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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

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Scout Scramble The uncertain future of the Boy and Girl scouts

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The Next Big Thing The body-positive film Fattitude makes its Idaho debut

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All Fried Up

JUMP hosts a french fry-centric community dinner

FREE TAKE ONE!


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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Editorial

EDITOR’S NOTE

News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Lex Nelson lex@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, Ben Schultz Advertising Ad Director: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Jason Jacobsen jason@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Sean Severud, sean@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Jeff Leedy, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Ken Griffith, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallasen, Zach Thomas Boise Weekly prints 25,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at almost 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Digital subscriptions: 12 months-$40, subscribe.boiseweekly.com If you are interested in getting a mailed

LOOKING AHEAD We’ve got plenty for you to read up on this week, from the changing landscape of the Boy and Girl scouts to the upcoming season at the Idaho Shakespeare Festival and gourmet french fries. We’re also busy tallying all of the votes for this year’s Best of Boise. There are plenty of surprises, but you’ll have to wait until our special issue comes out Wednesday, May 30, to find out the winners. We think that calls for a bit of celebration, which is why on Saturday, June 2, we’ll host our epic block party, The Big Le Boise, from 1-7 p.m. Live music, street performances, craft vendors and plenty of food and cocktails will fill our Broad Street block throughout the afternoon, so circle the date on your calendar now. In more immediate coverage, we explore the big news at the Boy Scouts of America in this issue, including a name change and a decision by the Mormon Church to cut its ties with the BSA. We examine how all of that impacts the local Boy Scout chapter on page 6 (hint: it’s a huge game-changer). Plus, in the wake of the Idaho Public Utilities Commission’s recent ruling allowing Idaho Power to begin segregating customers who generate solar electricity, Senior Staff Writer Harrison Berry updates us on the Solarize the Valley program, also on page 6. Ben Schultz sits down with a founding member of the rock group Chrome who still aims to “keep it weird” on page 17, and on page 18 Staff Writer Lex Nelson talks with activist Amy Pence-Brown prior to the Wednesday, May 30, screening of the provocative film, Fattitude. Speaking of provocative films, I have a preview of the new movie Disobedience, starring Rachel Weisz and Rachel McAdams, on page 19. Then, ISF’s producing artistic director Charlie Fee walks us through the first two productions of his festival’s season under the stars on page 20. Finally, we visit the enormous kitchen at Jack’s Urban Meeting Place to preview JUMP’s next so-called “community dinner,” which features some out-of-this-world french fries, on page 22. Turn the page to feast your eyes.

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TITLE: “Tree Stooges” MEDIUM: I’m painting on Aluminum with colorful acrylics. ARTIST STATEMENT: For more work please visit liskgallery.com or follow on instagram @jerriliskart and facebook.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online)

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SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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LIVE COMEDY MAY 17-20

6 NIGHTS A WEEK

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BAETZ

What you missed this week in the digital world.

AND THE WINNERS ARE… WHO EMERGED VICTORIOUS IN ONE OF THE MOST HOTLYCONTESTED PRIMARIES IN IDAHO HISTORY? WE’LL BRING YOU THE IDAHO PRIMARY ELECTION RESULTS ON THE MORNING AF TER THE BIG VOTE. CHEC K NE WS/ CIT YDESK ON OUR WEB SITE FOR DE TAILS ON THE WINNING CANDIDATES .

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PAULY

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DELICIEUX French bistro Petite 4, which recently opened its doors to rave reviews, debuts its Sunday brunch service on Sunday, May 20. Plus, Wild Root Cafe may add dinner. Read more at Food/Food News.

PLAZA PUSH City officials ceremonially cut the ribbon on the newly-redesigned Boise City Hall Plaza on May 11 (even though the plaza has been finished for weeks). Read more at News/ Citydesk.

PHOTO FINISH We’ve begun accepting entries for the annual Boise Weekly Black & White Photo Contest. Entries must be received by Tuesday, June 5. Read more at Arts & Culture/ Visual Art.

BUY TICKETS NOW! LIQUIDLAUGHS.COM | 208-941-2459 | 405 S 8TH ST

OPINION

4 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

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MAIL WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT THE HOUSING CRISIS? More than 11 million families now spend the majority of their income on rent, and family and young adult homelessness rates are rising in many communities. According to the National Low Income Housing Coalition, the average person making minimum wage in Idaho must work over 62 hours to afford a modest onebedroom apartment, for an average rent of $784—out of reach for many. That doesn’t even include the additional expenses that affect housing affordability, such as utilities, transportation and distance from work. But there’s housing assistance, right? Well, three out of every four families in need of housing assistance are turned away due to a lack of funding. Last year, advocates and Congressional champions secured a 10-percent increase to federal investments in affordable housing, but President Trump’s budget slashes affordable housing by $11 billion–a move that will likely increase homelessness and housing poverty. Although Boise has plenty of housing units for people who qualify for assistance—those earning 80 percent or less of median income—the Treasure Valley is a whopping 12,000 housing units short of what is needed for “very low income” (earning 50 percent or less of median income) or “extremely low income” (earning 30 percent or less of median income). Many people who actually get assistance in the form of housing vouchers then face

landlords who refuse to rent to them. Many of these people are veterans. Why does housing affordability matter? Sociologist and author of Evicted, Matthew Desmond, says, “the rent eats first,” so families are forced to skimp on groceries, medical care and other basic needs. When people have safe homes that they can afford, they are better able to find and maintain employment, achieve economic mobility and stay in good health. Kids have more success in school and life, and seniors have an opportunity to live and grow with independence and dignity. Towns, neighborhoods and schools benefit from the increased sense of community. Increasing and preserving affordable homes helps people climb the economic ladder, leading to stronger communities and bolstering economic productivity and job creation. What can you as an individual, business owner/ manager or corporation do? Talk to your city, county and state lawmakers and to candidates in this election year. Demand that they support legislation to make it illegal for landlords to reject a veteran’s application for housing simply because the veteran would pay his/her rent with a federal voucher. Demand an increase in minimum wage. Demand they fund the Idaho Housing Trust Fund. Be a YIMBY. That stands for Yes In My Backyard. In other words, welcome and support development, remodeling, zoning changes, etc. that might bring lower income housing to your

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

neighborhood. It won’t reduce the value of your property, but rather will increase it. And your neighborhood will thrive with more diversity. Support common sense approaches that might increase the density of your neighborhood. Studies show this is good for cities. (Remember, Boise is on a monumental growth trend, so we might as well accept density now, or we will end up with sprawl, which contributes to more use of cars, more pollution, more highway maintenance, more law enforcement and more increases in housing costs). Get your neighborhood association involved in the issue. It will affect everyone, and associations need to be in communication with the city/county/state and with developers to make contact on behalf of neighborhoods for YIMBY initiatives. Support groups [that promote] innovative housing solutions such as land ownership for mobile home residents, small footprint housing, using alternative materials and technologies in homebuilding (such as shipping containers), or increasing density in creative ways. Join the Boise/Ada County Housing Coalition to advocate and educate about ways to end homelessness. If you or your organization works with low income, housing insecure populations, attend our PUSH Expo on Thursday, May 31. We must continue to make a bold and sustained commitment to ensure that everyone has safe, accessible and affordable housing. When we invest in affordable homes, we invest in people, our communities, and America as a whole— from increased employment and economic mobility to improved health and better education. —Peg Richards and Neysa Jensen, President and Vice President, Boise/Ada County Homeless Coalition BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 5


CITYDESK

GEORGE PRENTICE

1 2 3 RF.C O M

NEWS A BIGGER TENT

In the last two years, 109 homeowners and businesses have installed solar panels through Solarize the Valley.

SOLARIZE THE VALLEY RETURNS FOR THIRD YEAR DESPITE MARKET WOES Looking at recent headlines, one might think the value of home solar power generation in Idaho is slipping. “You have a lot of uncertainty in the solar industry in the last year, between tariffs ... proposed by the Trump administration and then Idaho Power’s effort to change the net metering program,” said Wendy Wilson, executive director of Snake River Alliance. Despite that, SRA is rolling out its Solarize the Valley program for the third straight year. Between 2016 and 2017, approximately 1,000 people signed up for free solar panel assessments at their homes and businesses. Of that number, 109 home and business owners moved forward to installations. This year, news about a federal tax overhaul and a White House push for tariffs have stirred up doubts about the market. While the tax bill Trump signed into law in late 2017 largely preserves tax credits for home renewable energy generation, there was still a 3.8-percent drop in U.S. solar industry employment. The President’s proposed 30-percent tariff on imported solar panels, many of which are made in China, could also shock demand. Adding to the market shakeup was the May 9 Idaho Public Utilities Commission ruling on net metering. The ruling puts Idaho Power’s customers who generate some or all of their own electricity in a separate class from those that draw only from the electrical grid. There was outcry from environmental groups: Sierra Club Idaho Director Zack Waterman wrote in a release that it “is premature and may limit customers’ right to offset their own electricity usage without being charged higher rates for electricity consumed from the grid.” The PUC ruling added that more study is needed before Idaho Power makes price changes to net metering, and Wilson noted other developments that might affect the industry have yet to land. She hopes to see 300 people get assessments and 30 receive installations in 2018. A workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, May 23, at Altenergy Inc. in Garden City, as is an open house at the home of solar ambassadors Paul and Christine Hatab at 2001 N. 18th St. in Boise. —Harrison Berry 6 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

Girl Scouts fret over Boy Scouts welcoming girls into their ranks; Boy Scouts prepare for a break from the LDS church GEORGE PRENTICE The pushback was immediate, taking David Kemper, CEO of the Ore-Idaho Council of Boy Scouts of America, by surprise. “They thought it was the end of the world. Some said it shook the Boy Scouts to its very core,” said Kemper, whose council encompasses hundreds of Cub and Boy Scout packs and troops spread over 14 counties in southwest Idaho and eastern Oregon. Kemper wasn’t talking about the Boy Scouts of America’s recent name-change announcement or its decision to accept girls. Instead, he was referring to 1988, when the BSA said it would begin recruiting women into leadership positions, including scoutmasters, ending a male-only policy. At the time, Kemper had just joined the BSA executive ranks in a Chicago suburb following a previous career in accounting. He went on to assume other BSA executive roles in West Virginia, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, in that order, and ultimately assumed the top job at the Ore-Idaho council in 2006. “Right now, we have about 14,000 kids in more than 550 packs or troops in the Ore-Idaho Council,” he said. While Kemper has helped manage a number of previous changes in the last 30 years, none has been more dramatic than the most recent developments, including the decision to change the organization’s name next February from the Boy Scouts of America to Scouts BSA. The move comes in the wake of the program’s other major decision: to include young women in its ranks for the first time. “Think for a moment of the scout pledge: ‘A scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, etc.’ It doesn’t say, ‘A male scout is trustworthy, loyal and helpful,’” said Kemper. “Now, think of today’s families. They’re more complex. There’s really no reason that our program simply fits a boy or a girl. There’s nothing that they all can’t do. Girls want to go camping, they want to shoot, they want to climb, they want to hike, they want that outdoor adventure that is the main core of what the Boy Scouts have always been about.”

Eighty percent of the Ore-Idaho Council of the Boy Scouts of America is chartered or sponsored by the Mormon Church. The local CEO said, “We’ve got some behind-the-scenes operational changes to make.”

None of the packs or troops in the Ore-Idaho council include girls yet, but Kemper expects the change to happen in early 2019. “We want to do it right, so we took our time. Each chartered organization can decide how they want to be structured,” he said. To be clear, Kemper said each Cub and Boy scout pack or troop that accepts girls will create separate sub-divisions, with a group for boys and a separate group for girls. Boise City Councilwoman Holli Woodings, who also happens to be the board chair of Girl Scouts of Silver Sage, which includes about 3,700 girls in central and southern Idaho, has one main question about the Boy Scouts’ recruitment of girls: Why? “Why would they do this? I think it really devalues the role of single-gender environments when kids are exploring things like STEM or taking risks in the outdoors,” said Woodings. “Girl Scouts have known how to do this for 106 years. We have all the best research, really keeping us up to date on making our program relevant. And now we have this competing organization? We have always served girls and we always will serve girls. This is where girls can really get out of their regular societal box and take risks, doing something they wouldn’t necessarily do in other mixed-gender environments.” Woodings, who joined the Girls Scouts when she was in the fourth grade, isn’t the only scout on the Boise City Council. Fellow councilwoman Lisa Sanchez said she’s also a proud Girl Scout and remains active in the organization. “People like astronaut Barbara Morgan and Idaho State Senator Cherie Buckner-Webb—we’re all Girl Scouts,” said Woodings. “What the world

needs now is more women leaders and Girl Scouts is the organization that starts building those leaders.” While the Girl Scouts consider the real possibility of losing some of their ranks to what they see as a “competitor,” the Boy Scouts have to grapple with a dilemma of their own: the stunning May 8 announcement from the Mormon Church that it will end its 100-year relationship with BSA. “Eighty percent of our membership in the Ore-Ida Council is chartered or sponsored by the LDS church,” said Kemper, adding that the Boy Scouts were expecting the announcement, but were caught off guard by its timing. “Here in our region, I can tell you that yes, we’re obviously going to be serving less kids. Our council will need to transform from the way we look today to looking more like [what] other Boy Scout councils look like, say back on the East coast. Here in southern Idaho, we serve a higher density of kids in packs and troops sponsored by the LDS church. That’s going to change.” Kemper said his organization will spend the better part of the next year—the LDS church said it will officially cut ties in December 2019— organizing new units to replace existing LDSsponsored troops. “It’s just going to take us some time. We’ve got some behind-the-scenes operational changes to make,” he said. “That said, it’s an interesting time for us because we’ll be organizing new dens and packs for girls. Sisters want to compete with their brothers to do the same things, and parents want their daughters to do some of the same activities their sons are doing. I think it will be exciting going forward.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY MAY 16 Festivals & Events BOISE BIKE WEEK 2018—Join the Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance to celebrate all things bicycle. Check out the event Facebook page for a complete schedule of events. Through May 19. facebook.com/BoiseBikeWeek. IDAHO WALK BIKE SUMMIT 2018—Join the Idaho Walk Bike Alliance for the Idaho Walk Bike Summit 2018 May 16-18 at the Idaho State Capitol building. The summit will educate and inspire walking and biking advocates from across Idaho by presenting information attendees can implement quickly and affordably in urban and rural communities to improve conditions for walking and biking. Russ Roca, co-owner of The Path Less Pedaled, a bike travel blog-turned business, will be the summit’s keynote speaker on Thursday morning. 4:30-7 p.m. $65. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208345-1105, idahowalkbike.org/ summit-2018.

Workshops & Classes

Calls to Artists

FIGURE DRAWING—Practice your figure drawing skills with our live models in this four-week course. For ages 18 and older. Wednesdays through June 6. 7-9 p.m. $80. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208-991-0984, gemcenterforthearts.org.

BOISE WEEKLY BLACK & WHITE PHOTO CONTEST—Submit as many shots as you want, with a fee of $6 per entry. Through June 5. $6 per entry. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

Literature Art CONSTRUCTION, DECONSTRUCTION, AND ABSTRACTION: THE ART OF JAMES CASTLE—Through May 25. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. DAVID R. DAY: HORIZONS— Through May 26. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. JAMES CASTLE: EIGHTEEN ARTIST BOOKS—7 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1865 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1204, facebook. com/bsufinearts.

BYO BOOKS CLUB FOR INTROVERTS—Spend some time sharing the solitary act of reading while you relax, enjoy a glass of wine or a tasty snack, and catch up on that stack. Wednesday 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. The Local, 5616 W. State St., Boise, 208-412-3095, thelocalboise.com.

Kids & Teens THE CLUB—This club for teens with disabilities involves monthly get-togethers with music, crafts, games and movies. For ages 13-18. 2:30-3:30 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800, nampalibrary.org.

Food

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

AMERICAN CRAFT BEER WEEK AT PAYETTE BREWING—Celebrate American Craft Beer Week with Payette Brewing. Drop by Monday-Sunday for special events, beer deals, good times and more. Visit the Facebook event page to see a list of all the daily specials. Through May 20, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-344-0011, payettebrewing.com.

THURSDAY MAY 17 On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: PRINCESS BRIDE—Don’t forget to dress up as your favorite character for a chance to win prizes. Open to all ages. 7 p.m. $9-$11. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, boiseclassicmovies.com. BOISE MUSIC WEEK: THE MUSIC MAN—Celebrate the 100th consecutive season of Boise Music Week with family entertainment at it’s best. Music Man follows fast-talking traveling salesman Harold Hill as he tries to con the stubborn citizens of River City, Iowa, only to fall for a librarian. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, morrisoncenter. com.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 7


CALENDAR COMEDIAN MATT BAETZ—8 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208941-2459, liquidboise.com. PLAYHOUSE BOISE: TONY N’ TINA’S WEDDING—6:30 p.m. $35. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-7790092, playhouseboise.com. SPARK NEW PLAY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM READING—The Spark Program invites plays by emerging playwrights to participate in a week-long workshop process with the playwright, a director, dramaturg and cast in the room that culminates in a seated reading presentation for the public. 7 p.m. $10. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, campfiretheaterfestival.com.

by four expert trainers who understand the unique challenges and opportunities of being a woman in leadership. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $995. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, nextlevelwomenleaders.com.

Art THIRD THURSDAY AT THE GEM CENTER FOR THE ARTS—Check out May’s Third Thursday at the Gem Center for the Arts, featuring art by five Swell artists in the main gallery, VIVID Artists open studios, live music and snacks. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208-991-0984, gemcenterforthearts.com.

Workshops & Classes

Citizen

NEXT LEVEL WOMEN LEADERS TRAINING—Participants will learn new skills and develop actionable strategies, all delivered

NONPROFIT RESOURCE THURSDAY—Resource Thursdays offers a panel discussion with a

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, MAY 16-19

network of experts, followed by a feature presentation. Thursday 4-6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, idahononprofits. org.

FRIDAY MAY 18

Kids & Teens

BEHOLDER CON—Join All About Games for Idaho’s premier role-playing convention. Play Pathfinder, Dungeons and Dragons, Vampire the Masquerade, and more. 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. $10$15, $35 3-day badge. Legends Sports Pub and Grill, 7609 W. Overland Rd, Boise, 208-3435653, beholdercon.com.

BABY TODDLER STORYTIME—10:15-11 a.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800, nampalibrary.org. GIRL SCOUTS OF SILVER SAGE SUMMER KICKOFF—Kick off summer with Girl Scouts of Silver Sage at this open house. Participate in a tent set-up competition, enjoy archery from Cabela’s, virtual reality and more, and learn about some of the amazing things Girl Scouts do. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Girl Scouts of Silver Sage Council, 8948 W. Barnes St., Boise, 208-377-2011, girlscoutsssc.org.

The Facebook page for Boise Bike Week is loaded; to celebrate traveling on two wheels, the Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance has packed 14 events into seven days. Although it’s already mid-week, there are still plenty of opportunities left to get in on lauding life in the bike lane. Wednesday will feature a Ride of Silence down Bannock Street in downtown Boise to honor victims to bike accidents, raise awareness for cyclists and advocate for sharing the road. On Thursday, bikers can score free ice cream at Goody’s Soda Fountain & Candy Store in Hyde Park courtesy of Boise GreenBike, which will cut the ribbon on its new bike station. Friday will bring a screening of Breaking Away at Boise Bicycle Project, and on Saturday, an adaptive bike fair and party at The HandleBar will finish the week. Roll out your two-wheeler for those events and many more. Dates, times and locations vary. Check biketreasurevalley.org for more details. 8 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

TREASURE VALLEY TATTOO CONVENTION—Meet artists, get tattooed and see amazing art. The convention will feature 75 different booths of artists, vendors and attractions. 2-11 p.m. $15-$20. $40 weekend pass. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200, centurylinkarenaboise.com.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MAY 18-19

Ride on.

BOISE BIKE WEEK

Festivals & Events

Feed your inner bear.

On Stage

Workshops & Classes

THE ATHEIST COMEDY EXPERIENCE—Celebrate six years of atheist comedy in Boise, with Lady Bizness, Jen Adams, Sherry Japhet and Chadwick Heft. Hosted by Mikey Pullman. 8 p.m. $15. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

INTRODUCTION TO PORTRAITURE—This eight-week course is for anyone who has ever wanted to learn to create portraits in graphite, chalk pastel, and ink. For ages 18 and older. 6-8 p.m. $190. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208-991-0984, gemcenterforthearts.org.

BOISE MUSIC WEEK: THE MUSIC MAN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, morrisoncenter.com.

NEXT LEVEL WOMEN LEADERS TRAINING—8 a.m.-5 p.m. $995. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-6396610, nextlevelwomenleaders.com.

COMEDIAN MATT BAETZ—8 and 10 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com.

Literature

PLAYHOUSE BOISE: TONY N’ TINA’S WEDDING—6:30 p.m. $35. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-7790092, playhouseboise.com.

JAMIE FORD: LOVE AND OTHER CONSOLATION PRIZES—Idaho Humanities Council presents author Jamie Ford. Ford’s new notable book, Love and Other Consolation Prizes, inspired by a true story, is the unforgettable story of a young boy named Ernest, set during the 1909 Seattle World’s

SATURDAY, MAY 19

What’s your color?

RUSSIAN FOOD FESTIVAL

PRIDEFEST YOUTH DIVERSITY PROM

Compared to more popular cuisines like French, Italian and Japanese, Russian food may not have the best reputation in the U.S.—but if you hear someone bashing it, it’s likely they’ve never had the real thing. In Boise, the annual Russian Food Festival hosted by St. Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church is the place to go for authentic tundra eats, and this weekend is your chance to check it out. Apart from plenty of food—including beef Stroganoff; piroshki filled with everything from meat to apples; honey cake and vodka balls—there will be live Russian music and an opportunity to meet local religious iconographer Matthew Garrett. Preparations are already well underway; don’t miss the chance to chow down. Friday: 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m.-8 p.m., St. Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church, 872 N. 29th St., 208-345-1553, stseraphimboise.org/festival.html.

This year’s edition of Boise Pridefest won’t take over the town until mid-June, but that hasn’t stopped its organizers from pregaming with a handful of other LGBTQ friendly events. Before the 29th year of festivities kicks off, join the people behind Boise Pridefest and special guest Alyssa Edwards (of RuPaul’s Drag Race fame) for a prom night spectacular with the theme “A Night Under the Circus Top.” The Youth Diversity Prom will feature food, drinks and plenty of entertainment as well as the usual dancing. Those age 14-20 are welcome to snag a ticket and enter what Pridefest bills as “a safe space to add your color to the rainbow.” Last year, organizers estimate more than 35,000 people participated in Pride events—head to the Knitting Factory to get counted early. 7:30-10:30 p.m., $10. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, boisepridefest.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR Fair. Purchase tickets online or call 208-345-5346. 7:30-9 p.m. $25, $200 table for 8. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, rdbooks.org.

9 p.m. FREE. St. Seraphim of Sarov Russian Orthodox Church, 872 N. 29th St., Boise, 208-345-1553, stseraphimboise.org.

Odds & Ends

SATURDAY MAY 19

VIRTUAL REALITY GAMES—Dropin and try out Victory library’s new Playstation 4 VR games. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org/victory.

Food RUSSIAN FOOD FESTIVAL—This year’s menu will include beef stroganoff, shish-kebab, stuffed peppers, Russian crepes, piroshki, chebureki, borscht, salads, and an assortment of desserts. There will be an opportunity to meet and watch a local iconographer as he paints, as well as guided tours of the church to introduce visitors to Russian Orthodox worship. 11 a.m.-

Festivals & Events 41ST ANNUAL ORCHIDS AND ONIONS AWARDS—Join Preservation Idaho to celebrate places, individuals and organizations that have made a positive contribution to historic preservation in Idaho. A hosted reception will follow the ceremony. Reception tickets are available online. 1 p.m. FREE, $20$25 reception. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, preservationidaho.org. BEHOLDER CON—10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. $10-$15, $35 3-day badge. Legends Sports Pub and Grill, 7609 W. Overland Rd, Boise. 208-3435653, beholdercon.com.

SATURDAY, MAY 19

BOISE PRIDEFEST 2018 YOUTH DIVERSITY PROM: A NIGHT UNDER THE CIRCUS TOP—Join Boise Pridefest for a night of fun, dancing and entertainment at one of the largest events in the Northwest for the LGBTQIA youth community. Featuring Alyssa Edwards. For ages 14-20 7:30 p.m. $10. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3671212, boisepridefest.org. LANDLOCKED MOTORCYCLE SHOW—Join Rawhide Cycles of Nampa, DicE Magazine and Harley-Davidson for the Landlocked Motorcycle Show, featuring 20 by-invitation-only show bikes built by local shops. Plus live bands and several local vendors. 3-10 p.m. FREE. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3425553, dicemagazine.com/news/ landlocked. TREASURE VALLEY TATTOO CONVENTION—Noon-10 p.m. $15-$20. $40 weekend pass. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200, centurylinkarenaboise.com. WATERSHED WEEKEND 10TH ANNIVERSARY WATER FESTIVAL—Celebrate the Boise WaterShed’s 10th anniversary with festival activities, water games, cupcakes, and a trout release. Join local engineers to launch water rockets, race your friends through a hydraulic maze, build your own filter and win prizes, all while learning about the water cycle and water treatment. Find a full schedule of events online. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-608-7300, bee. cityofboise.org/watershed.

On Stage BOISE BAD MOVIE CLUB: TROLL 2—Be sure to take your sense of humor. Talking is encouraged. Alcohol is not allowed. Ages 13 and older. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Bown Crossing, 2153 E. Riverwalk Drive, Boise, 208-972-8200, meetup.com/ Boise-bad-movie-club.

Ladies night at The Flicks.

LUNAFEST BOISE Luna is the branch of the Clif Bar company dedicated to supporting women: It does everything from sponsoring workshops to publishing tips for closing the wage gap. It’s only fitting, then, that Luna is teaming up with Soroptimist International of Boise to put on Lunafest, a traveling film festival screening a slate of nine short films “by, for, and about women.” Some of the films are animated, others are first-person accounts, but all of them are meant to empower and inspire, from Emily Sheskin’s Jesszilla, the story of 10-year-old boxer Jesselyn Silva, to Waiting For Hassana by Funa Maduka, which follows a Nigerian woman’s escape from the Boko Haram. Stick around after to discuss the films, drink wine, graze on snacks and participate in a raffle. Men are welcome, too. 12:30 p.m., $10-$20. The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., 208-3424288, theflicksboise.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISE MUSIC WEEK: THE MUSIC MAN—2 and 7:30 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, morrisoncenter.com. COMEDIAN MATT BAETZ—8 and 10 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. COMEDIAN MICHAEL JR.—7 p.m. $20. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-854-3936, boisecentre.com. LUNAFEST BOISE—Soroptimist International of Boise is partnering with LUNAFEST to showcase nine short films by, for and about women. Tickets include post-screening social, complete with wine and snacks. 12:30-2 p.m. $20. The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, lunafest.org.

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 9


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BENEFITING:

OPHIDIA’S ANNUAL POLE-APALOOZA—Enjoy an evening full of amazing student and instructor performances. You will see all the aerial apparatuses in full swing, plus more. Wear comfy clothes, there will be plenty of floor seating on comfy pillows plus folding chairs. This show is BYOB. 8 p.m. $10-$13. Ophidia Studio, 2615 W. Kootenai St., Boise, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

AUTHORS ABRAHAM SMITH AND SCOTT MCWATERS READING—Writers Abraham Smith and Scott McWaters will read selections from their recently published book, Tuscaloosa Kills. 7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208972-9028, mingstudios.org.

PLAYHOUSE BOISE: TONY N’ TINA’S WEDDING—6:30 p.m. $35. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

BOISE BIKE WEEK ADAPTIVE BIKE FAIR—Try out a variety of adaptive cycles, including upright and recumbent handcycles and trikes, and tandem bikes and trikes. All ages and ability levels are welcome. Part of Boise Bike Week. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, 208-384-4486, parks.cityofboise. org/adventure.

XPRESSIONS DANCE ACADEMY: TURN IT UP—Xpressions Dance Academy’s 10th anniversary dance recital, featuring upbeat music and exciting performances. 10:30 a.m., 2:30 and 6:30 p.m. $TBA. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

Workshops & Classes

Watch for The Flicks movie calendar next week inside Boise Weekly.

theflicksboise.com

AUTHENTIC COLOMBIAN CUISINE

COFFEE CUPPING 101—Join Flying M Coffeegarage in Nampa for a 1-hour course in coffee cupping. Learn about the process from berry to cup, exercise your olfactory system, then taste three of their single origin roasts. Sign up online. 10 a.m. $10. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-4675533, flyingmcoffee.com. STORY STORY STUDIO: STORYTELLING MASTERCLASS—Join Leta Harris Neustaedter to master the art of telling a five minute live story. 1-6 p.m. $75. Metamorphosis Performing Arts Studio, 511 W. Main St., Boise, 208-697-4703, metamorphosisstudio.org.

Kids & Teens BOISE ROBOTICS GROUP (B.O.R.G.)—Meet with the Boise Robotics Group to work on your own projects or gain specialized help in your area of interest. Ages 10 and older accompanied by a parent. Saturday 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208362-0181, adalib.org/victory.

IDAHO’S LARGEST GARAGE SALE—With special guest Chumlee from Pawn Stars. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. $5. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, idahoslargestgaragesale.com.

Animals & Pets DRYLAND DOGS URBAN MUSHING EVENT: SCOOTERING, BIKEJORING, CANICROSS—Join Dryland Dogs to learn about dog scootering. Stop by the park anytime with your dog to observe, get a harness fitting, and take a test drive. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Camel’s Back Park, 1200 W. Heron St., Boise, 208-918-0379, drylanddogs.com.

Food BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove Streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Art

208.467.1254 3116 GARRITY BLVD SUITE 114 NAMPA, ID 83687

LUNCH SPECIAL $8.50

RUSSIAN FOOD FESTIVAL May 18 & 19| Friday 11a-9p | Saturday 11a-8p

Authentic Homemade Russian Foods & Desserts Hot & Ready to Eat or Take Home at St. Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church 872 N. 29th St. Boise // 345-1553 Complete Menu at stseraphimboise.org

ARTBIKE TOUR—Follow on your bicycle to visit artists and makers in and around the Surel Mitchell Live-Work-Create District. Each of the artists will share their work and space with you. Meet at Push & Pour Coffee. While this tour is fun for a wide age range, the final stop on the tour is restricted to 21-and-older only. 1-3:30 p.m. $10. Push & Pour, 214 E. 34th St., Garden City. 917495-5840, surelsplace.org. INDIGO ART FESTIVAL—Check out this family- and fur baby-friendly event that promotes mental health awareness by featuring inspiring stories, powerful artwork, and a collaboration of local businesses and musicians. 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m. FREE. Storey Park, corner of Main Street and Franklin Road, Meridian. 208371-3902, indigoidaho.org.

Literature AUTHOR MARK ASHER: BIRDCALL MORNING—Join local author Mark Asher for a book signing. Birdcall Morning is an emotional and lifeaffirming tale about the struggle to start over, the value of friendship, the true nature of love, and the changing times that we live in. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

10 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

Sports & Fitness

Odds & Ends

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. RUSSIAN FOOD FESTIVAL—11 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. St. Seraphim of Sarov Russian Orthodox Church, 872 N. 29th St., Boise, 208-3451553, stseraphimboise.org. STATE STREET FRIKI TIKI LUAU AND PIG ROAST—Join Capitol Bar and Distal Provisions for a traditional whole hog roast at the first ever State Street Friki Tiki Luau, featuring exotic tiki cocktails hand crafted with Don Q rums. Food starts at noon, with a whole hog presentation promptly at 2 p.m. Food tickets are $20. Noon-5 p.m. FREE-$20. Capitol Bar, 6100 W. State St., Ste. 101, Boise, 208-6295134, thecapbar.com.

SUNDAY MAY 20 Festivals & Events BEHOLDER CON—10 a.m.-9 p.m. $10-$15, $35 3-day badge. Legends Sports Pub and Grill, 7609 W. Overland Rd, Boise, 208-343-5653, beholdercon.com. INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM DAY—Sample 12 of Boise’s museums in one place, with live birds, hands-on activities, games, art projects, exhibits, nature activities and food trucks.

Note: Free admission applies to the Birds of Prey location on May 20 only. Noon-4 p.m. FREE. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208362-8687. boisemuseums.org/ international-museum-day. TREASURE VALLEY TATTOO CONVENTION—Noon-8 p.m. $15-$20. $40 weekend pass. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com.

On Stage BOISE MUSIC WEEK: THE MUSIC MAN—2 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, morrisoncenter. com. BOISE PHIL CHAMBER PLAYERS: SCHOENBERG AND PUTS—2 p.m. $15-$25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise. 208-344-7849, boisephil.org. COMEDIAN MATT BAETZ—8 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Art INDIGO ART FESTIVAL—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Storey Park, corner of Main Street and Franklin Road, Meridian. 208371-3902.

EYESPY

FOOD TRUCKS • COCKTAILS • BEER • CRAFT VENDORS

Religious & Spiritual A BIGGER TABLE: CONVERSATION WITH JOHN PAVLOVITZ— Author of A Bigger Table: Building Messy, Authentic, Hopeful Spiritual Community, John Pavlovitz invites us to build the bigger table Jesus imagined, practicing radical hospitality, total authenticity, messy diversity, and agenda-free community. Presented by the Wassmuth Center for Human Rights. 5:458:30 p.m. $15. Riverside Hotel, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter. org/events.

MONDAY MAY 21 Kids & Teens PRETWEEN BUBBLE ART—Learn how to use recycled items to make some beautiful watercolor artwork. 4 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4685800, nampalibrary.org.

Odds & Ends SWINGIN’ AT SOLID: VINTAGE NIGHT—Learn Lindy Hop, Balboa, Charleston and more. Then enjoy dancing to the big band hits of the ‘30s and ‘40s at 9 p.m. 8-11 p.m. $5. Solid Grill & Bar, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

TUESDAY MAY 22

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Talks & Lectures

FREE ALL AGES

CORT CONLEY: AN EVENING DOWN THE SALMON RIVER—Join Cort Conley, a Western river guide for 30-plus years, for a historical overview of boating on the Salmon River and a talk about some of the people who lived along its shores. RSVP to Ava Isaacson at ava@ idahorivers.org. 6-8:30 p.m. By donation. Beside Bardenay, 612 Grove St., Boise, 208-343-7481, idahorivers.org.

Kids & Teens BABY TODDLER STORYTIME—10:15-11 a.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800, nampalibrary.org.

BENEFITING THE WOMEN’S & CHILDREN’S ALLIANCE

TWEEN LEGO CLUB—4:30 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4685800, nampalibrary.org.

Odds & Ends

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

LIVE TRIVIA WITH LAST CALL— 7 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 11


LISTEN HERE COURTESY CURSE LEAGUE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY MAY 16 ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon BARTON AND BOLLAR—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s Saloon CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

CURSE LEAGUE, FUNKY TACO, MAY 18 Less than a month from its soft opening, The Funky Taco’s brick-and-mortar location in downtown Boise has found its rhythm. Billed as a music venue as well as a mixed-culture taco joint, the space has started to pull in acts to its second-floor stage. Next in the lineup is Curse League, an indie band out of Seattle that blends emo and math rock to produce a sound softer than both. Its music, as emphasized on its most recent album, Laying by the Fire in Good Company (self-released, 2018), is curated chaos, a jumble of notes woven just tightly enough to become song. Tracks like “Burrero” alternately burble and rage, but are at no point uninteresting. Stop by The Funky Taco to get to the bottom of the intrigue. —Lex Nelson With Laika The Dog, and Cactus Coy. 9 p.m., $5. The Funky Taco, 801 W. Bannock St., 208-991-4106, thefunkytaco.com.

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

EMILY TIPTON MUSIC—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek Grill FALL CREEK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow Brewhouse FRENCH AND THE FLIES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow Brewhouse GRANDDAD—With Termination Dust. 7 p.m. $7. The Olympic KARAOKE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse RED LIGHT CHALLENGE—7 p.m. FREE. Busters Bar and Grill SAMMY J—9 p.m. $10-$15. Reef

THURSDAY MAY 17 AARON GOLAY ALBUM RELEASE—With The Weary Times, and Zack Quintana. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic BEN BURDICK TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

COURTESY PALLBEARER

BRAIN BAGZ—With Ten High, Marquina and Non-Fiction. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

If Pallbearer were a kid, it would be a moody 10 year old at play in all-black clothes, but keeping an intelligent eye on the world. Yes, the band is a decade old this year, but that isn’t the only fuel for the metaphor. The group’s third album, Heartless (Profound Lore/Nuclear Blast, 2017), is a solid reprisal of its 2012 hit Sorrow and Extinction (Profound Lore)—named the year’s best metal album by Rolling Stone—and captures an unexpectedly mature balance, pairing raucous doom-laden choruses with melodic pauses. The echoing vocals exist in a space apart from the music, and the whole album comes off as a carefully choreographed heavy metal ballet. Record Exchange will be Pallbearer’s only Boise stop, and if the set doesn’t convince you on the trip, the meet-and-greet and album signing should. —Lex Nelson 4 p.m., FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com. 12 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

BLUES GROOVE AND GODFREY PAUL—The Blues Groove opens, followed by Godfrey Paul’s rockin’ country at 10 p.m. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ironwood Social BLUES TO LOSE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery-Cole BOBBY DEE KEYS—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew Laugh a Latte CHROME—8 p.m. $13-$15. Neurolux CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse COMSTOCK LODE DANCE—7-9 p.m. $8, $15 couples. Dick Eardley Boise Senior Center DANIEL MARK FALLER AND THE WORKING POOR—9 p.m. FREE. The Ranch Club DJ ZUZ—Kick off your weekend right & get down to The Curb Bar and Grill and enjoy the sounds of DJ Zuz! 7 p.m. FREE. Curb Bar and Grill EMILY TIPTON MUSIC—6:30 p.m. FREE. Leku Ona ENCORE—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s Saloon FRIDAY NIGHTS WITH DJ LENNY LENS—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub GAYLE CHAPMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365 GAYLE CHAPMAN AND KARIN SCHICK—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew Laugh a Latte JORDAN LEISURE—6 p.m. FREE. Dry Creek Mercantile

CHUCK SMITH—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

NEW TRANSIT—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon

EMILY TIPTON—6 p.m. FREE. Gem Center for the Arts

NIKKI LANE—With Carl Anderson. 7 p.m. $15. The Olympic

FRIM FRAM FOUR—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon

SEAN ROGERS—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse

THE HALF MACS—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew Laugh a Latte

SOPHIE GRIFFIN HOMECOMING SHOW—7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

JEREMIAH JAMES—7 p.m. FREE. Dwellers Public House

PALLBEARER, RECORD EXCHANGE, MAY 20

BELMONT AND YOUNG CULTURE—With Sportscourt, Roses Are Dead, and Kira. 7 p.m. $5. The Shredder

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Bella Aquila KONNEXTED CLUB NIGHT—With DJs Donald Bumps (founder and promoter of Konnexion), Darkchild, and Sorcery. 9 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s SISTERS IN SONGWRITING— Featuring Brook Faulk, Kayleigh Jack McGrath, and Desirae Bronson Music. 7 p.m. FREE. The Ranch Club WILSON ROBERTS—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365

FRIDAY MAY 18 ACCEPTABLE LOSSES—With Red Light Challenge. 10 p.m. $5. Reef

STRAIGHT AWAY—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny Bridge Irish Pub and Grill SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW DUO—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew Laugh a Latte TYCHO—With Emmit Fenn. 8 p.m. $25-$60. Knitting Factory Concert House

SATURDAY MAY 19 ALYSSA EDWARDS—Alyssa Edwards performs first at the Boise Pridefest Diverstiy Prom, followed by an 11 p.m. set at The Knit’s The Parallel. 11 p.m. $10. 9th St. Parallel at KFCH BREAD AND CIRCUS—2 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill

BROKEN OUTLAWS—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny Bridge Irish Pub and Grill CAMDEN HUGHES—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse CARMEL AND THE CLOSERS—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s Pub & Grill DANIEL MARK FALLER AND THE WORKING POOR—9 p.m. FREE. The Ranch Club DUSTY LEIGH AND THE CLAIM JUMPERS—10 p.m. $5. Reef ENCORE—With Sonido (Spanish dance music) 9-10 p.m. Part of the St. John’s Cathedral Neighborhood Block Party. 6-9 p.m. FREE. St. John’s Cathedral MOODY JEWS—8:30 p.m. FREE. The TK Bar NAOMI PSALM—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew Laugh a Latte NED EVETT—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365 NEW TRANSIT—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon RAWLEY FRY—7 p.m. FREE. Curb Bar and Grill SATURDAY NIGHTS WITH DJ ZUZ—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub SEPARATING THE SEAS AND WITHIN SIGHT—With Artificial Aliens, Life Upon Liars, and Fall of Fathom. 8 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder THE SOULMATES—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s Saloon TV GIRL—With Wished Bone, and Styles in Black. 7 p.m. $10. The Olympic

SUNDAY MAY 20 CUNNINGHAM AND MOSS—9 a.m.-noon p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room IRISH MUSIC—Enjoy Traditional Irish Session Music Sundays through May 20. 7-9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s Pub & Grill NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge PALLBEARER—The Arkansasspawned metal quartet hits The RX stage for their only show in town in support of their third album, Heartless. The band offers a complex sonic architecture that weaves together the spacious exploratory elements of classic prog, the raw anthemics of ‘90s alt-rock, and stretches of black-lit proto-metal. The performance will be followed by an album signing and meet-and-greet. For all ages. 4 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange

WE OUT HERE SUMMER SERIES—Weekly club night showcasing the most tasteful DJs and producers regionally. 10 p.m. FREE. Reef

MONDAY MAY 21 ANTI VISION—With Be Like Max, Non-Fiction, and Freedom Machine. 8 p.m. $6. The Shredder CREEK—With Vague Wolf, Panda & Rabbit, Meridian Movement, and Illicit Nature. 9 p.m. $5. Liquid Lounge DOUGLAS CAMERON—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365 MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse, 981 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com. OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND EMILY TIPTON—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon

TUESDAY MAY 22 BLUEGRASS OPEN MIC—Join the Idaho Bluegrass Association and Idaho Sawtooth Bluegrass Association for Bluegrass Open Mic every fourth Tuesday of the month. Show up to listen or show up to play, you’ll have fun either way. More information and a sign-up form can be found on the Idaho Bluegrass Association’s Web page. 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse JACK LLOYD GISH—5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Bar 365, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, riversideboise.com/dining/ lobby-bar. LA LUZ—With Savila. 7 p.m. $10. The Olympic MERKULES: USA TOUR—7 p.m. $15. Knitting Factory Concert House MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: BRENT COBB AND THEM— With Savannah Conley. 7 p.m. $12-$15. Neurolux SOMA—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery-Cole THE SUBURBANS—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon

TOM BURDEN AND FRIENDS— Noon p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe WALKING PAPERS—7 p.m. $10. The Shredder

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 13


2018 TREASURE VALLEY TATTOO CONVENTION EVENT MAP

VENDORS • Garden City Projects Jewelry/Artist Collective • Swamp Co Art & Screen Printing

• 100.3 X Rocks Radio Station

IN

DIA

N

M

/C

3

1

• Chapters Co Leather Goods

5

Blaque Owl

10

INKVISION

7

8

12

13

6

Hidden Hand

11

• Susie Q Tattoo Aftercare & Skincare

Babe Dont

Fist Full of Metal

4

9

• Treasure Valley Tattoo Removal Fist Full of Metal

Stay True

21

INKVISION

19

17

22

• TatSoul Tattoo Supply

24

23

• Eight Coins Tarot Tarot Readings

STAGE

Seating

STAGE 20x32

Garden City Projects

Garden City Projects

Devotion Piercing

Devotion Piercing

Hive Caps

Hive Caps

Info

SEATING

Royal Tiger

25

29

Five 33 Caps

INFO

Heart City

26

30

• Art Designed For You Kids Face Painting

35

• Sierra Kellie Handcrafted Goods

32

Five 34 Caps

Green Room

Blaque Owl

20

16

Allstate

15

Hidden Hand

37

• Square Theory Custom Frames

A/V

Lost Art

48 INK HOUSE

Life Styles

52

CHALICE

44

Nick Hill

49

Nick Hill

53

ACE CUSTOM

Lasting Dose

43

Olympia

INK HOUSE

47

40

Mammoth

39

A MINDS EYE

41 ELC

42

Dark Age

50

INK HOUSE

54

55

• Scentsy Candles

60

• Tao Glass Art Jewelry

LO YA

LT

Y

56 58

• Resurrection Tattoo Polish

51

Nick Hill

The Hook Up

• Painted Points Skull & Bone Artwork

45

Aloha

Swell

38

59

• Bhakti Yoga Center VENDORS TATTOO SHOPS STENCIL BOOTHS

14 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

• Wet Plates Tin Type Photography • Lipsense Beauty Products • Paint & Destroy Signs by Scott Larock

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TV/TC Boise’s Premier Tattoo Event Featuring the Best Tattooers From Around the World All styles of tattoos will be represented so whether you are

artists Boise has to offer as well as traveling artists from

looking for photo realism, tribal, Japanese, American

across the country. This year we are honored to have artists

traditional, watercolor, or anything in between, you are sure

from Australia and Russia joining in the fun as well! The

to find an artist to create your perfect tattoo. Once you get

convention is a great opportunity for tattoo collectors to

your new masterpiece, show it off in one of the many

add to their collection, or first time canvases to get a tattoo

competitions held throughout the weekend for a chance to

in a one of a kind venue by industry leading artists.

win a cash prize!

ATTENDING SHOPS

The Treasure Valley Tattoo Convention will feature the best

01 Grindtime Anaheim, CA

16 Atlas Portland, OR

34 Dedication Denver, CO

52 Death or Glory Davis, CA

03 Voodoo Circus Colorado

17 Stay True Dublin, CA

35 Torch Anaheim, CA

53 A Minds Eye Boise, ID

04 Home of the Brave Idaho

19 Mercy SLC, UT

37 Royal Tiger Austin, TX

54 The Hookup Nampa, ID

05 High Tide Juneau, AK

20 1986 Electric Logan, UT

40 Iron Wolf Boise, ID

56 Still Life Seal Beach, CA

06 Mission Beach San Diego, CA

21 Lost Art SLC, UT

41 Heart City Coeur d'Alene, ID

58 American Classic Nampa,ID

07 Olympia Olympia, WA

22 InkVision Boise, ID

43 Mammoth American Colorado

59 Rage City Spokane, WA

08 Fist Full of Metal Seattle, WA

23 Super Genius Seattle, WA

44 Chalice Boise, ID

60 Rise Above Mont Clair, CA

09 Electric Anvil Brooklyn, NY

24 Port City California

45 High Hands Albuquerque, NM

10 Heavy Duty Ogden, UT

25 Aloha Boise, ID

47 Imperial Boise, ID

11 Pyramid Boise, ID

29 Artwork Rebels Portland, OR

48 Sabbath Bellingham, WA

12 Black Rabbit Portland, OR

30 Devotion Boise, ID

49 Triple Crown, Austin, TX

13 California Electric Soquel, CA

32 Scapegoat Portland, OR

50 Ace Custom Charlotte, NC

15 Blaque Owl Missoula, MT

33 Yellow Rose SLC, UT

51 Loyalty Clearfield, UT

Body piercing and microblading will also be available alongside a wide range of vendors. Everything from clothing, handcrafted jewelry, leather goods, and tons of original artwork. New this year we will have a historic tattoo display for everyone to browse through, as well as the opportunity to get a unique tin-type photo right on site during the convention. Kids under 16 are free with a paid adult. Military and first responder discounts are available.

Photo by Chris Beaudoin

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 15


Don’t miss your chance to get tattooed by local and visiting artists this Friday through Sunday at the CenturyLink Arena. Tickets can be purchased ahead of time online or in person at the box office.

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram @tvtattooconvention and be sure to tag us #tvtattooconvention in all your convention adventures!

FRI SAT SUN MAY 18

MAY 19

MAY 20

DEVOTION TATTOO

TreasureValleyTattooConvention.com

16 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

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NOISE J E RE M Y H A RRIS

LOVING THE ALIEN: CHROME KEEPS IT WEIRD

“We made a total left turn and just totally got [away] from normality.”

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BEN SCHULTZ By the mid-1990s, singer-guitarist Helios Now performing with a five-person lineup, the Creed-led Chrome continues its legacy as Creed hadn’t played in the band Chrome in “The Most Influential Band You’ve Never Heard.” over a decade. Band founder Damon Edge had called him more than once to suggest gonna do. I think it was the right decision.” greater impact. A well-known piece of Chrome that they work on new material, but Creed Musicians that followed in Chrome’s wake folklore involves a Sabbath show that Creed always refused. seemed to agree. Albums like Alien Soundtracks attended while tripping on LSD. “He sounded terrible, kinda drunk and and its follow-up, Half Machine Lip Moves “I got so scared that I ran out of the place, drugged out,” Creed said in a 2017 interview (Siren Records, 1979), are now considered landwith Mojo. “I knew he was overweight, eating to thinking that the devil was after me,” he said marks of the industrial rock genre. The band’s excess. He was like, ‘We should make a Chrome in a 2014 interview with the UK-based fanzine music has influenced several groups, including record,’ but he didn’t want me to see him. I said Fear and Loathing. “I went on a devil trip with Butthole Surfers, Ministry and Nine Inch Nails. Black Sabbath, right? I was screaming, ‘He’s I didn’t wanna do a mail record. Then, three Although Creed is the only member of gonna send me to hell!’ I was looking for my months later, he died.” Chrome from the band’s early days, his curfriends and my brother, but some guy said he’d After Edge’s death from heart failure in take me to my seat instead. Then Black Sabbath rent bandmates are more than ringers or hired 1995, Creed restarted Chrome with fellow exhands. In fact, he has performed with most of came on and started playing the best songs.” members John and Hilary Stench. them for longer than he played with Edge. The sounds Creed heard that night inspired “I wasn’t planning on it,” Creed told Boise “It’s not easy once you get somebody his fiery, effects-heavy guitar style, a style which Weekly, “but all these people just started us‘Chromed’ and accustomed to playing it and helped transform Chrome’s sound when Creed ing the Chrome name—or trying to use the used to playing it and all that stuff to replace joined the band in 1977. He worked closely Chrome name—and it just got to the point him with somebody [else],” Creed said. “Even if with Edge on the group’s sophomore LP Alien where, ‘Wow, I gotta once again try to protect they’re a fan, it still takes a while.” Soundtracks (Siren Records, the Chrome name.’” The care that Creed takes in recruiting band 1977), which combined sciNow performing with a staticwhitesound.com/chrome members has paid off. AllMusic’s Mark Deming fi-themed lyrics and primifive-person lineup, the Creed-led declared that the recent Chrome album, Feel It tive, Stooges-inspired rock Chrome continues the legacy of Like a Scientist (King of Spades Records, 2014), with eerie synthesizer noises what San Francisco NPR radio “not only simulates the approach of the classic station KQED once dubbed “The Most Influen- and bizarre sound collages. Creed/Edge era with impressive accuracy, it genAlien Soundtracks was far more abrasive and tial Band You’ve Never Heard.” The group will erates a palpable excitement that’s a powerful reavant-garde than the spacey punk and New kick off a month-long US tour with a show at minder that, in an increasingly eccentric world, Neurolux on Friday, May 18. Local rock groups Wave of Chrome’s debut, The Visitation (Siren Records, 1976). According to Creed, the change Chrome is still as bracingly weird as ever.” Casual Worship and Evils will open. Creed hopes to unleash more weirdness For the 64-year-old Creed, rock and roll has in sound arose more out of instinct than a soon. He’s thinking about working on some deliberate plan. been a lifelong passion. solo material as well as another Chrome “We made a total left turn and just totally “I remember Elvis [Presley] when he was album following Techromancy (Cleopatra got [away] from normality,” he told BW. “It brand new,” he said. “I was four years old. … seemed to work out better. Because when punk Records, 2017). Before Elvis, the radio, I thought, was very “Music keeps changing, so fortunately, we’re was a new thing, we were gonna make a punk boring. I used to think to myself, ‘Why would band, [but] we decided we wouldn’t even be no- still in a certain kind of demand,” he said. “So anybody want to make music?’” Seeing acts like The Jimi Hendrix Experience ticed, you know? It was after The Visitation—we as long as that’s going on, I guess we might as made Alien Soundtracks instead of what we were well go with it, you know?” and Black Sabbath as a teenager had an even BOISE WEEKLY.COM

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BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 17


M ELANIE FOLW ELL

SCREEN THE BEAUTY OF BIG Fattitude aims to spread body positivity and fat acceptance in Boise LE X NEL SON The body-positive documentary Fattitude doesn’t pull any punches. The mission page of the film’s website begins: “Did you know that fat people are paid $1.25 less an hour than their thin counterparts? Or that a fat person who excels can still legally lose a job just because s/he’s fat? How about the reality that one in three doctors associate fat bodies with hostility, dishonesty and poor hygiene? Fat people are subject to discrimination everywhere they look.” For local body positivity activist Amy PenceBrown, creator of the radically feminist support group the Boise Rad Fat Collective, these are must-hear messages. That’s is why she’s been monitoring the production of Fattitude for years, waiting for its release so she could bring it to Boise. On Wednesday, May 30, at 7 p.m., the film will make its Idaho debut for a one-night screening at The Flicks. Directed by Lindsey Averill and Viridiana Lieberman (I Am Evidence, The Sentence), and featuring interviews with Guardian and GQ writer Lindy West, National Eating Disorders Association Program Director Claire Mysko,

Studies Department; the Psychology Department; and a course called Fat Studies. “The variety of voices that they brought together, from academics to activists to artists—the artwork in [Fattitude] is really great—to writers and models, and actresses and clothing designers...I mean, there’s a wide range of people with different experiences and expertise that tell these stories and help paint this fuller picture of what life is like right now for fat people in this country,” said Pence-Brown. “I think [the documentary] is super inspirational about where we’re headed, to a really great, more positive and inclusive life.” The film has been touring the country since its release in 2017. Through a company called Tugg, Pence-Brown was able to bring it to Idaho by partnering with The Flicks and pre-selling a portion of tickets. As of May 15, 95 of the seats in the roughly 150-seat theater had already been claimed, securing the documentary well in advance of its presale deadline. Pence-Brown said community sponsors, including business owners who bought a dozen or more tickets to pass out

In 2015, Amy Pence-Brown stripped down to a bikini and stood in the middle of the Capital City Public Market as a demonstration of body positivity.

VALARIE DOTY

supermodel Tess Holliday and a host of other experts and activists in fields ranging from fashion to nutrition, Fattitude attempts to illuminate the challenges and triumphs of being “fat”—a term both its creators and Pence-Brown embrace—in a world where thin is the cultural ideal. PenceBrown said it was this multitude of perspectives she found most powerful about the film, which she previewed on the Oregon State University campus earlier this month. She was there to speak to students in the Women, Gender and Sexuality 18 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

to customers and employees, helped make it happen along with local members of the BRFC, which has 2,000 devotees worldwide, roughly half from Idaho. In 2016, the BRFC filled screenings of the body-positive Australian documentary Embrace at two Edwards theaters in the Treasure Valley, so Pence-Brown was confident she’d be able to pack the largest theater at The Flicks. “I already know, because I know some of the people [who have bought tickets] either through [BRFC] or in real life, that there is a really diverse

demographic coming. People of all genders, people of all abilities, all sizes—and that’s the same for admission to [BRFC], it’s not limited to any one gender, and there’s no weight requirement,” she said. As she’s already seen the 90-minute film, what Pence-Brown is looking forward to most about the screening is the introduction to the body positivity movement she’ll give before it starts—going all the way back to the beginnings of fat acceptance in the 1960s as part of the Civil Rights movement—and the Q&A she’ll host at the end. She expects some difficult questions, as community knowledge about body image and health issues varies widely. “I often say I’m perpetually teaching one-onone,” she said. “There’s a wide range of people, and it’s really important to me as an activist and an educator to meet people where they’re at … The hardest part for people of fat acceptance and body positivity is the anti-diet culture,

[anti-]intentional weight loss concept. That’s a hard thing for people to let go of when you’ve been taught and it’s been ingrained in your head your whole life. These things that you believed about bodies, to hear that there’s actually new science and ideas and research around shame and other things that maybe show that they’re not as true as you always thought—that’s a hard thing to let go of, and people tend to get angry or upset.” Pence-Brown has made education on body positivity her full-time job. She speaks at universities and grade schools across the northwest, and also hosts local BRFC activities like Rad Camp, a “body-positive boot camp for feminists,” “chunky dunk” pool parties, plus-sized clothing swaps and more. Despite the challenges, she said, the movement is making strides. “I think this is a really exciting time, because it is on the brink of being big,” she said with a grin. “Pun intended.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


COURTESY BLEECKER STREET

SCREEN

Rachel McAdams (left) and Rachel Weisz (right) are entangled in a web of secrets in Disobedience.

DISOBEDIENCE: UNORTHODOX INTIMACY Two Rachels, One Fabulous Film GEORGE PRENTICE Upon hearing of the death of her estranged rabbi father, New York City photographer Ronit (Rachel Weisz), reacts by swinging from unorthodox adult behavior—drinking heavily, engaging in anonymous sex—to more childlike activity: She goes ice skating. We immediately learn that a big part of Ronit’s soul is shackled to her past. Even when she deliberately rips some of her clothing, an ancient Jewish tradition of rending a garment to express unspeakable emotion, we see that an equal part of her soul remains an Orthodox Jew. She’s soon aboard a jet heading back to England and the Orthodox Jewish neighborhood where she grew up. But she is shunned by nearly all of her former neighbors. Even her father’s obituary in the local Hebrew newspaper reads, “Sadly, he had no children.” Thus begins a deep, self-aware dive into Disobedience, a fine adaptation of Naomi Alderman’s best-selling novel of the same name, which won the author the 2007 Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award. I loved the book, so I must admit to some trepidation in approaching its big screen BOISE WEEKLY.COM

transformation. But I’m happy to report that director Sebastian Lelio (an Oscar winner this past March for A Fantastic Woman), and the performances of Weisz and Rachel McAdams—who portrays Esti, Ronit’s former lover—raise Disobedience to a must-see film.

DISOBEDIENCE (RATED R) Directed by Sebastian Lelio Starring Rachel Weisz and Rachel McAdams Opens Friday, May 18, at Edwards Boise Downtown Stadium 9

I first saw a screening of Disobedience in Toronto last year, and would have bet my last dollar that it would have been promoted as a serious Oscar contender, particularly for Weisz’s and McAdams’ performances. Yet for reasons I can’t fathom, distributors chose to hold Disobedience until this spring. When the film opened in New York City and Los Angeles, it

immediately became the fourth-best per-theater box office success of the year, only following Avengers: Infinity War, Black Panther and Isle of Dogs. It will open in Boise on Friday, May 18, at Edwards Boise Downtown Stadium 9. There is a lot to love in Disobedience, but two scenes—one of them rather subtle and the other quite provocative—top the list. Early in the film, Ronit and Esti are walking through the now-empty home of Ronit’s late father when Ronit spots an old radio on a fireplace mantle. She turns the radio on, but tunes away from a Hebrew-only station to land on pop music. A second later, the 1989 tune Lovesong by The Cure fills the room, and for a moment, the two women are transported to a forbidden love of their youth. Esti impulsively kisses Ronit, physically unlocking that past. Soon after, the two women are in a midtown London Hotel room, in one of the most electric nudity-free love scenes in recent memory. Ultimately, many hearts will be broken, including yours perhaps, as you watch two of contemporary film’s finest actresses at the top of their games.

STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 25

CINEMA CAFE MOVIE RENTALS BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 19


CITIZEN CHARLIE FEE

The creative force of Idaho Shakespeare Festival on murder, mayhem and Mama Mia GEORGE PRENTICE

There are two recurring themes running through the 42nd seasons of the Idaho Shakespeare Festival. “The letter ‘M,’ perhaps?” asked Producing Artistic Director Charlie Fee. Indeed, ISF’s first three productions of the season are Misery, Macbeth and Mama Mia. Bundle those with a new adaptation of Pride and Prejudice and an added September production of the musical, Beehive, and Fee has curated a season of dramas and musicals that feature fascinating, strong roles for women—the second clear theme. “There’s no question that we’re focusing on very strong women characters,” said Fee. “I picked this season 18 months ago, and I wasn’t setting out to say, ‘You know, let’s do a season that really focuses on women.’ However, as the season began to develop, I leaned into it.” Fee and his company are waist-deep in rehearsals and shows begin Friday, May 25, but he set aside a few minutes to talk with Boise Weekly about the two first shows, both of which he’s directing. Let’s start with Misery, a recent stage adaptation of the Stephen King novel and Oscarwinning film. This stage adaptation is from William Goldman, the master screenwriter who gave us Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, All the President’s Men, The Princess Bride and the screen adaptation of Misery. Stephen King’s sensibilities lean toward the horrific and are usually on the absolute edge

Previews Friday, May 25 Performances run in repertory from Saturday, May 26, through Sunday, July 29.

20 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

Misery was a wildly popular film, so I’m assuming that most of the audience will be pretty familiar with its plot. It’s very much about the relationship of Annie and Paul, and that’s why it works so well as a theater piece. Paul is a very famous writer, who has essentially built himself a gilded cage of success, which is why he wants to kill off his famous romantic heroine, Misery. But Annie is having none of that. She is, as she says, his number one fan. It’s an interesting take on artists becoming trapped by their own success. Take Robert Downey Jr.. How many of the Avengers films has he done? Ten? It’s an incredible place to be trapped, if all you’re after is money and fame. But look at Paul in Misery. He feels that he’s not the artist he should be. He’s an artist in crisis. You’ve already mounted this production of Misery in Cleveland at the Great Lakes Theater. What was the reaction there? Standing ovations every night. I wasn’t quite sure what to expect, because it definitely draws a new audience.

MACBETH Written by William Shakespeare Directed by Charlie Fee Previews Friday, June 1 Performances run in repertory from Saturday, June 2, through Saturday, June 23.

Let’s talk about your next deep dive. You’re also directing Macbeth this season. When we produced Hamlet last summer, we experimented with an architectural design that referenced the historic Globe Theater, creating an experience where the audience could sit onstage. Audiences enjoyed it so much that we immediately knew that we wanted to use it for Macbeth. And our acting company is absolutely on fire in this production. Lynn Berg is Macbeth, and he has stepped into a number of roles for us over the years, and with every season he’s better than the one before. He’s at the absolute height of his power right now. Our Lady Macbeth is the dynamic Erin Partin. The two of them are magnificent. Macbeth’s themes have, directly or indirectly, continued to be a constant in popular dramas for over four centuries. We’re in a world surrounded by horrific, evil governments, and evil is continually referenced in Macbeth. Think of it, Macbeth was a great heroic soldier who, at the beginning of the play, has essentially saved the nation of Scotland in a battle that no one thought could be won. He’s a brilliant, loyal soldier to his nation. But then he is given insight by the witches that there might be a future that is different. He begins to use the word “murder” almost immediately. With the dangling possibility of great power, he is sucked into a world that he never previously imagined for himself. He can’t escape it and, of course, he’s destroyed by it.

MAMA MIA Written by Catheerine Johnson, and based on the songs of ABBA Directed by Victoria Bussert Previews Friday, June 29 Performances run in repertory from Saturday, June 30, through Friday,

I’ve always looked at the three witches in Macbeth as similar to today’s media, stirring the cauldron, influencing, pushing and pulling Macbeth into all kinds of diabolical directions. As a member of the media yourself, I’ll let you draw that analogy. Now that I think of it, I’m imagining a contemporary production of Macbeth with all three witches as members of the media. It would be a rather horrible indictment. I’d be remiss if I didn’t quickly ask you about your other two big shows this summer. Well, the opportunity to do a new stage adaptation of Pride and Prejudice was too good to pass up. Everything aligned. Think of this for a moment, we’ll be performing Pride and Prejudice in rep with Mama Mia. That’s pretty interesting. Was Mama Mia on your wish list? I can’t tell you how many people have asked me, “When are going to do Mama Mia?” People started asking me six years ago, when it was still on Broadway. But now, we finally got the rights. Are you prepared for audience members who may want to sing along? We’re prepared for everything. However, a word of caution: Please be aware of the person who is sitting next to you, especially if you’re singing too flat or sharp. But a glass of wine or two and… Join right in. ABBA songs are a blast to sing, especially at the curtain call.

MISERY / ROGER MASTROIANNI

MISERY William Goldman’s stage adaptation of Stephen King’s classic horror novel. Directed by Charlie Fee

of the human condition. Plus, he’s very funny and very dark. That’s why I was so interested in casting Kathleen Tague as Annie and Andrew May as Paul. They’re both wonderful, dramatic actors. But underneath all that drama is the fact that they’re both zany comics. So, that script immediately came to life as soon as they entered the room.

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE Adaptation by Joseph Hanreddy Directed by Joseph Hanreddy Previews Friday, Aug. 3 Performances run in repertory from Saturday, Aug. 4, through Sunday, Sept. 2.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


ARTS NEWS

COURTESY ERIC KNAPE

1 2 3 RF.C O M

ARTS & CULTURE THE LOCAL CONNECTION

This year, Orchid Awards will dominate the upcoming ceremony.

PRESERVATION IDAHO KEEPS ORCHIDS, PEELS ONIONS Preservation Idaho has highlighted the good, bad and downright ugly in Boise with its Orchids & Onions Awards for more than 40 years. Think of the event as the Oscars & Razzies of preservation. Orchid Awards go to those who have helped conserve Idaho’s architectural and historical legacy, while “Onions” go to those who have “shown an insensitivity” on that front. This year however, the 1 p.m. ceremony on Saturday, May 19, at the Boise Public Library will be onion-free. “As Boise has grown we have found it can be more problematic to give Onion Awards because the deserving Onion recipient in one case is a potential Orchid winner in another,” said Preservation Idaho Executive Board President Paula Benson. “Unfortunately, with so much growth, there are many opportunities for Onions with entities that we hope to collaborate with for other sites or projects.” This year’s ceremony will be more positive, focusing on the 10 Orchid winners: Diane Myklegard, recipient of the Heritage Stewardship Award; Lori Dicaire of Vanishing Boise, named this year’s Friend of Preservation; Noel Weber, who scored the Scott Chandler Award for Excellence in Craftsmanship; Barbara Perry Bauer and Elizabeth Jacox of The Arrowrock Group, named Distinguished Preservationists; The Syringa Club, recognized as Heritage Stewards of Syringa Hall; and the preservation of the Lander Street Water Renewal Facility; the 523 Main Street building in Caldwell; the Third Ward LDS Meeting House (now The Healing Sanctuary) and the Leatherworks building in Idaho Falls; and the Genesee Exchange Bank in Genesee. A paid reception at The Cabin Literary Center will follow the free, public ceremony. Though it won’t call out Onion organizations or individuals, Benson said Preservation Idaho will talk about three as-yet-undisclosed government initiatives it considers “Onion projects.” “Two of these groups have made efforts at preservation, or at least have increased their preservation awareness, so we are hopeful that we can improve outcomes with them in the future,” said Benson. “The third is part of an overall challenge in the state.” —Lex Nelson

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Artist Meg Kahnle uses citizen scavenger hunts to create Boise-inspired art LEX NELSON

Active social media users in Boise may have already contributed to one of local artist Meg Kahnle’s projects without realizing it. Kahnle uses Instagram as both a source and platform for her interactive art endeavors, and this month, she plans to combine what she has learned from past efforts into a citywide, community-oriented scavenger hunt that will end up as a series of paintings featuring 20 iconic Boise landmarks. The new project, called Connect With Boise (a Artist Meg Kahnle poses in front of one of her paintings from a past series which, like those for play on Kahnle’s website name, Connect With Connect With Boise, was created over a base layer of photographs. Meg) has roots in her 2016 This is YOUR Boise adventure, when she used community Instagram ans have until Sunday, June 17, to carve out a few that people would just casually take, because I photos tagged with the #thisisboise hashtag as a hours of time, take the challenge and add their think it’s fun to see that juxtaposition of images,” backdrop for a series of multimedia paintings. photos. Then, Kahnle will spend the next month Kahnle said. “This Is Boise Beer,” for example, featured an or so making five art pieces with the results, The project has been in the works for almost overflowing glass of amber suds sculpted in acrylic four years, but didn’t really take off until last May, painting each landmark over collages of resulting gel over a grid of photos of local brews. photos and covering the whole thing with a shiny when Kahnle won a grant from the Alexa Rose It’s also a nod to her 2017 project, Connect Foundation that she said layer of resin. She plans to repeat the process three with Yoga, when she more times over the course of the year for a total gave her the “breathing asked people to post of four hunts and 20 art pieces, each featuring a room” to perfect the photos of themselves different landmark. idea. For the last year, practicing yoga on “ I KIN D OF SEE “I kind of want to see what happens organishe has partnered with instagram using the cally, and get some feedback on it,” Kahnle said of the Idaho State Archive #connectwithyoga CITIES AND PL ACES the first hunt, a few weeks before it went up onto check historical facts hashtag. Those photos A LM O ST L I KE line. “So I’m going to launch this one in May and and source old photos became base collages collect images and things like that. And the other and newspaper clipfor brightly colored PEOPLE. THE Y side of it is, if [participants] submit five images pings related to local paintings of women landmarks. This interest to the scavenger hunt, then they have a chance to in yoga poses, which HAVE THEIR OWN win one of the original paintings [valued at $200] in history, as well as a she displayed at lifelong fascination with that their pieces are in.” Yogafort, a branch of PUL SE.” Kahnle hopes the project will inspire people to the concept of place, Treefort Music Fest, get outside and check out the city they call home. sparked Connect With this March. When she isn’t painting or working at her day job Boise. Connect With Boise as a lead graphic designer for Bodybuilding.com, “I moved around a lot even when I was will borrow from both of those projects, and Kahnle leaves it all on the table when it comes to younger, so I’ve always been really interested in she’ll spice it up with a scavenger hunt. On exploration—she has an A license for skydiving, May 7, Kahnle posted an artistic “map” of Boise that idea of sense of place because I think they’re regularly straps on climbing gear to scale mounfascinating, and I kind of see cities and places on her website and social media accounts that almost like people,” Kahnle said. “They have their tains and is a dedicated yogi when both her feet guides users with hints to five local landmarks. are on the ground. own pulse, they have their own energy. You can Once there, participants are asked use their “[I want] to encourage people to actually smartphones to take photos of each spot, which really personify a city. So I’ve really enjoyed getwalk or bike around and do something active, ting to know Boise, and part of what makes me they can then upload to Instagram using the and explore the city in a way that might not have #connectwithboise hashtag for Kahnle to incor- feel like I know a place is dialing into its history otherwise,” Kahnle said. and creating things around the city and learning porate into her art. Those interested in participating can find more about it.” “The idea behind it is to integrate the history the map and clues for the first hunt by visiting The first scavenger hunt begins at the Idaho of Boise—like the old photos, old newspaper connectwithmeg.com or @connectwithmeg on State Capitol before guiding participants to walk articles, things like that—with more contempoor bike to four other spots around the city. Boise- Instagram. rary photos of people, lnstagram shots, anything BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 21


FOOD NEWS L E X N E L SON

GEORGE PRENTICE

FOOD

The Backyard Dawg is messy, but worth it.

GET DOWN AND DURTY IN STAR The red and yellow canvas signs that hang over the door of The Durty Dawg seem to promise fast food, but inside, the restaurant is curiously elegant, with hanging lights in iron cages, dark wood and a full bar. The hot dogs, burgers and thick-cut steak fries that arrive on black plastic trays lined with black and white checkered paper only underscore the contrast. The Durty Dawg is a new presence in Star, located in the business strip at the corner of Plummer Street and State Highway 44. It’s locally owned, and in a town that leans heavily on two pizza joints, an Asian eatery and an Irish pub for dining options, it comes as a breath of fair food-scented fresh air. To hear the waitresses tell it, the place has been slammed since opening its doors just over two weeks ago, a statement borne out by the fact that the kitchen was out of a handful of menu items by 7:30 p.m. on a Saturday. As the name suggests, hot dogs take pride of place on The Durty Dawg’s menu, with 20 different “dawgs” to choose from, topped with everything from mango salsa, shredded cabbage and mango habanero sauce (the Mad Mango Dawg) to barbecue pork, coleslaw and fried pickles (the Slaw P Dawg). Diners can also choose from a shorter list of burgers, chicken sandwiches, salads and steak fries topped with anything from gravy to chorizo chili. Pickle fries are the most popular appetizer. The prices are a bit steep (most dogs cost $10 and up) but the right entree warrants them. The Backyard Dawg, a Coney Islandborn Nathan’s dog wrapped in thick-cut bacon and smothered with tangy barbeque sauce, shredded cheddar and fried onions, is one solid choice. The dog itself was cooked perfectly, with a bit of resistance to each bite and a varied texture that promised real meat rather than meat-product slurry. The combination of smoky sauce and crunchy fried onion put it over the top in taste and texture, although eating it—and the Rolly Polly Dawg, a Polish sausage heavy on sauerkraut and onion—was a messy endeavor. The same went for the mac and cheese-topped Caliboy Burger, a comfort food dish saved from boredom by a crisp layer of bacon. Though the spot is clearly still finding its feet, with friendly staff and an unusual menu, it’s sure to lock in soon. Next time you make it out to Star, put The Durty Dawg on your list. —Lex Nelson 22 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

The french fry dinner (left) was the brainchild of JUMP Community Engagement Director Kathy O’Neill, Share Studio Coordinator Jess Libes and Chef Anna Tapia (right).

THOUGHT FOR FOOD

JUMP serves up creativity, inspiration and some amazing french fries GEORGE PRENTICE In a food-crazed culture where celebrity chefs are known for their on-camera preening and explosive tempers, Chef Ann Tapia breaks the mold. She’s soft-spoken, doesn’t have much time for social media and politely smiles when you praise her work. But ask her about the multitude of delicacies that come out of her kitchen at Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, aka JUMP, where Tapia is the executive chef, and her eyebrows rise like a perfect souffle. “I’m living my dream,” she said. “I couldn’t imagine a better job. They’re so open to these creative things that I want to do.” A constant flow of guests attending JUMP’s multi-faceted events and workshops get tastes of Tapia’s food. “We’ll be serving more than 1,200 guests here this week,” she said. “No, hold on. That’s just Tuesday through Saturday. When we add the food prepared for the next TEDx Boise event, that’s another 500 people.” Tapia doesn’t work alone, mind you. She’s surrounded by what she says are four of the most talented chefs in the region. Plus, a steady stream of guest chefs and caterers circulate in and out of the kitchen, which has a high-profile footprint on JUMP’s ground level. The menus are as varied as the guests. For preschoolers, there are “Flavorful Fairytales,” which combine storytelling and imaginative recipes—a Unicorn Noodle Bowl, for example, changes colors before your eyes. For downtowners, there’s Connect on the Deck on JUMP’s fifth-floor terrace each Thursday evening and Saturday afternoon, an event that offers live music, mingling

and an ever-changing menu—Tapia said she’s working on a “JUMP burger.” Then, there are the high-profile conferences at JUMP, such as a three-day ConvertKit conference in late June that promises to attract global craft and commerce entrepreneurs. “I want to present something new and unusual for every one of their events throughout the three days. I love listening to people who are planning events at JUMP; it inspires some really cool, interactive food items to go along with their particular mission,” said Tapia. Finally, there are JUMP’s Community Dinners. “It’s all about being a family friendly, affordable evening. They’re open to everybody and we really think we’re on to something,” said Jess Libes, a Share Studio coordinator who plans cooking and food programs at JUMP. “The dinner is the centerpiece of an evening that includes a number of activities. They cost $10, and kids under [age] 5 eat for free. Our first Community Dinner was spaghetti and meatballs.” Of course, with Chef Tapia at the helm, it wasn’t run-of-the-mill spaghetti and meatballs: The ostrich egg-sized meatballs were stuffed with fresh mozzarella and rolled in Panko. Suffice to say, kids and foodies were delighted. On the side was a “hand-held Caesar salad,” with romaine spears and edible paper butterflies tucked inside a parmesan-flavored chip. While adults ate to their hearts’ delight, kids made chef hats and foodinspired Tinkertoys using uncooked spaghetti and marshmallows.

“It was a big success and we had wonderful word-of-mouth, but we’re very excited about our next Community Dinner,” said Libes. That event is slated for Thursday, May 31, and Chef Tapia plans to celebrate the splendor of the spud with a gourmet french fry bar. The dinner will start off with shaved Brussels sprout slaw, but then the real fun begins when attendees start to garnish their russet or sweet potato fries with any number of extras: root beer-braised barbecue brisket, white cheese sauce, pico de gallo, bruschetta, crispy kale, truffle oil and a wide variety of what Tapia calls “krazy ketchups.” “We do a curry [and] blueberry ketchup. I know that sounds weird, but it’s really popular,” said Tapia. Kathy O’Neill, JUMP community engagement director, said she was salivating just listening to the executive chef describe the fries. “Trust me, you don’t get this kind of food at my house,” said O’Neill. “It was a real gift to JUMP when we got Chef Anna to join us. It was serendipity. She has these passions and skills, and it’s just a wonderful collaboration.” All of the studios throughout JUMP are focused on something, whether it’s innovation, movement or performance. O’Neill said that the creative dishes that come out of the kitchen are an inspiration for all of the above. “Food brings us together as a community. It binds us all and everybody leaves here with a smile on their face,” said O’Neill. “And french fries? Who doesn’t love french fries?” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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ATTENTION ALL COUPLES CULTIVATING LOVE “CELEBRATING 20 YEARS OF MARRIAGE IN THE GARDEN.” Did you, or someone you know, get married in the English Garden? Are you currently planning a wedding and looking for the perfect venue? Submit your photo and share the story of how you found love, and join us at our exclusive Cultivating Love Event. Submissions are due May 25 to be eligible to win prizes and be included in the celebration. Visit CultivatingLove.BoiseWeekly.com for more information.

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LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: HAILEY ANNE VOTH Case No. CV01-18-08160 PETITION FOR NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Hailey Anne Voth, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has filed in the District Court of Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Percy Nikko Rowan Haley. The reason for the change in name is an update in identify. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. on June 21, 2018 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 8, 2018 CHRISTOPHER D RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB May 16, 23, 30 and June 6

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BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 25


PAGE BREAK YODELIN’ IN THE CANYON DEAR MINERVA, I am a healthy, sexually active, adult male who tries to practice safe sex in my activities (ie: using a condom when engaging in intercourse and fellatio). However, I have yet to come up with a “safe” way to engage in my favorite activity—cunninlingus. It seems rather silly to put a condom on my tongue, leaving my lips and mouth unprotected. Placing plastic wrap over the female genitalia deprives both partners of the pleasure of the activity. Any suggestions other than know my partners and frequent STD testing? Sincerely, Eager Beaver Eater

DEAR E.B.E, Please don’t put a condom on your tongue. While choking could be fun during oral sex, I don’t think you want a condom lodged in your throat. You could, however, cut the tip and bottom band off of the condom, then cut down one side of it creating a DIY dental dam. It’s not plastic wrap and can be an effective barrier to STD transmission. Your focus, however, seems to be on maintaining the pleasure of the activity. While oral sex is considered lower risk than other activities, the risk is still there. You have choices as an adult. Knowing your partners and getting frequent STD testing is responsible. After that, you must decide if less pleasure but more peace of mind is your preference over an STD. You have to be able to live with your choices and then act accordingly. And that’s not just yodelin’ in the canyon! SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

26 | MAY 16–22, 2018 | BOISEweekly

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ASTROLOGY

BY ROB BREZSNY

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A chemist named Marcellus Gilmore Edson got a patent on peanut butter in 1894. A businessperson named George Bayle started selling peanut butter as a snack in 1894. In 1901, a genius named Julia David Chandler published the first recipe for a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. In 1928, two trailblazers invented loaves of sliced bread, setting the stage for the ascension of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich to its full glory. According to my analysis, Taurus, you’re partway through your own process of generating a very practical marvel. I suspect you’re now at a phase equivalent to Julia David Chandler’s original recipe. Onward! Keep going!

power in the coming weeks. You can be and should be as hip, cool, and groovy as you have been in a long time.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): One of the most popular brands of candy in North America is Milk Duds. They’re irregularly shaped globs of chocolate-covered caramel. When they were first invented in 1926, the manufacturer’s plan was to make them perfect little spheres. But with the rather primitive technology available at that time, this proved impossible. The finished products were blobs, not globes. They tasted good, though. Workers jokingly suggested that the new confection’s name include “dud,” a word meaning “failure” or “flop.” Having sold well now for more than 90 years, Milk Duds have proved that success doesn’t necessarily require perfection. Who knows? Maybe their dud-ness has been an essential part of their charm. I suspect there’s a metaphorical version of Milk Duds in your future, Gemini.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski once performed for England’s Queen Victoria. She possessed a backstage pass, and was able to converse with him after the show. “You’re a genius,” she told him, having been impressed with his artistry. “Perhaps, Your Majesty,” Paderewski said. “But before that I was a drudge.” He meant that he had labored long and hard before reaching the mastery the Queen attributed to him. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Libras are currently in an extended “drudge” phase of your own. That’s a good thing! Take maximum advantage of this opportunity to slowly and surely improve your skills.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my vision of your life in the coming weeks, you’re hunting for the intimate power that you lost a while back. After many twists and trials, you find it almost by accident in a seemingly unimportant location, a place you have paid little attention to for a long time. When you recognize it, and realize you can reclaim it, your demeanor transforms. Your eyes brighten, your skin glows, your body language galvanizes. A vivid hope arises in your imagination: how to make that once-lost, nowrediscovered power come alive again and be of use to you in the present time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The etymological dictionary says that the English slang word “cool” meant “calmly audacious” as far back as 1825. The term “groovy” was first used by jazz musicians in the 1930s to signify “performing well without grandstanding.” “Hip,” which was originally “hep,” was also popularized by the jazz community. It meant “informed, aware, up-to-date.” I’m bringing these words to your attention because I regard them as your words of

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I hope you will seek out influences that give you grinning power over your worries. I hope you’ll be daring enough to risk a breakthrough in service to your most demanding dream. I hope you will make an effort to understand yourself as your best teacher might understand you. I hope you will find out how to summon more faith in yourself—a faith not rooted in lazy wishes but in a rigorous selfassessment. Now here’s my prediction: You will fulfill at least one of my hopes, and probably more.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The ancient Greek poet Simonides was among the first of his profession to charge a fee for his services. He made money by composing verses on demand. On one occasion, he was asked to write a stirring tribute to the victor of a mule race. He declined, declaring that his sensibilities were too fine to create art for such a vulgar activity. In response, his potential patron dramatically boosted the proposed price. Soon thereafter, Simonides produced a rousing ode that included the phrase “windswift steeds.” I offer the poet as a role model for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Be more flexible than usual about what you’ll do to get the reward you’d like. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Here’s the operative metaphor for you these days: You’re like a painter who has had a vision of an interesting work of art you could create—but who lacks some of the paint colors you would require to actualize this art. You may also need new types of brushes you haven’t used before. So here’s how I suggest you proceed: Be aggressive in tracking down the missing ingredients or tools that will enable you to accomplish your as-yet imaginary masterpiece.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Useful revelations and provocative epiphanies are headed your way. But they probably won’t arrive sheathed in sweetness and light, accompanied by tinkling swells of celestial music. It’s more likely they’ll come barging in with a clatter, bringing bristly marvels and rough hope. In a related matter: At least one breakthrough is in your imminent future. But this blessing is more likely to resemble a wrestle in the mud than a dance on a mountaintop. None of this should be a problem, however! I suggest you enjoy the rugged but interesting fun. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One of the saddest aspects of our lives as humans is the disparity between love and romance. Real love is hard work. It’s unselfish, unwavering and rooted in generous empathy. Romance, on the other hand, tends to be capricious and inconstant, often dependent on the fluctuations of mood and chemistry. Is there anything you could do about this crazy-making problem, Aquarius? Like could you maybe arrange for your romantic experiences to be more thoroughly suffused with the primal power of unconditional love? I think this is a realistic request, especially in the coming weeks. You will have exceptional potential to bring more compassion and spiritual affection into your practice of intimacy. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to dream up new rituals. The traditional observances and ceremonies bequeathed to you by your family and culture may satisfy your need for comfort and nostalgia, but not your need for renewal and reinvention. Imagine celebrating homemade rites of passage designed for the new person you’ve become. You may be delighted to discover how much power they provide you to shape your life’s long-term cycles. Ready to conjure up a new ritual right now? Take a piece of paper and write down two fears that inhibit your drive to create a totally interesting kind of success for yourself. Then burn that paper and those fears in the kitchen sink while chanting, “I am a swashbuckling incinerator of fears!” ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to my assessment of the astrological omens, your duty right now is to be a brave observer, a fair-minded intermediary and an honest storyteller. Your people need you to help them do the right thing. They require your influence in order to make good decisions. So if you encounter lazy communication, dispel it with your clear and concise speech. If you find that foggy thinking has started to infect important discussions, inject your clear and concise insights.

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2018 | 27


Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 48  
Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 48