eagle, 208-939-1911, caferussianbear.com Every single thing on the menu is made from scratch: borscht, Russian crepes, beef stroganoff, potato pancakes. $$

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3015 McMillan Road, Ste. 108, Meridian, 208-887-7710 Traditional Italian dining and super secret, super delish bread dipping sauce. $$$

JAKER’S 3268 E. Pine St., Meridian, 208-288-0898, jakers.com Casual but classy family dining with nightly specials. $$

MISS TAMI’S COTTAGE STAGECOACH INN

SOCKEYE

GINO’S

EPI’S BASQUE RESTAURANT 1115 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-884-0142 Top-notch Basque cuisine in a homey atmosphere. Meals are served family-style. $$$

1030 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-888-1770, misstamis.com Following the tradition of tea as a meal. Great lunches and weekend brunch. $$

Nampa BRICK 29 BISTRO 320 11th Ave. S., Ste. 100, Nampa, 208-468-0029, brick29.com Fancy takes on common food with serious focus on locally sourced produce. $$

LA BELLE VIE 220 14th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-466-0200, labellevienampa.com A little bit of France in the middle of Nampa. $$

MONA LISA 102 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-442-1400, mlfondue.com An atmospheric fondue restaurant with an intimate setting. This isn’t just fine dining—it’s decadent. $$$ W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

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BARDENAY

BOISE BOOZE The city’s unique cocktail culture TARA MORGAN PHOTOGRAPH LAURIE PEARMAN

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isco. Mole bitters. Lillet Blanc. Cocktail menus across the Treasure Valley overflow with unconventional ingredients. Whether Boise bartenders are adding unique twists to classics or shaking up their own concoctions, they know how to serve it up knock-you-down strong. But what do the local gourmands guzzle? We asked some mixologists about the most “quintessentially Boise” cocktails on their menus. Here, little lushes, is what we sussed out. Red Feather Lounge is one of Boise’s premiere cocktail cantinas. With an ever-changing list of drinks made from locally sourced ingredients, sauntering up to the bar at Red Feather is always an experiment in innovation. Still, a select few cocktails, like the rose- and cucumber-laced Mona Ramsey, have become Red Feather classics. “The Mona Ramsey is far and away our most popular local cocktail, made with Square One organic cucumber vodka. It’s probably our best in-house creation using local ingredients,” said Red Feather bartender Mark Allen. Voted Best Local Bartender in BW’s Best of Boise three years running, Allen also has his own personal fave: The Gaspar. “It’s basically a classic gin martini made slightly wet in the classic style with more vermouth and parfait amour, which is an orange lavender liqueur,” said Allen. Another joint that sources its spirits locally—as in straight-fromthe-still-in-the-back-room local—is restaurant and distillery Bardenay. Though a few of the sprawling Basque Block eatery’s cocktails can get a little wacky, they mostly keep it classy with a dash of sass. “We sell more mojitos than any other drink,” said Bardenay’s Patrick Kalange. “But one of the drinks that I think is much better is the Basil Instinct. It’s a gin-based drink with gin, an orange liqueur called Citron, fresh lime sour and fresh lemon sour with muddled basil.” Down the street at Pair, a mirrored upscale lounge known for its innovative infused vodkas, one of the popular Idaho cocktails blends two of the above trends: mojitos and local liquor. “I would probably say our most ‘Boise’ cocktail is the Idaho mojito. It’s our version of the mojito which is made with 44 North, which is an Idaho vodka,” said bartender Jen Koble. “And instead of soda water, we top it off with champagne.” At the Linen District’s retro chic hotel bar, The Modern, bartender Michael Bowers takes a more studied approach to the joint’s top cocktails, breaking the menu into three categories: the short and boozy, the up and fruity, and the long and refreshing. “For the short and boozy, the Dorothy Parker is quintessentially a Modern beverage. It’s Plymouth gin and Dubonnet Blanc infused with chamomile, cardamom and anise,” said Bowers. “It’s one of our most enduring beverages, and it’s quite tasty and very summery.” Want to know what Bowers recommends for the up and fruity or the long and refreshing? Pull up a chair at The Modern’s sleek wood bar and tell him Boise Weekly sent you. You’re welcome.

NIGHTLIFE

KARAOKE N IGHTL IFE

Sing your heart out every day of the week MONDAY

44 Club Club Savvy’ s Navajo Room Overland Bar Terry’ s Willi B’ s

TUESDAY

44 Club Club Savvy’ s Cricket's Liquid Lucky Dog Navajo Room Overland Bar Shorty’ s Saloon Terry’ s Willi B’ s

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

44 Club Club Savvy’ s Ha’ Penny Navajo Room Overland Bar Shorty’ s Saloon Sin Terry’ s

44 Club Club Savvy’ s Humpin' Hannah's Navajo Room Overland Bar The Plank Quarter Barrel Terry’ s Willi B’ s

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

44 Club Club Savvy’ s Jo's Sunshine Lounge Navajo Room Nut House Overland Bar Sam’ s Place Terry’ s Willi B’ s

SUNDAY

44 Club Club Savvy’ s Cricket's Hooligans Pub Navajo Room Overland Bar Sam’ s Place Terry’ s

44 Club Bad Irish Balcony Club Savvy’ s Jim’ s Alibi Liquid Navajo Room Overland Bar The Ranch Club Terry’ s

44 CLUB

CRICKET’S

JIM’S ALIBI

LUCKY DOG

THE PLANK

SHORTY’S SALOON

4340 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-0693 Most Popular Song: “Picture” by Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow

1228 Oakland Ave., Boise, 208-344-6235 Most Popular Song: “Friends in Low Places” by Garth Brooks

2710 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-342-9220 Most Popular Song: “Summer Lovin’” from Grease

HA’ PENNY

JO’S SUNSHINE LOUNGE

650 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-336-1790, theplankboise.com Most Popular Song: “Fuck Her Gently” by Tenacious D

5467 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-672-9090, shortyssaloon.com Most Popular Song: “Picture” by Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow

BAD IRISH

2223 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-333-0074, luckydogtavern.com Most Popular Song: “Sweet Transvestite” from Rocky Horror Picture Show

199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, badirish.com Most Popular Song: “Friends in Low Places” by Garth Brooks

855 Broad St., Ste. 250, Boise, 208-343-5568, hapennybridgepub.com Most Popular Song: “Don’t Stop Believin’” by Journey

1115 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-376-2700, jossunshinelounge.com Most Popular Song: “Picture” by Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow

NAJAVO ROOM

QUARTER BARREL

4900 Emerald St., Boise, 208-343-5817 Most Popular Song: “Picture” by Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow

4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430 Most Popular Song: “Crazy” by Patsy Cline

150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com Most Popular Song: “A Whole New World” from Little Mermaid

HOOLIGAN’S PUB

LIQUID

10704 Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-9800 Most Popular Song: “When the Bodies Hit the Floor” by Drowning Pool

405 Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com Most Popular Song: “You Give Love a Bad Name” by Bon Jovi

THE NUT HOUSE

THE RANCH CLUB

12505 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-378-8273, nuthouseboise.com Most Popular Song: “Walk This Way” by Aerosmith

3544 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-7447 Most Popular Song: “Kryptonite” by Three Doors Down

3301 Collister St., Boise, 208-331-8225, statestreetsaloon.com Most Popular Song: “Picture” by Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow

CLUB SAVVY’S

HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S

OVERLAND BAR

SAM’S PLACE

WILLI B’S

3933 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-429-9339 Most Popular Song: “Black Velvet” by Alannah Myles

621 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557 Most Popular Song: “Summer Lovin’” from Grease

3907 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-336-4707 Most Popular Song: “Picture” by Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow

3395 N. Five Mile Road, Boise, 208-376-0074 Most Popular Song: “Dead or Alive” by Bon Jovi

225 W. Fifth St., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com Most Popular Song: “Here I Go Again” by Whitesnake

EL CHEAPO

PITCHERS & PINTS

BALCONY

SIN 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-342-3375, sinboise.com Most Popular Song: “Proud Mary” by Ike and Tina Turner

TERRY’S

LA URI E P EA RMA N

Best bets for the broke or the just plain cheap

1108 W. Front St., Boise, mypitchersandpints.com The exterior may look like a storage shed but with $1 drafts every day, who cares?

QUARTER BARREL BAD IRISH 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, badirish.com Get this: nickel beer. Oh, and live music, trivia and karaoke, too.

4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430 An all-new nonsmoking interior with plenty of sports-bar vibe, live music, $1 PBRs and $1 mystery drinks.

THE LIFT BAR AND GRILL

WILLI B’S

4091 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-3250, theliftboise.com Tuesday is Holy Oly night, with 50-cent Olympia cans, and you can throw back $2 domestics nightly.

225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com Home of the $4 martini and $3 well drinks, Willi B’s is a spot to hit in the pre-party hours.

PITCHERS & PINTS

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CLASSICS Proving that old school has staying power

QUINN’S 1005 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-345-0135 One part family diner, one part ragin’ party. Talk about the best of both worlds.

THE RANCH CLUB 44 CLUB 4340 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-0693 The 44 Club has two things going for it: karaoke and no taps. This is one of Idaho’s mainstays, so if you’re in the mood for an old bar with some local color, belly up.

BEN’S CROW INN LOS BETOS

DINING AFTER DARK Where to slay that late-night hunger FLATBREAD COMMUNITY OVEN

MERRITT’S COUNTRY CAFE

615 W. Main St., Boise, 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com When your night ends downtown before last call, Flatbread Community Oven is a classier way to feed the hunger than the nearest street meat option. Pizza, flatbread, salads and soups. Open Thursday-Saturday until 1 a.m. with a late night happy hour from 9 p.m. until close featuring $5 pizzettas, $5 flatbreads, $5 premium wells, $5 wines and $3 beers.

6630 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-6165, merrittscafe.com Ma and pa diner food open 24 hours a day, seven days a week for your scone, biscuits and gravy, and chicken fried steak fix all on one plate.

FRONT DOOR 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9201, thefrontdoorboise.com You’ll want to save the last beer of the night for Front Door. With a nodomestic policy for the taps, you won’t be able to say no to a beer with your slice. Open Friday and Saturday with a full menu until 11 p.m. and slices only until 2 a.m.

THE LOBBY 760 Main St., Boise, 208-343-3388, thelobbyboise.com The finger food menu comprised almost entirely of fried food won’t do a body good, but it might do your hangover OK. Chicken strips, onion rings, french fries and—if you must go green—fried green beans. Available until late, late.

LONGHORN LOUNGE 458 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-4163 The fryer is on and serving a full menu Monday-Sunday until late. Late for Kuna, anyway.

LOS BETOS 5220 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-658-1185; 6906 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-1494 Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week to sate your burrito cravings. Seriously, burritos bigger than your head.

O’MICHAEL’S PUB AND GRILL 2433 Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-342-8948, omichaelspub.com The North End’s only option for late night food with a full menu of pub grub during ski season until midnight on Friday and Saturday.

6781 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-342-9669 Still offering relief to anyone who considered biking but decided to tie one on instead.

THE BOUQUET 1010 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6605, thebouquet.net A non-smoking facelift hasn’t changed the pool-hall livemusic vibe of this landmark.

CACTUS BAR 517 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-9732 Novice drinkers can learn from the pros here.

3933 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-429-9339 Churching up the karaoke and pool table scene.

JIM’S ALIBI

205 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-7783; 1016 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-424-2225; 726 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-888-0842, pieholeusa.com Keeping it simple with pie for your pie hole. Open until 3 a.m.

2710 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-342-9220 Drinks are cheap, folks are friendly and games are everywhere. Dig the patio.

1005 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-342-9568 Serving a full menu of pub grub Wednesday-Saturday until 3 a.m., Sunday until 11 p.m. and Monday-Tuesday until midnight. (Summer only.)

SOLID 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620 Solid’s reputation for late night chicken and waffles on the same plate has made it destination food after the bars close. Serving late-night breakfast from midnight-4 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.

O’MICHAEL’S PUB & GRILL 2433 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-342-8948, omichaelspub.com It might not be fancy, but the drinks are strong enough to keep skiers and cyclists coming back.

PENGILLY’S SALOON 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344 With a century-old wooden bar, this friendly pub is America’s favorite. Esquire called it one of the best in the U.S.

TWIN DRAGON

PIPER PUB & GRILL

2200 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-344-2141 When only egg rolls and chow mein will get you through until morning, Twin Dragon gets the job done. Open until midnight Sunday-Thursday and 2 a.m. Friday-Saturday. Only to-go order are accepted a half-hour before close.

150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-2444, thepiperpub.com The best Scotch selection in town and some prime balcony real estate.

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STAGECOACH INN 3132 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-342-4161, stagecoachboise.com Serving up strong drinks and big steaks in the venerable bar and restaurant.

SUDS TAVERN 1024 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-345-9656 The epitome of a college bar but good fun on Boise State game days for the non-student.

TABLEROCK BREWPUB & GRILL 705 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-0944, tablerockbrewpub.com Boise’s oldest microbrewery. Give the eye to the Hopzilla.

CLUB SAVVY’S

PIE HOLE

QUINN’S

3544 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-7447 Once a hangout for seniors, it’s now headquarters for the cherry bomb crowd. And the palomino is still there.

TERRY’S STATE STREET SALOON 3301 Collister St., Boise, 208-331-8225, statestreetsaloon.com It may look like it’s about to fall down but the ever-present party keeps the roof raised.

VES’S BROADWAY BAR 1712 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-342-9951 Find another place where drinks are as cheap and as stiff as here. We dare you.

TOP SHELF Where to get it shaken or stirred ANGELL’S GRILL 999 Main St., Boise, 208-342-4900, angellsbarandgrill.com Classy, yet casual. In warm weather, the patio is a lush respite in downtown.

BARDENAY 610 Grove St., Boise, 208-426-0538, bardenay.com The country’s first restaurant distillery. A destination for a good glass of wine or a good martini.

BERRYHILL & CO. RESTAURANT 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com Elegance in and out, especially with a glass of just about anything in hand.

CHANDLERS STEAKHOUSE 981 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com The live jazz music is always on and the cocktails are always fancy.

THE GAMEKEEPER LOUNGE 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com This place was “Mad Men” cool before those guys were born.

HAPPY FISH SUSHI & MARTINI BAR 855 Broad St., Boise, 208-343-4810, happyfishsushi.com The martini menu is longer than the sushi menu and is even more creative.

LOCK, STOCK & BARREL 1100 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-336-4266, lsbboise.com This attractive steak house and well-stocked bar has all the bases covered.

MODERN HOTEL AND BAR 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244, themodernhotel.com A chic lounge and go-to location with 45-rpm record players in each bathroom.

PAIR 603 W. Main St., Boise, 208-343-7034, eatdrinkshare.com Itty bitty on size, but this bar has class coming out its ... well, you know what.

RED FEATHER LOUNGE 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-429-6340, justeatlocal.com/redfeather Candle-lit booths, a twostory wine case and prime people-watching—all with killer cocktails.

TAVERN AT BOWN CROSSING 3111 S. Bown Way, Boise, 208-345-2277, tavernatbown.com Fine wine and a steak or sushi and a martini, all in one classed up location.

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Start off in the wine mecca of Caldwell, where a stop at COYOTES FINE WINES on the creek means a three-for-one tasting. Coyotes is home to the Vale Wine Company, Fujishin Family Cellars and Bitner Vineyards. 217 S. Kimbal, Caldwell. Vale Wine Company, 208-409-8950, valewineco.com; Fujishin Family Cellars, 208-5730793, fujishinfamilycellars.com; Bitner Vineyards, 208-455-1870, bitnervineyards.com.

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If you haven’t gotten enough of BITNER VINEYARDS head out to where the stuff is made. Head west of Caldwell on Homedale Road to the vineyard to get a better appreciation of the wine process. 16645 Plum Road, Caldwell, 208-455-1870, bitnervineyards.com.

3

Continuing with roads named for fruit, head south on Plum Road to Grape Lane to visit KOENIG VINEYARDS. Koenig is better

known for the premium vodkas and eau-de-vie fruit brandies coming out of the distillery, but the winery is no side business. 20928 Grape Lane, Caldwell, 208-455-8386, koenigvineyards.com.

4

Head east to Sunnyslope Road, where the WILLIAMSON ORCHARDS AND VINEYARDS have been in operation since the turn of the 20th century. If you make it beyond the summer fruit stand, the tasting room beckons. 19692 Williamson Lane, Caldwell, 208-459-7333, willorch.com.

5

South of Williamson is the granddaddy of all Idaho wineries, STE. CHAPELLE WINERY. The large tasting room is just the beginning. Check out the series of summer concerts at which you can sit on the lawn, have a bite to eat and down a bottle of vino. 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-453-7843, stechapelle.com.

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Now trek south on Chicken Dinner Road to reach HELLS CANYON WINERY. The winery offers a great view, and Swallow’s Tasting Bar is open most weekends. 18835 Symms Road, Caldwell, 208-454-3300, hellscanyonwinery.com.

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Time to head southwest to Marsing, where DAVIS CREEK CELLARS has a tasting room in downtown. 429 Main St., Ste. 101, Marsing, 208-7942848, daviscreekcellars.com.

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It’s time to head back east, toward Nampa to visit SAWTOOTH WINERY, which has been racking up the awards. 13750 Surry Lane, Nampa, 208-467-1200, sawtoothwinery.com.

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For the final stop, head to Kuna to INDIAN CREEK WINERY, where you can celebrate with another glass. 1000 N. McDermott Road, Kuna, 208-9224791, indiancreekwinery.com.

THE URBAN WINE TOUR

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It’s time to head to Garden City, which is fast becoming a bastion for urban winemaking. SYRINGA WINERY opened its own tasting room in early 2010 and offers regular tasting hours. 3500 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-433-1616, syringawinery.com.

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Closer to the Boise River, CINDER WINERY has been growing by leaps and bounds and now offers regular Saturday tasting hours. 107 E. 44th St., Garden City, 208-407-4347, cinderwines.com.

While FRASER VINEYARDS’ actual vineyard is near Homedale, the winery’s tasting room is conveniently located between Ann Morrison Park and the Boise River. It makes a great starting point for an urban tour. 1004 La Pointe St., Boise, 208345-9607, fraservineyard.com. Head north across the river via Capitol Boulevard and make a stop in Bodo, where SNAKE RIVER WINERY has set up a tasting room. Better yet, it is open every day except Monday and has a selection of retail offerings. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-345-9463, snakeriverwinery.com.

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It’s time to put a little mileage on the odometer and head to Eagle, where WOODRIVER CELLARS beckons with not only a tasting room but an extensive list of live music. 3705 Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-286-9463, woodrivercellars.com.

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The final stop on this urban tour means driving just a little further north to 3 HORSE RANCH VINEYARDS, where the tasting room is open five days a week. 5900 Pearl Road, Eagle, 208-867-9721, 3horseranchvineyards.com.

THE URBAN BEER TOUR

1

Start in Boise’s North End, where HIGHLANDS HOLLOW BREWHOUSE tempts both skiers and cyclists on their way home from a day exploring. The small brewery offers a rotating selection of eight signature beers, including the popular Hippie Shake and Full Moon Stout. There’s also a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. 2455 Highlands Hollow, Boise, 208-3436820, highlandshollow.com.

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Head to downtown Boise where TABLEROCK BREW PUB, the area’s first microbrewery, has been turning out craft beer since 1991. Patrons can try a pint of the pub favorite Hophead IPA or the even hoppier Hopzilla. Summer means the appearance of the Orange Blossom pale ale but watch for seasonals including the Oktoberfest. 705 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-0944, tablerockbrewpub.com.

3

For the final stop, head west to SOCKEYE BREWERY, home of the most widely distributed local IPA in the Treasure Valley: Dagger Falls IPA. While Dagger Falls may have a devoted fan following, beer lovers can also kick back with a pint of the Widowmaker IPA or seasonal creations, including the Winterfest or the Old Devil’s Tooth barley wine. 3019 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-6581533, sockeyebrew.com.

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PAU L HOS EFR OS / IDAHO W INE C OU NTRY, C AX TON 2010

THE RURAL WINE ROUTE

STE. CHAPELLE WINERY

NIGHTLIFE FOR THE DAYLIGHT HOURS Hit the road to explore some of Idaho’s best vintages

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ine tasting is the socially acceptable daytime bar hop. The Treasure Valley happens to be home to a growing number of wineries, which, in turn, means an increasing number of opportunities to sample their creations. Chances are, no matter where an oenophile is in the valley, he or she isn’t far from a tasting room. Those who want to spend an entire day making their way through Idaho’s wine country need go no further than Canyon County, where a roadtrip loop takes visitors to nearly a dozen wineries. In Ada County, a slightly shorter route heads from downtown Boise to Eagle and includes six wineries. While most wineries welcome visitors on Friday and Saturday, many have limited mid-week hours. If in doubt, call ahead. If you’re more into beer, Boise is carrying on the proud Northwestern tradition of fine craft beers. Recently, several Boisebased microbreweries have teamed up to promote Boise as a craft-beer destination by hosting events showcasing the wares of each of the city’s breweries. But a beer lover need not wait for an event to sample the best of the local brewing scene. Take an afternoon and head out on your own pub tour. —Deanna Darr BOISEweeklyANNUAL MANUAL 2010-201151

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HYDE PARK PUB

SUN RAY CAFE

1501 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-336-9260 A pub with finger food, tap brews and that neighborhood feel. Dogs welcome.

1602 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-343-2887 Holding down a busy corner patio in Hyde Park with beer and pizza.

LEKU ONA 117 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-6665, iparagon.com/lekuona A corner sidewalk patio and talkative regulars make this Basque bar popular.

LIQUID LOUNGE / SOLID 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com Live music, late night food and miles of patio in the heart of the party.

LUCKY 13 PIZZA/THE GARAGE 3662 S. Eckert Road, Boise, 208-344-6967, lucky13pizza.com Bring your bike, your dog and a gaggle of kids.

GRAPE ESCAPE

GRAPE GETAWAYS When only vino will do

JUMPIN’ JANET’S 572 Vista Ave., Boise, 208-342-7620 A cozy bar with games and specials aplenty. The staff laughs as hard as they work.

LUCKY DOG GRAPE ESCAPE 800 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-368-0200 Fine wine, fine food and a killer downtown corner patio.

PIAZZA DI VINO 212 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-336-9577 An extensive collection of wines from around the world.

HIDEAWAYS When you need to get away THE BUFFALO CLUB 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811 Anyone who has a hankerin’ for Hank will feel right at home at this bar.

JO’S SUNSHINE LOUNGE 1115 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-376-2700, jossunshinelounge.com Giant bowls of popcorn and ever present blues at this old hotel bar.

2223 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-333-0074, luckydogtavern.com This little gay-friendly bar has great prices, strong pours and a non-smoking lounge with an affable clientele.

NAVAJO ROOM 4900 Emerald St., Boise, 208-343-5817 The Navajo has served up suds and stiff drinks for more than 40 years and remains a low-key place to meet with regulars.

RED EYE BAR AND GRILL 414 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-9797 Red Eye is perfect for losing track of time. It’s the kind of place that’s made for watching a band or NASCAR.

VISTA BAR 813 Vista Ave., Boise The little A-frame has been a watering hole for many a year and keeps its neighborhood bar feel.

WHITE WATER SALOON 1646 N. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-888-3063 This could quite possibly be Meridian’s only real bar. No kids. No food. Light up as you please.

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PRIMO PATIO Drinking al fresco BARDENAY 155 E. Riverside Drive, Eagle, 208-938-5093, bardenay.com Right on the Boise River, serving the distillery’s own hooch. A table on the riverside patio is worth the fight.

FALCON TAVERN 705 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-947-3111, falcontavern.com This downtown tavern has become “Boise’s neighborhood pub” thanks in part to a wide open patio and a full menu with a quality beer selection.

PARRILLA GRILL 1512 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-323-4688 This Hyde Park eatery is a popular place to chill during the halcyon days of summer.

REEF 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9200, reefboise.com You can feel the ocean breeze from the rooftop patio with tiki torches.

’TUDE AND TATTOOS Where the cool kids park 10TH STREET STATION 104 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-344-2677 Concrete stairs lead to this subterranean space with sports memorabilia and enough smoke in the air to set off the fire alarms.

MULLIGANS PUB & EATERY 1009 W. Main St., Boise, 208-336-6998, mulligansbars.com Mulligans offers strong drinks, plenty of bar games and cheap pub grub.

NEUROLUX 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com The most mysterious, eclectic bar in town with stiff drinks that will make you wonder why you ordered another.

BELLA AQUILA 775 S. Rivershore Lane, Eagle, 208-938-1900, bellaaquilarestaurant.com The riverside restaurant boasts one of the best patios around. Kill the summer heat with a Bella Bellini: strawberry vodka, strawberry puree and champagne straight up.

BITTERCREEK ALE HOUSE 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-1813, bittercreekalehouse.com One of the best beer selections in Boise with a prime Eighth Street location.

COTTONWOOD GRILLE 913 W. River St., Boise, 208-333-9800, cottonwoodgrille.com Relax in the elegant surroundings or kick back on the chic riverside patio.

CRESCENT “NO LAWYERS” BAR-GRILL 5500 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-322-9856, no-lawyers.com When they say “no lawyers” they mean it. But the rest of us can swill strong drinks.

YOU’RE WITH THE BAND, RIGHT? THE BOUQUET

THE LINEN BUILDING

SHORTY’S SALOON

1010 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6605, thebouquet.net Americana / Indie rock

1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com Americana / Indie rock

5467 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-6699, shortyssaloon.com Country

BRAWL STUDIO

LIQUID

TOM GRAINEY’S

118 E. 37th St. 12, Garden City Hard-core / Metal

405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com Punk / Rock

109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-2505 Rock

EGYPTIAN THEATRE 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net Indie rock

NEUROLUX

VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com Eclectic

3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com Indie rock

PENGILLY’S

THE VENUE

513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344 Americana / Country

521 Broad St., Boise, 208-919-0011, boisevenue.com Hard-core / Pop

HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557 Rock

KNITTING FACTORY 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, boknittingfactory.com Touring bands

REEF 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9200, reefboise.com Reggae / Hip-hop

You can properly rock out at these venues. For even more live music destinations, as well as weekly show listings, visit boiseweekly.com.

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STUBS SPORTS BAR

THE RED ROOM TAVERN

MCCLEARY’S PUB

CATACOMB CLUB

601 W. Main St., Boise, 208-343-7034 A haven for the tatted, PBRloving crowd. Check out the Betty Ford hangover curing weekend brunch.

9155 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-9910; 604 N. Orchard Ave., 208-853-9910 The State Street pub has a back yard bigger than yours.

204 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-392-7747, catacombclub.com The vibe at this weekend-only club depends on whether it’s hosting a French New Wave dance-a-thon or a feathery Burning Man after-party.

THE NUT HOUSE

SPORTS Finding your bar-stool jock BUSTER’S 1326 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-345-5688; 1396 E. State St., Eagle, 208-938-1800, busterssportsbar.com With TVs blaring sports and waitresses in skimpy outfits, it stays true to its name.

CHEERLEADERS 3541 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-939-9209, cheerleaderssbg.com At this family friendly sports pub, everyone is a fan.

CRICKETS BAR & GRILL 1228 Oakland Ave., Boise, 208-344-6235 You’re likely to see students tossing back cheap beer, playing pool and taking a break from the books.

12505 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-378-8273, nuthouseboise.com With 14 TVs showing all NFL, NBA, MLB and NHL games, it’s definitely a sports bar.

THE OFFICE 6125 E. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-377-2800 Just think: beer in one hand, phone in the other, “Honey, I’m at the office.” No lie.

THE POCKET 1487 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-375-2474 Venture in to this pool hall for a cold brew or a stiff cocktail.

Q’S BILLIARDS 6570 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-322-9122 Q’s is a Boise standard that defines “pool hall.”

LEGENDS SPORTS PUB & GRILL 7609 W. Overland Road, Ste. 100, Boise, 208-377-1819, legendspubandgrill.com Check the score of the game before or after the movies.

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100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-338-6604 China Blue is committed to a party with VIP areas, a bar in the women’s room and the music always turned up.

HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557 It’s the place to get your dance on. Favorite covers come courtesy of the Rocci Johnson Band and nobody parties like Rocci.

MACK & CHARLIES 507 W. Main St., Boise, 208343-5159, mackandcharlies.com Loud music, packed house and plenty of party for all.

SHORTY’S SALOON STUBS SPORTS PUB 3662 Findley Ave., Boise, 208-336-7882, stubspub.com Stubs is a sports-lover’s haven. Every seat allows viewing of the giant TVs. Every seat.

DUTCH GOOSE 3515 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-8887, dutchgoose.com Foosball, darts, pool, horseshoe pits and TVs galore.

CHINA BLUE

DANCE PARTY

5467 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-6699, shortyssaloon.com Where country rules the roost.

SIN 1124 Front St., Boise, 208-342-3375, sinboise.com What happens at Sin, stays at Sin. Party long, dance hard. Repeat.

Shake your ass

TOM GRAINEY’S/ GRAINEY’S BASEMENT

BALCONY CLUB

109 and 107 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-2505 With live music both upstairs and down, you get two different experiences without leaving the building.

150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208336-1313, thebalconyclub.com It may be the fiercest gay bar in town but the straight crowd can’t stay away.

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CULTURE CRUISE Where to find the art Boise hides in plain sight DEANNA DARR | PHOTOGRAPHS LEILA RAMELLA-RADER

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hink Boise lacks art and history? It’s time to start looking around. The city core is home to a surprising amount of public and historical art. Thanks to several different projects funded by the City of Boise, interpretive signs and guides can be found scattered throughout downtown. You can even download a free podcast from the Department of Arts and History’s website to take you on a guided tour of the city. We came up with our own walking tour of downtown treasures, so strap on comfortable shoes for an afternoon of cultural exploration.

1

UNTITLED, Michael Cordell, Sixth and Broad streets

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WATER FOUNTAIN, Capitol Boulevard and Idaho Street

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LINCOLN, Alphonso Pelzer, Capitol Boulevard at Bannock Street

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO BE?, Grant Olsen, Boise City Hall, Main Street side

BOW AND ARROW, Painted sign. Alley between Idaho and Bannock streets off Sixth Street

UNTITLED, Unknown artists, alley between Fifth and Sixth streets off Broad Street

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CYRUS JACOBS-UBERUAGA BOARDING HOUSE, Oldest surviving brick building in Boise, built in 1864. 607 Grove St.

MOTOR CAR, The Letterheads, 9 STEARNS Idaho Street between Sixth Street and Capitol Boulevard

HITCHCOCK BUILDING MURAL, Toby Robin and Fred Choate, 11th and Idaho streets

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SPIRIT OF THE HEALING WATERS, Kerry Moosman, and FREAK ALLEY, alley between Main and Idaho streets off 10th Street

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IDANHA HOTEL, Built in 1900, home of Idaho’s first elevator. Tenth and Main streets

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SPRING RUN, Marilyn Lysohir, 121 Ninth St.

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BOISE TOTEMS, Rod Kagan, Eighth and Idaho streets

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STEUNENBERG, Gilbert Riswold, Capitol Boulevard at Jefferson Street

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IDAHO STATE CAPITOL, Built in 1920, Capitol Boulevard at Jefferson streets

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IDAHO STATE CAPITOL, Built in 1920. Capitol Boulevard and Jefferson Street

C.W. MOORE PARK, Waterwheel, Fifth and Grove streets

4

RIVER OF TREES, Judith and Daniel Caldwell, sidewalk at Ninth and Idaho streets

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UNION BLOCK, Built in 1901. Idaho Street, between Capitol Boulevard and Eighth Street

CENTRAL FIRE STATION, Built in 1903 and once home to horse-drawn fire engines. Sixth and Idaho streets

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ALLEY HISTORY, Kerry Moosman, Ninth Street alley between Bannock and Idaho streets

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SPACE SHIP, Courtyard at State and Seventh streets

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SYDNEY’S NICHE, Rick Thomson, Eighth Street between Main and Idaho streets

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EGYPTIAN THEATRE, Built in 1927. Capitol Boulevard and Main Street

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1867, “THE MINER,” Bernie JestrabekHart, Grove Plaza behind US Bank building

HOSPITALITY AT THE NEZ PERCE, Doug Hyde, Capitol Boulevard and Bannock Street

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BOISE MURAL PROJECT, 50 different murals painted by local artists. Eighth and Bannock streets

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KILGORE TROUT, Marcus and Skyler Pierce, alley off Sixth Street between Grove and Main streets

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18 POSTCARD: A HOMETOWN 10 PENNY GREETING, Mark Baltes, Boise City Hall, Idaho Street side

HOFF BUILDING, Built in 1930, formerly Hotel Boise. Eighth and Bannock streets

SHADOWS, Judith Lombardi, Jefferson Street sidewalk between Eighth and Ninth streets

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HISTORICAL SITE, Boise Chinatown 1 of 3, Dwaine Carver, Capitol Boulevard across from Grove Street

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LAIAK, Ward Hooper, Capitol Boulevard and Grove Street

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UNTITLED, Guy Dill, Wells Fargo Plaza adjacent to Grove Plaza

HOMAGE TO THE PEDESTRIAN, Patrick Zentz, Grove Plaza between Grove fountain and Ninth Street

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GROVE STREET ILLUMINATED, Amy Westover, Grove and Ninth streets

BASQUE HISTORY MURAL, The Letterheads, Capitol Boulevard near Grove Street

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HISTORICAL SITE, Boise Chinatown 2 of 3, Dwaine Carver, Capitol Boulevard and Front Street

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CAPITOL BRIDGE TILES, Unknown, four pillars of the Capitol Boulevard Bridge

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BOISE ART MUSEUM SCULPTURE GARDEN, Julia Davis Park

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LINCOLN, Gutzon Berglum, Idaho Black History Museum, Julia Davis Park

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RIVER SCULPTURE, Alison Sky, Front Street and Capitol Boulevard HISTORICAL SITE, Boise Chinatown 3 of 3, Dwaine Carver, Grove Plaza KEEPSIES, Ann LaRose, Grove Plaza

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I LOVE YOU, Grant Olsen, Front and 11th streets

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PORTAL, Francis Fox, Eighth and Broad streets

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IDAHO ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL, Built in 2002. ANNE FRANK STATUE, Greg Stone, 770 S. Eighth St.

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GREAT BLUES, David Berry, Grove Plaza

ESTHER SIMPLOT, Ann LaRose, Ninth and Myrtle streets

SACAJAWEA AND POMP, Agnes Vincen Talbot, Idaho Historical Museum, Julia Davis Park

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JULIA DAVIS MEMORIAL, Jerry Snodgrass, Rose Garden, Julia Davis Park

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CULTURE

C ULTURE

Sun Valley Center for the Arts

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ichael Chabon, David Sedaris, Gloria Steinem, Junot Diaz. These lit superstars—along with scores of other artists and performers—have all trekked out to the Gem State to participate in exhibitions at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts. The center takes a multidisciplinary approach, augmenting the art in its gallery space with guest lecturers, musical performances, themed classes and workshops. “We try to gauge what is timely, what is contemporary, what types of subjects resonate with people in our community,” said SVCA Executive Director Bill Ryberg. “I’m a firm believer that every community is different; there’s different dynamics in any particular area.” Founded in 1971, the center operates two locations—a main gallery and office in Ketchum and a satellite in Hailey, featuring a classroom in the home where Ezra Pound was born. The center also hopes to open a location in Ketchum with flexible spaces for exhibitions and performances. The center has its programming lined up through December, with a number of big name speakers and rad art thrown into the mix. Here are some of the highlights: “Beam, Board, Breath: An Investigation of Trees,” features work from six artists who look into symbolic and environmental aspects of trees. Sculptural artist Patrick Dougherty’s site-specific massive twig installations are on display in the parking lot across from the Ketchum Post Office through January 2011. From Friday, Sept. 10, through Friday, Nov. 5, the SVCA will feature the exhibit “Water,” exploring water’s impact on the West. On Thursday, Nov. 4, the show will include speaker Maude Barlow, founder of the Blue Planet Project and senior adviser on water to the president of the United Nations General Assembly. Other upcoming speakers include author Sir Salman Rushdie on Friday, Sept. 10, and This American Life radio heartthrob Ira Glass on Saturday, Sept. 25. For more information on classes and other multidisciplinary components on the Sun Valley Center for the Arts upcoming schedule, visit sunvalleycenter.org. —Tara Morgan

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MOUNTAIN ARTS

M a t i n g B e a t l e s (d e t a i l ), 2010. C o u r t e s y t h e a r t i s t a n d M i x e d Gr e e n s , NY.

JOSEPH SMOLINSKI’S MATING BEETLES from the show BEAM BOARD BREATH

ART GALLERIES

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE

ERUDITE

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE

Check out these galleries to get ahead of the bell curve

THE GALLERY AT THE LINEN BUILDING

BOISE STATE: BOISE STATE VISUAL ARTS CENTER 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, boisestate.edu/art

500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com

1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com

PIAZZA DI VINO 212 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-336-9577

VANGUARD

GALLERY 2 Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, boisestate.edu

ARTISTBLUE GALLERY

SUB GALLERY Student Union, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4265800, finearts.boisestate.edu

BASEMENT GALLERY

Art so cool, it’s ice cold 1509 Caldwell Blvd., Nampa, 208-476-3643, artistbluegallery.com

928 W. Main St., Boise, 208-333-0309, basementgalleryboise.com

FRIESEN GALLERIES

DEAD BIRD ART GALLERY

Brandt Center, Northwest Nazarene University, 623 Holly St., Nampa, 208-467-8398, nnu.edu/offices/brandt-center

280 N. Eighth St., Boise, deadbirdgallery.com

GALLERY ALEXA ROSE 280 N. Eighth St., Boise

STUDIO 518 ANNEX

Art may not be the main event, but it’s a nice side dish COLE/MARR GALLERY 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, Boise, 208-336-7630, cmphotoworkshops.com

Just because you’re wearing jeans doesn’t mean you don’t have class BROSCHOFSKY GALLERIES 360 E. Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-4950, brogallery.com

GALLERY 1 Liberal Arts Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, boisestate. edu

ANCILLARY

OMNIFARIOUS

518 Americana Blvd., Boise

VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com

WOMAN OF STEEL GALLERY AND WINE BAR 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632, womanofsteelgallery.com

BROWN’S GALLERY 1022 Main St., Boise, 208-342-6661, brownsgallery.com

FRIESEN GALLERY 320 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-342-4733, friesengallery.com

JACK BURGESS GALLERY 491 E. 10th St., Ste. A3-L, Ketchum, 208-720-4462, jackburgess.com

LISK GALLERY 850 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3773, liskgallery.com

R. GREY GALLERY JEWELRY AND ART GLASS 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com

WARD HOOPER GALLERY 745 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-287-8150, wardhooper.com

WILL CALDWELL GALLERY 400 Sun Valley Road, Ketchum, 208-726-9059, willcaldwell.com

ZANTMAN ART GALLERIES OF SUN VALLEY 360 E. Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-727-9099, zantmangalleries.com

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ZOO BOISE

LEARN SOMETHING Cultural enrichment for your daily diet DEANNA DARR

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PHOTOGRAPHS LAURIE PEARMAN

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DISCOVERY CENTER OF IDAHO hoosing between doing something fun and doing something worthy is not necessarily an either/or proposition. And, in fact, 131 Myrtle St., 208-343-9895, scidaho.org Science, math and engineering take a giant the number of museums and cultural centers in the Treasure leap out of the textbooks at this hands-on museum. From learning about pulleys and Valley is surprising to even many longtime residents. air brakes by pulling yourself 6 feet into the From getting an up-close look at the pioneering history of the state air and then letting go of the rope, to sending to a behind-the-bars view on life as a convict to basking in the glow of stuffed animals spinning in a centrifugal force art to creating your own tornado, local attractions have all the cultural lesson, or even creating your own 7-foot-tall tornado, science gets very interactive for kids vitamins and minerals to do a body good. of all ages. Watch for special events focusing

IDAHO BLACK HISTORY MUSEUM 508 Julia Davis Drive, 208-433-0017, ibhm.org Housed in the historic St. Paul Baptist Church in Julia Davis Park, the Idaho Black History Museum is dedicated to sharing the contributions and history of black cultures in Idaho and around the world. Every year, the museum hosts a Juneteenth celebration, marking the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation. Admission is free but hours are extremely limited, so check before you go.

on astronomy and robots.

BASQUE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER 611 Grove St., 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com It’s not exactly a hidden fact that Boise is home to one of the largest Basque populations outside of Europe. The Basque Museum and Cultural Center is making sure everyone knows what that means through exhibits showcasing the history and contributions of the vibrant culture. That vibrant culture includes the always interesting bar in the Basque Center.

BOISE ART MUSEUM 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org

Boise Art Museum has gone from a volunteerdriven exhibit space to a nationally accredited museum sprawling across nearly 35,000 square feet with multiple galleries, an outdoor sculpture gallery, classrooms and a permanent collection. BAM has been in the middle of Boise’s art world since 1931. These days, the museum is not only the place to take in art, but to learn about it thanks to an evergrowing list of public programs and gallery walks. The facility hosts numerous special exhibits each year, attracting artists from around the world. Keep an eye out for the 2010 Idaho Triennial, one of the largest shows BAM hosts and highlighting the work of some of Idaho’s best artists.

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IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN IDAHO ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL 777 S. Eighth St., 208-345-0304, idaho-humanrights.org Most visitors are surprised to learn that the nation’s only memorial to Anne Frank is in Boise, but with the work of dedicated volunteers, the memorial and the Human Rights Education Center opened in 2002. The open air monument uses quotes from humanitarian leaders to foster discussion and reflection. It’s also one of the few places in the world where the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is on display.

2355 N. Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org The view outside the walls of the Old Idaho Penitentiary is very different now than when prisoners were doing hard time there. Idaho Botanical Garden offers visitors a chance to stroll through numerous gardens, including some dedicated to native plants. The garden hosts special events, including concerts and educational programs for those who want to learn to green-up their own thumbs—all in the shadows of the old prison guard towers.

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IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM

OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY

610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208-334-2120, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-334-2844, history.idaho.gov history.idaho.gov For more than a century, the museum has Who needs Scared Straight when you’ve got been preserving and displaying the history of class field trips to a penitentiary built more Idaho, from the prehistoric animals that once than 140 years ago? The sandstone structure ranged across the area, through the fur trapwas built at the base of Tablerock in 1870 and pers, gold miners, pioneers and current day. served as an active prison for 101 years. Now, For decades, the highlight of any trip to the visitors can leave on their own accord after museum has been touring cell blocks, the two-headed calf, solitary confinement Deja Moo, which and the gallows. The MUSEUM BARGAIN has a place of honor prison is also home in the Western sato the J. Curtis Earl Want to go on a cultural binge? The loon. Visitors can Memorial Exhibit, Boise Museum Association has put totake a plush version showcasing the nagether a deal for those who want to OD of the oddity home tion’s largest collecon educational enrichment. Buy a pass from the gift shop— tion of historic arms for $19 for adults or $9 for children, and because doesn’t and military memoget into up to seven participating culevery child want to rabilia, including tural attractions. The list includes nearly cuddle up with a spears, swords and two-headed, mutatheavy artillery spanevery location featured here, but check ed cow plush toy at ning the Bronze Age boisemuseums.org for details. the end of the day? to modern times. The public will get its first view of the newly renovated pioneer village outside the WARHAWK AIR MUSEUM main entrance beginning in the fall of 2010. 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-465-6446, Watch for rotating exhibits, as well as handswarhawkairmuseum.org on history events, classes and public lectures Housed near the airport in Nampa, the nonthroughout the year. profit museum honors the ser vice of militar y veterans, while highlighting the development of militar y aviation. Visitors can check out MK NATURE CENTER the impressive collection of militar y planes, 600 S. Walnut St., 208-334-2225, including a Curtis P-40N, a Curtis P-40E, a fishandgame.idaho.gov Dr-1 Fokker Tri Plane replica and an F86. Filling a 4.6-acre site in the middle of Boise Militar y uniforms and artifacts are also on is an oasis that teaches visitors about the display, and the museum hosts many educadiversity of Idaho’s water-based wildlife. tional programs. From cutthroat and rainbow trout to chinook salmon and sturgeon, as well as an array of water fowl, songbirds and even mule deer, ZOO BOISE mink and beaver, this is a living museum. 355 Julia Davis Drive, 208-384-4260, zooboise.org Visitors are encouraged to take a walk along Wildlife in Idaho is about more than elk and the streamside trail, which ser ves double bear ... well, at least at the zoo in Julia Davis duty as both an educational exhibit and a Park. The zoo has been expanding and improvwelcome escape in downtown Boise, only ing, and the latest African Plains exhibit has feet from the Greenbelt and Boise River. Just been a major hit with visitors, who can also leave the fishing pole at home. check out the new Zoo Farm.

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ART GALLERIES

STEWART GALLERY

HETEROGENEOUS

LAKE STREET GALLERY

GALLERY DENOVO

402 S. Third St., McCall, 208-634-5225

320 First Ave. N., Ste. 101, Ketchum, 208-726-8180, gallerydenovo.com

When you’re always up for a surprise

MOUNTAIN HOUSE FINE ART GALLERY

ART SOURCE GALLERY 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com

ARTISAN GALLERY 124 E. State St., Eagle, 208-939-5889, artisangalleryidaho.com

402 S. Third St., McCall, 208-634-7710

THREE FORKS GALLERY 1308 Roosevelt Ave., McCall, 208-634-5511, threeforksgallery.com

WHIRLING CIRCLES

DAN LOONEY GALLERY 3408 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-367-9330, imagemaker.org/artist/danlooney

KNEELAND GALLERY 271 First Ave. N., Sun Valley, 208-726-5512, kneelandgallery.com

OCHI GALLERY

PULCHRITUDINOUS

STEWART GALLERY

Bust out the heels and pearls

350 Walnut Ave.; 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com

1110 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com

DIAPHANOUS ANNE REED GALLERY 391 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-3036, annereedgallery.com

Walk carefully; in fact, just don’t move at all

GALERIE BELLE AME

FREDERIC BOLOIX FINE ARTS

BOISE ART GLASS

179 S. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-938-1342, galeriebelleame.com

320 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-8810, boloix.com

FUSIONS GALLERY 32 N. First St., Eagle, 208-938-9339, fusions-idaho.com

GALLERY 601 211 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-336-5899, gallery601.com

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661 Sun Valley Road, Ketchum, 208-726-7585, gilmancontemporary.com

125 Commerce St., McCall, 208-630-3660, whirlingcircles.com

ARTIZEN GALLERY 300 N. Third St., McCall, 208-634-5885, artizengallery.com

GILMAN CONTEMPORARY

GAIL SEVERN GALLERY 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5076, gailseverngallery.com

530 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com

ROLAND ART GLASS GALLERY 220 E. Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-2333,rolandgallery.com W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

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TERRACE DRIVE-IN THEATRE

INDEPENDENT VIEWPOINT Local alternatives to the budget-buster mega-plex JENNIFER HERNANDEZ | PHOTOGRAPH LAURIE PEARMAN

EGYPTIAN THEATRE 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net

THE FLICKS 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com

NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA GRILL 1509 Caldwell Blvd., Nampa, 208-475-2999, nampamovies.com

OVERLAND PARK CINEMA 7051 Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com

TERRACE DRIVE-IN THEATRE 4011 S. Lake Ave., Caldwell, 208-455-1433, terracedriveintheatre.com

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aking in a flick doesn’t have to mean heading to the mega-plex to catch the latest blockbuster. The Treasure Valley is home to a few bastions of cinema where the atmosphere is kept casual, the films eclectic and the ownership independent. At Boise art film mecca, the Flicks, movie goers can enjoy dinner and drinks while watching an indie picture. “Our main goal ... is to show films that you might not otherwise get to see. Independent films. Films for grown-ups,” said owner Carole Skinner. For some families, a movie can be a budget-buster. But those who don’t mind waiting until the buzz has faded can take the clan to Overland Park Cinema, where a $4 adult ticket includes popcorn and a soda. Even better, all Tuesday screenings cost $1.

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Many of the discount cinema’s secondrun films are family friendly so parents can entertain the brood without worrying about wayward f-bombs. One movie theater in Nampa has combined the Flicks’ drink-and-dinewhile-you-watch concept with Overland Park’s second-run plan. At Northern Lights Cinema Grill, inside the Karcher Mall, all shows cost $3. Don’t worry about trying to balance a steak burrito on your lap. This place offers movie-theater seating with freestanding countertops. Alcohol is served after 6:15 p.m., when the venue switches from all ages to adults only. Family is also the theme at 52-yearold Terrace Drive-In Theatre in Caldwell where owner Alice Estrada screens G, PG and PG-13 films. “We couldn’t play Nightmare on Elm

Street here. I don’t want that,” said Estrada. “When you show R-rated movies on a regular basis, you’re going to lose customers because this is a family thing and they won’t bring the kids.” The drive-in is nostalgic for baby boomers who remember being excited to go to the movies in pajamas and falling asleep in the back of dad’s car. Many locals remember seeing their first movie at the ornate Egyptian Theatre in downtown Boise, which was built in 1927. Just admiring the elaborate Art Deco hieroglyphic can be entertaining. Although the Egyptian now serves mainly as a concert venue, occasional movies still fill the screen. Whether you want a dine-in indie film, a discounted flick or drive-in nostalgia, ditch the megaplex and go local. W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

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TRICA

BOISE’S ART BLOCK The beating heart of the creative community DEANNA DARR | PHOTOGRAPH LAURIE PEARMAN

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n a mirror-lined studio, a group of budding ballerinas try to contain their energy while in the building next door, an ensemble of woodwinds is warming up not far from where the city’s next operatic season is being planned. Step down the street and actors are blocking a scene just across the road from where the next world tour is being plotted by a group of modern dancers. It’s just another day in Boise’s Cultural District, an area that forms the beating heart of the city’s arts community. At the core is an area that encompasses a little more than one city block, but the collection of buildings is home to the largest arts organizations in the Treasure Valley: Boise Philharmonic, Opera Idaho, Ballet Idaho, Boise Contemporary Theater, Idaho Shakespeare Festival and Trey McIntyre Project.

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“Boise is lucky to have that core from which all that art and creativity can emanate,” said Julie Numbers Smith, executive director of Ballet Idaho. The artistic congregation was part plan and part magnetism. Numbers Smith, who spent eight years as the executive director of the former Boise City Arts Commission, said two major factors led to what has become Boise’s art block: The creation of the city’s Cultural District, thanks in part to a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the vision of J.R. and Esther Simplot to create a permanent home for the philharmonic, opera and ballet companies. The Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, built in 1992, fills the block between Eighth and Ninth streets and Fulton

and Myrtle streets. The ballet, philharmonic and opera share rehearsal spaces, resources and classrooms, and all have youth programs, where the next generation of artists learn. “[The academy] is forever filled with little ballerinas and musicians and singers,” Numbers Smith said. “The fact that the block is populated with children coming up into those arts is very beneficial to the city.” Tom Bennett, executive director of the philharmonic laughed as he described the daily reminder he gets around 3 p.m. when young dancers in Ballet Idaho classes take to the floor above his head. “That’s what it’s all about,” he said. “It’s about kids and the arts. It’s a nice reminder.” Tom Tompkins, manager of the Simplot Academy and principal violist for Boise PhilW W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

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is Trey McIntyre Project, which looked at more than 100 spaces across the valley in its own search for a permanent home. Regardless of where they looked, they kept returning to downtown. John Michael Schert, executive director and dancer with TMP, said that it’s more about collaboration with the city as a whole and using the energy of the place. “[We wanted to] use the city’s best attributes,” he said. Schert likes the fact that the Cultural District helps offer identity to another neighborhood of Boise, making it more familiar and appealing to the public at large. The physical proximity has spawned several artistic collaborations that some feel may never have happened without the shared space. Many point to Boise Philharmonic Music Director Robert Franz’s series of programs last season that saluted other arts organizations, including Ballet Idaho and ISF. That proximity also makes things easier. “For me, it’s just more of a practical thing. We use the same facilities to rehearse and perform. I like face-to-face meetings, even unannounced ones,” said Mark Junkert, executive director of Opera Idaho. “To be able to go to work in that center—as we’re growing the city and growing the cultural district—is an exciting thing,” Numbers Smith said. By having so many leaders in the arts community in one area raises the public profile of many of the groups. “Arts attract people,” Numbers Smith said. “People want to come and see and be and understand and be around the creativity of what arts can do ... This is a business center for arts, and it’s a part of the downtown vitality. “I go back to the original vision,” Numbers Smith said. “It was more brilliant than people realize.”

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harmonic, calls the relationship “symbiotic.” “It makes perfect sense to put these groups together,” he said. “We know each other, and we’re all contributing to the vitality and the artistic health of the community and the state.” That vitality is partly what drew organizations like Boise Contemporary Theater, Treasure Valley Institute for Children’s Art and Trey McIntyre Project, all of which have either offices or performances spaces neighboring the Simplot Academy. Matthew Cameron Clark, BCT artistic director, said the company was looking for a home not only in downtown but in that specific neighborhood. When the former Frontier Wholesale Warehouse came up for sale, he jumped at the chance to transform it into a theater complete with office space and a black box performance area, renaming it the Fulton Street Theater. BCT quickly partnered with Idaho Shakespeare Festival, which rents year-round office space and uses the stage for summer rehearsals. The space is also home to both Balance Dance Company and Drop Dance Collective, as well as summer theater camps put on by ISF. Being in the same building allows for a lot of collaboration, both formal and informal, Clark said. “A lot of great opportunity comes out of that shared space.” Just around the corner from Fulton Street Theater is TRICA’s temporary home while the nonprofit finishes renovations to a former church in the North End. The children’s arts-education organization uses various spaces around town to hold its classes and camps thanks to community partnerships, said Founding Director Jon Swarthout. Additionally, discounted rent and grant support have helped TRICA grow as it awaits a final move. Among those partnerships

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THE S TU DIO

IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

Theater ALLEY REPERTORY THEATER 216 W. 38th St., Garden City, 208-388-4278, alleyrep.org Semi-pro, semi-community theater that likes to challenge and shock audiences.

BOISE CONTEMPORARY THEATER 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org As the name suggests, contemporary plays in a black box setting.

BOISE LITTLE THEATER 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org Solidly family friendly community theater with an emphasis on nostalgic classics.

IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org Professional contemporary and classical productions under the stars. Wine and cheese required.

KNOCK ’EM DEAD DINNER THEATER 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org Family-friendly community dinner theater. Be prepared for a sentimental popular favorite.

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PRAIRIE DOG PLAYHOUSE 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse.com Laugh-your-ass-off, farcefilled community theater.

STAGE COACH THEATRE 5296 Overland Road, Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com Community theater made by the people, for the people.

Dance BALANCE DANCE COMPANY 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-3184, balancedance.org Teen modern dance company that likes experimenting.

BALLET IDAHO 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0556, balletidaho.org Classic ballet, even when there’s a modern twist.

DROP DANCE COLLECTIVE 854 Fulton St., Boise Boise’s revolving modern dance company. You never know who will be on stage.

IDAHO DANCE THEATRE 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-331-9592, idahodancetheatre.org Boise’s modern dance company with some serious staying power.

TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT 775 Fulton St., Boise, 877-867-2320, treymcintyre.com World renowned contemporary ballet.

Music BOISE BAROQUE ORCHESTRA boisebaroque.com Small ensemble with a big sound brings classical for everyone.

BOISE MASTER CHORALE 100 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-7901, boisemasterchorale.net Choral music for those who are serious about it.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-344-7849, boisephilharmonic.org The heavy hitters of Boise’s classical scene provide a reason to get dressed up.

DARKWOOD CONSORT darkwoodconsort.com Viola, base and clarinet duo with “unique instrumental chamber music since 1992.”

MERIDIAN SYMPHONY 208-891-2721, meridiansymphony.org Bringing some culture to the ’burbs.

OPERA IDAHO 513 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-3531, operaidaho.org Belting out everything from the classic to the contemporary. W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

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L B F S C F UBL Regardless of what life throws at you, you deserve some time to mix it up. Take a lunch break. Say “yes” to after work cocktails. Do dinner with friends before the game or choose Bardenay just because. WWW.BARDENAY.COM BOISE EAGLE COEUR D’ALENE

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IDAHO INDIE WORKS

BUSINESS OF CRAFT Retailers are looking to a handmade future JACLYN BRANDT AND DEANNA DARR PHOTOGRAPH LAURIE PEARMAN

D

esigner labels are so 1990s. These days, shoppers want goods with labels that say things like “handmade by” or “made in Idaho.” The craft movement long ago left the confines of the art fair or the church bazaar. Now, it’s a mainstream retail force, and businesses across the country are jumping on board, stocking their shelves with creations made by hometown crafters. The Treasure Valley is no different, with several businesses now either incorporating craft in their offerings or dedicating themselves entirely to the wonders of craft. Many credit the popular website etsy.com with providing a catalyst for the movement. For many crafters, it was the first outlet they had to reach a larger market. Now stores are running with the idea and bringing the goods directly to consumers. When the White Pine Boutique (1306 Second St., S., Nampa) opened its doors roughly two years ago, locally made goods were always part of the plan. Owner Diana Shafer said the demand for handmade items has been growing, a trend she attributes to the fact that crafting has become more “normal” and more widely accepted by the general population. “Etsy has definitely become a household name,” she said. “It’s changed everything in the last 10 years.” Shafer works with between six and seven local artists on a consignment basis, featuring jewelry, accessories and a limited amount of clothing in her downtown Nampa boutique, alongside more mass-market offerings. “I wanted a mix of the two,” she said. “[The clothing options] are enhanced by the funky, locally made things.” Part of the attraction for shoppers is that their new treasure won’t be found in mass quantities in the local mall, but Shafer said people also like being able to say that it was made by a specific person nearby. Idaho Indie Works (106 N. Sixth St., Ste. C, Boise) has taken the idea of Etsy and given it a brick-and-mortar home, where crafters can combine resources and shoppers can browse a department store of craft. Idaho Indie works operates as an artists’ cooperative: each crafter pitches in for rent but keeps all of the profit from their sales. Millie Hilgert, artist and owner of Idaho Indie Works, said the handmade phenomenon is national, adding that Etsy happened to hit the market at the right time to take advantage of craft-hungry consumers. Many of the artists who are a part of Idaho Indie Works started at Etsy (and some continue to sell online), but the business has grown to include work from 21 artists, as well as offer classes to the public. Bricolage (280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 118, Boise) is following a similar path, offering a selection of handmade T-shirts, bags and accessories. Even the name of the store hints at its approach to retail. Co-owners Juliana McLenna and Chelsea Snow chose the word, which, in French, roughly means to make creative use of materials available at hand. “The more localized trade, the better. We love that more artists and makers and designers are finding ways to get themselves out there,” McLenna said.

SHOP

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THE WHITE PINE

THREADS Because your birthday suit isn’t enough ATOMIC TREASURES

ATOMIC TREASURES

VINTAGE EYE Vintage fashion slowly makes inroads in Boise

BACK ON THE RACK

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t’s sometimes said that Boise is about 10 years behind the rest of the country when it comes to trends, and when it comes to vintage clothing, it can certainly feel like that’s true. While vintage has been sought after elsewhere for years, in Boise it’s still a burgeoning industry. “Boise hasn’t, 100 percent, caught on to the resurfacing of old fashions,” said Luna Michelle Cambron, former owner of Box in the Basement. While it was one of Boise’s few true vintage stores, sluggish business forced it to close its doors for good at the end of August. Part of the reason vintage has been slow to catch on in Boise is that many Treasure Valley residents confuse vintage with thrift. Just calling a store “vintage” puts a sort of taboo on a business in Boise, Cambron said. “They think grandma’s closet,” she said. While you might find some vintage pieces in a thrift shop, a true vintage store has done the sorting for you, offering the same sorts of fashions that are inspiring the looks found in high-end retailers, except that these are the originals. Vintage stores have had a hard time in the past but some have found ways to continue. Picture Show Vintage moved into the Once Upon a Time antique store (4718 W. State St., Boise), while Atomic Treasures (409 S. Eighth St., Boise) continues to draw fashionistas into its downtown store. Box in the Basement, was open for roughly one year but Cambron still believes vintage will have its day in Boise. “It’s only a matter of time,” she said. —Deanna Darr

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409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-0811, atomictreasures.com “Funky” and “eclectic” don’t cut it when describing this bastion of vintage.

1226 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-342-4879, backontherackboise.com Office-worthy, designer labels at smokin’ consignment prices.

BARBARA BARBARA & CO. 834 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-342-2002 For the girls who like it sassy.

THE BRASS RAZOO 1304 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-463-0639, brassrazooboutique.com Vintage, retro and modern clothes and jewelry at a fraction of the cost.

CHERELLA 8071 W. Emerald St., Boise, 208-322-5555 Higher-end clothes for the woman who is as concerned with quality as she is with hip style.

ELLA’S ROOM 216 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-331-3552, ellasroom.com Lingerie so hot, you might be tempted to forego the rest of your outfit.

FANCY PANTS

THE REPEAT BOUTIQUE

825 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-3339 High end, high fashion for the hip woman.

500 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-389-4623 Stylish gently used duds.

RE-STYLE THRIFT STORE HAP TALLMAN STOCKMAN’S SUPPLY 4410 Overland Road, Boise, 208-344-7873, haptallman.com The place to go to dress your inner cowboy or cowgirl. In true Western style.

JUNKYARD JEANS 1725 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-389-2094, junkyardjeans.com When you absolutely, positively need a one-of-a-kind pair of jeans fashioned out of a vintage pair of jeans.

LUX FASHION LOUNGE

4983 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-429-6600, nacrescue.org The finest in thrift-store fashion for a good cause.

SARA’S SECONDHAND 608 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-331-2366 Consignment home decor and treasures.

TO THE NYNES 168 N. Ninth St., Ste. 100, Boise, 208-331-2338, tothenynesboise.com For the man who wants to look down right dapper.

785 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-4589, luxfashionlounge.com A fashion-forward place for those on a budget to find new and used clothes. Buy or sell.

URBAN REVIVAL

PALMER CASH

THE WHITE PINE

807 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-0028, palmercash.com Some of the hottest T-shirts in Hollywood come from downtown Boise.

1306 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-466-9083, thewhitepineboutique.com Fun fashions with a local/ eco-friendly vibe, as well as a good selection of goods from local crafters and artists.

PIECE UNIQUE CLOTHING CO. 404 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-387-0250 Just the place when a girl needs something trendy but unusual.

PICTURE SHOW VINTAGE 4718 W. State St., Boise, (inside Once Upon a Time) 208-344-1165 Vintage clothing and accessories.

1607 N. 13th St., Boise, 208- 283-9322 Vintage clothes and homewares for the shopper with an eye for a great find.

NEW TO YOU Gently used just about everything ANTIQUE WORLD MALL 4544 Overland Road, Boise, 208-342-5350, antiqueworldmall.com The name really does say it all: antiques from all over. W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

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PRESTIGE SKATEBOARDS

IDAHO YOUTH RANCH WAREHOUSE 5465 W. Irving St., Boise, 208-377-2613, youthranch.org Where the cost is based on weight. Clothes, furniture, decor and things that can’t be categorized.

ONCE UPON A TIME 4718 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-1165 Eclectic and unexpected antiques and collectables.

RIVER CITY SALES 251 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-323-9200 An ever changing supply of overstocks and returns.

TRIP TAYLOR BOOKSELLER 210 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-344-3311 Books of all types for people of all types.

YESTERYEAR SHOPPE 1211 First St. S., Nampa, 208-467-3581, yesteryearshoppe.com A playground for those who love books and vinyl.

FEET-WEAR Soul for your sole BANDANNA RUNNING AND WALKING 504 W. Main St., Boise, 208-386-9017, bandannarunning.com Say “no” to blisters with the perfect athletic shoes.

SHOE FETISH

SHOEZ 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 188, Boise, 208-343-3055 Just the place to satisfy your shoe-buying addiction, especially if it’s for sassy pumps.

SHU’S IDAHO RUNNING CO. 1758 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-6604, idahorunningcompany.com Helping you put one foot in front of the other, rapidly.

OUTDOOR

GEORGE’S CYCLES & FITNESS 5515 W. State, Boise, 208-853-1964; 251 E. Front St., Boise, 208-343-3782; 10178 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-884-3115, georgescycles.com Everything you need for all types of cycling.

GREENWOOD’S SKI HAUS 2400 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-342-6808, greenwoodsskihaus.com If it slides on snow, you’ll find it here.

Gearheads rejoice

IDAHO MOUNTAIN TOURING

THE BENCHMARK 625 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-338-1700 Climb, backpack and camp in style.

1310 W. Main St., Boise, 208-336-3854, idahomountaintouring.com Head to the mountains, via skis, backpack or bike.

THE BOARD ROOM

IDAHO RIVER SPORTS

2727 W. State St., Boise, 208-385-9553, boardroomboise.com They mean it: snowboards and skateboards for the boarder at heart.

3100 W. Pleasanton Ave., Boise; 2021 E. Wilson Lane, Meridian, 208-336-4844, idahoriversports.com When you want to get wet— with your kayak or raft.

BOISE ARMY NAVY

JOYRIDE CYCLES

4924 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-0660 Just the place for the fatiguewearing, Dutch-oven cookin’, whitewater-raftin’, campin’ outdoorsman in your life.

1306 Alturas St., Boise, 208-947-0017, joyride-cycles.com Spreading two-wheeled happiness from Boise’s North End.

ECO LOUNGE

MCU SPORTS

2445 Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-429-8855; 1626 S. Wells Ave., Ste. 120, Meridian, dnn.eco-lounge.com Eco-friendly products for the eco-conscious skier and boarder.

2314 Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-336-2300; 822 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-342-7734, mcusports.com Skiing, biking, boarding, they’ve got it.

310 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-336-0393 Where all the pretty, pretty high heels live.

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ROSEHILL COINS AND JEWELRY

NEWT AND HAROLD’S 1021 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-385-9300, newtandharolds.com Whether you use your board on the road or the slopes, you’ll feel at home here.

PRESTIGE SKATEBOARDS 106 S. 11th St., Boise, 208-424-6824, prestigeskateboards.com The place for the skateboard purist.

GIFTS For you or them 36TH STREET GARDEN CENTER 619 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-433-5100, 36streetgardencenter.com Keeping your garden looking swank.

ALL ABOUT GAMES

Shiny objects

7009 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-343-5653, allaboutgamesboise.com Heaven for non-electronic gamers who love rare games.

HAL DAVIS JEWELERS

BOISE ART MUSEUM GIFT SHOP

BLING

921 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-343-6151, haldavis.com Fine designer jewelry with a selection from Rolex.

LEE READ JEWELERS 650 E. Sonata Lane, Meridian, 208-376-8800, leereadjewelers.com Lee Read is engagement ground zero.

PRECIOUS METAL ARTS 208 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-363-9293, finecustomjewelry.com The place for some custommade bling.

R. GREY JEWELRY GALLERY 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com Handmade jewelry that doubles as art.

ROSEHILL COINS AND JEWELRY 3506 Rose Hill St., Boise, 208-343-3220 Estate finds at prices that don’t break the bank.

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670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org Unique discoveries for anyone who loves art.

BRICOLAGE 280 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-3718, bricoshoppe.com Handmade T-shirts, bags and other lovely discoveries.

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET Eighth St. between Jefferson and Front streets Fresh produce and locally made products almost all year round.

CHEERS 828 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-342-1805, cheers.invitations.com Say it on real stationery.

CRONE’S CUPBOARD 712 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-333-0831, crones-cupboard.com Give the gift of foresight and inner peace.

DRAGONFLY 414 W. Main St., Boise, 208-338-9234 When you need a smoking baby and killer jewelry.

DUNIA MARKETPLACE 1609 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-333-0535, duniamarketplace.com Free-trade finds from across the globe.

THE EDGE 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, (inside The Record Exchange) 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com Jewelry, music merch and kitsch galore.

EPITOME HOME AND GARDEN 121 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-333-0123 Beautiful finds to make your home a showpiece.

EDWARDS GREENHOUSE 4106 Sand Creek St., Boise, 208-342-7548, edwardsgreenhouse.com You’ve never seen so much greenery for inside or outside your home in one place.

EYES OF THE WORLD 1576 W. Grove St. Boise, 208-331-1212, eyesoftheworldonline.com Items from all over the world with an emphasis on handmade and well-crafted.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com Fun and fabulous finds for the hard-to-buy-for—with easy access to caffeine.

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MAIN STREET AUCTION

IDAHO INDIE WORKS

CHF HOME FURNISHINGS

106 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-342-0804, idahoindieworks.blogspot.com Handmade in Idaho.

104 S. Orchard St., Boise, 208-343-7769, shopchf.com Acres of furniture and home appliances.

MISS TAMI’S COTTAGE

DAVIES REED

1031 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-888-6829, misstamis.com It’s like walking into Jane Austen’s gift shop—everything is dainty and floral.

515 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-384-0514, daviesreid.com Hand-spun, hand-woven wool rugs made in the tradition of Central Asian tribal weavers.

POTTERY GOURMET

DUNIA MARKETPLACE

811 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-368-0649, potterygourmet.com For the culinary whiz who needs everything.

1609 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-333-0535, duniamarketplace.com Fair trade discoveries from around the world.

QUE PASA

FIVE RIVERS

409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018 Arts and crafts from Mexico, including jewelry and decor.

2285 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-388-3880, fiverivers.com Beautiful collection of furniture that’s high on style.

THE RECORD EXCHANGE

THE HOME STORE

1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com Tunes, vinyl and merch for the true music fan.

3210 Chinden Blvd., Eagle, 208-388-3880, thehomestoreneststyle.com Home decor and furnishings for those looking to make a statement.

REDISCOVERED BOOKSHOP

JIM’S APPLIANCE

180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rediscoveredbookshop.com A good book never goes out of style.

1115 Lusk St., Boise, 208-345-7711, jimsappliance.com The local choice for appliances, bedding and furniture.

SU CASA Getting your house and home in order

2912 W. Main St., Boise, 208-344-8314, mainauctioncorp.com One of Boise’s best-kept secrets for estate finds.

BENCH COMMISSION FURNITURE

RENEWAL

4255 Rose Hill St., Boise, 208-343-1251 Gently used furniture that spans decades.

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MAIN AUCTION CORPORATION

517 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-5444, renewalhome.com Gently used retro/hip furniture and houseware.

RICOCHET HOME CONSIGNMENT 5777 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-321-7500, ricochetboise.com Ever-changing collection of consignment furniture.

CRAFTY Make it yourself CALEDONIA FINE FABRICS 605 Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-338-0895, caledoniafabrics.com Polyester is so beneath you. An impressive collection of fine fabrics from wool and cashmere to silks and lace.

THE COTTON CLUB 106 N. Sixth St., Ste. B5, Boise, 208-345-5567, cottonclub.com While they have an office, all ordering is done online, with a focus on fabric for quilters.

FUZZ 605 Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-343-3899 Everything for the knitting, weaving or needle work.

NEED TO BEAD 1100 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-384-0404, needtobeadboise.com Tons of beads, as the name might suggest, but also an impressive list of classes.

PUFFY MONDAES 1004 Fourth St. S., Nampa, 208-467-1621, puffymondaes.com Sustainable crafts in Nampa, with a schedule of classes and workshops.

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BARBER PARK LAUNCH

BOISE RIVER 101 A quick and dirty guide to floating the Boise River DEANNA DARR PHOTOGRAPH LAURIE PEARMAN

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ery few things say “summer in Boise” as quintessentially as floating the Boise River on a lazy afternoon with your rear hanging in cold water as you drift under bridges and outstretched trees. But the difference between a zen-inducing summer day and the most cold and miserable few hours of your life is planning. A little advanced knowledge can keep your trip afloat—literally. Here’s what you need to know to make it down the river. Where to Float The most common stretch of river to float is from Barber Park east of downtown to Ann Morrison Park. The put-in area at Barber Park is maintained by Ada County and includes free use of air pumps, as well as an expansive parking lot. Throughout the floating season, gates are open from 8 a.m. until sunset daily, and the six-mile trip takes roughly an hour and a half to do. While the river is never officially closed, the county only offers services at times of the year when it is deemed safe to float, which means all the snags and branches have been cleared from the river and the water flow is low enough.

Parking The lot is open from 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.—although the exit gate is open until sunset—and parking costs $5 Mondays-Thursdays and $6 FridaysSundays and on holidays.

Shuttles A shuttle bus runs every hour between the two parks from 1-8 p.m. on weekdays and 1-9 p.m. on weekends and holidays throughout the season. If you’re depending on the shuttle for a ride, don’t forget that the shuttle doesn’t run if the rental office at Barber Park isn’t open. The cost to ride is $3 per person.

for each person on board, and children age 14 or younger must wear a life jacket at all times.

Booze Don’t even think about it. Alcohol is prohibited on the river. And don’t take any glass—no one appreciates stepping on broken shards.

Rentals While many Treasure Valley residents have their own rafts or tubes, rentals are available from a number of businesses:

ALPENGLOW 2314 Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-331-2628, alpenglowidaho.com Raft rentals.

BOISE ARMY NAVY 4924 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-0660 Raft and inflatable kayak rentals.

BOISE STATE CAMPUS RECREATION OUTDOOR PROGRAM 1515 University Dr., Boise, 208-426-1131, rec.boisestate.edu Raft and kayak rental available to the public.

EPLEY’S 4049 Eckert Road (Barber Park), Boise, 208-577-4584. epleys.com/boiselocation The official contractor for Ada County offers raft and tube rentals.

Life Jackets

IDAHO RIVER SPORTS

Remember, under state law, any boat must carry personal flotation devices

3100 W. Pleasanton Ave., Boise, 208-336-4844, idahoriversports.com Raft rentals.

RECREATION

RECREATION

PARKCENTER POND

URBAN ANGLER Fishing in Boise means a stroll downtown BINGO BARNES | PHOTOGRAPH LAURIE PEARMAN

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rom trophy salmon and steelhead trout on the South Fork of the Salmon just two hours north, to the salmon fly fishing for lunkers on the South Fork of the Boise River, to internationally renowned Silver Creek just two hours east, Boise is known worldwide as a base for world-class fishing. But anglers need not travel any distance to have great fishing within the city limits. The Boise River, stocked frequently with thousands of rainbow trout and infrequently with overruns of hatchery steelhead and salmon, can provide the hard-core angler with an early morning or lunchtime fix. With the Greenbelt running the entire length of the river through city limits, access to great fishing is easy, but there are a few even more accessible spots providing choice fishing grounds

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for the beginning and advanced angler. Just about any bridge that crosses the river in Boise provides access, and many are used by the Idaho Fish and Game Department as stocking spots for trout, steelhead and salmon. The bridges at Parkcenter Boulevard, Americana Boulevard and Glenwood Street are ideal spots for fly fishing or spincasting with parking and access on either side of the river. If sitting back with a bobber and a worm are more your style, Boise has some choice ponds regularly stocked with trout as well. Parkcenter Park in East Boise off Parkcenter Boulevard has an 8-acre pond with a handicapped-accessible fishing dock and public restrooms. Bernardine Quinn Riverside Park on the

Greenbelt has a 22-acre pond perfect for a float tube or kayak. Fishing from shore is pretty good, too, with a handicapped-accessible fishing dock. You can get there from Pleasanton Avenue off 27th Street. Veterans Park Pond near Veterans Memorial Parkway and State Street is another popular pond with a natural setting ideal for honing your skills either from shore or on the dock. At the corner of Eagle and McMillan roads the Charles F. McDevitt Youth Sports Complex has a very popular fishing pond. Redwood Park on Shamrock Street in West Boise near Ustick and Five Mile roads has a small pond sitting in the middle of a neighborhood. Wave to the neighbors as you haul in a lunker. W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

HIT THE TRAILS RECREATION

Top picks for Foothills escapes DEANNA DARR | ILLUSTRATIONS BEN WILSON

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oise’s Foothills are crisscrossed with enough trails to send mountain bikers, trail runners and hikers into a frenzied euphoria as they try to wrap their single-track minds around it. While having options is a good thing, it can lead recreationists into ruts, falling back on those familiar favorite trails. In the worst case, it can even lead to complete decision-making paralysis, leaving us shaken, confused and at home. To help, David Gordon, trails coordinator for the Ridge to Rivers trail system, offered his top picks for trails suitable for every skill level and interest. Many of the routes are loops that make use of several trails. To find your way around, pick up a Ridge to Rivers trail guide available at most outdoors stores in the valley for $6-$8. Proceeds help support the system, which currently includes 130 miles of trails.

MOUNTAIN BIKER

HIKER/ RUNNER

DOG/KID WALKER

Beginner

Beginner

Beginner

EAGLE BIKE PARK

LOWER MILITARY RESERVE

TOLL ROAD TO COTTONWOOD CREEK LOOKOUT

Minimal elevation change makes this a great option.

Lots of shade. On-leash dogs only on this trail. A little more than one mile long.

Great trails with minimal elevation change and you’re never far from your car.

Intermediate

Intermediate

POLECAT GULCH LOOP

DEER POINT TO ELK MEADOWS

A little more elevation change in a six-mile loop.

TABLEROCK TRAIL

Bogus Basin trails offer a little more elevation gain with great views.

Off-leash for dogs with some serious elevation gain on the two-and-a-half-mile route.

SCOTT’S TO CORRALS TO BOB’S

Advanced

Advanced

Trails are located off Bogus Basin Road. Head out on Scott’s to Corrals and come back on Bob’s.

CAMEL’S BACK PARK TO HULLS GULCH TO HULLS GULCH INTERPRETIVE TRAIL

DEER POINT TO ELK MEADOWS TO TEMPEST TO THE FACE TO DEER POINT

Combo offers 13 miles on an out-and-back trek.

Bogus Basin trails offer a good, long loop.

Advanced

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Intermediate

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EAGLE BIKE PARK

TWO WHEELED PLAYGROUND Bike park faces challenges, but earns love of mountain bikers SARAH BARBER | PHOTOGRAPH LAURIE PEARMAN

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he Idaho Velodrome and Cycling Park— or the Eagle Bike Park—on Old Highway 55 is the Treasure Valley’s answer to the Whistler Mountain Bike Park in British Columbia, Canada. The concept is the same, although Eagle’s no-hassle, no-fuss dirt playground is a work-in-progress. This trail system is designed for bikes and dressed up with the kind of excitement that hikers and horseback riders don’t want. Even though it’s not lift-serviced, there’s heavy emphasis on gravity-driven obstacle courses with whoop-de-doos, jumps and 8-foot drops. There’s also a pump track (like a miniBMX track intended for minimal pedaling), a dual slalom course and a 3.25-mile downhill course that begs for full suspension with a minimum of 5 inches of rear travel. For the legs-and-lungs set, more than six miles of nontechnical cross-country trails connect into five more miles of trails north of the Dry Creek Cemetery. The only thing missing is concrete. After several years and thousands of

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volunteer hours, the velodrome component of the IVCP is nothing more than a large dusty basin. Although the original goal was for completion in 2009, the velodrome still needs another $1.8 million. A group of roadies who want a piece of the action have begun fundraising to build a paved trail wide enough for criterium races. Such a course would reduce the expense of criteriums in the city because there would be no need to block roads. Local BMX-ers are also working with the city of Eagle to plan a certified track. Now, the only comparable option in the Treasure Valley is in Kuna. While it might seem like finding the money is the only roadblock, it’s not that simple. According to board member and volunteer coordinator Brad Nelson, complex issues surrounding the intended purpose of the cycling park and its management have led to conflict with city and county officials. Unlike Ridge-to-Rivers trails, the trails at the IVCP were designed exclusively with two wheels in mind, which represents a new

philosophy for land-use officials to wrap their minds around. For example, volunteers designed signs intended to improve safety at the cycling park, but county officials declined to help pay for any signs that restricted trail use to certain user groups. The reality is that horseback riders and dog walkers have no place in a cycling park—the dangers to everyone are obvious. As Nelson put it, county officials adhering rigidly to an anyone-is-welcome-anytime trail philosophy is like saying that “kids playing football at the Optimist fields must now share their field with polo players—at the same time.” Although dollars have dictated a hold on construction of the actual velodrome, volunteer efforts over the past two-and-a-half years can be credited for most of the progress that’s been made on trails, jumps and skill obstacles. Nelson estimates that everyone from area cycling enthusiasts to delinquents from the Ada County juvenile court system have contributed more than 9,000 hours of their time to work on the IVCP. W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

RECREATION

C OLIN C LAR K

BOISE GREENBELT

Time and again, the Boise Greenbelt is touted as one of the top attributes of the City of Trees—by both residents and visitors. We have to agree. Stretching 23 miles from Eagle to Lucky Peak along the Boise River, the Greenbelt is a hub of activity for bikers, walkers and runners. Over the years, unconnected sections have been linked, and one more will be added thanks to a new pedestrian bridge now under construction. Once completed, the bridge will connect the end of 36th Street in Garden City with the pathway on the north side of the river—roughly the location of the new Ray Neef MD Boise River Recreation Park near the Waterfront District. The Greenbelt will stay open throughout the project. —Deanna Darr

RHODES SKATEPARK

PUBLIC GOLF COURSES Fore! BANBURY GOLF CLUB 2626 N. Marypost Place, Eagle, 208-939-3600, banburygolf.com A beautifully manicured 18-hole option along the Boise River.

11826 W. Nette Way, Nampa, 208-465-1903, hunterspointidaho.com Challenging 18-hole course with views of Lake Lowell and the Owyhees.

INDIAN LAKES PUBLIC GOLF COURSE 4700 Umatilla Ave., Boise, 208-362-5771, indianlakesgolf.com Nine holes on the Bench with a view.

BOISE RANCH GOLF COURSE

LAKEVIEW GOLF COURSE

6501 S. Cloverdale Road, Boise, 208-362-6501, boiseranchgc.com One of south Boise’s most popular courses with 18 holes.

4200 W. Talamore Blvd., Meridian, 208-888-4080, golflakeviewgc.com Meridian’s original 18-hole course.

BROADMORE GOLF COURSE 103 Shannon Dr., Nampa, 208-466-0561, broadmorecc.com Nine holes for west valley residents.

2600 Centennial Way, Nampa, 208-468-5889, centennialgolf.net An 18-hole course with easy access from the highway.

605 N. Edgewood Lane, Eagle, 208-939-0402, eaglehillsgolfcourse.com Set on the top of the hills, these 18 holes offer sweeping views.

11102 S. Cloverdale Road, Kuna, 208-362-8897, falconcrestgolf.com Three courses in one: Robin Hood, nine holes; Championship, 18 holes covering more than 7,000 yards; Freedom, a loooong nine holes across nearly 4,000 yards.

EAGLE SKATEPARK Eagle Bike Park, Horseshoe Bend Way, Eagle Large concrete park with transitions, pyramid, funbox, stairs, handrails, ledges and a snake-run.

KUNA SKATEPARK Fourth and Locust streets, Kuna Concrete snake run and spine leading into a large vert bowl with metal coping.

5812 N. Pierce Park Lane, Boise, 208-853-3302, pierceparkgreens.com Nine holes at rock-bottom prices.

PIPE DREAMS SKATEPARK

4520 N. 36th St., Boise, 208-344-7807, quailhollowgolfclub.com A full 18 holes in the Boise Foothills on this challenging course.

Smeed Parkway and Sky Way, Caldwell Concrete street course with stairs, handrails and a concrete clover bowl.

RHODES SKATEPARK

3730 Ridgecrest Dr., Nampa, 208-899-4650, ridgecrestgolf.com Traditional links-style, 18-hole course in the middle of farmland.

1555 W. Front St., Boise Lots of ledges, rails, steel ramps, a brick bank, a pyramid and a steel halfpipe. It’s underneath the freeway to provide protection from weather and is lighted.

SHADOW VALLEY

STAMPEDE SKATEPARK

15711 Horseshoe Bend Road, Boise, 208-939-6699, shadowvalley.com Beautiful 18-hole course laid out across the Foothills.

Stampede Dr. and N. 11th Ave., Nampa Outdoor concrete park with rails, pyramids, ledges and quarter pipe.

RIDGECREST GOLF COURSE EAGLE HILLS GOLF COURSE

Bowls and rails

Corner of Fort and Reserve streets, Boise Concrete park with metal coping. Bowls, a pyramid, roll-ins and a spine.

QUAIL HOLLOW GOLF CLUB CENTENNIAL GOLF COURSE

SKATEPARKS

FORT BOISE SKATEPARK

PIERCE PARK GREENS

FALCON CREST

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HUNTERS POINT GOLF CLUB

WARM SPRINGS GOLF COURSE 2495 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-343-5661, cityofboise.org/wsgc City owned 18-hole course the river.

along

TULLY SKATEPARK East Pine and N. Main streets, Meridian Concrete street course with ledges, funboxes, handrails, three-, seven- and 11-stair sets, and a 6-foot half-pipe. W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

RECREATION

JOS HU A R OPER

THE FRONT CLIMBING CLUB

SKI AREAS

POOLS PLUS

CLIMBING

Respect the powder

Get all wet

Up and over

BOGUS BASIN MOUNTAIN RECREATION AREA

BORAH POOL

Boise, 208-332-5100, bogusbasin.org More than 2,600 skiable acres for all. Vertical drop: 1,800 feet.

BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN McCall, 208-634-4151, brundage.com Famous for its wide variety of runs and its lasting powder. Vertical drop: 1,800 feet.

MAGIC MOUNTAIN Twin Falls, 208-734-5979, magicmountainresort.com Plenty of expert trails to go along with peace and quiet. Vertical drop: 700 feet.

801 Aurora Dr., Boise, 208-570-6980 Lap lanes and a sprayground.

4000 W. Hatchery Road, Eagle, 208-939-0696 The 545-acre park offers a swimming beach.

FAIRMONT POOL 7929 Northview St., Boise, 208-570-6981 The pool can be rented for private parties.

IVYWILD POOL 2250 Leadville Ave., Boise, 208-570-6985 A pretzel and drop off slides.

LOWELL POOL

Albion, 208-673-5599, pomerelle-mtn.com This destination at 8,000 feet in the Sawtooth Mountains features 24 runs and plenty of Nordic loops. Vertical drop: 1,000 feet.

1601 N. 28th St., Boise, 208-570-6982 Try the 1-meter diving board.

Fairfield, 208-764-2526, soldiermountain.com Close to Sun Valley, but much more affordable with 1,150 acres of inbound terrain. Vertical drop: 1,425 feet.

SUN VALLEY Sun Valley, 208-622-4111, sunvalley.com With two mountains, Dollar and Baldy, Sun Valley continues to dominate with exhilarating runs. Vertical drop: 3,400 feet.

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308 S. 25th St., Boise, 208-363-7325, boisepeakfitness.com Take advantage of belay, climbing and classes.

EAGLE ISLAND

POMERELLE

SOLDIER MOUNTAIN

BOISE PEAK FITNESS

MERIDIAN POOL 213 E. Franklin Road, Meridian, 208-888-4392 Lap swim at this pool.

NATATORIUM 1811 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-570-6984 One word: hydrotube.

ROARING SPRINGS 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-884-8842, roaringsprings.com A true waterpark.

SOUTH POOL 921 S. Shoshone St., Boise, 208-570-6983 Dive in the oval shaped pool.

BOISE STATE CAMPUS RECREATION CENTER 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1131, rec.boisestate.edu Train on boulder, top rope and lead climbing routes.

THE FRONT CLIMBING CLUB 3235 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-345-7625, frontboise.com Bouldering gym with 2,000 square feet for climbing.

MIXED BAG Out of the ordinary BOCCE Ann Morrison Park, 1000 Americana Blvd., Boise, cityofboise.org Play the Italian way in a regulation court.

CRICKET Ann Morrison Park, 1000 Americana Blvd., Boise, cityofboise.org For lovers of sticky wickets.

CURLING Idaho Ice World, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, boisecurlingclub.org Canada’s national sport.

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r ec r eatio n

Idaho Steelheads

the Cheap seats Catching a game doesn’t have to cost you a small fortune Rachel Krause | Photograph Steve Conner

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veryone from families to college students could use a little help saving a few bucks, especially at sporting events where concessions alone can force a run to the nearest ATM to check your account balance. However, with all the promotions and deals available to spectators in Boise, you can actually afford to watch athletes work their butts off while you sit on yours. The Boise Hawks offers deals nearly every night of the week, including “Four for $34” deals, which provide four reserved third-base or home-plate seats, four hot dogs and four sodas for $34 if you bring a nonperishable food item to the box office. The Hawks also offer $1 Family Feast Nights, when hot dogs, snow cones, ice cream sandwiches and popcorn are all only $1 each. First-base reserved seats can also be purchased for $1 by wearing a Hawkstown bracelet, which are available at Walgreens, 94.9 The Eagle and the stadium box office. Visit boisehawks.com for more information. For hard-core hockey fans, the Idaho Steelheads offer a range of promotions, including seating in section 201 with 1350 KTIK for only $13.50. On Family Fun Fridays you can get four tickets, sodas and hot dogs for $44. In addition, 48 hours before every home game, top shelf seats located in the top row of the Qwest Arena are made available. Although those seats won’t afford you a view of large, bearded hockey players punching each other a mere 3 feet from your face, tickets are only $10 for adults and $7 for kids. Visit idahosteelheads. com for more information. Qwest Arena is also home to the Idaho Stampede, Boise’s NBA D-League team. Check idahostampede.com before each home game to see updated deals, which include the “Four for $40” deal that buys four tickets, four hot dogs or hamburgers, and four sodas for $40. There’s also the food-drive deal, which gets you a ticket if you donate food to the Idaho Food Bank. For the kiddies, reading is the ticket to a free ticket. The KeyBank Reading program awards kids with free tickets to a game for clocking in enough reading hours. Or, find at least 10 of your closest friends—your office buddies, family members or even a few basketball-loving strangers—in order to take advantage of discounted tickets for groups of 10 or more for $7 each.

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RECREATION

DAYTRIPPIN’ Recreating away from the big, bad city RACHAEL DAIGLE AND DEANNA DARR |

ILLUSTRATIONS BRIAN SENDELBACH

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oise is known as a haven for outdoor recreationists who love easy access to trails, rivers and assorted activities right outside their front door. But getting out of the Treasure Valley can lead to new adventures in gorgeous settings. Here are our choices for some of the best getaways within an easy drive of the Boise area.

SUN VALLEY (150 miles from Boise)

CITY OF ROCKS (200 miles from Boise)

Two hours northeast of Boise lays a year-round outdoor-lover’s playground. Sun Valley is internationally renowned as the world’s first ski resort, where the “steep and deep” is a way of life. Nordic skiers and snowshoers rack up the miles along the groomed trail system that runs throughout the Wood River Valley. It’s possible to make a weekend out of it by trekking into one of the numerous yurts that dot national forest land. Once the snow is off the ground, ski runs turn into mountain bike trails and road bikers then take to the paved pathway that runs nearly the length of the valley. Fly fishermen come from all over to try their skill in Silver Creek or the Wood River. Staying in Sun Valley isn’t exactly cheap, but remember, there are always the numerous campgrounds scattered across the area.

The Gem State is known for the majestic forests of north and central Idaho, but southern Idaho holds its own special allure, especially for those who like to hold on to life with the tips of their fingers. Not far from the Utah border, the City of Rocks National Reserve stands like a citadel on the high desert, where soaring rock towers, jagged cuts and sheer cliff faces attract climbers who want to surround themselves with their sport. For those who want to keep their feet a little more firmly on the ground, camping in the City of Rocks offers a whole new kind of people watching.

STANLEY (130 miles from Boise) The town of roughly 100 residents isn’t known as the Gateway to the Sawtooths for nothing. As far as mountain recreation is concerned, if you can think of it, chances are you can do it near Stanley. Although the road to Stanley is often closed once the snow flies, the area is a year-round destination for everything. In alphabetical order, shall we? Biking, camping, climbing, fishing, hiking, horseback riding, hot spring soaking, hunting, kayaking, outdoor live music listening, rafting, skiing, snowmobiling, snowshoeing, wildlife watching, yurting. And we guarantee we’re missing a few.

IDAHO CITY

(40 miles from Boise) Less than an hour from Boise, Idaho City is a sure way to give your non-Idaho friends a nugget of that old Wild West feeling. Wandering the streets and the old cemetery can keep a city slicker gawking all day, but if real recreation is on your agenda, the surrounding area is rife with trails for horses, ATVs and your dusty boots. Those same trails make for good snowmobiling come winter and if you want to make a weekend out of it, snowshoe into a yurt. You’ll find camping near town and if you’re one of those camp-in-the-comfort-of-your-RV types, you’ll find a few spots to hook up.

GARDEN VALLEY

RIGGINS (150 miles from Boise) Idaho is known as the home of whitewater rafting with more river miles than anywhere else in the country. Few places celebrate that fact quite like Riggins, where whitewater is the town industry. Located on the Salmon River, Riggins calls to rafters and kayakers like a siren in a life jacket and river sandals. Each summer, boaters flock to the big water of both the Salmon River and the nearby Snake River in Hell’s Canyon. And don’t forget steelhead fishing in the fall.

94ANNUAL MANUAL 2010-2011BOISEweekly

MCCALL (100 miles from Boise) Tamarack shamarack. McCall and the Long Valley were a draw for recreationists long before there was even talk of a ski area. Now, most skiers who head north of Boise hit the slopes at Brundage or trek on skinny skis on the trails maintained as part of the extensive Sno-Park system. In the summer, Payette Lake brings families who want to bask along its shores or glide across its waters on waterskis, jet skis or a little more quietly in canoes or sea kayaks.

(50 miles from Boise) Allow us to recommend getting to Garden Valley the long way: Boise to Idaho City, then down to Lowman and cut over to Garden Valley. It’s a hell of a pretty drive, won’t take but a few hours, and if you get to Crouch, you’ll be happy to see not one but two packed bars. As for the actual recreating, rafting and ATVing are definitely the big draws here. Let the lazy upper Middle Fork of the Payette float you a few miles or get serious with a guided company on the main. Hot springs are literally around every corner, but you’ll have to get a guidebook or earn the trust of a few locals if you want to find them. Come snow season, snowmobiles replace the ATVs and in Garden Valley proper, you’ll find a respectable family tubing hill. W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

VIC R OB ER TS \ DANC ER S : ANNALI R OS E, ILANA GOLDM AN, DYLAN G- B OW LEY, JOHN M ICHAEL SCHERT, LAUREN EDSON

TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT

Year Round

September 2010

FIRST THURSDAY

WAGON DAYS

Downtown Boise, downtownboise.org Downtown galleries and shops stay open late the first Thursday of every month.

Sept. 3-5, Sun Valley, wagondays.com Celebrating the area’s heritage with arts and a parade.

THE WOMAN IN BLACK FIRST FRIDAY Downtown Eagle Eagle galleries stay open late the first Friday of every month.

Sept. 3-26, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, idahoshakespeare.org Idaho Shakespeare Festival closes its 2010 season.

IDAHO TRIENNIAL EXHIBIT SUNDAY MARKET Linen Building, thelinenbuilding.com On the third Sunday of each month, local vendors gather to hawk their arts, crafts, jewelry and more.

August 2010 THE BIG LEBOISE Aug. 28, Boise Weekly HQ, boiseweekly.com Boise Weekly’s annual block party means a full day of live music, a bloody mary contest, kids corner, beer and wine, food, a skate ramp and local crafters.

Sept. 4-Dec. 5, Boise Art Museum, boiseartmuseum.org This juried art exhibit features the best of Idaho art.

ART IN THE PARK Sept. 10-12, Julia Davis Park, boiseartmuseum.com Returning for its 56th year with nearly 300 artists.

HYDE PARK STREET FAIR Sept. 17-19, Hyde Park, gruntwerks.net Music, food and vendors.

SUN VALLEY SPIRITUAL FILM FESTIVAL Sept. 17-19, Sun Valley, svspiritualfilmfestival.org International films exploring religion and spiritual themes.

MUSICAL MOVIES Sept. 19, Egyptian Theatre, boisephilharmonic.org Silent films with accompaniment by Boise Philharmonic.

MUSEUM COMES TO LIFE Sept. 25, Idaho State Historical Museum, history.idaho.gov Living-history exhibit with more than 50 presenters.

CHEFS’ AFFAIRE Sept. 30, Boise Centre, idahofoodbank.org Valley chefs raise money for the Idaho Food Bank with a black-tie evening.

October 2010 BOISE PHILHARMONIC Oct. 1-2, Morrison Center, boisephilharmonic.org Performing works by Strauss, Liszt and Tchaikovsky.

FAMILY HARVEST FESTIVAL Oct. 2-3, Idaho Botanical Garden, idahobotanicalgarden.org Celebrate the harvest with music, hay rides and games.

OKTOBERFEST Oct. 2, downtown Boise Toast, German style.

SEE SPOT WALK ERNEST HEMINGWAY SYMPOSIUM Sept. 30-Oct. 1, The Community Library, Ketchum, thecommunitylibrary.org/hemingway Annual conference celebrating the famed author.

BOISE STATE FOOTBALL September-January, boisestate.edu Bronco season kicks off on the Smurf Turf.

Oct. 3, Julia Davis Park, idahohumanesociety.org Dog parade to benefit the Idaho Humane Society.

THE KRUMBLIN FOUNDATION Oct. 6-30, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org World premiere of the play by Joe Conley Golden and Tom Willmorth.

PROMENADE MUSIC FESTIVAL Oct. 7-9, promenadeboise.com BW presents the music festival with nearly 100 bands.

TRAILING OF THE SHEEP

BARBER TO BOISE

Oct. 8-10, Ketchum, trailingofthesheep.org Celebrating historic ranching with music, food and the trailing of the sheep.

Oct. 16, barbertoboise.com The popular run and walk ends at Bronco Stadium.

STEVE KNAPP, LIGHT PAINTINGS Oct. 9-April 17, 2011, Boise Art Museum, boiseartmuseum.org Large scale glass and light installations.

KILLADELPHIA Oct. 13-23, Visual Arts Collective, alleyrep.org Alley Repertory Theater looks at the lives of Graterford Prison inmates.

SUN VALLEY JAZZ JAMBOREE Oct. 13-17, Sun Valley, sunvalleyjazz.com More than 35 jazz groups from around the world perform every type of jazz around town.

WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF Oct. 13-30, Company of Fools, Hailey, companyoffools.org The classic by Edward Albee.

TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT Oct. 16, Morrison Center, treymcintyre.com Boise’s cultural ambassador comes home to perform.

BCT NEW CLASSICS READING SERIES Oct. 18, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Classic play reading series.

IGNITE BOISE Oct. 21, Egyptian Theatre, igniteboise.com Three-hour marathon of ideas brings the public together.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC Oct. 22-23, Morrison Center, boisephilharmonic.org Philharmonic presents “A Night at the Movies” with themes from popular movies.

BAROQUE! WITH BALLET IDAHO Oct. 23-25, Ester Simplot Performing Arts Center, balletidaho.org Ballet Idaho kicks off its 2010-2011 season.

JU LIA GR EEN

BOOZE RULES Know before you drink

A

BOO AT THE ZOO Oct. 30, Zoo Boise, zooboise.org Costumed extravaganza for children in need of candy.

BCT NEW CLASSICS READING SERIES Nov. 8, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Classic play reading series.

CROSSTOBERFEST

BW COVER AUCTION

Oct. 30-31, sunvalley.com The Oktoberfest-style event includes the Idaho state cyclo-cross championships.

Nov. 17, Idaho State Historical Museum, boiseweekly.com BW’s annual cover art auction to benefit public art.

IDAHO STEELHEADS

BOISE PHILHARMONIC

October-April, Qwest Arena, idahosteelheads.com Hockey returns to Boise.

Nov. 19-20, Morrison Center, boisephilharmonic.org Works by Ravel, Dillon and Schumann.

FETTUCINE FORUM October-May, Rose Room, cityofboise.org/artsandhistory Free public lectures on the first Thursday of every month.

November 2010 BOGUS BASIN SKI AND BOARD SWAP Nov. 5-7, Expo Idaho New and used ski and snowboard gear.

IDAHO DANCE THEATER Nov. 5-7, idahodancetheater.org Company opens its season.

TRU

HOLIDAY MARKET November-December, 8th Street Market Place, capitalcitypublicmarket.com Capital City Public Market heads inside.

IDAHO STAMPEDE November-April, Qwest Arena, idahostampede.com Boise’s own NBA D-League team hits the court.

December 2010 SEX A.K.A. WIENERS AND BOOBS

Nov. 23-Dec. 18, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Based on the words and works of Truman Capote by Jay Presson Allen.

Dec. 8-25, Visual Arts Collective, alleyrep.org The reprise of Alley Repertory Theater’s production.

ST. ALPHONSUS FESTIVAL OF TREES

Dec. 10-12, Ester Simplot Performing Arts Center, balletidaho.org Ballet Idaho presents the holiday classic.

Nov. 24-28, Boise Centre Christmas trees are donated and decorated to raise money for health care.

CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING Nov. 26, Grove Plaza, downtownboise.org Community gathers downtown to mark the season.

THE NUTCRACKER

BCT NEW CLASSICS READING SERIES Dec. 13, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Classic play reading series.

January 2011 BCT NEW WORKS READING SERIES Jan. 10, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Reading of new plays.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC Jan. 21-22, Morrison Center, boisephilharmonic.org Philharmonic presents “The Magic of Mozart.”

NORWAY Jan. 26-Feb. 16, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Co-world premiere of the play by Samuel D. Hunter.

IDAHO DANCE THEATER Jan. 28-30, idahodancetheater.org IDT continues its season.

MCCALL WINTER CARNIVAL Jan. 28-Feb. 6, McCall, mccallwintercarnival.com This 46th annual McCall Winter Carnival includes ice sculptures, music and more.

SUN VALLEY NORDIC FEST Jan. 29-Feb. 6, Sun Valley, svnordicfestival.com Clinics, demos and races.

hectic week can arouse desires to get one’s drink on, but don’t crack that bottle yet. State open-container laws conform to federal standards, meaning no person in a vehicle may drink or possess unsealed alcoholic beverages. According to Idaho State Code, alcohol may be transported but no person shall break it open or drink. The only location an unsealed container can be located is in a trunk or behind the last upright seat. In certain states passengers may have or drink alcohol, but in Idaho, that is a no-no. The one exception: in a vehicle used primarily for transporting people for compensation (like a limo). Another exception is RVs, which can have open containers in the living quarters. Violating these laws will result in a misdemeanor for the driver and an infraction for the passenger. If you’re itching to take your hooch outdoors, keep in mind people may have up to 7.5 gallons of beer or wine in non-glass containers in a city park without a permit, but booze isn’t allowed on any street, parking lot, restroom, playground, swimming pool, the Greenbelt or within 250 feet of the Boise River. And remember: Sharing alcohol or tobacco with the geese or other park wildlife is, in fact, prohibited. —Rachel Krause

C R I T I CAL KNOWLEDGE

C RITICA L KN OWL ED GE

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

JU LIA GR EEN

TWOWHEELED LAWS Know your bike regs

B

—Rachel Krause 100ANNUAL MANUAL 2010-2011BOISEweekly

MODERN ART

February 2011

March 2011

VALENTINE FOR AIDS

IDAHO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Feb. 3-13, Flying M Coffeehouse, valentineforaids.com Art exhibit to benefit the Safety Net for AIDS Program.

CHOCOLATE AND DIAMONDS Feb. 4, Discovery Center of Idaho, scidaho.org Annual gala fundraiser with chocolate, a diamond raffle and auctions.

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL Feb. 6-8, banffcentre.ca International film festival with films about mountain culture.

March 10-13, The Flicks, idahofilmfestival.com Roughly 50 films from all around the globe.

TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT March 12, Morrison Center, treymcintyre.com Celebrate Mardi Gras with a dance performance with the famous Preservation Hall Jazz Band.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC March 18-19, Morrison Center, boisephilharmonic.org Featuring works by Beethoven and Brahms.

BCT NEW WORKS READING SERIES Feb. 14, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Reading of new plays.

BOISEWEEKLY.COM

February, The Flicks, lunafest.org Screening of approximately 10 short films focusing on women and women’s issues.

April 2011 THE VELOCITY OF AUTUMN April 6-30, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org A new play by Eric Coble.

GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL April 6-9, geneharris.org Bringing a stellar lineup of jazz musicians to Boise State with performances and workshops.

April 9, Esther Simplot Performing Arts Center, balletidaho.org Ballet Idaho closes its season with Sleeping Beauty.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC April 15-16, Morrison Center, boisephilharmonic.org Philharmonic performs Carmina Burana.

IDAHO DANCE THEATER April 15-17, idahodancetheater.org Company closes its season.

RACE TO ROBIE CREEK April 16, robiecreek.com One of the toughest half-marathons in the Northwest.

BOISESTYLE.COM

GOLISTENBOISE.ORG

News, arts, entertain- You look marvelous Keep your music local ment, rec, everything you ever need or want to know BEHINDTHEMENU.COM MUNDOVORE. WORDPRESS.COM Inside Boise’s eateries Going locavore in Boise

THE PIANO

LUNAFEST

March 21, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Reading of new plays.

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Where to turn for your virtual fix of Boise

Feb. 25-26, Morrison Center, boisephilharmonic.org Philharmonic presents works by Bernstein, Saens and Eigar.

Feb. 25-27, Esther Simplot Performing Arts Center, balletidaho.org Ballet Idaho continues its 2010-2011 season.

BCT NEW WORKS READING SERIES

ON THE WEB

BOISE PHILHARMONIC

JULIA G REEN

icycling laws became a large point of interest after a string of bicyclists’ deaths last year. Boise City Council responded to these incidents by making numerous changes in January to city bike laws. According to City Code, motorists must give 3 feet of space when passing a bicycle, and those turning left shall yield the right of way to bicycles coming from the other direction. Motorist can’t turn right in front of a cyclist at an intersection, alley or driveway if it means the cyclist has to brake or avoid a collision. Under a new cycling harassment ordinance, it is also now a misdemeanor for any motorist to intimidate or harass a person on a bike. A bicyclist can ride on a sidewalk and within a crosswalk, except when prohibited by traffic signs or when it is unsafe. Bikers must also yield the right of way to any pedestrian. Riding carelessly can land a rider in prison for up to six months or stuck with a fine of up to $1,000. City Code also requires brakes on bikes. A law unique to Idaho—the Idaho Stop Law—allows cyclists to treat stop signs like yield signs. A biker must slow at a stop sign before entering an intersection, after yielding the right of way to vehicles already there. At red lights, cyclists can proceed after stopping.

EYE ON BOISE (SPOKESMAN.COM/ BLOGS/BOISE)

NWFOODNEWS.COM

News and politics from an insider

THINKBOISEFIRST.ORG

All things foodie

Buy local, buy local

FAMEFIFTEEN.COM Boise’s social scene

TREASUREDVALLEY. COM Watercooler fodder

W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

BCT NEW WORKS READING SERIES April 18, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Reading of new plays.

SUSAN G. KOMEN RACE FOR THE CURE May 7, race.komenboise.org Support breast cancer research with the annual race.

BOISE BIKE WEEK May 15-21, boisebikeweek.org Weeklong event to raise awareness of cycling issues.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET April-December, downtown Boise, capitalcitypublicmarket.com Array of fresh vegetables, foods, crafts and more.

CULINARY WALKABOUT April, cdhd.idaho.gov/sn/ culinary The area’s finest chefs prepare meals as a fundraiser for Meals on Wheels.

June 2011 MAYHEM IN THE GROVE June 3-4, Boise Centre, murderinthegrove.com Formerly Murder in the Grove, the conference is expanding to cover all genres of fiction.

BIGWATER BLOWOUT RIVER FESTIVAL

May 20-21, Morrison Center, boisephilharmonic.org Philharmonic presents its season finale, with works by Elgar, Lalo and Berlioz.

June 4, Riggins, bigwaterblowout.com Celebrate everything whitewater on the Salmon River.

SUN VALLEY WELLNESS FESTIVAL

June 9-12, Eagle, eaglechamber.org Music, parades and more.

May 27-30, Sun Valley, sunvalleywellness.org The theme is wellness for body, mind and soul.

EAGLE FUN DAYS

GEM STATE JAM June 10-11, Old Idaho State Penitentiary, gemstatejam.com Featuring musicians and an enviro friendly theme.

MERIDIAN DAIRY DAYS June 16-18, Meridian, dairydays.org Celebration of Meridian’s milky heritage.

JU LIA GR EEN

April 16, The Record Exchange, recordstoreday.com Celebrate the culture of independent record stores.

JUNTEENTH June 19, Idaho Black History Museum, ibhm.org Celebrate the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation.

MAIN STREET MILE June 24, mainstreetmile.org Annual race through Boise to support men’s health and prostate cancer awareness.

GET ON THE BUS

MOVIES IN THE PARK: BOISE June-August, Julia Davis Park, ,boiseschoolsfoundation.com Free movies once a month.

MOVIES IN THE PARK: MERIDIAN

Public transit is challenging, but cheap

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IDAHO PRONUNCIATION GUIDE

etting around the Treasure Valley without a car is no easy task. Unlike most cities, public transportation options are rather limited in these parts, despite ongoing efforts by Treasure Valley Regional Transit—the local transit authority—to improve service. Since gas prices started spiking and the recession hit, bus and van pool ridership has jumped but that hasn’t translated into more routes or increased frequency of trips. While much was made of Boise Mayor Dave Bieter’s push to build a streetcar in downtown Boise and his championing of a light rail system between Canyon and Ada counties, the bus is still your only real option (other than your bike) if you don’t have your own motorized wheels. TVRT has developed a comprehensive plan for future transit, which includes increased service, as well as the introduction of service to more rural areas. For now, here’s the skinny on bus service. For more specific information, visit valleyride.org.

Say it like a local

WHEN

EXPERIMENTAL MUSIC FESTIVAL April, krispenhartung.com The latest in experimental music in Boise.

WE ART WOMEN April, Visual Arts Collective, weartwomen.org Art by female artists sold at auction to support the Women’s and Children’s Alliance.

MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET May-September, downtown Meridian, meridianfarmersmarket.com Fresh produce and goods.

IRONMAN BOISE

EAGLE FARMERS MARKET

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OYSTER FEED

May-October, downtown Eagle, cityofeagle.com Fresh produce and goods.

EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE

June 11, ironmanboise.org Athletes take on a triathlon across Boise.

June 11, Merill Park, Eagle, eaglefire.org Touted as the world’s largest rocky mountain oyster feed.

June-August, Settlers Park, Meridian, meridiancity.org Free family-friendly movies every Friday night.

ALIVE AFTER FIVE June-September, Grove Plaza, downtownboise.org Live music and food every Wednesday evening.

BOISE HAWKS June-September, Hawks Memorial Stadium, boisehawks.com

May, Eagle Island, Eagle, gruntwerks.net Weekend of jam music and area vendors.

SAVOR IDAHO June 12, Idaho Botanical Garden, savoridaho.org Annual wine and food event.

The boys of summer return.

IDAHO GREEN EXPO

PRIDE

May 2, Boise Contemporary Theater, bctheater.org Reading of new plays.

May, Boise Centre, idahogreenexpo.org A full weekend for learning everything green.

June 12-18, boisepride.org Straight, gay or somewhere in between, celebrate Boise’s LGBT community.

June-September, Idaho Botanical Garden, idahobotanicalgarden.org Live music in the garden every Thursday evening.

MODERN ART

RUSSIAN FOOD FESTIVAL

EMMETT CHERRY FESTIVAL

IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

June 15-18, Emmett, emmettidaho.com/emmettcherry-festival Family event marking the area’s agricultural history.

June-September, idahoshkespeare.org The summer theater season featuring both Shakespearian and modern plays.

May 2011 BCT NEW WORKS READING SERIES

May 5, Modern Hotel, themodernhotel.com Local artists take over the Modern Hotel for a mass art exhibit.

May, St. Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church, stseraphimboise.org Traditional Russian cuisine, readings and church tours.

JULIA G REEN

Typically, buses in the Boise area run regularly on Monday through Friday, with reduced trips Saturday. Buses don’t run on Sunday. Pickups typically start before 6 a.m., but the last pickup of the day is before 7 p.m.

Boise (Boy-see)

Kootenai (Koo-tun-ee)

Phillippi (Phil-ih-pie)

Basque (Bask)

Kuna (Q-na)

Resseguie (Rez-i-gyoo)

Cassia (Cash-uh)

Les Bois (Lay-bwa)

Shoshone (Show-shown)

Chinden (Shin-din)

Manitou (Man-i-too)

Targhee (Tar-gee)

HOW MUCH

Coeur d’Alene (Coreduh-lane)

Moscow (Moss-co)

Teton (Tee-tawn)

Owyhee (O-why-hee)

Weiser (Wee-zur)

Crapo (Cray-poh)

Payette (Pay-yet)

The good news is riding the bus is pretty damn cheap. A local-only trip costs a rider $1, while it’s a whopping $3 to go anywhere on the system. Day passes cost $2 for local trips or $6 for systemwide service.

Gernika (Ger-nee-ka) W W W.B O IS E W E E K LY. COM

BOTANICAL GARDEN CONCERT SERIES

—Deanna Darr BOISEweeklyANNUAL MANUAL 2010-2011101

C RITICA L KN OWL ED GE

RECORD STORE DAY

MUSIC FROM STANLEY C RITICA L KN OWL ED GE

June-September, Stanley, musicfromstanley.com Live music in the mountains.

THURSDAY FARMERS MARKET June-September, downtown Boise, capitalcitypublicmarket.com Fresh produce and goods.

ART AND ROSES ART FAIR June, Julia Davis Park, eaglearts.org Artists gather in the Rose Garden to sell their wares.

BOISE REC FEST June, boiserecfest.com Boise’s newest festival celebrates all things recreational.

DELI DAYS June, Ahavath Beth Israel Congregation, ahavathbethisrael.org Serving up traditional Jewish favorites.

GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL June, Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, serfes.org Boise’s Greek food festival enters its 29th year.

I48 FILM FESTIVAL June, thislovelymachine.com/i48 Teams have 48 hours to create an original movie.

July 2011 BARS AND STRIPES July 2, Boise Weekly HQ, boiseweekly.com Alley cat bike race through the streets of Boise.

SAWTOOTH MUSIC FESTIVAL July 29-30, Redfish Lake, Stanley, sawtoothmusicfestival.com Showcasing an array of rock, roots and Americana bands.

SUN VALLEY SYMPHONY July-August, Sun Valley, svsummersymphony.org A cast of world-class musicians and a diverse repertoire.

TWILIGHT CRITERIUM July, boisetwilightcriterium.com One of the year’s hottest cycling events fills the heart of downtown Boise.

August 2011 YELLOWPINE HARMONICA FESTIVAL Aug. 5-7, Yellowpine, harmonicacontest.com The largest harmonica throwdown west of the Mississippi.

CURB CUP Aug. 6, downtown Boise, boisecurbcup.com Street performers fill downtown Boise.

Idaho’s (lack of a) helmet law

Aug. 6, Basque Block, basquecenter.com Enjoy Basque music, dancing, food and drinks.

BEERFEST August, Ann Morrison Park, boisebeerfest.com The name says it all: a fest of beer. Plus a little live entertainment.

BRAUN BROTHERS FAMILY REUNION August, Challis, braunbrothersreunion.com Annual gathering of friends and fans to celebrate the music of the Braun Brothers.

SOUL FOOD EXTRAVAGANZA August, Julia Davis Park, boisesoulfoodfestival.com Live music and good-for-thesoul food to benefit local charities.

TOUR DE FAT August, Ann Morrison Park, newbelgium.com/tour-de-fat New Belgium Brewing Company brings its traveling circus with a celebration of beer, bikes and sustainability.

WESTERN IDAHO FAIR August, Expo Idaho, idahofair.com Chock full of traditional country fair activities.

JULIA GREEN

PUT A LID ON IT

SAN INAZIO FESTIVAL

O

n the list of things you should know about Idaho, add this one: There is no helmet law for motorcyclists. As long as you’re 18 or older, you’re allowed to commute or pleasure ride on your motorbike without head gear. This is troubling to many. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that motorcycle helmets reduce the likelihood of a fatality by 29 percent. “We would love to see a mandatory helmet law, but a lot of the legislators in the state aren’t necessarily for it, especially the ones that come from agriculture backgrounds,” said Sgt. Kyle Christensen of the Boise Police Department motorcycle unit. “They don’t want to wear a helmet when going out to water or feed the animals, or other simple stuff like that ... some of the motorcycle crashes we go to would definitely be very less severe if people were wearing helmets.” So, here’s the question: Risk helmet hair or risk your life? —Stephen Foster 104ANNUAL MANUAL 2010-2011BOISEweekly

W W W.B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M

ADVERTISER INDEX Antique Retro Connection 29 Art Source Gallery 69 Bardenay 73 Bare Waxing Boutique & Co. 61 Beam Global Spirits 57 Bee Xpress 77 Benjamin Street Home Decor 80 Berryhill & Co. 11 Bikes 2 Boards 87 Black’s Boxes 79 Blue Cow Frozen Yogurt 36 Blue Door Cafe 47 Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area 92 Boise Army Navy 87 Boise Art Glass 69 Boise Art Museum 23 Boise Bargain Basket 104 Boise Bicycle Project 86 Boise Co-op 96 Boise Fry Company 43 Boise Pride 71 Boise School District 25 Bosnia Express 41 Brick Oven Bistro 33 Buffalo Wild Wings 93 Cafe de Coco 27 Cameo Salon 27 Capital City Growers 13 Cat Dr. 61 Chandlers Steakhouse 35 Cherella 77 City Peanut Shop 43 Classic Design Studio 78 Costume Shop 61 Cottonwood Grille 43 Discovery Center of Idaho 13 Dragonfly 15

W W W.B O IS E W E E K LY. COM

DV8 Salon Eddie’s Dogs Edward’s Greenhouse Egyptian Theatre El Gallo Giro Family Medical Residency of Idaho Flatbread Community Oven The Flicks Floating Feather Flying M Coffeehouse Flying M Coffeegarage Gino’s Italian Ristorante Glitz Beadz Goldy’s Breakfast Bistro Good Goods & Co. Homeland Realty Idaho AGC Idaho Botanical Garden Idaho Grape Growers Idaho River Sports Idaho Shakespeare Festival Idaho Youth Ranch India Foods The IT Girl Jackson Floors Jeffrey’s Next Door Jim’s Alibi Jim’s Appliances Kabul Market Knitting Factory Ladd Family Pharmacy Larry Miller Subaru Lee’s Candies Liquid Mazzah Moxie Java Nampa Civic Center

69 36 61 73 37 17 106 17 64 37 37 29 77 4 77 7 7 21 29 93 54 25 41 7 7 42 56 80 41 2 69 87 40 49 37 65 63

Needs Real Estate Services 29 Neurolux 73 New Belgium Brewing Company 5 Nina’s A & C Salon 29 North End Organic Nursery 25 O-Zone Condom Shop 49 Pengilly’s 73 Peterson Motors 19 Pho Nouveau 43 Primary Health 85 Record Exchange 72 Rediscovered Bookshop 77 Renewal Consignment Housewares 64 Repeat Boutique 105 River Time Yoga 91 Salon Che 27 The Shed Downtown 27 Solid 49 Spearmint Rhino 49 St. Luke’s Women’s Fitness Celebration 15 Stan’s Hot Dogs 91 Sun Valley Resort 95 Sysco 89 Taco Bell Arena 66 & 102 The Torch 56 Tree City Smoothies 39 Tres Bonne Cuisine 41 Trey McIntyre Project 3 Twisted Ewe Yarn Shop 72 Varin Wardell 81 Volkswagon Audi Boise 108 Westmark Credit Union 105 The White Pine 79 Yummy Meats 53 Zip Idaho 93 Zoo Boise 23

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Annual Manual 2010-2011