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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

M AY 2 3 – 2 9 , 2 0 1 7

6-7

Marketing 101

See how Boise Farmers Market and Capital City Public Market coexist

8

Pass on Plastic

A new zero-waste grocery will sell essentials without single-use plastics

VO L U M E 2 6 , I S S U E 4 9

18

Break a Leg

The cast of Misery promises broken bones at Idaho Shakespeare Festival

FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Editorial

EDITOR’S NOTE

News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Lex Nelson lex@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Advertising Ad Director: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Jason Jacobsen jason@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Sean Severud, sean@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Jeff Leedy, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Ken Griffith, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallasen, Zach Thomas Boise Weekly prints 25,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at almost 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Digital subscriptions: 12 months-$40, subscribe.boiseweekly.com

ONE DOWNTOWN, TWO SATURDAY MARKETS It’s second nature to most of us that there are two large Saturday markets in downtown Boise each spring and summer. But to a visitor or newcomer, having two separate outdoor markets within a few blocks of one another on the same day is a bit of a head-scratcher. That’s reason enough for Staff Writer Lex Nelson to visit with the people who keep both markets thriving. It’s an intriguing look back on the tension that created the split, and the happy present where both markets coexist. Read more on pages 6 and 7. Just prior to their opening night, I sat down with actors Andrew May and Kathleen Pirkl Tague, stars of the play Misery, which will launch Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s 42nd season under the stars. On page 8, Pirkl Tague says her character Annie is “somewhat ridiculous, even though she’s intense, fierce and messed up.” And May confirms that “fibulas and tibias will be shattered” during the performance. The City of Boise has done a pretty swell job in its recycling efforts (approximately 97 percent of residents participate) and its curbside composting program (nearly 90 percent of households take part). It appears that the next big thing to tackle is the first “r” in the reduce/reuse/recycle formula—reducing the use of things that can’t be recycled. Lex Nelson tells us about the still-in-the works Roots Zero Waste Market, which will sell bulk produce to its customers without singleuse plastics. Read more on page 18. Also this week, I review two new, very different films: How to Talk to Girls at Parties and RBG. One co-stars Nicole Kidman and is a trippy dive into the London punk scene of the late 1970s. The other is about U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I’ll leave it to you to figure out which is which on page 19. Finally, a mea culpa. In our May 16 issue of Boise Weekly, we misidentified our #boiseweeklypic on page 26 with the wrong Instagram user. It should have read csknox_. Our apologies.

If you are interested in getting a mailed subscription, please email

—George Prentice, News Editor

subscriptions@boiseweekly.com Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055

Fax: 208-342-4733

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com

ARTIST: Nicolette Fretwell The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2018 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by

TITLE: “New Day” MEDIUM: Acrylic on canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: Art is my passion; in this painting, my inspiration is seeing the sunrise and sunset of each new day—the gratitude of present and nature in our lives.

Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online)

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SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2018 | 3


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SHARE AND SHARE ALIKE? WHE THER THE CIT Y OF BOISE C A N AC C O M M O DATE T WO B I KE SHARE PROGR AMS REMAINS TO BE SEEN, BUT OFFICIALS WITH CALIFORNIA -BASED LIMEBIKE SAY THE Y ’D LIKE TO ROLL OUT THEIR OWN PROGR AM HERE. BOISE GREENBIKE DIRECTOR DAVE FOTSCH SAID IF LIMEBIKE COMES TO THE CIT Y OF TREES, “THIS IS CERTAINLY GOING TO PRESENT SIGNIFICANT CHALLENGES TO US.” RE AD MORE AT NE WS/CIT YDESK. 1 2 3 RF.C O M

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MAKE-UP EXAM After interviewing three finalists for Boise State president, the Idaho State Board of Education said it isn’t satisfied with the search, so it’s pressing the reset button. Read more at News/Citydesk.

THE BEST MEDICINE Auditions for the Boise’s Funniest Person 2018 contest will take place Saturday, June 16; Monday, June 18; and Tuesday, June 19. Read more at Arts & Culture/Stage.

WATER, WATER The Idaho Department of Water Resources announced it will award grants to communities stricken by floods following the rough winters of 2016 and 2017. Read more at News/Citydesk.

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BOISE FARMERES MARKE T PRODUCE / LE X NELSON

O

A DAY AT THE MARKETS

Five years after going their separate ways, Capital City Public Market and the Boise Farmers Market coexist and thrive LE X NEL SON BAKED GOODS AT CAPITAL CIT Y PUBLIC MARKE T / LE X NELSO N

6 | MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

kind of like a broken family, that’s a lot of n Saturday mornings when the sun what it felt like,” said Melissa Nodzu, who is shining, downtown Boise becomes served as market director for CCPM from a paradise for shoppers traveling on foot, with two farmer’s markets to choose from 2013-2016. Matt Williams, the CCPM board president setting up tables bursting with fresh produce— whose family farm, Waterwheel Gardens, has towering piles of blood-red radishes, forests of leafy greens, heaps of carrots still trailing soil— been a vendor at CCPM since 2000, put it baked goods and locally made art. Wander from this way: “For the first couple years, definitely there one market to another for long enough though, and it starts to become clear that artists congre- was still the feeling of ‘they used to be part of us, and we used to be with them’, and there’s gate in one collection of booths while produce this rift. It was kind of like—I’ve never gone vendors gather in the other. Neither market through a divorce, but I can imagine—just tryis mutually exclusive, but their identities are ing to redefine normal.” clear—and clearly very different. Five years later, it appears a balance has been What Boiseans new to the area or not thoroughly entrenched in the down-and-dirty struck. To continue Williams’ metaphor, the days in court are over, and now the two parents of downtown politics may not know is that the two Boise farmers markets—the arts-heavy share joint custody over Boise Saturday marketCapital City Public Market, currently centered goers. But a weekend at mom’s house isn’t quite on Idaho Street, and the farmer-focused Boise the same as a weekend at dad’s. “There’s definitely a difference in the shopFarmers Market at the corner of 10th and pers … People that are oing to Capital City, Grove streets—used to be one. In October they’re going to linger for a while and try to 2012, a faction of vendors from CCPM experience and see everything that’s there. split from the original pack to start its own Whereas people who go to BFM, for the most produce-centered market a few blocks away. part they’re in and they’re out. They’re getting That spinoff became the Boise Farmers their food and they’re Market, which leaving,” said Nodzu. opened its gates to Ellis said that BFM the public in April “ WE THINK THAT is designed that way: to 2013 at its original give local grocery shoplocation on the IT’S RE ALLY pers easy access to procorner of 11th and duce, and local farmers Front streets. Now, UNIQUE FOR BOISE a customer base. five years later, ten“The main focus is sions between venTO HAVE T WO agricultural products … dors and organizers Our goal is we have to have died down, and DIFFERENT BUT have more farmers total representatives from V ERY SUCCES SF UL than all of the other both markets say categories combined.” they aren’t just surMARKE T S .” she said. “So right now viving, but thriving we have right about 50 in their new niches. farmers and we have “We think that between 30 and 40 non-farmers.” it’s really unique for Boise to have two very CCPM, in contrast, doesn’t stick to a strict different but very successful markets two ratio, focusing more on providing a well-roundblocks away from one another,” said Karen ed experience for customers. Ellis, the current BFM market manager and a “I think that when you’re in the heart of past director of CCPM until she was fired in downtown like we are, on Idaho Street, you’re 2012 over allegations of poor business practices. “I don’t know that they’d be as successful going to be a wonderful experience for tourists equally if they were not as close as they are. It’s and visitors,” said CCPM Executive Director the perfect opportunity for people—it’s like an Mona Warchol. “If you want to see what Idaoutdoor mall, you have a lot of choices in not ho’s about, you can see all the different things that we offer. So I definitely think we’re high on a lot of space.” the tourist attraction [list], if you will. If you’re But things weren’t always so copacetic. During the months of slow separation, market here visiting you aren’t necessarily going to buy groceries on Saturday, but you could easily buy personel on both sides of the divide gave a sign from Rusty Junkers about Idaho.” various reasons for the split and its ensuing CCPM thrives on a festival atmosphere, drama, ranging from the high ratio of artisans with buskers and performance artists lining to farmers to the volume of out-of-town the sidewalks between booths, putting ceramic customers making it difficult for locals to artists and local bakeries cheek-by-jowl with shop for their weekly groceries at the original violinists and mimes. According to Warchol, CCPM. Whatever the true tigger, the divide CCPM attracts 15,000-20,000 visitors every caused an identity schism, spurring both Saturday at the peak of its season, which runs markets to define themselves and emphasize April-December each year. BFM is smaller their differences. but growing: Ellis said the original estimate of “That first year was really hard, because 2,000-2,500 visitors per week has swelled to especially among the vendors there were still 6,000-10,000 over the last six seasons, and the a lot of hurt feelings in a sense, and [it was] BOISE WEEKLY.COM


L E X N E L SON

COURTESY WHATERWHEEL GARDENS COURTESY WHATERWHEEL GARDENS

Capital City Public Market vendors sell a range of products, from fresh fruit and vegetables to flowers, art, jewlery and prepared foods.

market’s indoor winter location on Front Street keeps them coming year-round. There are also some structural differences between the two markets. Warchol emphasised that while BFM is a nonprofit, CCPM is a business league of 127 entrepreneurs. “I would say we’re truly a public market, which can encompass farms, artists, jewelers, specialty foods, you name it … [Whereas at BFM] they pride themselves as a Boise farmers market,” Warchol said. Ellis echoed that sentiment. “We are the farmers market, and this is where people shop for fresh local food. The other market, the public market, offers a lot of things

that we aren’t able to offer, and that’s great. It’s the best thing for this city to have happened,” she said. Though the markets have respective identities, a few artisans have found homes at BFM, and a handful of farmers stuck with CCPM. One of them is Waterwheel Gardens, which sells fresh produce, as well as dried fruit and preserves that Williams said go over well with tourists. There are even a few vendors with booths at each venue. Both markets are exclusively local, and while some shoppers are loyalists to one or the other, siding with favorite vendors, many Boiseans stop by both groups of tents on a given Saturday.

“When we split the markets we actually doubled the number of people coming back downtown to shop because now they had the option: They could wander and look at everything and shop at their convenience [at CCPM] or if they wanted to just come in and shop they could do that and go [at BFM]. So I think it turned out better than anyone thought it might,” said Ellis. When Boise Weekly posed the question of market preference on social media, Facebook user Paige McMahon spoke up for the neutral faction. “I usually visit [BFM] first and then walk around [CCPM] afterwards,” she wrote. “The farmer’s market is where I’ll pick up produce (and my favorite tamales!), but I enjoy the

Capital City market because of the live music and bustling city energy! Lots of yummy street food there too!” Though it’s hard to forget what the markets once were, organizers on both sides said they’re looking forward rather than backward, and are optimistic about the years ahead. “It’s kind of like what the City of Boise is going through right now,” said Williams. “There’s a lot of people who are like, ‘Oh, we wish the city was still the small town that we remember growing up,’ and it’s like, ‘Yes, I get the nostalgia feeling, but you can’t go back, you know? As the city grows, you have to make the best out of the growth.’”

Boise Farmers Market, located at the corner of 10th and Grove streets, focuses on produce, and more than half of its vendors are farmers. L E X N E L SON

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BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2018 | 7


CITIZEN ANDREW MAY AND KATHLEEN PIRKL TAGUE Taking the adage “break a leg” a bit too seriously with th the co-stars of Misery GEORGE PRENTICE

BINGO BARN ES

real, genuine gallows laughter. That’s when we All that said, there’s a fair amount of Prepare for a summer of Misery—that’s a know you’re 100 percent with us. good thing—at the Idaho Shakespeare Festival. humor in Misery. May: Twisted humor. ISF’s 42nd season of repertory under the stars You must know that by then, audiences Pirkl Tague: My character is somewhat starts with a bang, quite literally, on Friday, ridiculous, even though she’s intense, fierce and are right there with you, like they’re on a May 25, with Misery, the stage adaptation of thrill ride at an amusement park. messed up. the wildly popular book and Oscar-winning May: It’s such a visceral response. We’ve movie from the modern master of suspense, had audience members say, “I loved that. That Kathleen, have you deconstructed Annie’s Stephen King. was so good,” and you can tell when they’re mental illness? “The name value certainly draws people in just saying it, or when they really mean it. Pirkl Tague: In the book, Annie is put on to the theater,” said Andrew May, who plays Trust me, they really mean it. novelist Paul Sheldon, held captive by “his big- trial for killing children in a hospital, but they Pirkl Tague: We have this roller coaster gest fan” Annie Wilkes, portrayed by Kathleen couldn’t convict her because they didn’t have enough evidence. There are also references to her thing going on, where everyone is relaxed and Pirkl Tague. saying, “Oh, Annie is just a funny old lady,” being a serial killer. “It is a challenge, especially for me, beand then she’ll jump out at you, growl and cause Annie was bark like a mean Gerportrayed on the man shepherd. screen by Kathy Bates, who won the I’d be remiss if I Oscar,” said Pirkl didn’t ask you to talk “ANDRE W AND I LIKE TO GO AT IT A BIT Tague. “It’s a little a bit about Idaho intimidating, but I MORE RE ALISTICALLY. BUT WE TRUST E ACH audiences. love a challenge.” May: I’ve always Days before OTHER, WHICH IS A BIG THING. I DO SOME found that there’s a their opening legacy of fun here. night, May and PRE T T Y CR A Z Y THINGS TO HIM.” Pirkl Tague talked Kathleen, you with Boise Weekly returned to the about the mayhem Idaho Shakespeare and fun surroundFestival company ing the classic Can I assume that you bring that backstory in last year’s Hamlet after being away for thriller. quite some time. into your portrayal of Annie? Pirkl Tague: That was the first time in 10 Pirkl Tague: I think underneath all that psyThere is a bit of violence in Misery. Can I years and it was heartbreakingly wonderful to chosis is deep sadness. That’s a neurosis, right? assume that it’s carefully choreographed? be on the stage where I’d had so many incredConstructing fictional realities in order not to Pirkl Tague: Some actors are really picky ible moments. I always say when I die, I want experience the true reality of deep pain. about violence being very well rehearsed. Anmy ashes to be sprinkled somewhere under drew and I like to go at it a bit more realistiI was lucky enough to see Misery on Broad- the stage. cally. But we trust each other, which is a big way several years back, and I must say that thing. I do some pretty crazy things to him. But let’s not go there just yet. I guess May: It has been a bit of a pet peeve of mine there’s something really special about a collecI could say “break a leg,” but I’m afraid tive gasp coming from an audience. that when you choreograph something to an that might actually happen in Misery. May: There are moments when we can tell inch of its life, you have a tendency to show its May: Yes, fibulas and tibias will be that the audience is really with us. When our technique. And while that’s impressive, at the shattered. story is funny, it’s not a nervous “ha-ha,” but a same time it takes you out of [the] action. 8 | MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2018 | 9


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY MAY 23 On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: PRINCESS BRIDE—Adults-only show. 7 p.m. $9-$11. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, boiseclassicmovies.com/deals. CARTOON CHAOS CABARET: THE CLOWNIFEST DESTINY TOUR—Join the craziest crew of clowns on their debut tour. You’ll enjoy a wild ride full of spectacular stunts, gut-wrenching gags, tantalizing tease and a comedy cherry on top. With special guests Burn It Down Burlesque, featuring Stella Sin and Muff Jones. 7 p.m. $15. The Shredder, 430 S. 10th, Boise, 208-345-4355, shredderboise. com.

Art CONSTRUCTION, DECONSTRUCTION, AND ABSTRACTION: THE ART OF JAMES CASTLE—Through May 25. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. DAVID R. DAY: HORIZONS— Through May 26. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. JUSTIN W. JOHN: SIMULACRUM—In the photographs and paintings of Simulacrum, memories like masks, signs, and symbols illustrate an obscure vision of reality. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. UpCycle Studio, 380 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-297-5591, justinwjohn.com.

Food PAYETTE BREWING YAPPY HOUR—The dog lovers at Payette

FRIDAY-MONDAY, MAY 25-28

are throwing a party for all of their furry friends. It’s a great chance to make some fellow puppy-loving friends and enjoy cold, tasty brews in good company. Idahound will be on hand, and Burgerlicious will be slinging tasty grub. Take a leash and whatever you need to pick up after your pup. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-344-0011, payettebrewing.com.

THURSDAY MAY 24 On Stage COMEDIAN HEATH HARMISON— 8 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. HOMEGROWN THEATRE: MR. BURNS—Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play is a delightfully bizarre look at our human need for stories and the persistent survival of

the oldest storytelling medium in the world: live theater. 8 p.m. $10-$35. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208991-0984, hgtboise.org.

mld.org/music-adventures-paigemoore-carnival-animals.

FRIDAY MAY 25

Kids & Teens

Festivals & Events

MUSIC ADVENTURES WITH PAIGE MOORE: CARNIVAL OF THE ANIMALS—Paige Moore presents fun and engaging music and movement programs for children ages 12 and younger. Children participate in hands-on music experiences that encourage the most growth, the most learning and the most fun. You’ll enjoy an active exploration of “Carnival of the Animals” by Camille Saint Saens. This group invites children to discover the aural description of animals in the piece, and encourages them to move, kick, hop and dance. We finish our very own Animal Parade and a takehome craft. All ages and abilities welcome. 7 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451,

ISF: MISERY—8 p.m. $13-$50. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208429-9908, idahoshakespeare.org.

ANIME OASIS EX—2 p.m. $20-$50. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3338000, animeoasis.org.

STAGE COACH: SISTER ACT—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

On Stage

Sports & Fitness

BLT: ONCE UPON A MATTRESS— If you thought you knew the story of The Princess and The Pea, you may be in for a surprise. 8 p.m. $18-$20. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

STRIKE OUT SUICIDE—Join the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention-Idaho Chapter for their first annual Strike Out Suicide fundraiser. Register online. 6-10 p.m. $20. Caldwell Bowl, 2121 Blaine St., Caldwell, 208-695-5072, afsp.donordrive.com/event/IdahoStrikeOutSuicide.

COMEDIAN HEATH HARMISON— 8 and 10 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

SATURDAY, MAY 26

HOMEGROWN THEATRE: MR. BURNS—8 p.m. $10-$35. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208-991-0984, hgtboise.org.

MONDAY, MAY 28 1 2 3 RF.C O M

1 2 3 RF.C O M

A RRY N ZEC H / A N I M EOA S I S . O RG

Get animated for anime.

Your international lookbook.

A salute to the troops.

ANIME OASIS EX

THIRD ANNUAL URBAN CULTURAL SHOW

MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY

Anime may have originated in Japan, but it’s become a staple with American audiences who fill convention halls to meet the artists and innovators behind their favorite characters. Boise is no exception, and on Friday, May 25, the multi-venue Anime Oasis EX convention will kick off its 17th year in the City of Trees. The four-day affair includes everything from a roller disco to an improv comedy show, a cosplay battle and a speed dating event. Guests include buff pop band Dead Lift Lolita; RWBY and Red vs. Blue voice actress Arryn Zech; Vic Mignogna, who has voiced characters in more than 300 shows and video games; cosplayer/costume designer Tanglwyst de Holloway and more. Score four-day passes online or single-day tickets at the door to get your geek on. Times, ticket prices and locations vary. Visit animeoasis.org for details.

According to the Idaho Office for Refugees, more than half of the refugees who moved to the Gem State during the 2016-17 Fiscal Year came from African nations, the largest share from Rwanda, Ethiopia and the Congo. With the Treasure Valley growing more culturally rich by the day, it’s no wonder the Miss Africa Idaho Urban Cultural Fashion Show has found enough success and support to return for a third year. This time around, the focus will be on local artists and designers, and the show will include a host of vendors selling their fashions and other goods. Hosts will also serve up a selection of drinks and Nigerian appetizers, and all proceeds will go to fund Metro Meals of Wheels, which provides hundreds of meals to local seniors every day. 6-8:30 p.m., $20-$25. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Avenue, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

Thanking U.S. military veterans for their service is a gesture that will never go out of style, and though it doesn’t hurt to give them a nod every day, there’s no time better than Memorial Day. This year, Idaho Division of Veterans Services will honor those who gave their lives for the safety of American citizens in a ceremony at the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery. It also happens that 2018 is the 100-year benchmark of the end of World War I, an anniversary that the ceremony will note, along with showcasing an aircraft flyover, a wreath presentation and words from the governor’s office. Representative from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force will also participate. Those attending are asked to park at Optimist Park and take buses to the site. 10 a.m., FREE. Idaho State Veterans Cemetery, 10100 Horseshoe Bend Road, Garden City, 208-780-1340, veterans.idaho.gov.

10 | MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

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342-4222 ★ 646 FULTON ★ theflicksboise.com

• cinemas • café • videos • fun

Inside: Special Events & June-August Film Schedule Additional films not listed may be shown. Check www.theflicksboise.com

Schedule is subject to change. VOL. 34, NO. 3

Opens June 8 Award winning author Ian McEwan adapted his novella about a young couple on their honeymoon in 1962. The film stars Saoirse Ronan, Billy Howle, Anne-Marie Duff, Adrian Scarborough, Emily Watson, and Samuel West and was directed by Dominic Cooke.

Opens May 25

THE RIDER Opens May 25

A rodeo star (Brady Jandreau) struggles to find a new life after an accident ends his career. Chloe Zhao directs this drama about the changing landscape of the American West. Winner of 10 International Awards including 2 Independent Spirit Awards.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is one of our most revered public figures. This documentary explores her exceptional life and career. It features Gloria Steinem and Nina Totenberg and was directed by Betsy West and Julie Cohen.

Opens June 1 Enn (Alex Sharp) is smitten when he meets Zan (Elle Fanning) at a party hosted by Queen Boadicea (Nicole Kidman). John Cameron Mitchell directs this romantic, scifi punk musical comedy based on a story by Neil Gaiman.

“The Rider marries the majestic vistas of the greatest American westerns with a deeply interior story of a cowboy having to renegotiate his identity.”

OWEN GLEIBERMAN, Variety

“The film’s success rests on Elle Fanning and Alex Sharp’s performance in this love story. It would be cliché to say they have great chemistry, but they do.”

BEN CROLL, The Wrap

ALEX NG, Film Threat

Opens June 15

Opens June 15

Willem Dafoe narrates Jennifer Peedom’s breathtaking documentary, filmed in Alaska, Norway, Tibet and Australia, which shows the ways mountaineers, ice climbers, free soloists, heli-skiers, snowboarders, wing suiters and parachuting bikers “conquer” earth’s peaks. (NR)

Johnny Flynn and Jessie Buckley star in this thriller about a young woman who throws in her lot with a handsome stranger. This is the first feature film by Michael Pearce who directs from his own script. Academy Award winning documentary

“One of the most visceral essay films ever made.” HARRY WINDSOR, Hollywood Reporter

Opens June 22

filmmaker Morgan Neville (20 Feet from

“Features a truly breakthrough performance Stardom) shows archival footage of Fred (maybe two) and announces writer/director Rogers and interviews his wife and co-stars to Michael Pearce as a talent to watch.” better understand his motivation in creating a BRIAN TALLERICO, RogerEbert.com

Opens June 8

“It’s a lyrical and rapturous film - a repressed passion play, funny, delicate and heartbreaking.”

special place for kids on his iconic, TV show, Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood. Yo-Yo Ma also stars. (NR)

“…a profoundly emotional experience.” STEVE POND, The Wrap

Writer-director Paul Schrader (Taxi Driver; American Gigolo; Affliction) delves into the soul of a minister (Ethan Hawke) facing a crisis of faith. Mary, a troubled parishioner (Amanda Seyfried) seeking guidance, ignites the fuse in this gripping thriller.

“A truly captivating, pertinent piece of cinema.” STEFAN PAPE, HeyUGuys

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BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2018 | 11


SPECIAL EVENTS AT THE FLICKS i48 Screenings

Boise Pride Presents Venus

Reinventing Power

JUNE 9

JUNE 13 AT 7:00

JUNE 28 AT 7:00

2018 is the 15th annual i48 Film Competition and Festival! Teams of filmmakers from around Idaho have 48 hours to write, preproduce, cast, shoot, and edit original short films three to six minutes long. All the finished films will screen in a day long festival at the Flicks on Saturday, June 9th (times TBD). Tickets are $5.00. To register your team and be a part of the competition or for more information, go to www.idaho48.org.

Writer-Director Eisha Marjara created this comedy about a transitioning woman (Debargo Sanyal) who discovers she is the father of a 14 year old boy. Sponsored by the Pride Foundation and Boise Choruses; tickets are $10 and are available at The Flicks Box Office and at www.theflicksboise.com (online store).

Reinventing Power: America’s Renewable Energy Boom is the new documentary from the Sierra Club that takes us across the country to hear directly from the people making our clean energy future achievable. Tickets are $10 in advance and at the door. Q & A will follow.

The Big Burn JUNE 20 AT 7:00, $7.50 IN ADVANCE AND AT THE DOOR Writer-Director Samantha Silva brings her award-winning short script, The Big Burn, to life in this deeply Idaho movie about a woman caught between the rugged beauty of the wilderness and the reality of her failing marriage. Preceded by Get in the Truck, by Neil Brookshire. Q & A will follow.

Season runs May 25 through September 30. Pay-Per-Play Layaway and Single Tickets are now available!

www.idahoshakespeare.org

Boise Film Festival SEPT 14-16, 2018 This year the annual Boise Film Festival will have a new home at The Flicks! More details soon at www.boisefilmfestival.org.

Skid Row Marathon JULY 19 AT 7:00 A criminal court judge starts a running club for L.A. street people – restoring their dignity as they learn success is not beyond their reach. This award winning documentary by Mark Hayes is a benefit for Corpus Christi Day Shelter and Boise Sanctuary. $12

or call 208-336-9221

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE

Non-credit courses, lectures and events for the intellectually curious over age 50. Aaron Henry

Become a member now! $35 osher.boisestate.edu (208) 426-1709

Production Sponsor

Endowment Foundation

CONDUCTED BY ROBERT FRANZ

September 15 & 16 The Morrison Center Tickets: $19 to $81 • 208-426-1110

415 S. 8th Street | Downtown Boise 208.385.9337 | rgreygallery.com 12 | MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

Group, Senior, Child, Military & Student discounts available. Ticket prices do not include sales tax or applicable fees.

Learn more about the 2018/19 season

www.operaidaho.org

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14 Varieties of Take-n-Bake Lasagnes Gourmet Entrées & Desserts U Dine-In or Take Out 1504 Vista Ave. U Boise U (208) 345-7150 www.cucinadipaolo.com

'ALLERYs#LASSES 3UPPLIESs%QUIPMENT 110 Ellen St. Boise (Garden City) (Ellen St. is across Chinden from 49th)

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Opens June 29 Opens June 22 Friends and family gather for a weekend at a lakeside estate. While everyone is caught up in passionately loving someone who loves somebody else, a tragicomedy unfolds. Tony-winning playwright Stephen Karam adapted Anton Chekhov’s classic play. Tony-winner Michael Mayer directs Saoirse Ronan, Elizabeth Moss and Annette Bening.

Opens June 29 Nick Offerman and Kiersey Clemons star as father and daughter who make music together just for fun and find they have a hit on their hands. Blythe Danner, Ted Danson, Toni Colette and Sasha Lane star for writerdirector Brett Haley in the feel good movie of the summer.

Nathalie Baye stars as the family matriarch who runs the family farm while the men are fighting World War I. Acclaimed filmmaker Xavier Beauvois (Of Gods and Men) revels in the beauties of the French countryside while focusing on the intricate drama of empowered women. Subtitled in English “A genuinely astounding piece of filmmaking which is as beautiful as it is essential.” LINDA MARRIC, HeyUGuys

“Kiersey Clemons proves she’s the real deal.“

Opens July 6 Sam (Andrew Garfield) is enchanted by a young woman (Riley Keough) he sees in the pool at his L.A apartment. When she disappears, he becomes obsessed with finding her. This suspenseful drama also stars Topher Grace; David Robert Mitchell (It Follows) directs. ® Nominated for the Palme d’Or at Cannes 2018

AMY NICHOLSON, Variety

Opens July 13 Sky Bergman’s documentary celebrates the wit and wisdom of adults 75 to 100 years old who are living their lives to the fullest. Forty people share their secrets and insights to living a meaningful life. (NR)

July 6 Director Ashley Bell documented a trek across Thailand with a70 year-old elephant sent to the sanctuary run by Lek Chailert. Named one of Time Magazine’s Heroes for Asia and the Ford Foundation’s Hero of the Planet, Lek rescues Asian elephants from lives of hard labor. (NR)

“…a heartfelt reminder that for many, age is just a number.” ROBERT ABELE, L.A. Times

Opens July 13 Three strangers are reunited by astonishing coincidence. Born identical triplets, separated at birth, and adopted by three different families, their amazing feel-good story became a global sensation. Awardwinning documentarian Tim Wardle reveals the secret behind the fairy tale.

Winner of Sundance Film Festival’s Special Jury Award

Opens July 20 Grandpa (Christopher Plummer) gets kicked out of the nursing home for dealing weed. His estranged daughter (Vera Farmiga) is forced to rescue him. Bobby Cannavale, Peter Fonda and Christopher Lloyd co-star for writerdirector Shana Feste.

“…the type of film that’s impossible to come away from unchanged.”

“A touching yet wised-up father-daughter road movie.“

KIMBER MYERS, L.A. Times

OWEN GLEIBERMAN, Variety

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BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2018 | 13


SEASON 70

NOW PLAYING Happy H appy Hour daily from m 3-6pm in n the bar att tthe he Inn at 500 Capitol Capito tol richardsboise.com richardsbo ri b ise.com (208)) 472-1463 472-1463 3 Find us us on o Facebook Fac aceb ebook

208.342.5104 • BoiseLittleTheater.org

Dramatic. Outrageous. Unforgettable.

20 2018-2019 SEASON TICKETS AV AVAILABLE NOW!

And that’s just the costumes. Buy your 18|19 season tickets today. BCTheater.org

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“We tell stories here.�

Opens July 27

Opens July 20 Ben Foster and Thomasin McKenzie play father and daughter who live off the grid in Oregon until they run afoul of authorities. Writer-director Debra Granik (Winter’s Bone) collaborated with Anne Rosellini to bring the novel by Peter Rock to the screen.

â€œâ€Śboth lyrical and realistic at the same time, anchored by a pair of unforgettable performances.â€?

Opens August 3

Gus Van Sant directs paraplegic cartoonist John Callahan’s script based on his autobiography about the healing power of art. Joaquin Phoenix, Jack Black, Rooney Mara and Jonah Hill star.

This winner of Best Narrative Film at the San Francisco International Film Festival, written and directed by Bo Burnham, is about the nightmare that is junior high. Elsie Fisher, Josh Hamilton and Missy Yager star. “The kind of comedy that hipper parents might just be able to watch with their own offspring and enjoy.� LESLIE FELPERIN, Hollywood Reporter

“A life-afďŹ rming sweet-and-sour concoction.â€? PETER DEBRUGE, Variety

BRIAN TALLERICO, RogerEbert.com

Opens August 31 Nick Hornby adapted his novella about a Brit (Chris O’Dowd) who is obsessed with the music of an American rocker (Ethan Hawke) who was romantically involved with his girlfriend (Rose Byrne).

PUZZLE Opens August 10

Forty year old Agnes (Kelly MacDonald) has never ventured far from home. When she receives a jigsaw puzzle as a gift, the experience of being very, very good at something changes her life. Irrfan Khan co-stars; Marc Turtletaub directs. “Oren Moverman’s script, based on the Argentinian ďŹ lm Rompecabezas by Natalia Smirnoff, is graceful with the details and its characters.â€? – KATE ERBLAND, IndieWire | 14 MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

“A lovely low-key comedy with a rock ‘n’ roll heart.�

Opens August 17

STEVE POND, The Wrap

Musician Dane Johansen walked the Camino de Santiago with his cello on his back, playing for fellow travelers in the vast landscape of northern Spain. Documentarian Tristan Cook chronicles the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of the pilgrimage to the haunting soundtrack of J.S. Bach. (NR)

“Beauty-dazed and rapt with a kind of giddy sadness.� Film Journal

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CALENDAR Food COMMUNITY POTLUCK FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND HUMANITIES ADVOCATES—If you love poetry, philosophy, literature, critical theory, permaculture or sustainability in general, then get to know this growing community of scholars, artists and farmers. Take food, drinks and an instrument if you play. Children welcome. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Victory Farm Center for the Humanities, 825 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-922-8501, victoryfarmcenter.org.

SATURDAY MAY 26 Festivals & Events 3RD ANNUAL URBAN CULTURAL SHOW—6-8:30 p.m. $20-$25. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com. ANIME OASIS EX—11 a.m. $20-$50. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3338000. animeoasis.org.

SPECIAL OLYMPICS IDAHO 2018 USA GAMES FUNDRAISER—Help Team Idaho compete in the USA Games while enjoying silent auction, mock games, face painting, food from Saint Lawrence Gridiron and the Idaho Food Truck Coalition, and drinks from local breweries. Plus Team Idaho athlete Dillion, aka DJ Big D, will be playing music along with local bands. Email shannon@idso. org for more information. Noon-6 p.m. FREE. Cecil D. Andrus Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise, idso.org.

On Stage BLT: ONCE UPON A MATTRESS—8 p.m. $18-$20. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN HEATH HARMISON— 8 and 10 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. HOMEGROWN THEATRE: MR. BURNS—8 p.m. $10-$35. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208-991-0984, hgtboise.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

BEERFEST FRIDAY JUNE 8TH, 2018

@ WARHAWK AIR MUSEUM 5PM TO 9:30PM

ISF: MISERY—8 p.m. $13-$50. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208429-9908, idahoshakespeare.org. STAGE COACH: SISTER ACT— Adult humor and mild language. 8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

FOOD TRUCKS

STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: WIZARD OF OZ—Dinner (6:15 p.m.) and show (8 p.m.) available Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. 8 p.m. $10-$41. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

BEATLES TRIBUTE BAND

LOCAL BREWERIES

Workshops & Classes APPRECIATION FOR THE HUMAN BODY: INTRO TO HUMAN ANATOMY—Learn the basics of heart and brain anatomy using preserved human organs. Activities will involve discussions of heart and brain anatomy that are followed by hands-on exploration of the anatomy using preserved organs. This is intended to help introduce high school juniorsenior students to a college-level anatomy and physiology course (with parental approval). Adults are welcome, too. 9 a.m. $29. College of Idaho, 2112 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5011, collegeofidaho.edu.

TICKETS O00N SALE $25 TICKETS ARE A MUST TO GET IN.

Kids & Teens SPRAY PAINTING SPACE WORKSHOP—Learn to create striking outer space paintings using spray paint. Students will explore materials, techniques and safety while creating multiple paintings in this four-hour workshop. For ages 12 and older. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $65. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208-991-0984, gemcenterforthearts.org.

Odds & Ends CLOTHING EXCHANGE—Save resources and money with this free clothing swap, held every fourth Saturday of the month. Take your gently used clothing, shoes and accessories to trade for newto-you items. All sizes welcome. Through Sept. 22. 2-3:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Animals & Pets MAIDEN’S HOPE DOG CARNIVAL—You’ll enjoy dog contests, demonstrations, and other fun family activities. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE to attend, $15-$25 to compete. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, maidenshope. org/event/maidens-hope-dogcarnival.

A $200 0 VALUE FOR

$160

YOU WILL ENJOY • ONE (1) COMPLIMENTARY NIGHT’S STAY IN THE DIAMOND PEAK TOWER HOTEL* • TWO (2) BUFFET VOUCHERS • $20 GAS COMP AT JACKPOT CHEVRON

CALL BOISE WEEKLY AT 208.344.2055 x3004

OR

USE YOUR BW SMARTCARD AP TO PURCHASE A CERTIFICATE NOW *BASED ON AVAILIBILITY. EXCLUSIONS APPLY. OFFER EXPIRES MAY 1, 2019

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2018 | 15


Over 6000 s.f. of NEW & USED outdoor gear!

Formerly Backcountry Pursuit

CALENDAR Food

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CONSIGN and SHOP

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HIGH QUALITY OUTDOOR ADVENTURE GEAR

RV and Van Conversions Free Estimates 100% Guarantee

BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove Streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

SUNDAY MAY 27 Festivals & Events ANIME OASIS EX—11 a.m. $20-$50. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3338000, animeoasis.org.

DOWNTOWN BOISE’S BEST SELECTION OF WINES BY THE BOTTLE & GLASS MON. - SAT. 11-7 • 21+ 208-978-3385 574 W. MAIN ST. BOISE CITYCENTERWINES.COM

On Stage

208-985-4185 • 11000 W Fairview Ave. www.integrityfabricationandauto.com

YOUR CAR IS HIGH TECH. IS YOUR TECHNICIAN? Computerized Diagnostic Engine Analyzer

ISF: MISERY—7 p.m. $13-$50. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208429-9908, idahoshakespeare.org.

ISF: MISERY—8 p.m. $13-$50. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208429-9908, idahoshakespeare.org.

Kids & Teens GROOVIN’ AND MOVIN’ STORYTIME—You’ll be reading, grooving, and moving all morning long. For active toddlers ages 3-6 (must be accompanied by an adult). 10:15 a.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208468-5800, nampalibrary.org.

Food WISHES WINE AND BREW—Help Idaho nonprofit Wish Granters Inc. raise funds to grant wishes to adults with a terminal Illness

TUESDAY MAY 29 On Stage CELTIC WOMAN: HOMECOMING TOUR—Celtic Woman celebrates Ireland’s rich musical and cultural heritage while introducing Ireland’s most talented singers and musicians onto the world stage. 7 p.m. $39-$99. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, morrisoncenter.com.

Literature EVENING BOOK CLUB—Join a discussion of A Tale For the Time Being by Ruth Oze. For ages 18 and older. 6 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Hidden Springs Branch, 5868 W. Hidden Springs Drive, Boise, 208-229-2665, adalib.org/hiddensprings.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

ROCKET RECALL DOG TRAINING SEMINAR—Learn reward-based and motivational techniques to develop a stellar recall with your dog during this 90-minute seminar taught by Certified Professional Dog Trainer Janee Moore of Boise Dog Sports. Noon-1:30 p.m. $20-$45. Boise Dog Sports, 6025 W. Randolph Drive, 831-251-1216, boisedogsports.com.

Scheduled Factory Maintenance

Jeff’s Import Auto 4433 Adams Street Garden City • 376-4686 jeffsimportautowerks.com

MONDAY MAY 28

BLACK&WHITE PLACES PLACES

THINGS THINGS

Festivals & Events

EADLINE DEADLINE D ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 11:59 ON JUNE 5th

2017 WINNER RUTHANN GREENE

COMEDIAN HEATH HARMISON— 8 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com.

On Stage

in Ada and Canyon counties. Discount tickets on sale through May 10. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $25-$30. Indian Creek Winery, 1000 N. McDermott Road, Kuna, 208-3779029, wishgranters.org/eventcalendar.

Animals & Pets

Late Model Volkswagen & Audi Service & Repair

PLE PEOPLE PEO

BLT: ONCE UPON A MATTRESS—8 p.m. $18-$20. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

and honor those who have served and are serving on our Armed Forces, through music and reflection, with a keynote speech by Col. Curt Bowers. 11:30 a.m. FREE. Hillcrest Memorial Gardens, 15862 S. Indiana Ave., Caldwell, 208-459-4949, hillcrestmemorialgarden.com.

2017 WINNER SARA BUSH

2017 WINNER MARIA ESSIG

FOR PRIZE INFORULES AND ENTRY VISIT

BWPHOTOCONTEST.B BOISEWEEKLY.C COM 16 | MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

ANIME OASIS EX—11 a.m. $20-$50. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3338000, animeoasis.org. MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY AT IDAHO STATE VETERANS CEMETERY—10 a.m. FREE. Idaho State Veterans Cemetery, 10100 Horseshoe Bend Road, Boise, 208-780-1340, veterans.idaho.gov. MEMORIAL DAY REMEMBRANCE PROGRAM—This service is designed to help families and friends remember

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


WEDNESDAY MAY 23 ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon BOISE ROCK SCHOOL END OF SPRING SESSION GIGS—All active BRS bands perform everything from classic covers to radio-ready originals written by students. Refreshments available. For all ages. 4-9 p.m. $5. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place BRANDON PRITCHETT—7 p.m. FREE. Reef CAMDEN HUGHES—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse THE GLITCH MOB—8 p.m. $25$100. Revolution Concert House and Event Center

LOCKSMITH: LOUDER THAN WORDS TOUR—With J. Lately, Illumneye Crew, Flow Tha Change, Leon The God, Tony G, and StevieBoy Muziq. 8 p.m. $12, $16 meet-and-greet. The Shredder MANTRA MONTHLY SIX MONTH ANNIVERSARY—With DJ Hohn, Flowstate, Hooked On Tronicz, and The White Owl Project. 9 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s STEVE BAKER AND MICAH DEFFRIES—7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe WOLF PARADE—With Japandroids. 8 p.m. $26-$65. Knitting Factory Concert House

FRIDAY MAY 25 ALTURAS—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon

KING ROPES—With Lucid Aisle, and Gipsy Moonrise. 9 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder

ARBOUR SEASON—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny Bridge Irish Pub and Grill

LEE PENN SKY—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365

B-TOWN HITMEN—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s Saloon

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

BLOOM (FROM BREAD AND CIRCUS)—8 p.m. FREE. Dwellers Public House

MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow Brewhouse

BRANDON PRITCHETT—7 p.m. FREE. Curb Bar and Grill

PEDRO THE LION—7 p.m. $18$20. Neurolux

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

SOPHIA GRIFFIN—7 p.m. FREE. Busters Bar and Grill

CUNNINGHAM AND MOSS—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365

THURSDAY MAY 24 BEN BURDICK TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse BOISE ROCK SCHOOL END OF SPRING SESSION GIGS—All active BRS bands perform everything from classic covers to radio-ready originals written by students. Refreshments available. For all ages. 4-9 p.m. $5. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place

DOUBLE SHUFFLE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery-Cole EMILY TIPTON MUSIC—6 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub and Grill ENEFERENS—With City Of Nothing, and Mizeryland. 9 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe FRIDAY NIGHTS WITH DJ LENNY LENS—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub JEFF CROSBY AND THE REFUGEES—With Timmy the Teeth. 8 p.m. $12-$14. Neurolux THE JOHNNY UTAHS—9 p.m. FREE. The Ranch Club

SEAN HATTON AND NEAL GOLDBERG—2 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill SEAN ROGERS—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse SMOOTH AVENUE—6 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill Y LA BAMBA—7 p.m. $10. The Olympic

SATURDAY MAY 26 ABAASY—With Toarn, Life Upon Liars, Davidian, and Roses Are Dead. 7:30 p.m. $10-$12. The Shredder BIG WOW—8 p.m. $5. WilliB’s Saloon BOISE HIVE’S MAYDAY! MICRO MUSIC FEST—Featuring headliners Pears (New Orleans), with High (Pears support band), and locals low-fi, Cam Callahan and Campaign Revival, The Love Bunch, Juice!, Lakoda, Red Light Challenge, Marshall Poole, Ancesters, and Ghost Revolver. All proceeds benefit the Boise Hive and funds their mental health program. 4 p.m. $12-$15. Visual Arts Collective BROKEN OUTLAWS—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny Bridge Irish Pub and Grill CLAY MOORE TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse DALE WATSON—Celebrate the grand opening of Mountain Village Resort’s new concert venue, Velvet Falls Dance Hall, in Stanley. With Jeff Crosby. 8 p.m. FREE-$30. Mountain Village Resort EMILY TIPTON MUSIC—5-8 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Winery GALEN LEWIS—11 a.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill JOHN LENSING—7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

CHUCK SMITH—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lost Grove Brewing

COBERLY, TOWN AND DAY—6 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill

LLOYD AND BECKY BLAKE—5 p.m. FREE. Tower Grill

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

EALDOR BEALU—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

LYLE SINCLAIR AND JERRY BEE—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew Laugh a Latte

PATRICK RICE—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365

FRIM FRAM FOUR—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon JEREMIAH JAMES—7 p.m. FREE. Dwellers Public House JOSEPH LYLE—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365 LADIES NIGHT WITH DJ LENNY LENS—With Mateo from 103.5 Kiss FM, plus two-for-one well drinks and draft beers. 10 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub LAS ROSAS—7 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

THE MIGHTY RED MELONS: TRIBUTE TO MERLE HAGGARD AND BUCK OWENS—With Twangtown. 8 p.m. $20-$30. Knitting Factory Concert House NOAH KADRE EXPERIENCE—10 p.m. $5. Reef SASQUATCH MUSIC FESTIVAL— It’s time for the annual pilgrimage to one of the most scenic concert venues in the world—the Gorge Amphitheater outside George, Washington—where more than 120 acts will help you kick off your summer right. See the

THE JOHNNY UTAHS—9 p.m. FREE. The Ranch Club

REBECCA SCOTT BAND—2 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill SASQUATCH MUSIC FESTIVAL—May 25-27. $325 three-day pass. $129-$899. The Gorge Amphitheater SATURDAY NIGHTS WITH DJ ZUZ—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub SEAN HATTON BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill SEAN ROGERS—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

SPENCER BATT—7 p.m. FREE. Curb Bar and Grill TOMORROWS BAD SEEDS—With Sun Dried Vibes, and Thicker Than Thieves. 9 p.m. $12-$16. Reef TOPAZ—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew Laugh a Latte

SUNDAY MAY 27 FRANDREW BARBEQUE AND

PEARS, THE VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE, MAY 26

ROB HARDING DUO—9 a.m.noon. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room

New Orleans-based hardcore punk band Pears won’t be alone at Garden City’s Visual Arts Collective on Saturday, May 26—but as the headliner of the Boise Hive Mayday! Micro Music Festival, it will bring in the most cachet. Formed around a core of past members of The Lollies, Pears came out of the gate hard in 2014, recording its debut album Go to Prison (Fat Wreck Chords, 2015) in the first two months after its inception. Green Star (2016) and Human Movement (2017) followed on the same label, solidifying the group’s relentless, throaty style. On Saturday, Pears will share the stage with High, low-fi, Cam Callahan and Campaign Revival, The Love Bunch, Juice!, Lakoda, Red Light Challenge, Marshall Poole, Ancesters and Ghost Revolver. Head their way to get punked. —Lex Nelson

SASQUATCH MUSIC FESTIVAL—May 25-27. $129-$899, $325 three-day pass. The Gorge Amphitheater

4 p.m., $12-$15. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

MUSIC FEST BENEFIT—With Jeff Crosby and the Refugees, On the Loose, Hat Shop Band, and 101, plus Big Mac and the Noise, Deja Blue, Fast Eddie, Jeremiah James Gang, and Tracy Morrison. 2-10 p.m. $10. Donnelly Boat Docks KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—10:30 a.m. FREE. Bella Aquila NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge

THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse SIXES—With Mariana, and Impetus. 7 p.m. $8. The Shredder WE OUT HERE SUMMER SERIES—Weekly club night showcasing tasteful DJs and producers. 10 p.m. FREE. Reef

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE R AYL AMONTAGNE.COM

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill

festival website for a complete schedule. May 25-27. $129-$899, $325 three-day pass. The Gorge Amphitheater

COURTESY LEELEE BLUNT

MUSIC GUIDE

LISTEN HERE

MONDAY MAY 28 BROOK FAULK—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365 FOREST BEUTEL—With Ana Lete. 7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse REBELS & REJECTS—9 p.m. $5. Liquid Lounge SUMMERFIELD: RAY LAMONTAGNE—With Neko Case. 7 p.m. $45-$65. Memorial Stadium

TUESDAY MAY 29 ALEX SJOBECK DUO—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and BreweryCole CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse FREE X SHOW: THE FEVER 333—Listen to 100.3 The X to win free tickets. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory Concert House MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse RYAN WISSINGER—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365 THE SUBURBANS—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon

RAY LAMONTAGNE, MEMORIAL STADIUM, MAY 28 Baseball is America’s pastime, but in the City of Trees warm weather brings another favorite activity: outdoor concerts. The Summerfield Concert Series, held in Memorial Stadium (headquarters of the Boise Hawks) brings music to a ballpark atmosphere for the ultimate lazy evening, and will kick off its third season with a performance by singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne. Folk devotees are likely already well-versed in LaMontagne’s soft, easy vocals and delicate acoustic guitar harmonies from his 2010 album, God Willin’ & the Creek Don’t Rise (RCA Records), which scored a Grammy for Best Folk Album. LaMontagne will ride high in Boise following the May 18 release of his seventh record, Part of the Light (RCA Records, 2018). Don’t miss his debut on the diamond. —Lex Nelson With Neko Case. 7 p.m., $45-$65. Memorial Stadium, 5600 Glenwood St., 208-322-5000, summerfieldconcerts.com. BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2018 | 17


BEER GUZZLER HEMP, HEMP HOORAY All of the brews this week have a hemp connection: One is named for a sweet sativa strain, one is brewed with hemp seed and the third gives a nod to both a stoner movie and a cannabis variety of the same name. As an aside, industrial hemp is making a comeback, the 2014 Farm bill having lifted the U.S. government’s previous ban on hemp cultivation. DOUBLE MOUNTAIN SWEET JANE IPA, $4.79-$5.79 The fluffy, three-finger head slowly slips away from this copper-tinged brew. Subtle aromas are marked by soft, leafy hops backed by a sweet mix of tropical fruit, cherry and a touch of toffee. This is my style of IPA: The hops are ever-present, but not too aggressive. They compliment the mild caramel malt and subtle citrus flavors. NEW BELGIUM THE HEMPEROR HPA, $2.49-$2.99 This one is brewed with hemp, more specifically the hearts of hemp seeds that have been sterilized to meet the tangle of regulatory laws. It pours a dark gold with a decent head that leaves a glass-clinging lace. The first whiff? Heady weed that mellows out as you sip. The flavors are an easy-drinking mix of smooth malt, soft hops and light lemon. I bet you can’t drink just one. STONE TANGERINE EXPRESS IPA, $1.99-$2.49 The massive eggshell head that tops this hazy orange-tinged brew persists nicely. As you might expect from a Stone IPA, the nose is dominated by citrusy hops, with a touch of orange coming through. Unlike some fruit-enhanced ales, here the tangerine flavors lurk beneath the bitter hop profile. It’s a great choice for IPA lovers looking for something a little different. —David Kirkpatrick 18 | MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

FOOD

Lea Rainey (right) plans to sell her homemade honey at Roots Zero Waste Market along with bulk items, fresh produce, beauty supplies, eggs and dairy essentials.

A NEW, OLD-WORLD WAY TO SHOP

Local micro-grocery Roots Zero Waste Market to sell bulk produce, eliminate single-use plastics LE X NEL SON When the news came down the pipeline that the City of Boise’s new Hefty EnergyBag recycling program won’t accept plastic clamshell containers or water bottles, it reaffirmed Boise native Lea Rainey’s resolved in her new business venture: opening a micro-grocery and cafe—dubbed Roots Zero Waste Market—to sell bulk produce to customers without single-use plastics. “I think that everyone is acutely aware of our plastic problem, not just in the United States but globally,” said Rainey. “I was inspired by traveling in Europe for work and seeing these zero-waste markets where you simply focus on the food. You go in, you bring your own container, weigh it, fill it up and pay for it. And I just thought it was brilliant because it really takes out the stress of trying to figure out, ‘Okay, what do I have to do with this plastic packaging now?’” The market will sell bulk goods like pastas, beans, dried fruit and grains from stainless steel gravity bins, as well as fruits and vegetables kept fresh by an ionized-water misting system, and a selection of dairy and eggs. Plus, Rainey plans to offer bulk beauty supplies like lotions and shampoos from glass dispensers, and even hopes to find a way to sell bulk toothpaste. The building will also house a community space and “bistro cafe,” which will use produce from the market for deli items, sandwiches and juices, and sell local beer, wine, cider and coffee. Meat won’t be stocked in the market, but the deli will use some cuts for its entrees. Everything sold at Roots will be as organic, non-GMO, fair trade and locally sourced as possible.

“We’ll have on-site compost as well,” said Rainey, “so that we can really maximize every little bit of everything that comes out of the store.” The concept for Roots has been brewing for more than a decade. Before working for 14 years as a global delivery manager for Hewlett-Packard, Rainey was a catering manager for chef Lisa Peterson, who owns a’Tavola Gourmet Marketplace & Cafe. She also worked at the Boise Co-op before it left its old location on Hill Road. Rainey said she used to be a typical consumer—she didn’t hesitate to buy plasticswaddled vegetables or individually-wrapped granola bars in cardboard boxes. But over the years, her environmental views caught up with her lifestyle, and her family now uses bamboo toothbrushes instead of plastic ones, keeps bees to make homemade honey (which will be up for sale at Roots) and buys as much in bulk as possible. Rainey said her frustration with the process of purchasing bulk items in containers she brought from home at places like the Boise Co-op was a big factor in moving forward with Roots. “The problem that we have in Boise is that while we have some good bulk food sections, no one there really makes it easy for you,” said Rainey. “... You have to take all of your bulk containers up to a cash register and kind of check out before you check out, so that they can weigh everything for you, and then you go and fill them and come back.” At Roots, bulk purchases will work on a streamlined honor system. Weigh stations

located around the store will allow customers to weigh their containers—anything goes, and Roots will offer glass jars, and hemp and organic cotton bags for those who don’t want to bring a vessel from home—and record the weight before filling them. At the register, cashiers will subtract the original weight from the final one to figure out the price of the item. “We want to change the way that people are consuming, but we want to make it really easy for them,” said Rainey. Roots went from an idea to a reality in early May when Rainey and her business partner, 30-year restaurant and bar industry veteran Zach Yunker, started final negotiations on the former Ali Baba Hookah Bar space at 3308 E. Chinden Boulevard. The spot is in Garden City’s Surel Mitchell Live-Work-Create District, which Rainey feels is a great fit for her community concept. The permitting process is ongoing, but Rainey said Roots should be open for business by October 2018. Right now, Rainey is funding the venture with her personal savings and support from three angel investors, but she’s planning a funding drive Wednesday-Sunday, May 23-June 10, as a final push before Roots opens its doors. “We are asking 10,000 people in the community to give $10,” Rainey wrote in an email. “... Every person who donates on our website will have their name printed on our Community Wall in the market as a sign of appreciation and investment in this Big Idea we have to create a healthier community and planet.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


SCREEN

COURTESY A24 FILMS

HOW TO TALK TO GIRLS AT PARTIES: A PUNK-ERA BREXIT

MOVING”

– Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

STIRRING” “FIERCE UNEXPECTEDLY ROMANTIC. “

– Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

and

– Joshua Rothkopf, Time Out

Nicole Kidman chews so much scenery that she should swear off fiber for life GEORGE PRENTICE

Elle Fanning (left) and Alex Sharp co-star in How to Talk to Girls at Parties, opening Friday, June 1, in Boise.

London music dens until they happen upon one Your own appetite for the outre will most cerparticularly prickly pub. The music is insane, tainly factor into how much you enjoy How to but it pales in comparison to the all-in-black, Talk to Girls at Parties, an outlandish, sometime spike-haired, F-bomb-throwing madwoman in stumbling but ultimately sweet trip back to the 1970s—not the KC and the Sunshine Band ‘70s, the corner. Heavens to Betsy, it’s Nicole Kidman as Queen Boadicea, a nutcase who promotes mind you, but the chaotic ‘70s of the Ramones atrocious punk rock acts when she’s not welding and Sex Pistols. Based on an 18-page short story of the same name by Neil Gaiman (Stardust), the metallic wardrobes for her artists—no, seriously. Kidman appears to be having a blast in the film, yarn is rolled out and stretched to its limits by and she chews so much director/co-screenwriter John scenery that she should Cameron Mitchell (Hedwig HOW TO TALK TO GIRLS AT PARTIES swear off fiber for life. and the Angry Inch). (PG-13) Directed by John Cameron Mitchell But back to Enn. He Critics are already wildly Based on a short story by Neil Gaiman and his friends next stumble divided on How to Talk to Starring Alex Sharp, Elle Fanning and upon a bizarre group of Girls: New York Magazine Nicole Kidman tourists who are holed up in wrote that the film is a “legitiOpens Friday, June 1, at The Flicks a rented London mansion. mate eyesore,” while The Indetheflicksboise.com. But their taste in fashion (all pendent called it “wondrous” plastic), music (metronomand “inspired.” Count me with the latter. I’m as stodgy as the next old white ic) and just about everything else makes the punk scene seem downright buttoned-down. Among guy, but even I can look back at the punk scene the group, who for some bizarre reason speak in with some amount of fondness. American accents, is a teenage girl named Zan In How to Talk to Girls, teenager Enn (Alex (Elle Fanning, featured in The Curious Case of Sharp, who lit up Broadway in The Curious Incident of the Dog) and his leather-clad mates are Benjamin Button and Maleficent). Zan decides to stage a private rebellion, conducting her own true believers in punk, crawling through grimy

little Brexit from her brood to get a taste of Enn’s punk-fueled freedom. However, don’t think for a moment that How to Talk to Girls evolves into a run-of-the-mill rom-com. The film takes a hard left turn into science fiction, and when it’s not going off the rails the only normalcy in it is chaos. Think of Xanadu on crack cocaine. Or Splash on meth. The supporting cast includes Ruth Wilson (so wonderful in Showtime’s The Affair) and Matt Lucas (Little Britain). But the highest praise goes to Mitchell, who’s accustomed to burning down the house as an actor (the title role in Hedwig on Broadway and in film) and director (2010’s Rabbit Hole, which secured Ms. Kidman an Oscar nomination). Mitchell and co-writer Philippa Goslett’s How to Talk to Girls screenplay honors all the tang of Gaiman’s original short story and adds the dollop of sweetness necessary to sustain a believable love story. Ultimately, How to Talk to Girls harkens back to a handful of other unconventional but crazy/lovely Brit films that initially defied convention but improved with age: A Hard Day’s Night (1964), Quadrophenia (1979) and Trainspotting (1996), to name a few.

SCREEN EXTRA SUPREMELY WONDERFUL: RBG OPENS FRIDAY, MAY 25 The Avengers have nothing on the RBG—aka U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, subject of one of the most popular and entertaining big-screen documentaries in recent memory. In an already crowded summer box office, the 85-year-old Ginsberg is muscling out many of the big boys, with RBG BOISE WEEKLY.COM

HERO. ICON. DIS H S

raking in more than $3.8 million at the domestic box office. “It’s almost unheard of to see a documentary perform this well in summer blockbuster season,” Jeff Bock, analyst at Exhibitor Relations, told Variety. “For a documentary to hit $1 million, it’s like a regular film hitting $100 million.” RBG is expanding nationwide, opening at The Flicks in Boise on

Friday, May 25. It’s already generating enough buzz to make the Oscar shortlist for Best Documentary. The film opens with snippets from Ginsberg’s far-right critics, slamming her as a “witch,” “evil-doer” and “zombie.” President Donald Trump calls her “an absolute disgrace.” But RBG is going strong—just witness her pumping free weights as the film catches her in a daily workout.

“She’s like a cyborg,” says fitness trainer Bryant Johnson. No wonder some of Hollywood’s top actresses wanted to portray her in On the Basis of Sex, a big-budget film opening this November. Felicity Jones landed the much-coveted role, but in the meantime, RBG gives viewers the real deal. —George Prentice

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NYT CROSSWORD | RHYMES, SCHMYMES ACROSS Picnic annoyance Cold quarters Racetrack informant Like okapis and giraffes Sit pensively Cry from a survivor Conversation over a few whiskeys? 25 Wear 26 Pose 1

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27 Mario Vargas Llosa’s country 28 Strummed instrument, for short 29 Where butter and cheese are produced 30 ____ buddies 31 Moreover 32 Org. for drivers 33 Return to base 36 2015 Verizon purchase

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Loving verse? Some pageant wear Brought charges against Daddy Criticize severely Part of a makeshift swing ____ after Depend “Just pretend I’m right” Singer of high notes Scottish accents Dusted off, say James who won a posthumous Pulitzer Says, informally “When the Levees Broke” director High ____ Publisher in a robe, familiarly Algonquian Indians Open, as a bottle Prince and others Some drink garnishes Fish whose name sounds like the past tense of 46-Across? Greets silently Begets Take back 3-3, e.g. Site of one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World Professional fixer, for short Uses Gchat, e.g. Scornful sound H. G. Wells villain Four-time Australian Open winner

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84 Keeper of the books, for short 87 Japanese appetizer 91 Lifts 92 Everything 94 Appear that way 97 101 course 99 “… I’ll eat ____!” 100 Order (around) 101 May or Bee 102 Prevent from clumping, say 103 In conclusion 104 Sway 107 Random data point 108 ____ Reader 109 Powerful politico 111 & 112 Coupled 113 “Collage With Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance” artist

Picasso, e.g. Recent arrival Personalized music gift Backyard shindig, informally Perfect score, or half of a score Smart remarks Zooey of Fox’s “New Girl” Long, narrow pieces of luggage Modify Where Hemingway wrote “The Old Man and the Sea” Old Chrysler ____ terrier Parties Pastor role in “There Will Be Blood” L A S T

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DEAR MINERVA, I have recently started to make peace with my body. I have always been a curvier girl and there has always been pressure on me to lose weight. I have made some amazing strides to do so and part of what has helped me is using social media to post progress as well as post pictures of myself when I feel beautiful and sexy. I have one friend who continually complains about the pics as being inappropriate. Sometimes they are risque since I am nude but covered in certain areas, but I would never say they are in bad taste. How do I deal with the negativity? Sincerely, Proud Curvy

DEAR PROUD, You should never be ashamed of your body. Embrace it and love it, even if you are a work in progress. I think there’s a good chance that your friend is in the minority. There will ALWAYS be haters in this world that is why you should continue to post what makes you happy, especially when you’re feeling amazing about yourself. Because of this question I conducted a poll. Since Instagram has a wide range of people celebrating their bodies while lifting others up, I placed a poll in my Instagram story that said, “How do you feel about seeing tasteful nudes of your friends/people on IG?” The results showed that 79% voted “I Love It” with 21% of respondents saying “Nope.” So keep posting! As for your Negative Nancy friend, promptly show her the “Unfollow” button. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

22 | MAY 23–29, 2018 | BOISEweekly

RUTH BADER GINSBURG SWAG RU Sometime during the Obama administration, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s reputation began to transform from legal luminary b to po pop culture phenomenon. That led to an increased awareness of the liberal judge’s track creas record, but also some of the best progressiverecor signifier swag since Buff Bernie: A Coloring signifi Book for Berniacs. Sure, her memoir, My Own Words, is a bestseller, but who wouldn’t want to be caught reading Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, while drinking out of an “I Believe in RBG” or “Dissent” mug, featuring the Supreme Court Justice riding a unicorn under a rainbow, or a drawing of her flipping the double bird, respectively? “Notorious RBG” t-shirts also abound in every color of the rainbow. With a documentary about the liberal totem set for release Friday, May 25, it’s not too early—nor too late—to deck out in RBG gear. AMA ZON.COM

SOCIAL MEDIA POSITIVITY

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FIND

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TOP 10 (PLUS 3) TV SAME DAY RATINGS PLUS THREE DAYS OF DELAYED DVR VIEWING Source: TVbyTheNumbers. zap2it.com for week of May 7-13

1. 2.  TIE 3 TIE 3 TIE 5

THE BIG BANG THEORY, CBS (55% DVR BOOST)

ROSEANNE, ABC (54% DVR BOOST) . GREY’S ANATOMY, ABC (58% DVR BOOST) . YOUNG SHELDON, CBS (36% DVR BOOST) . NCIS, CBS (38% DVR BOOST)

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. EMPIRE, FOX (38% DVR BOOST) . MODERN FAMILY, ABC (54% DVR BOOST) . MOM, CBS (33% DVR BOOST) . SURVIVOR, CBS (33% DVR BOOST) . AMERICAN IDOL, ABC (18% DVR BOOST)

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ASTROLOGY GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Now is a favorable time to worship at the shrine of your own intuition. It’s a ripe moment to boost your faith in your intuition’s wild and holy powers. To an extraordinary degree, you can harness this alternate mode of intelligence to gather insights that are beyond the power of your rational mind to access by itself. So be bold about calling on your gut wisdom, Gemini. Use it to track down the tricky, elusive truths that have previously been unavailable to you. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “A poem is never finished; it is only abandoned,” wrote poet W. H. Auden, paraphrasing poet Paul Valery. I think the same can be said about many other kinds of work. We may wish we could continue tinkering and refining forever so as to bring a beloved project to a state of absolute perfection. But what’s more likely is that it will always fall at least a bit short of that ideal. It will never be totally polished and complete to our satisfaction. And we’ve got to accept that. I suggest you meditate on these ideas in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Paradoxically, they may help you be content with how you finish up the current phase of your beloved project. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I highly recommend that you spend the next three weeks hanging out on a beach every day, dividing your time between playing games with friends, sipping cool drinks, reading books you’ve always wanted to read and floating dreamily in warm water. To indulge in this relaxing extravaganza would be in maximum alignment with the current cosmic rhythms. If you can’t manage such a luxurious break from routine, please at least give yourself the gift of some other form of recreation that will renew and refresh you all the way down to the core of your destiny.

BY ROB BREZSNY VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Contemporaries of the ancient Greek philosopher Pythagoras told colorful stories about the man. Some believed he was the son of a god and that one of his thighs was made of gold. When he crossed the Casas River, numerous witnesses testified that the river called out his name and welcomed him. Once a snake bit him, but he suffered no injury, and killed the snake by biting it in return. On another occasion, Pythagoras supposedly coaxed a dangerous bear to stop committing violent acts. These are the kinds of legends I expect you to spread about yourself in the coming days, Virgo. It’s time to boost your reputation to a higher level. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): My counsel may seem extreme, but I really think you should avoid mildness, meekness and modesty. For the immediate future, you have a mandate to roar, cavort and exult. It’s your sacred duty to be daring and experimental and exploratory. The cosmos and I want to enjoy the show as you act like you have the right to express your soul’s code with brazen confidence and unabashed freedom. The cosmos and I want to squeal with joy as you reveal raw truths in the most emotionally intelligent ways possible. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): French novelist Honore Balzac periodically endured intense outbreaks of creativity. “Sometimes it seems that my brain is on fire,” he testified after a 26-day spell when he never left his writing room. I’m not predicting anything quite as manic as that for you, Scorpio. But I do suspect you will soon be blessed (and maybe a tiny bit cursed) by a prolonged bout of fervent inspiration. To ensure that you make the best use of this challenging gift, get clear about how you want it to work for you. Don’t let it boss you. Be its boss.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Ancient civilizations were at war constantly. From Mesopotamia to China to Africa, groups of people rarely went very long without fighting. There was one exception: the Harappan culture that thrived for about 2,000 years in the Indus River Valley, which in the present day stretches through Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. Archaeologists have found little evidence of warfare there. Signs of mass destruction and heavy armaments are non-existent. One conclusion we might be tempted to draw is that human beings are not inherently combative and violent. In any case, I want to use the Harappan civilization’s extended time of peace as a metaphor for your life in the next eight weeks. I believe (and hope!) you’re entering into a phase of very low conflict. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Every human being I’ve ever known, me included, has to wage a continuous struggle between these pairs of opposites: 1. bad habits that waste their vitality and good habits that harness their vitality; 2. demoralizing addictions that keep them enslaved to the past and invigorating addictions that inspire them to create their best possible future. How’s your own struggle going? I suspect you’re in the midst of a turning point. Here’s a tip that could prove useful: Feeding the good habits and invigorating addictions may cause the bad habits and demoralizing addictions to lose some of their power. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Some books seem like a key to unfamiliar rooms in one’s own castle,” said author Franz Kafka. I suspect this idea will be especially relevant to you in the coming weeks, Aquarius. In addition to books, other influences may also serve as keys to unfamiliar room. Certain people, for instance, may do and say things that give you access to secrets you’ve been keeping from yourself. To prep you for these epiphanies, I’ll ask you to imagine having a dream in which you’re wandering through a

house you know very well. But this time, you discover there’s a whole new wing you never knew existed. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Just for now, let’s say it’s fine to fuel yourself with comfort food and sweet diversions. Let’s proceed on the hypothesis that the guardians of your future want you to treat yourself like a beloved animal who needs extra love and attention. So go right ahead and spend a whole day (or two) in bed reading and ruminating and listening to soul-beguiling music. Take a tour through your favorite memories. Move extra slowly. Do whatever makes you feel most stable and secure. Imagine you’re like a battery in the process of getting recharged. ARIES (March 21-April 19): The Aries poet Anna Kamienska described the process of writing as akin to “the backbreaking work of hacking a footpath, as in a coal mine; in total darkness, beneath the earth.” Whether or not you’re a writer, I’m guessing that your life might have felt like that recently. Your progress has been slow and the mood has been dense and the light has been dim. That’s the tough news. The good news is that I suspect you will soon be blessed with flashes of illumination and a semi-divine intervention or two. After that, your work will proceed with more ease. The mood will be softer and brighter. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do you know what you are worth? Have you compiled a realistic assessment of your talents, powers, and capacities? When I ask you if you have an objective understanding of your real value, Taurus, I’m not referring to what your illusions or fears or wishes might tell you. I’m talking about an honest, accurate appraisal of the gifts you have to offer the world. If you do indeed possess this insight, hallelujah and congratulations! If you don’t, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to work on getting it.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 49  

Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 49