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The Brave

Gary Invictus

It Floats

The trouble with BHS’s new mascot

Harsh diagnoses haven’t slowed down this Boise man

HGT’s Men on Boats holds water

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BOISEWEEKLY STAFF sally@boiseweekly.com Publisher: Matt Davison mdavison@idahopress.com Editorial Editor: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Xavier Ward xward@idahopress.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: https://portal.cityspark.com/ EventEntry/EventEntry/BoiseWeekly Contributing Writers: Jaclyn Brandt, Minerva Jayne, George Prentice, Anonymously Single Advertising Account Executive: Shea Sutton, shea@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Jason Jacobsen jason@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Jeff Leedy, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Ken Griffith, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallasen, Zach Thomas Boise Weekly prints 39,000 copies every Wednesday, with 22,000 distributed free of charge at almost 1,000 locations throughout the Treasure Valley and 17,000 inserted in Idaho Press on Thursday. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Digital subscriptions: 12 months-$50, subscribe.boiseweekly.com If you are interested in getting a mailed subscription, please email subscriptions@boiseweekly.com

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A VERY BOISE HIGHLIGHT

Boise High School has a new mascot. Earlier this week, the Boise School District Board of Trustees voted unanimously to change the “Boise Braves” to “Boise Brave,” a move that will, likely, make few people happy. On the one hand, fans of the “Boise Braves” are upset at what they see as a taking, and on the other, “Brave” is an adjective with no real-world referent—some mascot. On page 6, Xavier Ward has written a story about that transition I can’t wait for you to read, one that puts the emphasis on the Natives and tribes that helped make the change possible. During the mascot debate in Boise, I’ve returned to this year’s Treasure Valley Reads title, There There, by Tommy Orange. If readers take one thing away from this book, it’s that Natives are out here today. They drive cars, own smartphones, watch TV and listen to modern music. Those might seem like obvious, trivial observations, but the image of the Native American forwarded by mascots like the Boise Braves is durable, with the alluring patina of history, and we have to be on guard that those images don’t take precedence over real people. When its members voted on Aug. 12, the Boise School District Board of Trustees upheld a community value, hearing the words and honoring the concerns of people actually affected by Boise High’s mascot. That’s something to celebrate. Later, on page 8, Jaclyn Brandt tells the story of Gary Arbaugh. This remarkable (and extremely active) Boisean got a pair of diagnoses that have crimped his sporty lifestyle, but he has found a new hobby: making walking canes. On page 9, I write about HomeGrown Theatre’s production of Men on Boats, an energetic and smart play about an historic mission to explore the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. There’s a twist: Every character is played by a woman, and whenever possible, a woman of color. Finally, on page 11, George Prentice calls Where’d You Go, Bernadette the “anti-August” movie of the year. These midsummer months are graveyards for films, and in his review, Prentice makes the case for a few hours in an air conditioned theater to see great performances by Cate Blanchett, Kristen Wiig and Billy Crudup. —Harrison Berry, Editor

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HEP A PART II Hepatitis A has been found in a worker at a second Boise restaurant—this time in food service worker at the Red Robin Gourmet Burgers and Brews on Parkcenter Boulevard. Learn more at News/ Citydesk.

LAKE STREET ON MAIN ST. Boston band Lake Street Dive rolled into Boise for a show at The Egyptian Theatre on the heels of its latest album, Free Yourself Up, but don’t discount the opening artist, Yola. Find out why at Music/ Music.

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X AVIER WARD

NEWS

‘BRAVE’ NEW WORLD Boise High changes its mascot amid conversations with Shoshone-Bannock Tribe X AVIER WARD

Boise High students are no longer “the Braves.” After a meeting the evening of Aug. 12, the Boise School District Board of Trustees unanimously approved a motion to change the mascot to the Brave. By dropping the “s” from the former mascot, the new mascot embodies a value rather than a stereotype, according to the district. The decision was widely debated, with some saying the change erases the school’s history, and others saying simply dropping a letter from the name is doesn’t go far enough. “Personally, I’m in the camp of the people who think it’s not enough of a change,” said Tai Simpson, an indigenous activist and member of the Nez Perce tribe.“I can’t think of any school ever that’s used an adjective as a mascot.” On the opposite side, a protest group, Save the Boise Braves, gathered signatures to get the school board to slow the process—an ultimately unsuccessful move. Boise High Principal Robb Thompson said this is one of the final steps to right past wrongs. The school has been working since 2014 to rid the school of negative imagery showing indigenous people as a caricature. “Every day is a good day to be brave,” Thompson said at the meeting, the Idaho Press reported. According to the Idaho Press report, 27 people testified at the meeting. Of those, 24 were in favor of the change. “Boise Schools has always been able to move forward while respecting the past. The administration’s recommendation does not erase, nor diminish, Boise High’s past,” Boise High staff member Denise Donovan stated in a written testimony to the board. The change has been largely well-received by local tribes. The school district worked with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe to enact the change and come up with a solution for replacing the insensitive mascot. “I’ve seen countless stereotypical mascots from Braves to Savages to Indians,” said Lori Edmo-Suppah, editor of the Sho-Ban News, the Shoshone-Bannock newspaper. “It’s a matter of respect.” 6 | AUGUST 14–20, 2019 | BOISEWEEKLY

Boise High’s mascot will change from the Braves to the Brave, a value-based mascot instead of a caricature of indigenous culture.

said she has been ejected from sporting events Edmo-Suppah said that she does not speak in the past for telling coaches or school offor the tribe, but believes personally that Boise ficials their indigenous mascots are insulting. High is taking appropriate steps regarding the “I think what’s most important is, it’s mascot. She said she has heard arguments that the mascots are not forms of mockery, but rath- about respect,” she said. “Realize there’s no honor in er a sign of their masrespect for cots.” indigenous Replacpeople. To ing “The her mind, “THE Y ’RE WHITE PEOPLE Braves” isn’t that’s nonthe only sense. WHO THINK THE Y ’RE change that “They’re needs to white HONORING [ U S ] AND happen, people who but it’s think they’re THE Y ’RE NOT. … IT’S A a step in honoring C O LO N IZE D V I E W.” the right [us] and direction, they’re not,” she added. she said. Oregon, “It’s a coloWashingnized view.” ton, Montana and Wyoming are adjusting Edmo-Suppah said the solution is simple: their curricula to include indigenous perspecListen to indigenous people. There are those tives, and Edmo-Suppah said Idaho should who think they know what’s best and what’s follow suit. respectful, but she said most indigenous people “All you read about in Idaho history is are opposed to the mascots and want to see from a white-man perspective,” she said. them change. “That’s what history books are all about.” “I don’t see how they can continue on with The Shoshone-Bannock isn’t the the way they are,” she said. only Idaho tribe to rally against native Edmo-Suppah has covered high school mascots. The Nez Perce have also taken a sports in Idaho for more than 20 years, and

stand on mascots in other parts of Idaho. On June 14, the Nez Perce sent a letter to the Teton School District in support of changing the district’s mascot, “the Redskins,” which is a racial slur. While there are a number of variant explanations for the word “redskin,” including Natives’ use of red clay on the east coast and a derogatory comment on Natives’ skin color, the letter pointed to a more violent origin rooted in the government call for Native scalps. “We understand that school alumni may have a well-formed connection with the mascot; however, we believe that the harm of using such a mascot outweighs any benefit of that connection,” the letter states. A representative of the Nez Perce said local tribes should be consulted as a matter of policy when it comes to retiring their Native mascots. The change has also been embraced by many Boise High students and graduates. Ezra Hampikian, a Boise High alum who once wore the mascot costume, has since become a fierce opponent of the mascot and an advocate for its replacement, urging school districts to discuss their potentially offensive mascots with local tribes. “I think it’s really, really important to listen to indigenous voices when making this decision,” she said. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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JACLYN BR ANDT

ARTS & CULTURE THE REMARKABLE GARY ARBAUGH

The prodigious runner and water-skier is redirecting his energy after receiving two difficult diagnoses JACLYN BRANDT when they were from Boise to Stanley. I’ve done Gary Arbaugh has led a remarkable life. He two Hood Coasts, which is Mount Hood to the worked in sales at TV and radio stations for Coast. I’ve done Rainier to the Coast. I’ve done more than 30 years in the Boise area, and has become a recognizable face around town to busi- Jasper to Banff up in Canada—the grizzly bear ness owners, charities, runners and many others. capital of the world. Arbaugh’s favorite race moments include runArbaugh made the most of his life durning across the Golden Gate Bridge in the middle ing his career, and he was looking forward of the night and being chased off the course by a to throwing himself into his hobbies during grizzly bear during that Canadian relay. retirement. Then things changed. In 2015, he He has also received notoriety for water skiing was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. The 861 weeks in a row (every week between 1999 diseases have altered his mobility in many and 2016). Most of those weeks were done out at ways, but even after the diagnosis, he continLucky Peak, but because of vacation, “I had to ski ued to be as active as physically possible. “It started about four years ago. I was diagnosed in Hawaii and Mexico and Grand Cayman, [as well as] back east a few times,” Arbaugh said. with Parkinson’s, I had to sell my motorcycles, I “I’ve actually had to hire guys to clean the didn’t have balance any more. I was getting along pretty well with Parkinson’s there for a couple years, snow off the ramp so I could get the boat in [at I was taking about 10 exercise classes a week, which Lucky Peak]. If Lucky Peak is frozen like it has is good for Parkinson’s. I was boxing, yoga, Tai Chi, been I’d go down to Marsing: The Snake River weight training. I was really working out hard,” he never freezes.” Because he was always down at Lucky Peak on said. “And then I stumbled going into the house New Year’s Day, Arbaugh got the idea 17 years and broke my leg in three places.” After several months of suffering with a broken ago to help others—and he and his wife decided leg that wouldn’t heal, Arbaugh finally went back to start the Polar Bear Challenge, benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation. to the doctor. “We were going to be up there skiing any“They said ‘the reason it won’t heal up is beways, so we decided, ‘let’s go talk to Make-Acause you’ve got cancer,’” he explained. Wish,’” he said. Arbaugh was The 2020 Polar Bear diagnosed with Challenge will be the multiple myeloma, “I GOT INTO THIS 17th year of the fundan incurable blood raiser, which brought cancer. TO KE E P M E B U SY out approximately 300 “So I’ve got two participants in 2019 and diseases that don’t go BEC AU S E I ’ M RE AL has raised an average of together well—I’ve $35,000 a year for the got Parkinson’s that ANTSY. I JUST WANT foundation. makes you stumble Arbaugh water skied durand fall down, TO STAY B U SY A N D ing the Polar Bear Challenge and then I’ve got nearly every year, but “now I I LIKED IT BE T TER the blood disease just wade in.” that weakens your THAN I THOUGHT.” For the last decade, bones,” he said. Arbaugh has also run a “Not a good combineighborhood-wide (outnation to have.” door) Boise State Broncos The limited mowatch party during every away football game, and bility was especially tough for Arbaugh, who had an average of 75 people show up to each event. led an active life over the years racing sailboats, “We had a Mexican food truck serve tacos one motorcycles, horses and on foot. He has run the Race to Robie Creek 13 times, the Sawtooth Relay time and there were 115 people there,” he remembered. “After a while it connected people.” nine times and Mount Hood to the Coast twice. Despite his new situation, Arbaugh does every“I was just running to get into shape, so I started doing Robie Creek,” he said. “I got hooked thing he can to stay active. He has been married for 38 years and spends as much time as possible with up with a bunch of guys and we started doing his wife, two children and two grandchildren. He relays. We did every one of the Sawtooth Relays 8 | AUGUST 14–20, 2019 | BOISEWEEKLY

Two diagnoses have cut into Gary Arbaugh’s active lifestyle, but he has found a new hobby: making walking sticks.

rides his bicycle and hunts on his side-by-side, getting out as much as possible: “I’ve got to keep doing what I am doing.” Arbaugh is not someone to give up or feel sorry for himself, and he continually adds to his list of hobbies. He was taking art classes from the YMCA’s Artist in Residence program when he got a new idea. He walks with a cane, and decided it would be fun to make himself a few canes, which he carves out of wood he finds. After receiving many requests from friends and family for their own canes, he has made it into more than a hobby—it’s now a business. “I got into this to keep me busy because I’m real antsy,” Arbaugh said. “I just want to stay busy, and I liked it better than I thought.” He now takes requests and carves the canes with a drawknife once owned by his grandfather. Arbaugh’s canes are personalized for every person. He has built a Dalmation-themed cane for a dog lover, one with replaceable trinkets at the top for each holiday season, and a “blood” dripping cane with vampire teeth for a nurse during Halloween season. “An 80-year-old lady came to me last week I asked her what she wanted and she said ‘I don’t know, I used to bicycle a lot.’ So I put a bicycle belt on her’s,” he said. Arbaugh has kept his humor, and built a few canes with a sort of “pee spout” in the middle—he laughed and said it’s for old men. Most of them have something extra attached, whether it’s a piece of an antler, leather or a feather. All the antlers are from the deer, elk and other animals he has hunted. The canes also have a variety of finishes, including varnish, paint, sparkles or any other request he receives. “I like them with a little character to them,” he said.

His friends have started bringing him any wood they find, and he has since expanded production to include slingshots or replaceable heads to the canes. He also makes solar light stands and wine racks, including those made out of wood from different wine countries, including the Snake River region. Arbaugh’s canes are sold by word of mouth at this point, but he gets a lot of requests from nurses and doctors because of the amount of time he has to spend in their offices. “I’ve been going to chemo for several months now,” he said. “I’ve always had a different cane to take in and show them.” The medical professionals either buy them for their own patients, for their office use or for their own family members. The canes are made out of a variety of woods, including pine, juniper, bamboo, and he even made one for a friend out of a sunflower stock. Although he also makes them for himself, he said he only has so many hours in a day to use a cane—so he now prefers making them for others. Arbaugh considered setting up shop at a local flea market, “but I can’t keep up with demand now. I only want to make a couple a week.” Creating the canes is something that helps Arbaugh do what he did in his professional and personal lives—meet new people all over the Boise area. “Retirement is not what I thought it was going to be,” he said, but he is in a position to help others and he enjoys every minute of it. You can still see Arbaugh riding around town—although now it’s on a 3-wheel bicycle instead of his motorcycles. He has given up the water skiing, but still has made an important impact on many lives in the Boise area. He plans to continue making that impact, just in a new way. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


FRONTIER MAZE

HGT’s play Men on Boats is a raucous critique of manifest destiny HARRISON BERRY The three-sentence summary of the life of John Wesley Powell is impressive. A lifelong geologist, he became a member of the Illinois Natural History Society by age 25, and was gifted enough to eventually become the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey, as well as the director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Museum. An opponent of slavery and supporter of the Union, he wore the navy blues and lost an arm at the Battle of Shiloh. Later, he led a U.S.-sanctioned expedition down the Colorado River, charting the Grand Canyon. Other achievements and discoveries would follow, but Men on Boats, a play by Jaclyn Backhaus and directed for HomeGrown Theatre by Nick Garcia, centers on his time on the HomeGrown Theatre’s production of Men on Boats is high-energy, funny and smart. Colorado, and paints a portrait of the 10 men who participated in that journey that can’t be found in history books. For one thing, every actor in the play is a woman, and many of them personalities start to clash. Powell’s relentless ghost story, and Powell’s physical limitations are women of color. on account of his missing arm—and how optimism goes from charming to insuffer“[Backhaus] wanted to write this advenable, pitting him against Dunn. The Howland that played into his sense of purpose—were ture, but she has this theatrical way of writing. brothers (Rachel Dickerson and Jz Marrero) gripping. Characters were well-drawn, smart In and of itself, it’s not a straightforward and flawed. Other elements bordered on are fractious with pretty much everybody. historical story,” said Jaime Nebeker, who plays Comic relief, even in the hardest of times, tedium: The cast was, at 10, historically acPowell’s second in curate and very large; and while river-rafting comes from Patti command, William scenes were welcome moments of high O’Hara’s Old Shady, Dunn, and is HGT’s energy, they often felt non-essential, which Powell’s brother and managing director. is ironic, given Men on Boats is a play about one dry coot. MEN ON BOATS Writing the play, river rafting. One scene involving Native By laminating HomeGrown Theatre Backhaus pulled women into the roles of Americans was so on-the-nose that it felt at the Gem Center for the Arts directly from Powell’s historical men, the play- like it had been pulled from another, more 8 p.m., expedition log, which didactic, play entirely. wright and HGT have $10 suggested donation Powell, played charisThe audience for this play is anyone who created something Zen matically by Veronica cares about theater. HGT draws from an that feels like an open Von Tobel, references ocean of modern and contemporary plays invitation to critique at regularly in the play, that touches audiences where they live. Its every bend in the river. and no, the playwright did not intend for the last production, She Kills Monsters, trafficks “What does this play mean, now that women actors to play their characters as women. women have the opportunity to take a journey in grief and Dungeons & Dragons, and Men Rather, gender has been layered on top of the on Boats is a romp through the wilds that like this? How is manifest destiny different in history, leaving it up to the audience to make challenges historical biases when it comes to this play than it was for men? What a great sense of that wrinkle as it will, and at the Aug. gender. Its next, the eighth-annual Horrific opportunity for these men, but wow, what 10 opening night, the audience reacted with Puppet Affair, is hands-down one of the best a great opportunity for women to take this hoots, laughter and sometimes boot-stomping. journey first and be sanctioned by the govern- ways to celebrate Halloween. All of it is creThe central conflict in Men on Boats is ative and done for the love of the game. ment,” Nebeker said. between the men and the river, which is at “If we get a kick out of it, our audiences The play was well-met by the audience, first a source of joy and adventure, and ends a are going to get a kick out of it. We get to and was at its strongest when exploring charsource of hardship and deprivation. The Grand acters and doing worldbuilding. A subplot start with us and our interests. If you’re makCanyon is deep and long, and when food and ing theater that excites you, it shows to the involving the discovery of a previous, illsupplies start to run scarce, the characters’ big audience,” Nebeker said. fated expedition down the Colorado teased a BOISE WEEKLY.COM

JOEL HROMA

ARTS & CULTURE

ANONYMOUSLY SINGLE MEXICO I was recently heading back from a bachelorette party in Mexico and was stuck in the airport for over 6 hours. I was living my best life—hungover, 4-day-old hair, hobo chic attire and last night’s makeup. All the girls were asleep, looking for last-minute souvenirs or listening to their headphones. Unfortunately for me, I was spiraling in my head with my own thoughts. As a single girl I know you understand what I’m talking about. I was creepily watching and judging everyone I saw and then evaluating my life. For example, I was shooting daggers at all the happy couples and then coming up with their flaws. I’m cuter than her, I bet he’s unemployed and she’s settling. Or he looks too old for her, she must have daddy issues. I knew I had to stop so I just focused on my phone to drown out everything else. Bad idea. First, looking at my phone meant reliving the fun trip I’d had and scrolling through all the pictures of margaritas, smiling friends and beach selfies. However, that quickly turned into looking at old pictures of myself—a thinner, younger version of myself—occasionally accompanied by a picture of happier times with a former flame. I started analyzing every picture and trying to pinpoint at what moment I started gaining weight and dating men not worth my time. If any of my friends shared this moment of desperation with me I’d tell them to snap out of it and reassure them with kind words and a motivational quote I’d stolen off Instagram. So why was I just letting myself spiral? Luckily I sought a lifeline, started talking to a girlfriend and came back to reality before I’d done too much damage. Why are we so hard on ourselves, but so supportive of our friends? Why do we instantly go to “I’m going to die alone instead I just haven’t met the one?” Have you been there? What helps you out of the darkness? Cheers to focusing on the positive not dwelling on the negative. —A.S. Hit me up at anonymouslysingle@boiseweekly.com or follow me on Instagram. BOISEWEEKLY | AUGUST 14–20, 2019 | 9


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FIRST DEGREE ‘BERN’

SCREEN

Where’d You Go, Bernadette opens Friday, Aug. 16, at The Flicks GEORGE PRENTICE Where’d You Go, Bernadette may be the best anti-August film in recent memory. I have long theorized that August is Hollywood’s wasteland. Simply put, don’t expect any filmmakers behind an August release to be renting a tuxedo come Oscar time. With so many families enjoying the last gasp of summer before another school year begins, film distributors have Cate Blanchette is “a magician” in Where’d You Go, Bernadette—this year’s “anti-August” movie of note. been known to clean out their junk drawers in the weeks before Labor Day. But then there’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette, a flowers, you have to stop being so overwhelmed was “unfilmable,” doubting its “free-ranging sly, sensical contemplation of the human experi- by the lovely smell because otherwise you hilarity” could be captured by a camera lens. ence. Take as an example the opening moments couldn’t smell a predator. That’s why your brain Trust me. It’s “filmable.” of the film when we hear the voice of 16-yearRichard Linklatter: I have made no secret is considered a discounting mechanism. It’s old Bee (newcomer Emma Nelson) waxing of my admiration for this Oscar-nominated literally a matter of survival.” poetic on humankind’s fragility: writer/director (Boyhood, School of Rock, Dazed What follows over the next 90 minutes is an “Have you ever heard that the brain is and Confused). Linklatter has lifted complex, intellectual merry-go-round that whizzes by a a discounting mechanism? Let’s say you Seattle mudslide, an accidental overdose in a phar- beautiful characters from an epistolary, nonget a present and open it and it’s a fabumacy and a full-tilt mental meltdown. Keep all of linear novel and integrated them into a welllous diamond necklace. Initially, you’re that in mind when you consider that Where’d You balanced, three-act ensemble piece. delirious with happiness, jumping up and Cate Blanchett: In the hands of some Go, Bernadette is being promoted as a comedy. down, you’re so excited. The next day, the All that said, about two-thirds of the way into actress other than the two-time Oscar winner, necklace still a film during which I Bernadette could have devolved into a scenmakes you happy, admittedly wondered ery-chewing mess. Blanchett is a magician. but less so. After Emma Nelson: This Chicago-native eighththis thing was THIS MOVIE WHIZZES BY where a year, you see the grade wunderkind brings an emotional intelgoing, I told myself, necklace and you ligence into the eye of her parents’ domestic think I love this A SEAT TLE MUDSLIDE, AN “Imovie.” think, ‘Oh, that hurricane. I’m guessing that Linklatter, who Sure, it’s as old thing.’ It’s the has had an unprecedented knack for directquirky as wearing ACCIDENTAL OVERDOSE same for negative ing young talent, had something to do with tennis shoes with a emotions. Let’s say Nelson’s amazing performance. Chanel gown, but IN A PHARMACY AND you get a crack in Billy Crudup as Bernadette’s workit’s swell and often A FULL-TILT MENTAL your windshield obsessed Microsoft guru husband might adorable. And oh and you’re really be the film’s biggest surprise. Crudup takes yes: There are some BREAKDOWN—AND IT’S upset: ‘Oh no, my the often-thankless role of the protagonist’s penguins along the windshield, it’s ruspouse, which has time and again been way on Bernadette’s A COMEDY. ined. I can hardly marginalized in so many other films; but unlikely journey to see out of it. This Antarctica (don’t ask: Crudup’s delicate portrayal rounds off many is a tragedy.’ But of Bernadette’s prickly edges. And in the no spoilers here). you don’t have enough money to fix it, so The film is often untidy and occasionally off- shadow of such high-wattage performances you drive with it. In a month, someone asks from Blanchette, Nelson, and Kristen Wiig the-rails (as is Bernadette), but I did ultimately you what happened to your windshield, as Bernadette’s off-the-chain Seattle neighsurrender to its intellect and charisma. I can and you say, ‘What do mean?’ Because your bor, Crudup’s performance is the story’s count the reasons why on one hand: brain has discounted it. The source material: The 2012 runaway chart- much-needed anchor. “It’s for survival. You need to be prepared All in, Where’d You Go, Bernadette is octopping novel of the same name, penned by for novel experiences because they often signal casionally confounding, but fiercely intelligent Maria Semple, was dubbed “sparkling” by The danger. If you live in a jungle full of fragrant and utterly original. New York Times, but many thought the book BOISE WEEKLY.COM

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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY AUG. 14 Theatre ISF: THE MUSIC MAN—There’s trouble in River City when a fasttalking salesman gets his heart stolen by the town librarian. By turns wicked, funny, warm, romantic and touching, The Music Man is family entertainment at its best. 8 p.m. $13-$57. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, idahoshakespeare.org.

Film POINT BREAK: PRESENTED BY THE BOISE FILM FOUNDATION AND PAYETTE BREWING—Join us for an exclusive screening of POINT BREAK! Bring your blanket/ low back chair, $10 and your thirst. Kids under 12 are $5. 8-10 p.m. $5-$10. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S Pioneer St., Boise, 208-283-7065.

Civic Benefit BASKETS ‘N BREWS—Join Busy Baskets 208 at LongDrop for an evening of drinks and creativity, with free can of cider. Proceeds benefit Boise Bicycle Project. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $40. LongDrop Cider, 603 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-342-0186.

Teens EXPLORE VIRTUAL REALITY GAMES—Drop in and try out the library’s Playstation 4 Virtual Reality games! Ages 10+ 4:305:30 p.m. FREE. Victory Branch, 10664 West Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

Food & Drink

Kids

CALDWELL NIGHT RODEO 85TH ANNUAL BUCKAROO BREAKFAST—Enjoy a first-class breakfast of hotcakes, eggs, sausages, hash browns and beverages. 6:30-9:30 a.m. $4-$6. O’Connor Field House/ Caldwell Event Center, 2207 Blaine St., Caldwell, cityofcaldwell.org.

WATERSHED WEDNESDAY: WATER FUN DAY—This WaterShed Wednesday is going to be a blowout celebration of fun and water. 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208608-7300, bee.cityofboise.org.

IVRC COFFEE TALK—Enjoy a cup of coffee and connect with others who are interested in or working in virtual, mixed, or augmented reality. 8:30-10 a.m. FREE. The District Coffee House, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, idahovirtualreality.com.

THURSDAY AUG. 15 Festivals & Fairs BEYOND THE BLOCK SUMMER COMMUNITY GATHERINGS—Join JUMP this summer for laughter, music, food, and fun the third

THURSDAY, AUG. 15

FRIDAY, AUG. 16

Thursday of every month. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, jumpboise.org.

of this beautiful book. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, rdbooks.org.

Comedy

Theatre ISF: JULIUS CAESAR—Shakespeare’s classic drama of intrigue and allegiance is the ultimate political thriller. 8 p.m. $13-$52. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, idahoshakespeare.org.

SCREENAGERS DOCUMENTARY SCREENING—Screenagers is an award-winning film about growing up in a digital world and offers solutions to help our kids navigate it. 7 p.m. $10. The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., Boise, 208336-5533, nutritionworks.org.

Literary Arts ROGER BOE: THE FLOWS—Roger Boe will be sharing his research and background about the creation

Other BOISE FARMERS MOBILE MARKET—Support your local farmers every week at the Boys and Girls Club and enjoy fresh veggies, fruits, honey, eggs and more. 4:30-6 p.m. FREE. Boys and Girls Clubs of Ada County Moseley Center, 610 E. 42nd St., Garden City. GARDEN AMBASSADOR TOURS— Join Garden Ambassadors for guided tours through the Idaho Botanical Garden. 10-11:30 a.m. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

SATURDAY, AUG. 17

Before the iPhone, mobile phones were just that: phones. Afterward, they were pocket portals to the internet, and an entire generation of American children can’t remember a time when the digital world wasn’t portable. The phenomenon has attracted the attention and concern of parents, psychologists and neuroscientists, which will be brought to the big screen on Thursday, Aug. 15, when Nutrition Works will play Screenagers at The Flicks. This documentary asks—and seeks to answer—questions about how this new e-frontier is affecting young people’s development, and gives parents tools for ensuring their children’s real lives are at least as good as their digital lives, by discussing the relevant issues with experts and telling the stories of children whose lives have been impacted by easy, and often obsessive, access to the World Wide Web. 7 p.m. $10. The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., Boise, theflicksboise.com. 12 | AUGUST 14–20, 2019 | BOISEWEEKLY

WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Enjoy fair food, carnival rides, livestock shows, arts and crafts displays, vendor booths, live entertainment, prime people watching and more at this annual event. See online for a full schedule. Noon-11 p.m. $4-$7. Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Boise, idahofair.com.

Theatre ISF: JULIUS CAESAR—Shakespeare’s classic drama of intrigue and allegiance is the ultimate political thriller. 8 p.m. $13-$52.

FRI., AUG 16 - SUN., AUG. 25

Let it flow

BASQUE MUSEUM 22ND-ANNUAL WINEFEST Forget the college bar and nightclub scenes— the Basque Block is home to some of the biggest parties in Boise. One of the most hotly anticipated is the Winefest, now in its 22nd year. On Friday, Aug. 16, the Basque Museum and Cultural Center will throw down, serving more than 100 domestic and imported wines for sampling. It’s all paired with live music from the Aldape Bootstompers, dance performances by the Oinkari Basque Dancers, tapas by in-block restaurants and raffles. It’s also one of the biggest wine sales in town, with hundreds of bottles discounted. In 2018, more than 1,000 people showed up for it, sampling some of the best wine in town, and this year, the event is likely to be even bigger. All proceeds from the party benefit the Basque Museum and Cultural Center. 5:30-9 p.m. $45-$55. Basque Museum and Cultural Center, 611 Grove St., Boise, basquemuseum.eus.

A party for furry friends

KEL SE Y PARRY

SCREENAGERS DOCUMENTARY SCREENING

BASQUE MUSEUM 22ND ANNUAL WINEFEST 2019—Sample more than 100 wines, indulge in tapas from local restaurants, enter to win raffle prizes, and dance the night away. 5:30-9 p.m. $45-$55. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol and Sixth, Boise, 208343-2671, basquemuseum.eus

PMUTHS1956 CC BY SA 3.0

COURTESY BASQUE MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER

COURTESY MYDOC PRODUCTIONS.

Screen time

Festivals & Fairs

SHERRY JAPHET—Sherry Japhet’s credits include ComicCon New York, Emerging Comics Showcase, E Talent Showcase, and numerous TV and radio productions. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Laughs, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, liquidboise.com.

Film

FRIDAY AUG. 16

Funnel cakes and fair rides

BOISE CORGI FEST

THE WESTERN IDAHO FAIR

For years, the family dog breed of choice was the bulldog, followed by the Golden Retriever. More recently, ascendent breeds included Boston Terriers, Pugs, French Bulldogs and now the Corgi. They can credit their popularity in part to Elizabeth II, who got her first corgi, Dookie, in 1933. Since then, she has had more than 30 of the dogs. They’ve since appeared in the anime Cowboy Bebop, which features an over-the-top intelligent corgi named Ein. Every year in Boise, they get their dues at the Boise Corgi Fest, this year set for Saturday, Aug. 17, in Ann Morrison Park. Join other owners and fans for a pup parade, a costume contest, a Corgi derby and more. Folks who are feeling peckish can buy food, and don’t miss the Fuzzy Pawz Rescue-benefitting silent auction. Last year, the event raised $700 for the organization, which houses homeless and at-risk dogs cats with loving families. 10 a.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 S. Americana Blvd., Boise, boisecorgifest.org.

Fairs have been the staple of community celebration in the United States for years. They’re the set of 80s high school romance, a place where just about anything can be fried and a place to ride exciting attractions that are inadvisable after eating said fried food. The Western Idaho Fair, a Treasure Valley-wide soiree, brings all of those things (minus campy 80s romance). The fair is complete with live music from 90s stars 3 Doors Down to legendary rock group REO Speedwagon. After rocking out, attendees can ride the rides or go watch one of the competitions the fair has to offer. The 4-H and Future Farmers of America portion of the fair offers animal showings from cows and horses to rabbits and even guinea pigs. Fair events are scattered through the day, but admissions begin at noon and close at 10 p.m. The fair closes for the day at 11 p.m. Noon. $7. 5610 N. Glenwood St., Boise, idahofair.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, idahoshakespeare.org.

Comedy SHERRY JAPHET—Sherry Japhet’s credits include ComicCon New York, Emerging Comics Showcase, E Talent Showcase, and numerous TV and radio productions. 8 and 10 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Laughs, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, liquidboise.com.

Sports & Outdoors 2019 U.S. BOOMERANG NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS—Boise hosts the 2019 U.S. Boomerang National Championships, the first time in U.S. history that a national tournament will be held in the Gem State. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Heroes Park, 3064 W. Malta Dr., Meridian, usba.org. FLY ZONE FRIDAY: CELEBRATE AVIATION DAY—Celebrate Aviation Day by zooming into the Discovery Center for Fly Zone Friday. You’ll enjoy a paper airplane launcher competition. Planes must be built at the Discovery Center during the event, but feel free to get creative and take your own designs. A prize basket is at stake. Free for members and free with general admission for all others. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$12. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 W. Myrtle St., Boise, dcidaho.org.

Food & Drink THIRD FRIDAY FAN FAVORITE NIGHT WITH CRISP—Crisp is back out front and pairing some “Fan Favorite” Barbarian beers with some of their popular food items. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Barbarian Brewing Garden City, 5270 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-375-5639.

Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, idahoshakespeare.org.

Literary Arts BOOKSTORE ROMANCE DAY— Rediscovered Books and Once and Future Books share a day with games, activities, and a romance-specific sale. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, rdbooks.org.

Comedy SHERRY JAPHET—Sherry Japhet’s credits include ComicCon New York, Emerging Comics Showcase, E Talent Showcase, and numerous TV and radio productions. 8 and 10 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Laughs, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, liquidboise.com.

Sports & Outdoors 2019 U.S. BOOMERANG NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS—Boise hosts the 2019 U.S. Boomerang National Championships, the first time in U.S. history that a national tournament will be held in the Gem State. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Heroes Park, 3064 W. Malta Drive, Meridian, usba.org. FIELD TRIP: MORES MOUNTAIN BIRD HIKE AND PICNIC—Join Golden Eagle Audubon Society to escape the heat and hike the beautiful 2.5-mile Mores Mountain Interpretive trail. 8 a.m. FREE. Miller Gulch Trailhead and Parking, 6753-6843 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise, goldeneagleaudubon.org. RESORT TO ROCK TRAIL RACES— Three distances to choose from: 50K, 32K or 10 miles. All three races start and finish at the Simplot Lodge. All runners will be treated to a fast finish and welcomed with a

CALENDAR

party featuring music, great schwag and a free lunch for all participants from the Bogus Basin Ski resort. All courses on the Bogus Basin side are crew-friendly with multiple aid stations that are support team-accessible without the use of four-wheel drive vehicles. 6 a.m. $50. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, 2600 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise, trailrunner.com.

Civic Benefit SECOND ANNUAL J’ADORE L’AFRIQUE GALA—The second annual J’adore L’Afrique Gala is a formal red carpet, black tie evening show showcasing Africa in a new innovative light. 6-9 p.m. $25. Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise.

Learning EFFIJI BREATH CLASS—Breathwork helps you release the negative and discover your most full and purposeful life. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $25. Viva Fitness Club, 6053 Corporal Lane, Boise. 415-383-2645, effijibreath.com.

Other 6TH-ANNUAL TRADITIONAL AND TACTICAL KNIFE SHOW— Knive show with knives from popular local and world renowned knife makers. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. $6. Wyndham Garden Boise Airport, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise, idahoknifeshow.idahoknife.com. BOISE FARMERS MARKET—Find fresh local seasonal vegetables and fruit, many types of locally raised protein, breads and pastries, honey, jams and sauces, fresh-roasted coffee, and a delicious selection of ready-to-eat foods. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Shoreline Drive, 1500 Shoreline Dr., Boise, theboisefarmersmarket.com.

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—At The Capital City Public Market, you’ll meet Treasure Valley farmers, artists, bakers and other passionate vendors. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Eighth Street Corridor, Eighth and Idaho streets, Boise, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

SUNDAY AUG. 18 Festivals & Fairs WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Enjoy fair food, carnival rides, livestock shows, arts and crafts displays, vendor booths, live entertainment, prime people watching and more at this annual event. See online for a full schedule. Noon-11 p.m. $4-$7. Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Boise, idahofair.com.

Theatre ISF: THE MUSIC MAN—There’s trouble in River City when a fast-talking salesman gets his heart stolen by the town librarian. By turns wicked, funny, warm, romantic and touching, The Music Man is family entertainment at its best. 7 p.m. $13-$57. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, idahoshakespeare.org.

Comedy SHERRY JAPHET—Sherry Japhet’s credits include ComicCon New York, Emerging Comics Showcase, E Talent Showcase, and numerous TV and radio productions. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Laughs, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, liquidboise.com.

• Tacos, Bowls, Burritos, Burgers, Salads & More • Great Food, Fun Vibe, Family-friendly • Join us for dinner and enjoy amazing fajitas, tamales or a er! delicious burger! • Dine In or Try any NEW Dinner Take Out Special & Get a • Lunch & FREE Churro Fried Ice Cream!* Dinner Daily • Catering * Offer good until October 31, 2019.

SATURDAY AUG. 17 Festivals & Fairs BOISE CORGI FEST—Help raise money for charity and celebrate all things Corgi. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 S. Americana Blvd., Boise, boisecorgifest.org. WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Enjoy fair food, carnival rides, livestock shows, arts and crafts displays, vendor booths, live entertainment, prime people watching and more at this annual event. See online for a full schedule. Noon-11 p.m. $4-$7. Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Boise, idahofair.com.

Theatre ISF: JULIUS CAESAR—Shakespeare’s classic drama of intrigue and allegiance is the ultimate political thriller. 8 p.m. $13-$52.

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BROADWAY • PERFORMING ARTS EDUCATION • OUTREACH MC Box Office • 208-426-1110 • MorrisonCenter.com

208-996-3006 600 S. Rivershore Lane, Eagle

www.bluetoroidaho.com BOISEWEEKLY | AUGUST 14–20, 2019 | 13


MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

CALENDAR Sports & Outdoors 2019 U.S. BOOMERANG NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS—Boise hosts the 2019 U.S. Boomerang National Championships, the first time in U.S. history that a national tournament will be held in the Gem State. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. FREE. Heroes Park, 3064 W. Malta Drive, Meridian, usba.org.

MONDAY AUG. 19 Festivals & Fairs WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Enjoy fair food, carnival rides, livestock shows, arts and crafts displays, vendor booths, live entertainment, prime people watching and more at this annual event. See online for a full schedule. Noon-11 p.m. $4-$7. Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Boise, idahofair.com.

Comedy MINORITY RETORT—Minority Retort has become one of Portland’s most popular and critically-ac-

TUESDAY AUG. 20 Festivals & Fairs WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Enjoy fair food, carnival rides, livestock shows, arts and crafts displays, vendor booths, live entertainment, prime people watching and more at this annual event. See online for a full schedule. Noon-11 p.m. $4-$7. Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Boise, idahofair.com.

Theatre

Sports & Outdoors

Theatre

WILD WETLANDS NATURE WALK WITH ASL INTERPRETATION—Wetland ecologist Chris Murphy of Idaho Fish and Game will lead a visit to the Idaho Shakespeare Festival wetland. 7 p.m. FREE. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, idahoshakespeare.org.

ISF: THE MUSIC MAN—There’s trouble in River City when a fasttalking salesman gets his heart stolen by the town librarian. By turns wicked, funny, warm, romantic and touching, The Music Man is family entertainment at its best. 8 p.m. $13-$57. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, idahoshakespeare.org.

WEDNESDAY AUG. 21 Festivals & Fairs WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Enjoy fair food, carnival rides, livestock shows, arts and crafts displays, vendor booths, live entertainment, prime people watching and more at this annual event. See online for a full schedule. Noon-11 p.m. $4-$7. Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Boise, idahofair.com.

Film CABIN IN THE WOODS: PRESENTED OF THE BOISE FILM FOUNDATION AND THE IDAHO HORROR FILM FESTIVAL—Join us for an exclusive screening of Cabin in the Woods! Bring your blanket/low back chair, $10 and your thirst. Kids under 12 are $5. 8-10 p.m. $5-$10. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S Pioneer St., Boise, 208-2837065, boisefilmfoundation.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

ISF: JULIUS CAESAR—Shakespeare’s classic drama of intrigue and allegiance is the ultimate political thriller. 8 p.m. $13-$52. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, idahoshakespeare.org.

CALENDAR EXTRA COURTESY CIRQUE SERIES

CIRQUE SERIES TRAIL RACE RETURNS TO SUN VALLEY In less than two weeks Sun Valley will once again host the Discrete Cirque Series on the slopes of Bald Mountain. Billed as “the premiere mountain running series in the United States,” the Cirque Series includes races at iconic ski resorts in Utah, one at Colorado’s Arapahoe Basin, and for the truly dedicated, one in Alaska. Sun Valley might be the toughest race. At 9.5 miles, it’s the longest course in the series and has the most vertical gain during the climb to the top of Bald Mountain. The first part of the course goes The author racing in the Cirque Series in 2018. directly up the ski run. “Sun Valley is an amazing community, but the course is optimal because you climb over 3,400 vertical feet in our race—the views are 360 from the summit,” said Julian Carr, the man behind the series. ”[It’s] super hard, super beautiful and we can’t wait for year two!” Last year’s inaugural race had a few mishaps, including a last-minute course reroute for trail maintenance that added nearly 2 miles. In 2018, the overall winner was Wood River Valley-native Ben Stout, and the 2018 women’s winner was Ketchum local Morgan Arritola, a member of the USA Mountain Running Team. She currently leads the series, having won two Utah races in 2019. Racers are divided among three different divisions, giving beginners the chance to earn some swag. Hundreds of dollars of gear is given away in each division, and prizes are awarded to the youngest racer, king and queen of the hill, and whoever finishes in the middle of the field. Sun Valley-area locals can stay keyed into the Cirque Series’ social media feeds (@cirqueseries). The organizers drop off substantial prize bags on a nearby mountain top in the days leading up to the race, adding an extra incentive to get in a last-minute training run. —Micah Drew 14 | AUGUST 14–20, 2019 | BOISEWEEKLY

claimed comedy shows. Hosted and produced by Jason Lamb (XRAYFM radio, Portland Podcast Festival), Julia Ramos (All Jane Comedy Festival) and some of the NW’s finest comedic talent, the show’s goal is to provide comedians of color with a platform to speak their minds and share their unique perspectives, as well as reach the diverse comedy audience that exists within the so-called “whitest city in America.” 8 p.m. $12. Liquid Laughs, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, liquidboise.com.

Literary Arts BRYNNE CONROY: THE FEMINIST FINANCIAL HANDBOOK— Brynne Conroy’s The Feminist Financial Handbook is a must read for any one interested in money, not just for women and feminists. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, rdbooks.org.

Comedy KYLE AYERS—Kyle Ayers is a comedian, writer and actor living in New York City, by way of his hometown near Kansas City. He brings his satirical look at growing up in the small town to the big city, with a unique viewpoint on his generation, our childhoods, and daily life. He has performed in the Brooklyn Comedy Festival and the Laughing Devil Comedy Festival. 8 p.m. $15. Liquid Laughs, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, liquidboise.com. RAMAPONG COMEDY TUESDAYS—RamaPong and Red Mic Comedy teamed up to give comics a place to work out jokes. Go see what they’re working on this week. 9:30-11 p.m. FREE. RamaPong, 204 N. Capitol Blvd., Ste. 10, Boise.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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CALEB CRUMP

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HOMESHAKE, THE NEUROLUX, AUG. 15

The project of Mac Demarco guitarist Peter Sagar, Homeshake brings a contemporary, jazzy twist to lo-fi indie pop. One Youtube comment described the Montreal-based solo act’s frosh album Fresh Air as “so sexy it’s probably banned in Saudi Arabia and Texas.” While it’s probably not banned, the music is a treat. The mix of gated, vintage instrumentals pairs perfectly with the wispy and refreshing vocal harmonies. Sagar is touring on his second album, Helium, which just dropped in February. He also released a collection of remixes to Helium this month. The album is more electronic than his first album, but carries the same ambience. Homeshake is hitting the Neurolux with KeithCharles and Daddy Frank. KeithCharles is a lo-fi rapper based out of New York City. —Xavier Ward With KeithCharles and Daddy Frank. 8:30 p.m. $12-15. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, neurolux.com.

COURTESY YOUTUBE

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ALIVE AFTER FIVE: MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL AND THE THE JUKE DADDYS, THE GROVE PLAZA, AUG. 14

Blues trio Mississippi Marshall and the Juke Daddys is Mississippi “Blues Daddy” Marshall, Jody “Cornpone Jenkins” Smith and Dayle “Mojo Foot” May. Based out of Idaho City, the band’s sound is a unique form of rockabilly. Hearing Mississippi Marshal croon out raw blues lyrics as he strums up a high-energy riff on his guitar, it comes as no surprise that he was a semifinalist for the International Blues challenge, a Grammy Museum Foundation award-winner for Originality and Mississippi Music Foundation award-winner for Best Instrumental. Mississippi Marshal has been performing since he was 11 years old and writing songs for three decades. The Juke Daddys use plucky guitars, the beat of the drums and the vibrations of the bass to swell their music into a blues rock mash-up that hooks the listener. They will play in the Grove Plaza on Wednesday, Aug. 14, at 5 p.m. —Devon Burleigh With NKE. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza, 827 W. Main St., Boise, downtownboise.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

MUSIC GUIDE

WEDNESDAY AUG. 14

WIZ KHALIFA—With French Montana and Chevy Woods. 7 p.m. $45-$85. Ford Idaho Center Amphitheater

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL AND THE JUKE DADDYS—With NKE. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza DOUGLAS CAMERON—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek Grill KENDRA MCKINLEY—With Ana Lete. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux LEE PENN SKY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel SPENCER BATT—7 p.m. FREE. Old Chicago Downtown STEVE Eaton—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar at The Riverside Hotel

THURSDAY AUG. 15

FRIDAY AUG. 16

BOISE COMMUNITY BAND: SWINGING THROUGH THE SUMMER—7 p.m. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place DAVE MANION—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel

MOZZY: INTERNAL AFFAIRS TOUR—8 p.m. $20-$55. Knitting Factory SAMUEL HENRY—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar at The Riverside Hotel

CUNNINGHAM AND MOSS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel

SHON SANDERS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel

JA RULE AND ASHANTI—8 p.m. $50-$155. Revolution Concert House MARSHALL POOLE—With White Elephant, and Sick Wish. 7 p.m. $7. The Olympic

THE PIANO GUYS—7:30 p.m. $48-$53.Outlaw Field at the Idaho Botanical Garden THE SOULMATES—4:30 p.m. FREE. Albertson’s Broadway on the Rocks SPERRY HUNT—6:30 p.m. FREE. Caffeina Roasting Company

DEIFY X: WEST COAST TOUR— With The Phets. 9 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

SATURDAY AUG. 17

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: HILLFOLK NOIR—6 p.m. $8-$12. Idaho Botanical Garden

ANDREW SCOTCHIE—With The River Rats, and Bread and Circus. 7 p.m. $8. The Olympic

HOMESHAKE—With KeithCharles. 8:30 p.m. $12-$15. Neurolux

BOBBY DEE KEYS—8 p.m. FREE. McCleary’s Pub-State St.

PLAYBOI CARTI—8 p.m. $50$150. Knitting Factory

COLLEGE LEVEL—With Van Lavish. 10 p.m. $5. Reef

PROPERGANDA: OM UNIT—With Orracle, and Erratique. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $10-$12. Fatty’s Bar

HAND OF DOOM BLACK SABBATH TRIBUTE—With Vindicata. 8:30 p.m. $5. Neurolux

WINGIT—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar at The Riverside Hotel

MOJO BOOGIE—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar at The Riverside Hotel

ADDAM C. AND BOURGEOISIE BEATS—9 p.m. $5. Reef

MICHAELA STUTZ FRENCH—8 p.m. FREE. Quinn’s Restaurant and Lounge

BANGARANG: A HIP-HOP EVENT—Boise Hip-Hop Community event benefiting Radio Boise. 6 p.m. $10-$15. The Shredder

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—9 p.m. FREE. Ranch Club

IRATION: LIVE FROM PARADISE SUMMER TOUR—With Pepper, Fortunate Youth, and Katastro 5:30 p.m. $32-$119. Outlaw Field at the Idaho Botanical Garden

TUESDAY AUG. 20

3 DOORS DOWN—6 p.m. FREE. Western Idaho Fair THE APPLESEED CAST—With Muscle Worship, and The Green Zoo. 8:30 p.m. $12-$14. Neurolux BOISE BAROQUE SUMMER DINNER PARTY SEASON OPENER—6 p.m. $100. Chateau des Fleurs

TRAVIS TRITT AND THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND: OUTLAWS AND RENEGADES TOUR—7 p.m. $30-$75. Ford Idaho Center Amphitheater

THE BROTHERS COMATOSE—7 p.m. $12. The Olympic

ZACK QUINTANA BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar at The Riverside Hotel

JOHNNY KUNK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel

SUNDAY AUG. 18 ALL THE BAD TIMES—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar at The Riverside Hotel ELWAY—With Sam Russo, and Ramona. 7 p.m. $12. The Shredder MOOD SWING—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel NAS—With Vito, and Young Neves. 8 p.m. $35-$75. Revolution Concert House TRAVELIN’ MILES—One-mansuitcase band. 11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar at The Riverside Hotel

JEN AND JOHNNY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel

SAWTOOTH SERENADERS—7 p.m. FREE. Barbarian Brewing Downtown Boise Taproom

WEDNESDAY AUG. 21 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: THE NAVY BAND NORTHWEST FUNK BAND, EDMOND DANTES—With Boise Rock School. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza LIVE AFTER 5 IN THE GARDEN: ENCORE—5 p.m. FREE. Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum MATTY J AND CAJON ALONE— One man band, acoustic guitar and cajon. 7 p.m. FREE. Old Chicago Downtown NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Western Idaho Fair at Expo Idaho

MONDAY AUG. 19

SAM AND KATE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel

RETURN OF THE MONDAY DEATH PARTY VOL. II—Featuring Dead Animal Assembly Plant, with HeXXeN, and The Bewitchin Jinxxx Burlesque Dancer. 9:30 p.m. $5. Liquid Lounge

STEPHEN LEWIS AND THE BIG BAND OF FUN—7 p.m. $8. The Olympic STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar at The Riverside Hotel

SPENCER BATT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 at The Riverside Hotel

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MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN $GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH BAD MANNERS DEAR MINERVA: I have a “friend” that I go to dinner with a couple of times a year. We’ve known each other for many years. She’s a real go-getter and has been very successful in her life. I am happy for her success but every time we go somewhere to dine, I brace myself, because she treats waitstaff terribly. She recently invited me out for dinner and I can’t bear the idea of going and having to secretly make apologies and leave appropriate tips because she is unable to be satisfied. How can I get out of this? —Sincerely, Fed Up

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DEAR FED: Nothing can change the mood of a dinner engagement than watching someone treat poorly the very people who are there to help you enjoy your experience. No amount of success can buy politeness and kindness. Waitstaff work very hard at their jobs. They are responsible for so much and take the brunt of complaints that are beyond their control. Even if something doesn’t go right, it would seem to me that there is rarely cause for rudeness. Accept her invitation for dinner on the condition that she behave appropriately. Yes, this will require a difficult-but-crucial conversation. Explain that you’d like to spend time with her but that her mistreatment of waitstaff is no longer on the menu. This gives room for her to realize how she has behaved (on the off chance that she is unaware) and allow her to correct her behavior. Either way it works out, you’ll know how to proceed. Cheers! SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/AskMinerva or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous. Illustration of Minerva by Adam Rosenlund.

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ADOPT-A-PET Noodle Says...

These pets can be adopted at Conrad Strays. conradstrays.com |

SADIE is looking for her forever home where she will be the center of attention! She’s so sweet and loves to be held.

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WHIPPERSNAPPER will be ready for her forever home soon. She is quite the character and loves to play, play, play!

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WANDA is gorgeous. She is looking for her new family and can’t wait to spend the rest of her life with them!

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TRUESTACK Jenga has been a popular party game since the 1970s. The name is derivative of the Swahili word kujenga, which means “to build.” The objective of the game is the opposite of the meaning. Instead, players take things away from the tower, hoping to not knock it over. Over the years, the game has taken many forms. More recently, it’s become a popular bar game, often bars or breweries will have “giant Jenga” sets. Jenga, the official brand of the game, has sold more than 80 million sets, with 4.3 billion individual blocks sold. There are also a number of knock-off games, including those of the boozy variety. Truestack, a Jenga-style game, that gets two to four players loaded whilst removing bricks, attempting not to topple the tower. Each brick has instructions such as “take a drink,” “drink two,” “make a rule” and “person to your right takes a drink.” Truestack is available at The Record Exchange for $17.99. —Xavier Ward Truestack, $17.99, therecordexchange.com.

OSCAR: 1-year-old male Domestic Rat. Curious, friendly and sociable. Surrendered due to his previous owners moving away.

CALLIE: 3.5-yearold, spayed female Labrador Retriever mix. Playful, friendly and affectionate. Can be shy in new environments.

MELODY: 2-yearold, 8-pound female Domestic Mediumhair. Sweet, gentle, easygoing. Warms up easily to people.

TOP 10 BOISE HIGH SCHOOL FACTS 1. Boise High was founded in 1902 to replace the overcrowded Central High School 2. It was originally a red brick structure, later replaced by white brick by Tourtellotte and Hummel, who would also design the Idaho State Capitol 3. Notable alumni include former Boise Mayor Carolyn Terteling-Payne and U.S. Sen. Frank Church

4. The school was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 5. Commonly called “the science building,” the large, separate building southeast of the administration building is officially called the Frank Church Technology Building 6. Newsweek has consistently ranked Boise High the top high school in Idaho, and regularly makes its national list of top high schools

7. The Boise High newspaper is The Boise Highlights 8. The gymnasium was built in 1936—in part using funds provided by its students 9. Boise High’s sister schools, Borah and Capitol, were built in 1958 and 1965, respectively. Timberline opened in 1998 10. In 2019, 18 out of 33 National Merit Scholarship semifinalists in the Boise School District were Boise High students

Cat Care by Cat People

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. simplycats.org | 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

GRAYSON: I was dumped outside. My elbow was badly injured, requiring two surgeries. I deserve a soft place to land.

DUCHESS: A teeny tiny lady who ended up in a feral community. It wasn’t her idea, believe that! Super cuddly and wants to be your friend.

18 | AUGUST 14–20, 2019 | BOISEWEEKLY

SATIN: She ended up pregnant way too young. She found access to a shed and delivered her babies. She has been socialized.

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I M AGES 1 2 3 RF.C O M

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. idahohumanesociety.org | 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

Taken by Instagram user @bookishbrooke83.


ASTROLOGY LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Moray eels have two sets of jaws. The front set does their chewing. The second set, normally located behind the first, can be launched forward to snag prey they want to eat. In invoking this aggressive strategy to serve as a metaphor for you in the coming weeks, I want to suggest that you be very dynamic and enterprising as you go after what you want and need. Don’t be rude and invasive, of course, but consider the possibility of being audacious and zealous. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s relatively rare, but now and then people receive money or gifts from donors they don’t know. Relatives they’ve never met may bequeath them diamond tiaras or alpaca farms or bundles of cash. I don’t think that’s exactly what will occur for you in the coming weeks, but I do suspect that you’ll garner blessings or help from unexpected sources. To help ensure the best possible versions of these acts of grace, I suggest that you be as generous as possible in the kindness and attention you offer. Remember this verse from the Bible: “Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libra-born Ronald McNair was an African American who grew up in a racist town in South Carolina in the 1950s. The bigotry cramped his freedom, but he rebelled. When he was nine years old, he refused to leave a segregated library, which prompted authorities to summon the police. Years later, McNair earned a PhD in Physics from MIT and became renowned for his research on laser physics. Eventually, NASA chose him to be an astronaut from a pool of 10,000 candidates. That library in South Carolina? It’s now named after him. I suspect that you, too, will soon receive some vindication, Libra: a reward or blessing or consecration that will reconfigure your past. SCORPIO (Oct. 3-Nov. 21): Scorpio author Zadie Smith wrote, “In the end, your past is not my past and your truth is not my truth and your solution—is not my solution.” I think it will be perfectly fine if sometime soon you speak those words to a person you care about. In delivering such a message, you won’t be angry or dismissive. Rather, you will be establishing good boundaries between you and your ally; you will be acknowledging the fact that the two of you are different people with different approaches to life. And I bet that will ultimately make you closer. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Nothing fruitful ever comes when plants are forced to flower in the wrong season,” wrote author and activist Bette Lord. That’s not entirely true. For example, skilled and meticulous gardeners can compel tulip and hyacinth bulbs to flower before they would naturally be able to. But as a metaphor, Lord’s insight is largely accurate. And I think you’ll be wise to keep it in mind during the coming weeks. So my advice is: don’t try to make people and processes ripen before they are ready. But here’s a caveat: you might have modest success working to render them a bit more ready. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “For though we often need to be restored to the small, concrete, limited, and certain, we as often need to be reminded of the large, vague, unlimited, unknown.” Poet A. R. Ammons formulated that shiny burst of wisdom, and now I’m passing it on to you. As I think you know, you tend to have more skill at and a greater inclination toward the small, concrete, limited, and certain. That’s why, in my opinion, it’s rejuvenating for you to periodically exult in and explore what’s large, vague, unlimited, unknown. Now is one of those times. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Look into my eyes. Kiss me, and you will see how important I am.” Poet Sylvia Plath wrote that, and now, in accordance with astrological omens, I’m authorizing you to say something similar to anyone who is interested in you but would benefit from

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BY ROB BREZSNY gazing more deeply into your soul and entering into a more profound relationship with your mysteries. In other words, you have cosmic permission to be more forthcoming in showing people your beauty and value. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In his *Anti-Memoirs*, author André Malraux quotes a tough-minded priest who served in the French Resistance during World War II. He spent his adult life hearing his parishioners’ confessions. “The fundamental fact is that there’s no such thing as a grown-up person,” the priest declared. Even if that’s mostly true, Pisces, my sense is that it is less true about you right now than it has ever been. In the past months, you have been doing good work to become more of a fully realized version of yourself. I expect that the deepening and maturation process is reaching a culmination. Don’t underestimate your success! Celebrate it! ARIES (March 21-April 19): How did sound technicians create the signature roar of the fictional monster Godzilla? They slathered pinetar resin on a leather glove and stroked it against the strings of a double bass. How about the famous howl of the fictional character Tarzan? Sonic artists blended a hyena’s screech played backwards, a dog’s growl, a soprano singer’s fluttered intonation slowed down, and an actor’s yell. Karen O, lead singer of the band Yeah Yeah Yeahs, periodically unleashes very long screams that may make the hair stand up on the back of her listeners’ necks. In accordance with astrological omens, I’d love to see you experiment with creating your own personal Yowl or Laugh or Whisper of Power in the coming weeks: a unique sound that would boost your wild confidence and help give you full access to your primal lust for life.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough,” said Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, ex-President of Liberia. In accordance with astrological imperatives, I propose that we make that your watchword for the foreseeable future. From what I can tell, you’re due to upgrade your long-term goals. You have the courage and vision necessary to dare yourself toward an even more fulfilling destiny than you’ve been willing or ready to imagine up until now. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): How did our ancestors ever figure out that the calendula flower can be used as healing medicine for irritated and inflamed skin? It must have been a very long process of trial and error. (Or did the plant somehow “communicate” to indigenous herbalists, informing them of its use?) In any case, this curative herb is only one of hundreds of plants that people somehow came to adjudge as having healing properties. “Miraculous” is not too strong a word to describe such discoveries. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Gemini, you now have the patience and perspicacity to engage in a comparable process: to find useful resources through experiment and close observation—with a hardy assist from your intuition. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Today the city of Timbuktu in Mali is poor and in the throes of desertification. But from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries, it was one of the great cultural centers of the world. Its libraries filled up with thousands of influential books, which remained intact until fairly recently. In 2012, Al-Qaeda jihadists conceived a plan to destroy the vast trove of learning and scholarship. One man foiled them. Abba al-Hadi, an illiterate guard who had worked at one of the libraries, smuggled out many of the books in empty rice sacks. By the time the jihadists started burning, most of the treasure had been relocated. I don’t think the problem in your sphere is anywhere near as dire as this, Cancerian. But I do hope you will be proactive about saving and preserving valuable resources before they’re at risk of being diluted, compromised, or neglected.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 28 Issue 9  

Boise Weekly Vol. 28 Issue 9