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6 Donut

Swole

Can donuts be the new workout food?

LOCA L A N D I N DE PE N DE N T

18 Doggie in the Window Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs is a treat

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Pizza for Two Two Meridian pizza joints’ takes on the greatest vehicle for mozz FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | APRIL 11-17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Editorial News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Lex Nelson lex@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Greta Gardner Interns: Brian Millar Advertising Ad Director: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Jason Jacobsen jason@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Sean Severud, sean@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Jeff Leedy, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow, Adam Rosenlund Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Ken Griffith, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallasen, Zach Thomas Boise Weekly prints 25,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at almost 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Digital subscriptions: 12 months-$40, subscribe.boiseweekly.com

EDITOR’S NOTE BOISE WEEKLY: STORY SEEKERS

This week has been full of adventures for Boise Weekly staff, and we’ve ranged all across the Treasure Valley (and beyond) to chase down some fresh stories just for you. But before I fill you in on that, I have to stop for some even bigger news: Best of Boise voting is officially open! From now through Monday, April 30, local—and, this time, national but Boise-stationed—businesses will vie for your votes for everything from Best Barber Shop to Best Chinese Food. To make your opinion count, click on the Best of Boise banner on boiseweekly.com and cast your votes for spots (and people) you’d like to see showered with BW accolades. Now, back to operation story seekers. Earlier this month, I made the trek out to Meridian to chat with Emily Knigge, the creator of the high-protein, whole-foods donut company Fit Donut for this week’s feature story: “Have Your Cake and Get Fit, Too” (pages 6-7). The piece is a deep dive into the trend of fitness desserts from a local angle, and in it there are details on my taste test of Knigge’s product, plus a spotlight on local high-protein ice cream producers Killer Whey! and a nutritionist’s perspective on fitness desserts from St. Luke’s Registered Dietitian Callie Miller. Then, Senior Staff Writer Harrison Berry and I made a second trip to Meridian to test out two very different pizza joints, Varsity Pizza (formerly Blue Tiger), a classed-up old-school pizza parlor, and Coned, which serves up something far from the usual slice. We decided to channel our food frenzy into a duel of the pizza joints; you can read the two resulting stories on page 20. News Editor George Prentice made by far the longest journey, stopping in Eagle to sit in on a Planning and Zoning Commission meeting and public hearing that ended with an unexpected concession to citizens on fracking and oil drilling restrictions (page 8-9). He also made a mental stop even farther afield at the Isle of Dogs, a fictional trash island off the coast of Japan. While not technically a real place, the Isle of Dogs is the setting for a new Wes Anderson film of the same name set to debut Friday, April 13, at The Flicks. Prentice gave it “two paws up”—find his review on page 19. —Lex Nelson, Staff Writer

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ARTIST: Kelsey Hawes TITLE: “No Drama Llama” MEDIUM: Acrylic on Canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: After years of selecting artwork for the cover of Boise Weekly, and being inspired by other local artists, it’s time I pick up a paint brush again and start creating some art myself. To all the Questival participants: good luck! And have a llamazing time!

Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online)

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SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each

week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

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FOUR WAYS TO FIX FACEBOOK

ProPublica has identified four practical reforms that address some of the Facebook security issues that have been making headlines nationwide. Read more of the story at News/ National.

HOW DO YOU IDENTIFY FAKE NEWS?

Find the right questions and much-needed answers on how to spot unreliable reporting. Hint: Solid sources and healthy skepticism can help. Read more at News/National.

THE WHEEL DEAL

Public affairs television network C-SPAN rolled its customized motor coach to the Idaho Statehouse April 9. Boise was part of the network’s “50 Capitals Tour.” Read more at News/Citydesk.

OPINION

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BOISEweekly | APRIL 11-17, 2018 | 5


C OURTESY FIT D ONUT

EAT YOUR CAKE AND GET FIT, TOO The high-protein dessert trend makes its Idaho mark LE X NEL SON

While Fit Donut uses a sugar substitute for its dough base, its toppings aren’t usually sugar free, and give the donuts bolder flavors.

C OURTESY KILLER WHE Y !

6 | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

It wouldn’t be an overstatement to say the CNBC show Shark Tank, which features entrepreneurs pitching their brands to a panel of angel investors, is a trend incubator—and that the debut of the whole-food, high-protein donut company The Dough Bar on the program may have signaled a new era for so-called fitness desserts. In Idaho, the trend—which already has a long, if niche, history nationwide—is starting to explode at the local level. Emily Knigge, the creator of Fit Donut in Meridian, said new customers often mistake her high-protein donut brand for the one that scored a $300,000 investment on Shark Tank. It’s difficult to blame them, as the January episode aired aired within weeks of the opening of Fit Donut’s storefront on Fairview Avenue. “There are other companies [like ours],” Knigge said, “but there aren’t any around here.” Inside, Fit Donut feels more like a gym than a bakery, with a black and gray color scheme and a hot pink counter. Posters of women running, doing sit-ups and lifting weights cover the walls, complete with slogans like “If you are going to cheat, cheat clean.” The workers behind the counter wear the same uniform as their customers: leggings and Nike running shoes for the women, basketball shorts and muscle shirts for the men. Next door, the Crunch Fitness gym supplies a steady stream of walk-ins. Like Shark Tank’s The Dough Bar, Fit Donut prioritizes its ingredients, and Knigge makes no bones about catering to weightlifters and fitness junkies with self-imposed dietary restrictions. The 16 varieties of donuts she produces are baked, not fried, and

made from a blend of whole grain flours, whey protein, almond milk, cashew milk, coconut oil and Stevia. Plus, they all fit into a specific protein, carb and calorie range: Each donut has 5-9 grams of protein, 1.5-3.5 grams of fat, 1.5-4 grams of sugar and 6-9 grams of carbohydrates. “I do try and keep things changing, but I do want them all to fit within 103 calories or less,” said Knigge. “...A box of six is like the equivalent to one Krispy Kreme donut.” Before she became a fitness dessert micro-mogul, Knigge worked as a nurse, and then as a freelance personal trainer after her husband introduced her to weightlifting. While working as a trainer, she came up with the idea of making a high-protein, fitfriendly dessert as a perk for her clients. “I just happened to have a donut pan, so I made them donuts,” she said. “I thought that cupcakes were too, I don’t know—there are cupcakes everywhere. But I thought, ‘No one has [healthy] donuts.’” When clients started offering to pay for extra donuts and her friends and family began placing large orders, Knigge decided to quit personal training in favor of baking donuts full time. In May of 2017, she started her delivery business, and on January 15 she opened her Meridian storefront. Now, she said, her crew bakes roughly 80 dozen donuts fresh every day. Although Fit Donut’s product is a donut by name, it’s much closer to cake, with a dense, spongy texture and distinct protein powder aftertaste cut by frosting and toppings like crushed B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


L E X NE L SON

C OURTESY FIT D ONUT

Owner Emily Knigge said a box of a half a dozen Fit Donuts is roughly the caloric equivalent of one Krispy Kreme.

Armstrong’s company also shows just how popular so-called fitness foods have become, even with people who’ve never set foot inside a weight room; he lists his clients as not only weightlifters; but also soccer moms, diabetics and more. This, along with Killer Whey!’s high protein content, points to one of two debates that have sprung up around fitness desserts: How much protein is too much for the average consumer? “Right now, I don’t think there’s a limit, as far as ‘300 grams of protein in a day is your limit’ kind of a thing. But a lot of us really do meet our protein needs, and we don’t need as much as we consume as a nation,” said Callie Miller, a registered dietitian and nutrition counselor at St. Luke’s in Meridian. “So it probably isn’t best to pile up on the high protein desserts.” Miller noted that serious athletes who use the extra protein to replenish muscle are an exception to the rule, and added that people with kidney problems should be careful of eating too much protein, as it can be hard for their bodies to process. The American College of Sports Medicine offers a way to calculate optimal protein intake based on recommendations from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: According to a 2015 report, protein should make up 10-35 percent of a person’s daily energy intake—or, for every NELS

ON

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

The Protein Bakery, but Complete Cookies are ubiquitous in gas stations and grocery stores, and a host of other high-protein desserts—like Muscletech protein cookies, Optimum Nutrition cake bites and MHP pudding packs—are up for grabs on fitness retail websites like Bodybuilding.com. The trend of tackling typical dessert foods and designing high-protein alternates isn’t limited to baked goods, either. Ice cream brands like Halo Top, IceNLean and Wheyhey have brought frozen desserts into fashion too, and here in Boise, the ice cream company Killer Whey! is riding the same wave. “It’s essentially a product I made for myself,” said Killer Whey founder Louis Armstrong. “I’m a health and fitness fanatic, and I’m also a food scientist [with a bachelors from University of Idaho], so kind of comparing those two I decided to make a protein ice cream after eating an ice cream sandwich and realizing how terrible it was for you.” Armstrong’s locally-made ice cream is whipped up from a blend of whey protein, cream, vanilla extract, Stevia, xylitol (a sugar alcohol) and a trio of gums, and comes in four flavors: vanilla, chocolate, mint chocolate chip and peanut butter. In flavor and texture, the product is nearly a dead ringer for classic ice cream, and only a lingering grainy feeling on the tongue betrays its high content of whey protein—an impressive 44 grams per pint.

LEX

chocolate cookies and sprinkles. Each donut is frosted to order, and Knigge said the coconut cluster—which features a chocolate frosting, coconut flakes, carob chips and caramel drizzle—is her most popular offering, with raspberry glaze, caramel cream, cinnamon maple and peanut butter cup following close behind. The flavor of the month is also a big seller; Knigge added a mint chocolate donut to the menu in March in honor of Saint Patrick’s Day, and kicked off April with a banana sundae-inspired donut topped with banana frosting, caramel, carob chips and almonds. So-called protein bakeries like Knigge’s have been around since the 1990s, but gained traction in recent years with the rising popularity of lowcarb, high-protein diets like paleo and ketogenic. The Protein Bakery, which opened in New York City in 1999, was one of the first. Also started by an avid weightlifter, The Protein Bakery serves up cookies, brownies, blondies, cakes and shakes made with rolled oats it claims are high in protein and fiber, and free of gluten, trans fats, preservatives and wheat. Their breakfast cookie, studded with raisins, dried cranberries, pumpkin seeds, walnuts and almonds, packs a 5-gram protein punch. Lenny and Larry’s was also quick off the blocks, and opened in 1993 as a collaboration between two self-proclaimed gym rats who, according to their company website, were tired of eating “chicken breast after chicken breast, protein shake after protein shake.” Their vegan, Kosher Complete Cookies—the anchor of their brand, which also includes Muscle Brownies and Muscle Muffins—deliver between 8 and 16 grams of protein, and come in classic flavors like snickerdoodle, chocolate chip and mint chocolate, as well as more oddball options like lemon poppyseed and birthday cake. Fresh Healthy Cafe on Broad Street is the only Idaho outpost the stocking products from

Fit Donut offers gluten-free donuts daily for a slight upcharge: A half dozen costs $14 rather than $10.99.

pound of body weight, a person should consume .35 grams of protein. The second debate around “fit desserts” centers on health, and is encapsulated by a 2015 article published by Harvard Medical School: “Are Protein Bars Really Just Candy Bars in Disguise?” After comparing the calories, sugar, salt, fat, protein, fiber, vitamin and mineral content of a Snickers bar to a Nutz Over Chocolate Luna Bar (made by the Twin Falls, Idaho-based company Clif Bar), the piece concluded that “a Snickers bar isn’t all that much worse than many nutrition bars.” While Miller didn’t go that far, she did point out that “fit desserts” can pile up calorically if they’re turned to as a substitute too often. “From a dietitian’s standpoint, unless you’re really addicted to sugar it’s best to go after the whole foods sources, so you aren’t caving into sweets all time,” Millar said. “...It’s probably better to just have some ice cream every once in a while rather than something like [a protein bar] every single day.” Still, the high-protein dessert trend continues, and both Knigge and Armstrong have their own theories as to why. “I think it’s just this day and age. Everything is digital, everything is social media, everybody can see everybody else, so you kind of want what everybody else has,” said Knigge. “You see all of these people with these great healthy lifestyles and you want that for yourself, but you still have that sweet craving because you’ve been eating sugar your whole life.” Armstrong, too, pointed to cravings. “I think a lot of it has to do with guilt for people,” he said. “Everybody loves their guilty pleasures, like donuts and pizza, you name it. So if you can create something that’s healthy that satisfies those cravings, why not trade it for that and satisfy your guilty pleasure.” BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | 7


CITYDESK

NEWS

FRACK WITH EAGLE AT YOUR OWN EXPENSE “I knew that I had to take a stand.” GEORGE PRENTICE

Boise households will soon receive 26 plastic bags and instruction on plastic recycling.

ORANGE IS THE NEW BOISE

8 | APRIL 11-17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

infrastructure or degradation of the value, use and enjoyment of private property.” In that provision lies the daylight for Brock and her contingent of Eagle residents, who see it as a way for their city to craft an ordinance that prioritizes health and safety over profits. “The City [of Eagle] has no power but for what the legislature gives it,” City Attorney Cherese McLain told the commission. “But I would point you to the words ‘reasonable local provisions.’ “

ADAM RO SENLUN D

Over approximately five weeks starting in mid-April, Boiseans will start receiving what City of Boise Department of Public Works Communications Manager Colin Hickman called “basically a little welcome kit” from the city. That kit will include a 26 plastic bags and instructions for how to use them to recycle plastics. The bags, safety-orange in color, mark an important shift in how the city will treat recyclables going forward. “A motto has been with every massive challenge comes opportunities,” Hickman said. “These bans from China have been a wake-up call and an opportunity for the city to do things in a better way.” Up until late-2017, China recycled approximately half of the plastic and paper products in the world, but last year it announced it would no longer be “the world’s garbage dump” and banned the import of many recyclable items. The move sent cities around the globe into a tailspin over how to keep previously exportable recyclables out of landfills. Boise was one of the few exceptions. Shortly after the ban took effect Jan. 1, local officials announced they had a plan that would go beyond simply solving the plastics problem: It would allow Boiseans to recycle more items than ever before. “This is an innovative solution that allows us to turn a bad situation into something quite positive,” said Boise Mayor Dave Bieter in January. Starting in August 2017—well before China’s announcement—the city of Boise and Republic Services, which collects Boiseans’ waste, quietly partnered with Renewlogy, a firm based out of Salt Lake City that processes plastics into commercial biofuel. The partnership has been facilitated by a $50,000 grant from Dow Packaging and Specialty Plastics, and the Keep America Beautiful initiative. The city will take on the rest of the cost of the program. There will be no additional fees assessed to Boiseans as a result of the switch, leaving the orange plastic bags as the most visible reminder that their recyclables will no longer be shipped overseas, and will instead be converted to fuel closer to home. Residents will, however, have to learn new recycling habits. Items allowed in the bags include plastic bags and sleeves; 9 plastic dinnerware; bubble wrap and

Something unique—some might even call it historic—happened at Eagle City Hall on the evening of April 2. “It was pretty thrilling,” said Shelley Brock, an Eagle resident and board member of the Eagle-based Citizens Allied for Integrity and Accountability. “I have a personal, vested interest in Eagle. I’ve lived here since I was a kid.” Brock stood before the City of Eagle Planning and Zoning Commission as an advocate. She and a growing number of Eagle residents argued it’s time for the city to draw a line in the sand when it comes to oil/gas exploration, and particularly fracking. That isn’t so unusual—the surprise was that officials fell right in line. “It was about three years ago when my husband and I drove over to Gem County to buy some feed for our sheep, and we stumbled upon seismic testing that was going on in that region. I started asking more about it and learned that there was a real possibility of seeing drilling and fracking where all those beautiful orchards are,” said Brock. “And then I got my hands on some maps showing where exploration companies had been leasing land, including land underneath people’s homes. When I found out that there were some leases in the northwest Eagle Foothills where we live, it became very personal.” Idaho has a bumpy, controversial and recent history with gas exploration. In a series of exclusive reports in 2011, Boise Weekly exposed the financial troubles of Bridge Resources, and when Bridge began selling off its assets, Snake River Oil and Gas and Texas-based Alta Mesa Holdings started snapping up leases. This triggered a flurry of drilling activity in 2012, followed by seismic tests and even more land lease negotiations. Meanwhile, lobbyists representing the exploration companies began flexing their muscle at the Idaho Statehouse, and it didn’t take long for the Idaho Legislature to begin instituting new rules making it nearly impossible for local municipalities to prohibit drilling operations in their backyards. Title 47, Chapter 3, of the Idaho Code, which pertains to “geologic information, and prevention of waste” at or near oil and gas wells, was recently revised by the legislature to restrict any city or county from “prohibiting the extraction of oil and gas.” However, the law also stipulates the extraction “may be subject to reasonable local ordinance provisions… which protect public health, public safety, public order or which prevent harm to public

“Are there any existing wells in this area?” asked P&Z Commissioner Derek Smith. “Not that I’m aware of,” said McLain. The absence of existing wells didn’t deter citizens and members of CAIA from packing City Hall. One by one, they stood before the

commission to voice opposition to the idea of drilling and fracking within city limits. “I really feel this is something we don’t need here,” said Richard Boozel, Eagle resident and Democratic candidate for the Idaho State Senate. “We moved here six years ago from Michigan and Flint has horrible water. We certainly don’t want that here,” added Lorrie Argabrite. “If I see on the horizon that our property values go into the ditch, I’m outta here,” said Isaac Hasselblad, owner of Hasselblad Lumber. Homeowners who live in nearby Payette County, where oil and gas exploration towers already dot the landscape, came to pass on warnings to Eagle about their own experiences. “I live in Fruitland, and I can tell you that Payette County didn’t do its homework in setting up any rules,” said Julie Fugate. “I now live between two active drill sites. We’re gravely concerned about the decrease of our property values. Seriously, that could be your reality.” Soon after, Shelley Brock handed out packets of papers to the P&Z commissioners and the city attorney. She had already gone through McLain’s first draft of a proposed ordinance on oil and gas exploration in Eagle, and had a number of suggestions to tighten it. The first zeroed in on a section of the ordinance titled “purpose.” “Why are the words ‘economical remunerative’ in there?” asked Brock. The initial draft of the ordinance included the following language: “It is necessary and appropriate to adopt reasonable requirements for Oil and Gas resource development so that these resources can be obtained in a manner that is economically remunerative, and that minimizes the potential impact on the residents of the City of Eagle.” Simply put, it gave equal weight to the economic fortunes of oil and gas drilling companies as the well-being of citizens. “Nowhere in Idaho code is there a requirement that cities and counties must assure operators will ‘profit lucratively’ from operations in their jurisdictions,” said Brock. “The city’s duty is to protect Eagle residents and their property.” Brock also suggested: • The elimination of exemptions for “trade secrets” when it comes time for applicants to disclose the chemicals they’ll use on any site. 9 • Baseline water quality testing prior to drilling, to be conducted by an indeB O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


JUST KEEP SIGNING

CITYDESK (CONT.)

NEWS

GRE TA GARDNER For the sixth straight year, the Republicancontrolled Idaho Legislature chose to push the state health care coverage gap to the back burner, leaving a plan proposed by outgoing Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter languishing in committee. But healthcare advocates remain undeterred in their efforts to take the issue directly to voters this November. The clock is ticking: they have until Monday, April 30, to collect enough petition signatures to be eligible for the fall ballot. “I think the Legislature’s failure was absolutely an attempt by House Speaker Scott Bedke to keep all Republicans from having to go on the record as opposing Medicaid expansion for 35,000 Idahoans,” said Adrienne Evans, executive director of United Vision for Idaho. “We’ve been fighting this for six years. People are dying. This is the most egregious thing that they could have done.” The 2014 Census estimated that 78,000 Idahoans landed somewhere in the gap, meaning their incomes disqualified them from participating in the state-run health insurance exchange and from Medicaid eligibility. The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare recently estimated that the coverage gap has decreased over the past few years to 35,000 people.

During the recently completed session of the legislature, Idaho House Democrats and a handful of House Republicans asked that the Governor’s proposed plan be put to a vote, but the GOP majority stalled the bill. Rep. Christy Perry (R-Nampa), one of the few Republican legislators in support of the measure, made an emotional plea to her GOP colleagues to reconsider their opposition. “I have been all but spit on in this body for bringing the bill back,” a teary-eyed Perry said on

pendent third party at the applicant’s expense. • Automatic emergency shut-off valves on drilling equipment and post-extraction facilities, with access provided to city officials and first responders in case of a fire or explosion. • An indemnification provision, signed by the applicant, in addition to general liability insurance in the amount of no less than $15 million per occurrence. • A requirement that oil and gas wells and processing facilities be set back no less than half a mile from the nearest property line and a quarter of a mile from any highway. • Allowing oil or gas post-extraction facilities only in heavy industrial zoning districts. When the public comment period wrapped up, the P&Z meeting had stretched well past the three-hour mark. As McLain feverishly took note of all of the suggestions, she turned to the commissioners and asked, “Which of these should we include in the updated draft?” Commissioner Steve Guerber held up Brock’s list of suggestions, looked at the attorney and said, “[I] think you should be looking at this. It contains reasonable expectations to make sure that things that have happened elsewhere don’t happen here.” Acting Commission Chair Theresa Johnson agreed. “As for that phrase ‘economic remuneration,’ we wouldn’t have that for any other business coming to Eagle, so we really don’t need 8

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

the floor of the Idaho House. “But I don’t give a damn what anyone thinks of me [in here]. I came here not because of the people here, but to represent my people, who have cried to have some movement in this particular arena.” Bedke interrupted Perry to ask her to “gather herself ” and to “remind everyone [to] debate the motion to send it back, and not the merits of the bill.” “The impact of inaction is severe. Lives are in limbo when Idahoans can’t afford health coverage,” said Lauren Necochea, Director of Idaho Voices for Children, adding her disappointment that even a plan proposed by Republicans couldn’t “get across the finish line.” Meanwhile, organizers at Medicaid for Idaho remain determined to bring the issue to voters this November. But they have their work cut out for them. An initiative on this year’s ballot will require at minimum the signatures of 6 percent of registered voters in 18 out of 35 Idaho legislative districts—a total of 56,000—on a petition by April 30. “It is fiscally irresponsible to refuse to keep federal dollars here in Idaho that would be used to help Idahoans,” said Medicaid for Idaho leader Tracy Olson. “We pay federal taxes. We should benefit from them like other states that have expanded Medicaid.”

that in here,” said Johnson. McLain told the commission that she would have an updated drafted ordinance for them to consider at their next meeting, scheduled for Monday, April 16. Johnson also decided to keep the public hearing officially open, meaning more public testimony on the proposed ordinance could be heard at the April 16 session. “I must say, this has been one of the best pieces of input I’ve heard in many years,” said Guerber, congratulating the attendees. “You people really came prepared tonight.” Speaking to Boise Weekly the following day, Brock said that was music to her ears. “My first thought when I first found out about the oil and gas exploration was, ‘This is the richest, most powerful industry in the world and there’s no stopping them. We’ll have to sell our place and move.’ But then it struck me that this is happening all over the country and across the planet,” said Brock. “I saw my precious grandsons’ faces and knew that I had to take a stand for them, so they wouldn’t have to fight this same battle in the very near future.” Still, Johnson cautioned at the conclusion of the meeting that her commission wouldn’t have the ultimate say on the ordinance. “Just a reminder,” she said, “the Planning and Zoning Commission is a recommending-only body. The city council will have the final say.”

City spokesman: “We ask that residents do their best.”

other packaging materials; plastic food packages; foam items like bowls, cups and plates; and plastic dairy tubs and their lids. Those items should be rinsed of food and other contaminants, and allowed to dry before being placed in the orange bags. “We ask that residents do their best. A good example would be toothpaste tubes,” Hickman said. “They’re now accepted in the energy bags. Nobody will probably cut open their toothpaste tube and clean out the remnant. We just ask people do their best to keep their items clean and dry.” Likely the biggest change residents will notice, Hickman said, will be that plastic grocery bags will now be accepted as recyclable materials. Previously, the bags gunked up the recycling machinery and were one of the most prolific contaminants in the program. The orange bag system will make an asset out of a nuisance. “We’re hoping that shift turns [plastic bags] from contaminants to fuel,” Hickman said. Other changes are coming to the rest of the recycling bin: In addition to paper products like magazines, newspapers, office paper and mail, metals like aluminum and steel cans, flattened cardboard boxes, a limited number of plastic items including detergent and milk jugs, and soda and juice bottles may also be placed directly into the blue bins. Some items will not be allowed into the bins or the bags: water bottles and hinged-lid or “clamshell” containers will now be relegated to the trash. Boise currently has a 98 percent recycling participation rate, and Hickman said the city expects the new rules to have a negligible impact on the continuity of the bin and bag system in the future. In fact, total participation is likely to increase. On April 3, Meridian City Council approved a one-year project that will allow 1,500 Meridian households to recycle plastics numbered 3 through 7 in partnership with Boise’s program. That project will cost $12,000, which will be paid through the Meridian Community Recycling Fund. If more than 1,500 households try to register for the project, “We will be thrilled,” said Andrea Pogue, a Meridian Solid Waste Advisory Commission commissioner. “That is the kind of data we want to report to the commission.” 8

—Harrison Berry BOISEweekly | APRIL 11-17, 2018 | 9


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY APRIL 11 On Stage BCT: THE ROOMMATE—Jen Silverman’s absorbing comedy celebrates self-discovery and unexpected reinvention later in life. Empty-nested and alone in her Midwestern home, Sharon takes on a roommate, Robyn, who has just arrived from New York City. Before she has even unpacked, Robyn challenges everything about Sharon’s way of life. Book clubs, ‘80s pop music and the occasional shared toke complicate their unlikely but enduring relationship, even as they venture into dangerous territory. Recommended for ages 13 and older. 7 p.m. $10-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Art BOISE STATE 2018 SPRING BFA EXHIBITION—Check out artwork from 20 graduating students in the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts, Illustration and Art Education program. Work is also showing in the Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, in the Hemingway Center, Room 110. Through April 24. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/ visualartscenter. BRYAN ANTHONY MOORE: BRAZEN BULL, A NATURAL MYTHSTORY OF NORTH AMERICA—The College of Idaho’s Rosenthal Gallery hosts Bryan Anthony Moore for a unique ongoing exhibition that started with blank walls. By the time the exhibition closes in April, the walls are expected to be completely lined with Moore’s vision of combining American historical figures with inspirations directly from exhibits from the college’s Orma J. Smith

FRIDAY, APRIL 13

Museum of Natural History. It is a process the gallery’s visitors are invited to watch throughout his stay. Through April 30. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Rosenthal Gallery, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5321, collegeofidaho. edu/rosenthalgallery. AN INTENTIONAL EYE: SELECT GIFTS FROM WILFRED DAVIS FLETCHER—Wilfred Davis Fletcher (1922-2016), a third-generation Idahoan and longtime friend and supporter of the museum, donated his first gift—a small graphite drawing by Maynard Dixon—in 1984. In the years since then, he has made 17 additional donations, totaling nearly 600 works of art. His incredible generosity has significantly shaped the Museum’s permanent collection of approximately 4,000 objects, by introducing artworks by prominent artists who were previously unrepresented. Through April 14. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

JAMES CASTLE: EIGHTEEN ARTIST BOOKS—In honor of the Idaho artist’s processes, the exhibition James Castle: Eighteen Artist Books will present a humble collection demonstrative of his curatorial practices. Books will open to pages that reflect his deliberation and intended execution through use of patterns, pictorial juxtapositions, repetition of techniques and vernacular materials. The exhibit is designed to draw new and familiar audiences into a conversation with this artist and a small portion of his artist books. 7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1865 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261204, facebook.com/bsufinearts.

Today, her thought-provoking titles effectively marry emotional content and technical expertise to enhance the viewers’ enjoyment. Through April 28. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. PASSEY AND APPELMAN: WOODSMOKE—This new book by artist Troy Passey and writer J. Reuben Appelman presents their impressions of the passage of time, history, memory and architecture, and offers the viewer a glimpse into the character of the home of American artist James Castle through the exploration of the house’s interior, exterior and landscapes original to Castle’s time on the site. Part of a month-long exhibition celebrating the James Castle House, which opens to the public April 28. 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-9729028, boiseartsandhistory.org/ events/2018/april/woodsmokeexhibition.

LAUREL LAKE MCGUIRE: EMOTIONAL LANDSCAPE OF FLORALS, AN EXHIBIT OF LARGE SCALE FLOWERS—Enjoy a little bit of spring as you lose yourself in a landscape of flowers. During her youth in the artistic climate of Cape Ann, Massachusetts, Laurel Lake McGuire learned to use layered washes, fine detail and stunning colors.

SATURDAY, APRIL 14

Literature AUTHOR DEVRI WALLS: VENATORS RELEASE PARTY—Celebrate the release of Devri Walls’ latest young adult novel, book one in the Venators series. Rune Jenkins, her twin brother Ryker, and their friend Grey have been kidnapped and taken to Eon, a supernatural alternate dimension. They are Venators, descended from a long-forgotten race of warriors created to keep Earth and Eon separate. Now they must fight to return home before Eon consumes and traps them forever. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org. SAPPHIRE OPEN MIC—Showcase your music, poetry, stories or monologues. Hosted by local music favorite Ryan Wissinger, Sapphire Open Mic is all-ages and family-friendly. Sign up beginning at 6 p.m.; first-come, first-served. 7 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

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Raise a glass to foothills grass.

BEERS, BANDS AND PUBLIC LANDS

Public lands are a hot-button issue in Idaho, and staple commodities for many who live in the Boise area and like to hike and bike in the surrounding foothills. In the spirit of keeping fences down and endangered species protected, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers—the national conservation group that calls itself “a voice for the silent wilderness”—is hosting a Beers, Bands and Public Lands kickoff event in Boise to celebrate the start of its 2018 National Rendezvous, a three-day party filled with conservation-centric events that will take place Thursday, April 12, through Saturday, April 14. Plans for the brewfest include live music from Lounge on Fire and Tylor & the Train Robbers, plus plenty of beer, a raffle and other fun for all ages. Head down to Grove Plaza Friday to put your money where your boots are. 5-9 p.m., $20. Grove Plaza, Downtown Boise, backcountryhunters.org/boise_brewfest. 10 | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

Roll on in.

BOISE HEMPFEST

While the idea of Hempfest may not appeal to everyone, there’s more to this annual event than the name first suggests. Yes, the main focus is on cannabis—the festival bills itself as “a cannabis education event,” after all, and there will be a slate of speakers to fill listeners in on its history and advocate for its use—but controversy aside, the outdoor event is also an excuse for Idahoans of any stripe to enjoy a Saturday. Julia Davis Park will be filled with vendors selling everything from funky tie-dye t-shirts to donuts and grilled cheese, and a music lineup including Noble Holt, Red Light Challenge, Cairo Fusion, Bukkit, Pause for the Cause and more will play live for attendees all day. Plus, the fest is free and family friendly; smoking of any controlled substance in the park will earn the offender the boot from the Boise Police officers standing by. 10 a.m.-10 p.m., FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., boisehempfest.com.

Shakespeare revisited.

FRINGE THEATRICAL: DESDEMONA

Fringe Theatrical Productions has a very specific goal in mind with its production of Desdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief: to prove to viewers that Desdemona, wife of Shakespeare’s Othello, is “far from the quivering naif we’ve all come to know.” The play is the creation of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paula Vogel, and in 1993, the New York Times described a production of Desdemona as “bawdy” and “thunderingly ironic.” That tone, along with its emphasis on an underutilized female character, makes it a perfect fit for Fringe, which seeks to “facilitate the voices of the disenfranchised.” The premier of Desdemona April 5 marked the second full-scale production for Fringe, which is still a fresh voice on the Boise theater scene. 8 p.m. nightly, 2 p.m. Saturday matinee. $15. The Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, 208-991-0984, 208fringe. com. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR Talks & Lectures HYATT RESERVE BIRD HABITAT PROJECT—The Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve Habitat Enhancement Project is improving conditions for birds by restoring native vegetation to hillsides overrun with weeds. Local bird expert Heidi Ware of the Intermountain Bird Observatory will talk about the hillside birds of the Hyatt Reserve and explain how the improved habitat will be beneficial. Take your lunch and socialize before the program, which starts at noon. Hosted by the Boise River Enhancement Network. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208972-8200, boiseriverenhancement.org.

Citizen BOISE CITY TOWN HALL MEETING—The Boise City Council and Mayor Dave Bieter want to connect with citizens and engage

with them on the future of the city outside of the traditional public hearing format. They’ve launched a series of town hall-style meetings that will take place around the city over the course of the next year. Each citizen who wishes to address the mayor and council will be given three minutes. The next two town meetings are scheduled for Wednesday, July 11, at the Library! at Collister, and Wednesday, Oct. 10, at the Library! at Hillcrest. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Boise Fire Station No. 4, 8485 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-384-4034, fire. cityofboise.org.

Kids & Teens CODING FOR KIDS AND TEENS— Learn real-world coding techniques using Scratch. Questions? Contact Derek at dramos@adalib. org. For ages 10-19. 6:30-7:45 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org/victory.

SATURDAY, APRIL 14

PRESENTING

VIDEO GAME CHALLENGE—Enjoy open play on Wii and X-Box consoles. 4:30-5:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org/ victory.

Animals & Pets GOLDEN EAGLE AUDUBON WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRD WALKS—Join the Golden Eagle Audubon Society every Wednesday morning to get a little exercise while enjoying nature and identifying birds. The group meets at Janjou Patisseries for coffee, then carpools from there to a variety of locations. Contact Kathy with questions at 208-921-1340. 9 a.m.-noon FREE. Janjou Patisserie, 1754 W. State St., Boise. 208-921-1340, goldeneagleaudubon.org.

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NEPALESE CULTURE AND CUISINE WITH GLOBAL GARDENS—Global Gardens is excited to introduce refugee and entrepreneur Ratna Subba, who will guide participants through the preparation of momo, a traditional Nepalese dumpling filled with meat or vegetables. Chef Subba arrived in Boise in 2012, and has since shared his passion for introducing others to his country’s cuisine by opening a food truck named Darjeeling MoMo in 2015. In this hands-on program, you’ll learn how to make our own momo, and then enjoy a shared meal featuring other Nepalese dishes. Recipes to take home and beverages available for purchase. Registration ends Monday, April 9. For ages 13 and older. 6-8:30 p.m. $40. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, jumpnepal.eventbrite.com.

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THURSDAY APRIL 12 Show some local love.

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET OPENING DAY

On Saturday, April 13, the Capital City Public Market will return to Boise to amp up the locavore love fest, setting up shop again on Eighth Street for the 2018 season. CCPM has been providing street space for vendors of fresh fruit, grass-fed meat, made-to-order snacks, local art and more since 1994 from midApril to mid-December. Over the years the number of local producers has grown steadily, and now the height of market season offers more than 100 spots to shop. The market footprint shifts week to week, but organizers promise that booths will fill Eighth Street from Main to Bannock streets for opening day. If you’re on the hunt for something fresh, grab your reusable bag and head over early Saturday morning for the pick of the produce. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., FREE. Eighth Street, Downtown Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

Festivals & Events FETTUCCINE FORUM: MAKING THE JAMES CASTLE HOUSE—Join Boise City Department of Art and History along with the manager of the new James Castle House Cultural Sites and Studio Maelstrom Architect as they discuss the city’s massive restoration project to preserve Castle’s home, work spaces and physical legacy. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844422, boiseartsandhistory.org.

On Stage BCT: THE ROOMMATE—Jen Silverman’s absorbing comedy celebrates self-discovery and unexpected re-invention later in life.

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CALENDAR Empty-nested and alone in her Midwestern home, Sharon takes on a roommate, Robyn, who has just arrived from New York City. Before she has even unpacked, Robyn challenges everything about Sharon’s way of life. Book clubs, ‘80s pop music and the occasional shared toke complicate their unlikely but enduring relationship, even as they venture into dangerous territory. Recommended for ages 13 and older. 7 p.m. $10-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

their impressions of the passage of time, history, memory and architecture, and offers the viewer a glimpse into the character of the home of American artist James Castle through the exploration of the house’s interior, exterior and landscapes original to Castle’s time on the site. Part of a month-long exhibition celebrating the James Castle House, which opens to the public April 28. 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-972-9028, boiseartsandhistory.org.

COMEDIAN GABE DUNN: FUELED BY DESPERATION COMEDY SHOW—8 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Literature

FRINGE THEATRICAL: DESDEMONA—Fringe Theatrical Productions presents the second play of their inaugural season: Desdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief by Paula Vogel. As the wrongly accused and suffering wife of Shakespeare’s Othello, Desdemona has long been viewed as the victim of circumstance. But as Pulitzer Prize-winner Vogel demonstrates in her comic deconstruction of Shakespeare’s play, aligning tongue-in-cheek humor while raising serious questions as to the role of women through the ages, Desdemona was far from the quivering naif we’ve all come to know. For mature audiences. 8 p.m. $15. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208991-0984, 208fringe.com.

Art BOISE STATE 2018 SPRING BFA EXHIBITION—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter. BRYAN ANTHONY MOORE: BRAZEN BULL, A NATURAL MYTHSTORY OF NORTH AMERICA—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Rosenthal Gallery, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5321, collegeofidaho.edu/rosenthalgallery. AN INTENTIONAL EYE: SELECT GIFTS FROM WILFRED DAVIS FLETCHER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. JAMES CASTLE: EIGHTEEN ARTIST BOOKS—7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1865 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1204, facebook.com/bsufinearts. LAUREL LAKE MCGUIRE: EMOTIONAL LANDSCAPE OF FLORALS, AN EXHIBIT OF LARGE SCALE FLOWERS—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. PASSEY AND APPELMAN: WOODSMOKE—This new book by artist Troy Passey and writer J. Reuben Appelman presents

AUTHOR NATALIE PERRY: DAD #1, DAD #2, A QUEERSPAWN VIEW FROM THE CLOSET—Meet Natalie Perry, author and LGBTQ family advocate, who was only 12 years old when her dad came out to her family. Due to her dad’s position as the former Chief Judge of the Idaho State Court of Appeals, he never came out publicly. While Natalie’s family kept their secret for two decades, they have now all agreed to share their story in the hope of starting conversations on how to accept families that some still do not understand. Dad #1, Dad #2 chronicles the highs and lows of growing up in a closeted gay family. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Religious/Spiritual 11TH STEP CONSCIOUS CONTACT ACA MEDITATION MEETING—Adult Children of Alcoholics readings with 20 minutes silent meditation followed by open sharing. ACA is a Twelve Step, Twelve Tradition program of men and women who grew up in alcoholic or otherwise dysfunctional homes. They meet to share experiences and recovery in an atmosphere of mutual respect. Noon-1:15 p.m. $2 donation. First Presbyterian Church, 950 W. State St., Boise, 208-345-3441, fpcboise.org.

Animals & Pets BEE CITY USA LECTURE SERIES: PLANTING FOR POLLINATORS—Honey bees, bumble bees, native bees, butterflies and even birds are in decline. One major factor is loss of habitat. Join botanist Ann DeBolt to learn how you can invite these beautiful and essential pollinators into your yard with plants they love. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Garden City City Hall, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-371-4140, gardencityidaho. govoffice.com.

Food HELP WITH HEALTHY EATING— Drop by the Boise Co-op in the Village for a program all about healthy eating. You’ll enjoy some

12 | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

delicious samples, get new recipes, and learn about reading nutrition labels on a store tour. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Co-op, The Village, 2350 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-809-2200, boise.coop.

FRIDAY APRIL 13 Festivals & Events BEERS, BANDS AND PUBLIC LANDS BREWFEST—Celebrate the kickoff to Backcountry Hunters and Anglers’ 2018 National Rendezvous. If you love public lands, show your support and help raise money to protect them. You’ll enjoy tasty offerings from local breweries, cideries and food trucks, as well as live music by Lounge on Fire and Tylor & the Train Robbers. Your ticket gets you a steel drink mug and three drink tickets. Plus raffle prizes and more. All ages welcome. All proceeds go toward protecting our public lands and waters. Stick around after for BHA’s first-ever Backcountry Film Fest next door at The Boise Centre, featuring films from many outdoor enthusiasts, including Public Lands advocate and TV host Randy Newberg. 5-9 p.m. $20. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise, backcountryhunters.org. FRIDAY THE 13TH AT OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY—The Old Pen comes to life on Friday the 13th. Join Kathy Deinhardt-Hill, author of Hanged: A History of Idaho’s Executions, to learn about the arrest, trial, conviction and execution of Ernest Walrath and Troy Powell. This year marks the 67th anniversary of the only double execution in Idaho’s history. Walrath and Powell were also the youngest men ever executed in the state. Execution-related artifacts from Idaho State Historical Society collections will be on rare display. Visitors can also take a self-guided tour of the site and explore 100 years of prison history. 5-9 p.m. $8-$13. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-334-2844, history. idaho.gov/oldpen.

On Stage BCT: THE ROOMMATE—Jen Silverman’s absorbing comedy celebrates self-discovery and unexpected re-invention later in life. Empty-nested and alone in her Midwestern home, Sharon takes on a roommate. Before she has even unpacked, Robyn challenges everything about Sharon’s way of life. Book clubs, ‘80s pop music and the occasional shared toke complicate their unlikely but enduring relationship, even as they venture into dangerous territory. Recommended for ages 13 and older. 8 p.m. $10-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

BLT: DEATH OF A SALESMAN—See for yourself why Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman won the Pulitzer Prize and countless Tony Awards and came to be considered one of the greatest plays of the 20th century. Through this amazingly dramatic story, you get to experience the visceral loss of identity and a man’s inability to accept change in himself as he experiences his loss of The American Dream. For ages 13 and older. 8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater. org. BOISE PHIL AND ZUILL BAILEY: TALES OF HEMINGWAY—Crowd favorite Zuill Bailey returns to dazzle on the cello on Michael Daugherty’s Tales of Hemingway, a cello concerto in four movements, each named after a book or short story written by the prolific American journalist and author Ernest Hemingway. Also on the program is Wagner’s Die Meistersinger and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3. Take your seats an hour early for the Musically Speaking pre-concert lecture, hosted by Jamey Lamar. 7:30 p.m. $24-$72. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208344-7849, boisephil.org. COMEDIAN PAULY SHORE—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $30. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. FRINGE THEATRICAL: DESDEMONA—Fringe Theatrical Productions presents the second play of their inaugural season: Desdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief by Paula Vogel. As the wrongly accused and suffering wife of Shakespeare’s Othello, Desdemona has long been viewed as the victim of circumstance. But as Pulitzer Prize-winner Vogel demonstrates in her comic deconstruction of Shakespeare’s play, aligning tongue-in-cheek humor while raising serious questions as to the role of women through the ages, Desdemona was far from the quivering naif we’ve all come to know. 8 p.m. $15. Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208-991-0984, 208fringe. com.

various pole and aerial acts that will enlighten and inspire. 8 p.m. $16-$20. Ophidia Studio, 2615 W. Kootenai St., Boise, 208-4092403, ophidiastudio.com. STAGE COACH: QUARTET—In Ronald Harwood’s dramatic comedy, Cecily, Reggie and Wilfred reside in a home for retired opera singers in Kent, England. Each year, there is a concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday. Jean, who used to be married to Reggie, arrives at the home and disrupts their equilibrium. She still acts like a diva and refuses to sing. But the show must go on. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Art BOISE STATE 2018 SPRING BFA EXHIBITION—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994. art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter. BRYAN ANTHONY MOORE: BRAZEN BULL, A NATURAL MYTHSTORY OF NORTH AMERICA—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Rosenthal Gallery, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5321, collegeofidaho.edu/rosenthalgallery.

AN INTENTIONAL EYE: SELECT GIFTS FROM WILFRED DAVIS FLETCHER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. JAMES CASTLE: EIGHTEEN ARTIST BOOKS—7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1865 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1204, facebook.com/bsufinearts. LAUREL LAKE MCGUIRE: EMOTIONAL LANDSCAPE OF FLORALS, AN EXHIBIT OF LARGE SCALE FLOWERS—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. THE LUCKY ONES: REFUGEES ARRIVING IN UNCERTAIN TIMES—In partnership with the Idaho Black History Museum, the International Rescue Committee presents a visual story of Idaho enriched by refugees. The exhibit places a human face on the 2017 Travel Bans and the issue of refugee resettlement. Through Aug. 15. 5:30-8 p.m. FREE. Idaho Black History Museum, 508 Julia Davis Drive, 208-789-2164, ibhm.org. PASSEY AND APPELMAN: WOODSMOKE—3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-972-9028, boiseartsandhistory.org.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL FUNDRAISER— Enjoy an evening of entertainment featuring some of Idaho’s finest songwriters, plus silent and live auctions to raise money for the Idaho Songwriters Association. With Dan Costello, Brook Faulk, Red Light Challenge, DeVaard and more. 7 p.m. $15-$25. Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, idahosongwriters.com. OPHIDIA PERFORMANCE GROUP: THE DARKNESS OF LIGHT—The Darkness of Light is a collection of pole, aerial and contemporary dance pieces that explore the relationship between light and dark. Each cannot exist without the other and their interaction is something surreal. Ophidia Performance Group will expose battles and harmonies through

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


Literature GHOSTS AND PROJECTORS POETRY SPEAKEASY—Enjoy a one-on-one performance with an eccentric, costumed character (past performers have included a mad scientist, a cowgirl, and an operatic bluebird, just to name a few). Plus tarot card readings, poetry on demand, music by J. R. Rivero Kinsey and Ashley Rose, and more. Tokens for private performances, poetry on demand, and tarot readings are an additional $5 each or three for $12 and will be available at the door. Presented in partnership with Boise State, Big Tree Arts, Death Rattle Writers Festival, Storyfort, Lost Grove Brewing and the Boise Co-op. Proceeds benefit The Cabin’s Ghosts and Projectors reading series. 7-10 p.m. $3-$5. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

Sports & Fitness TAI CHI: MEDITATION IN MOTION—Tai Chi reduces stress and increases balance and flexibility.

Learn this gentle martial art from a trained instructor. 11 a.m.-noon. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org/victory.

Odds & Ends FRIDAY NIGHT MAGIC—Do you love Magic the Gathering? Join over 100 Friday Night Magic customers in your choice of one of three Friday Night Magic events: Standard, Draft or Commander. You’ll receive one booster pack for playing and additional prize packs depending on your performance. Buy-in depends on your choice of event. 7-11 p.m. $5-$15. All About Games, 7079 Overland Road, Boise, 208-343-5653, allaboutgamesboise.com. PUT A CORK IN MS 2018—Help Put a Cork in MS while enjoying the CW Moore Penthouse rooftop sunset view and taste fine wine, beer and wonderful food. There’ll be cork crafts and other items for sale, with all funds going to support a cure for MS. This annual fundraising event is put on by Chef Zee’s nonprofit Corks 4 A Cure.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Buy your tickets online at the website listed below. 5-9 p.m. $20. Zee’s Rooftop Cafe, 250 S. Fifth St., Ste. 900, Boise, 208-3810034, zeechristopher.com.

Animals & Pets IDAHO HORSE EXPO—Don’t miss your chance to see a wide range of horse breeds, from the familiar, like Quarter Horses and Mustangs, to the exotic, like Friesens and the Peruvian Paso. Get your discounted advance tickets at RC Beans Saddlery, Saddle Up, Hap Tallmans and Cowboy Supply, as well as the Idaho Horse Council Office, where you can get a discounted three-day pass. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$10, $17-$23 3-day pass. Ford Idaho Center Horse Park, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-442-3335. idahohorsecouncil.com.

SATURDAY APRIL 14 Festivals & Events 3RD ANNUAL BOISE HEMPFEST 2018—Check out this cannabis education event, featuring speakers, vendors and live music. Visit boisehempfest.com for details. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisehempfest.com. BACKCOUNTRY HUNTERS AND ANGLERS NORTH AMERICAN RENDEZVOUS—Join Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, the Sportsmen’s Voice for Our Wild Public Lands, Waters and Wildlife, for their biggest party of the year. Saturday is chock full of seminars by special guests, including hunter and advocate Randy Newberg and First Lite’s Ryan Callaghan, and includes lunch. On Saturday night, the 2018 Campfire Stories event will spotlight Steven Rinella of MeatEater, Remi Warren, and more. Saturday events can be purchased at backcountryhunters. org. 9:30 a.m.-10 p.m. $20-$55, $200 weekend pass. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise. 406-926-1908, backcountryhunters.org/rendezvous_2018.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

FEAST TEEN—Feast Boise and JUMP Boise present Feast Teen, a crowdfunded microgrant dinner event that awards cash to local creative/community doers, to financially kickstart a communitybased project. Your ticket entitles you to a seat at the dinner and a ballot, which you will cast for your favorite of the 10 teen-led projects that will be presented during the meal. The three presenters with the most votes will each win $500 to actualize their project idea. It’s going to be a fun, inspiring and delicious evening. 6-8 p.m. $25. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-6396610, feastboise.org/teen.

GET BUSY FOR BEES

Bee populations have been declining for years, and the pollinator crisis hasn’t escaped notice in the Gem State. With flowers starting to open across the valley and tensions over bee survival running high, the time is ripe for a slate of beecentered events, which will take place in Ketchum and Garden City in the coming weeks. The Garden City event scheduled for Thursday, April 12, “Planting for Pollinators,” is part of the Bee City USA Lecture Series and will be led by Anne Debolt, who recently retired from the Idaho Botanical Garden. Debolt will discuss how bees are losing their habitats and which local plants best attract them to backyard gardens. At 5:30 p.m. on the same day, The Sun Valley Center for the Arts will hold a free lecture at its Ketchum headquarters called “Border Free Bees” as part of its Friday-Friday, April 13-22, Big Idea Project, which revolves around pollinators and the American food system. Dr. Cameron Cartiere, an Associate Professor at Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, B.C., will lead the discussion, which is named after his Border Free Bees public art initiative. The project attempts to raise awareness of the trouble that bees face, in part by transforming “under-utilized urban sites” into pollinator pastures. Collaborating with a variety of scientists, artists and community groups, members of the initiative hope to assist bees by creating more habitat for them.

123RF. C OM

CALENDAR

CALENDAR EXTRA

Although The Center will host a range of beefocused events and even a gallery opening through June, one that’s both interesting and iminent is “What is the Threat?” A panel discussion that will take place at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24. Steve Hobbs, a backyard beekeeper, will moderate the panelists, who include Tom Harned, a commercial beekeeper and owner of Five Bee Hives; Ross Winton, Regional Wildlife Biologist with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game; and Sara Berman, who runs Squash Blossom Farm. The panelists will discuss the impact bees and other pollinators have on humans, as well as the role they play in maintaining the food supply. For humans to keep up a sustainable agricultural system, the bees need to keep buzzing, and these events will encourage people to get busy to help. —Brian Millar

MERCHANT SPOTLIGHT

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CALENDAR On Stage BCT: THE ROOMMATE—Jen Silverman’s absorbing comedy celebrates self-discovery and unexpected re-invention later in life. Empty-nested and alone in her Midwestern home, Sharon takes on a roommate, Robyn, who has just arrived from New York City. Before she has even unpacked, Robyn challenges everything about Sharon’s way of life. Book clubs, ‘80s pop music and the occasional shared toke complicate their unlikely but enduring relationship, even as they venture into dangerous territory. Recommended for ages 13 and older. 8 p.m. $10-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: DEATH OF A SALESMAN—See for yourself why Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman won the Pulitzer Prize and countless Tony Awards and came to be considered one of the greatest plays of the 20th century. Through this amazingly dramatic story, you get to experience the visceral loss of identity and a man’s inability to accept change in himself as he experiences his loss of The American Dream. For ages 13 and older. 8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater. org. BOISE PHIL AND ZUILL BAILEY: TALES OF HEMINGWAY—Crowd favorite Zuill Bailey returns to dazzle on the cello on Michael Daugherty’s Tales of Hemingway, a cello concerto in four movements, each named after a book or short story written by the prolific American journalist and author Ernest Hemingway. Also on the program is Wagner’s Die Meistersinger and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3. Take your seats an hour early for the Musically Speaking pre-concert lecture, hosted by Jamey Lamar. 7:30 p.m. $24-$72. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-3447849, boisephil.org. COMEDIAN PAULY SHORE—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $30. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. FRINGE THEATRICAL: DESDEMONA—Fringe Theatrical Productions presents the second play of their inaugural season: Desdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief by Paula Vogel. As the wrongly accused and suffering wife of Shakespeare’s Othello, Desdemona has long been viewed as the victim of circumstance. But as Pulitzer Prize-winner Vogel demonstrates in her comic deconstruction of Shakespeare’s play, aligning tongue-in-cheek humor while raising serious questions as to the role of women through the ages, Desdemona was far from the quivering naif we’ve all come to know. New York Newsday calls Vogel “one of the smartest, most original and engaging playwrights to come along.” For mature audiences. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15.

Gem Center for the Arts, 2417 W. Bank Drive, Boise, 208-991-0984, 208fringe.com. OPHIDIA PERFORMANCE GROUP: THE DARKNESS OF LIGHT—The Darkness of Light is a collection of pole, aerial and contemporary dance pieces that explore the relationship between light and dark. Each cannot exist without the other and their interaction is something surreal. Ophidia’s Performance Group will expose battles and harmonies through various pole and aerial acts that will enlighten and inspire. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $16-$20. Ophidia Studio, 2615 W. Kootenai St., Boise, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com. STAGE COACH: QUARTET—In Ronald Harwood’s dramatic comedy, Cecily, Reggie and Wilfred reside in a home for retired opera singers in Kent, England. Each year, there is a concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday. Jean, who used to be married to Reggie, arrives at the home and disrupts their equilibrium. She still acts like a diva and refuses to sing. But the show must go on in this funny and poignant play. Adult language and suggestive humor. 8 p.m. $12$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Workshops & Classes SMALL FOOTPRINT GARDEN DESIGN—Join landscape designer Marcia Hestead for this informative, one-hour free lecture on landscape design for small spaces. Take your notebook and questions. Call to save your seats. 10 a.m. FREE. FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-4000, farwestgardencenter.net.

Art AN INTENTIONAL EYE: SELECT GIFTS FROM WILFRED DAVIS FLETCHER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. JAMES CASTLE: EIGHTEEN ARTIST BOOKS—9 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1865 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1204, facebook.com/bsufinearts. LAUREL LAKE MCGUIRE: EMOTIONAL LANDSCAPE OF FLORALS, AN EXHIBIT OF LARGE SCALE FLOWERS—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. THE LUCKY ONES: REFUGEES ARRIVING IN UNCERTAIN TIMES—11 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Idaho Black History Museum, 508 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-7892164, ibhm.org.

14 | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

Literature CHEF DOUGHTY: THE CHEF WITHIN, BREAKFAST EDITION— Meet Chef Joyce Doughty, who will have some tasty tidbits to share from her new cookbook of breakfast favorites. 11 a.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Sports & Fitness GRIDIRON DREAMS BOWLING CLASSIC BY STRIKES FOR KIDS—Gridiron Dreams hosts a youth football camp, and proceeds will be used to provide scholarships. You’ll enjoy two hours of bowling, along with raffle and silent auction. The event will be hosted by former Boise State football stars. For all ages and skill levels. Get more info at gridirondreamsbowlingclassic.com. 11 a.m. $50, $250 for up to 6; $30 spectators. Wahooz Fun Zone and Pinz Bowling Center, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-8980900, wahoozfunzone.com. OINKARI BASQUE DANCERS LAMBPAGE 5K—Join the Oinkari Basque Dancers of Boise for this Basque-themed 5K open to all runners and walkers who would like to participate. There’ll be a delicious lunch and fun games waiting for you in the park once you reach the finish line. Entry fee includes race bib, lunch, games and T-shirt. Find details, race route and sign-up at oinkari.org/ lambpage. 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $30. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 N. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-5571960, oinkari.org/lambpage. RUN FOR RESPECT 5K WALK/ RUN—Participate in the first Run For Respect 5K Walk/Run to promote education and prevention awareness for teen dating violence. Then stick around for music, food and fun. All ages are welcome. Proceeds will support the Advocates Against Family Violence Teen Outreach Program that teaches teens about healthy relationships. 9:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $30. College of Idaho, 2112 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208459-5011, aafvhope.org.

Odds & Ends GREAT IDAHO GUN SHOW—9 a.m.-6 p.m. $8. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com.

Animals & Pets IDAHO HORSE EXPO—Don’t miss your chance to see a wide range of horse breeds, from the familiar, like Quarter Horses and Mustangs, to the exotic, like Friesens and the Peruvian Paso. Get your discounted advance tickets at RC Beans Saddlery, Saddle Up, Hap Tallmans and Cowboy

Supply, as well as the Idaho Horse Council Office, where you can get a discounted three-day pass. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$10, $17-$23 3-day pass. Ford Idaho Center Horse Park, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-442-3335, idahohorsecouncil.com. MERIDIAN CANINE RESCUE OPEN HOUSE—Join Meridian Canine Rescue to celebrate their first year of saving lives at their new location. They’ll have vendors, silent auction, activities for kids and adults. Plus rescue pups will be making appearances throughout the day. Noon-3 p.m. FREE. Meridian Canine Rescue, 501 E. Scenery Lane, Ste. 100, Meridian, 208-794-0944, meridianrescue. org.

Food BOISE FARMERS MARKET—The Boise Farmers Market is the community’s source for locally grown foods sold by the farmer. The Market features specialty food products, Idaho goods and a select few artisans, plus a community space to learn about food and sustainability. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove Streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET— Market goers will find booths full of fresh local produce, beautiful flowers, delicious specialty food items, and one-of-a-kind locally crafted art. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-3453499, capitalcitypublicmarket. com.

SUNDAY APRIL 15

Workshops & Classes MAGICAL FAIRY GARDEN WORKSHOP—Enjoy creating a small scale garden for tiny creatures. Container, plants, soil and natural embellishments included. Call to pre-pay for your seat. 10:30 a.m. $30. FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-4000, farwestgardencenter.net.

4 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

Odds & Ends GREAT IDAHO GUN SHOW—9 a.m.-6 p.m. $8. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com.

Art

Animals & Pets

AN INTENTIONAL EYE: SELECT GIFTS FROM WILFRED DAVIS FLETCHER—Noon-5 p.m. FREE$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

GOLDEN EAGLE AUDUBON BIRD WALK AT HULL’S GULCH—Join Golden Eagle Audubon Society for a bird walk at Hull’s Gulch. The baby Great Horned Owls should be visible in their nest, and spring migration will bring new songbirds to the area. All ages and levels of experience are welcome. Binoculars and guidebooks will be available for use. Contact Alex Takasugi with questions at geasfieldtrips@ gmail.com. 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-484-9132, bee.cityofboise. org/foothills.

JAMES CASTLE: EIGHTEEN ARTIST BOOKS—9 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1865 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1204, facebook.com/bsufinearts.

Literature NATIONAL STUDENT POET KINSALE HUESTON READING—Join Rediscovered Books for a reading by the Western Region’s National Student Poet, Kinsale Hueston, along with other regionally and nationally recognized student poets. Hueston is an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation and focuses her work on modern issues facing her tribe, including violence against women, the loss of native languages, exploitation of resources and racial prejudice.

IDAHO HORSE EXPO—Don’t miss your chance to see a wide range of horse breeds, from the familiar, like Quarter Horses and Mustangs, to the exotic, like Friesens and the Peruvian Paso. Get your discounted advance tickets at RC Beans Saddlery, Saddle Up, Hap Tallmans and Cowboy Supply, as well as the Idaho Horse Council Office, where you can get a discounted three-day pass. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$10, $17-$23 3-day pass. Ford Idaho Center

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

On Stage THE BIG GAY CABARET—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344, facebook.com/PengillysSaloon. COMEDIAN GABE DUNN: FUELED BY DESPERATION COMEDY SHOW—8 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. STAGE COACH: QUARTET—In Ronald Harwood’s dramatic comedy, Cecily, Reggie and Wilfred reside in a home for retired opera singers in Kent, England. Each year, there is a concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday. Jean, who used to be married to Reggie, arrives at the home and disrupts their equilibrium. She still acts like a diva and refuses to sing. But the show must go on in this funny and poignant play. Adult language and suggestive humor. 2 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR Horse Park, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-442-3335, idahohorsecouncil.com.

MONDAY APRIL 16 On Stage BROADWAY IN BOISE: RAIN, A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES—Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the release of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. For the first time, Rain will bring the historic album to life in this psychedelic multimedia spectacular. 7:30 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, morrisoncenter.com.

Art BOISE STATE 2018 SPRING BFA EXHIBITION—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter. BRYAN ANTHONY MOORE: BRAZEN BULL, A NATURAL MYTHSTORY OF NORTH AMERICA—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Rosenthal Gallery, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5321, collegeofidaho.edu/rosenthalgallery. JAMES CASTLE: EIGHTEEN ARTIST BOOKS—7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1865 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1204, facebook.com/bsufinearts. LAUREL LAKE MCGUIRE: EMOTIONAL LANDSCAPE OF FLORALS, AN EXHIBIT OF LARGE SCALE FLOWERS—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

Calls to Artists BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Each week since 2001, Boise Weekly has published a piece by a local artist on the front cover—a practice unique among alternative weeklies—and, every October, we gather up the original works that appeared over the previous 12 months and put them up for auction. It’s always a kickass party and for a kickass cause: a portion of proceeds goes to the artists, a portion supports BW’s Cover Auction Art grant program and a piece of the pie is set aside to support BW’s investigative journalistic mission. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

Sports & Fitness

Art

NWPF DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S SPRING SESSION-EAGLE—Dance for Parkinson’s uses dance, live music and community to develop artistry and grace while addressing such PD-specific concerns as balance, flexibility, coordination, gait, isolation and depression. 10:45-11:45 a.m. FREE. Eagle Performing Arts Center, 1125 E. State St., Eagle, 832-594-7887, danceforparkinsonsidaho.org.

BOISE STATE 2018 SPRING BFA EXHIBITION—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter.

NWPF DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S SPRING SESSION-BOISE—Dance for Parkinson’s uses dance, live music and community to develop artistry and grace while addressing such PD-specific concerns as balance, flexibility, coordination, gait, isolation and depression. 1:30-2:30 p.m. FREE. Ballet Idaho, 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 832-594-7887, danceforparkinsonsidaho.org. YOGA ROCKS—Join instructor Jason Allen Carr for this YogaPop Yoga Class set to sounds of Pop Music royalty. The class will meet Mondays through April 30. 6-7:30 p.m. $15. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

TUESDAY APRIL 17 Festivals & Events ANDRUS CENTER ANNUAL ENVIRONMENTAL FORUM: IDAHO’S WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY IN A TIME OF GROWTH—Join the Andrus Center for Public Policy for their annual environmental forum. The conference will address issues related to Idaho’s water supply and water quality in the context of rapid population growth and climate change in southern Idaho. 8 a.m.5 p.m. $50. Boise State Student Union Simplot Grand Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-3784, sps.boisestate.edu/ andruscenter.

On Stage WELCOME TO NIGHT VALE—The creators of one of the world’s most downloaded podcasts bring their acclaimed live show to Boise. You’ll enjoy stories from the strange desert town of Night Vale, delivering rich, nuanced drama in the form of a community radio show hosted by Cecil Palmer (played by Cecil Baldwin). With guest stars and live musical score by Disparition, as well as featured musical guests Danny Schmidt and Carrie Elkin. 8 p.m. $25-$27. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

BRYAN ANTHONY MOORE: BRAZEN BULL, A NATURAL MYTHSTORY OF NORTH AMERICA—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Rosenthal Gallery, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5321, collegeofidaho.edu/rosenthalgallery. AN INTENTIONAL EYE: SELECT GIFTS FROM WILFRED DAVIS FLETCHER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. JAMES CASTLE: EIGHTEEN ARTIST BOOKS—7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1865 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1204, facebook.com/bsufinearts. LAUREL LAKE MCGUIRE: EMOTIONAL LANDSCAPE OF FLORALS, AN EXHIBIT OF LARGE SCALE FLOWERS—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

20% Off Fashion & Jewelry

THE LUCKY ONES: REFUGEES ARRIVING IN UNCERTAIN TIMES—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Idaho Black History Museum, 508 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-7892164, ibhm.org.

Literature IDAHO WRITERS GUILD LITERARY LUNCH—When you meet with an editor or agent, your “pitch” is your introduction to your work. You have a short time to interest your target about your writing. Whether you write fiction or non-fiction, your pitch needs to convey its appealing and unique concept. Learn how to develop a pitch with an engaging title, a unique concept, a hook, characters, and a theme. Be able to deliver your pitch in less than three minutes and get feedback from your peers. 11:30 a.m. $20-$25. Riverside Hotel, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3431871, idahowritersguild.com. POETRY SLAM—Proceeds benefit the Meridian K-9 Rescue unit. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew Laugh a Latte, 112 E. Idaho, Meridian, 208-957-6442, alattelaugh.com.

• Jewelry • Henna • Sarees • 3715 W. Overland Rd. • 208.350.6147 www.indiafashionandgrocery.com

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Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. Volunteer at ilcdinners. ivolunteer.com. 5:15-7 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011, ilcdinners.ivolunteer.com.

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BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | 15


LOUNGE ON FIRE and TYLOR & THE TRAIN ROBBERS $15 stainless cup/2 tickets

5:00p - 9:00p

$5 per additional 2 tickets

APRIL 13, 2018 The Grove Plaza: 827 W Main. Boise, ID 83702

KEEP YOUR CAR HAPPY! All of the work done on your VW or Audi at Jeff’s Import Auto is GUARANTEED! We are your local experts offering great service at competitive prices.

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY APRIL 11 ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid BRIAN FALLON AND THE HOWLING WEATHER—With Ruston Kelly. 8 p.m. $25-$60. Knitting Factory CAMDEN HUGHES—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MCGINNIS HOLT BLUES BAND— 7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL FUNDRAISER— With Dan Costello, Brook Faulk, Red Light Challenge, DeVaard and more. 7 p.m. $15-$25. Sapphire

MOONCHILD: SPRING TOUR 2018—With Edmund Wayne. 8 p.m. $12-$17. Neurolux

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JOE JACK TALCUM (DEAD MILKMEN) AND COOLZEY—8 p.m. $10. Shredder

KARAOKE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Terry’s

KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Terry’s

KAYLEIGH JACK BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

NEAL AND FRIENDS—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

LO MOON—6 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

MUSCLE DUNGEON—With The Fur Coats. 7 p.m. $7. Olympic REBECCA SCOTT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SEAN ROGERS—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE UPTOWN CHIEFS—8 p.m. FREE. Dwellers

ORIGINAL JIM—8 p.m. FREE. Reef SHINE BRIGHT: CLOSE TO HOME TOUR—With Danny the Skeleton Horse, Day X Day, As Fire Falls, and Life Upon Liars. 7 p.m. $10. Shredder

Jeff’s Import Auto

SLACKLINE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE C OURTESY C OAST MODERN/M YR AH SARWAR PHOTOGR APH Y

STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

4433 Adams Street Garden City • 376-4686 jeffsimportautowerks.com

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—9 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

SWAN LAKE APRIL 20 /21 VELMA V. MORRISON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

THURSDAY APRIL 12 BEN BURDICK TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers BLUES NIGHT: JAKE DEJONGH—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny CHUCK SMITH—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DAN COSTELLO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 FADED LEROY—With Critical Shakes, Dweller, and Sportscourt. 8 p.m. $7. Shredder FRIM FRAM FOUR—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Terry’s STEEL PANTHER: SUNSET STRIP LIVE— 8 p.m. $23-$50. Knitting Factory WOOLY BUGGERS BROTHERS—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

For tickets call 208.426.1110 or visit.BalletIdaho.org

FRIDAY APRIL 13 ASPHALT BUFFET—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s BOBBY DEE KEYS—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew BOISE PHIL AND ZUILL BAILEY: TALES OF HEMINGWAY—7:30 p.m. $24-$72. NNU Brandt Center

16 | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

BROKEN OUTLAWS—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

LOUNGE ON FIRE—With Tylor & The Train Robbers. Part of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers’ 2018 National Rendezvous. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

BRI CAUZ—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

COAST MODERN, NEUROLUX, APRIL 14

On its Facebook page, Los Angeles-based Coast Modern calls itself “America’s Newest Band,” but the shoegaze-y quality of its music suggests there’s nothing new under the sun. In “Just Comb My Hair” off its debut album, Electric Feel (300 Entertainment, 2018), a shrine to someone’s ego and an emotion the singer “just can’t describe” are swept under the rug by the song’s titular injunction. In another track, poverty is no impediment when one has “pockets full of no.” The inside of Neurolux doesn’t get much natural light of its own, but on April 14, the sun will set beautifully when Coast Modern plays with fellow Angelenos The Palms, and Denver, Colorado-based deCollage. —Harrison Berry With The Palms and deCollage. 8 p.m., $15-$18. Neurolux, 111 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MUSIC GUIDE SATURDAY APRIL 14

JORDAN LEISURE—7 p.m. FREE. Ironwood Social

BASS PHYSICS—With Edamame, and Lapa. 7 p.m. $10. Olympic

KARAOKE WITH DJ ADDICTIVE SPIN—9 p.m. FREE. TK Bar

BLUES TO LOSE—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

LIGHTNING KINGS—7:30 p.m. $18-$25. Sapphire

BOISE PHIL AND ZUILL BAILEY: TALES OF HEMINGWAY—7:30 p.m. $24-$72. Morrison Center

MAHOGANY ROOTS—7 p.m. FREE. Dwellers

BROKEN OUTLAWS—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny COAST MODERN—8 p.m. $15$18. Neurolux DJ POWERCAT—8 p.m. FREE. High Note GLEN HOWES—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew GUILTY PLEASURE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Gathering Place HILLFOLK NOIR—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Terry’s

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SUNDAY APRIL 15 BOISE STATE SYMPHONIC WINDS SPRING CONCERT—7:30 p.m. FREE-$7. Morrison Center THE BREEDERS—With Flasher. 8 p.m. $20-$50. Knitting Factory IRISH MUSIC—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Terry’s

OLD DOGS AND NEW TRIX—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SEAN HATTON AND BERNIE REILLY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

UKULELE TOM AND FRIENDS— Noon. FREE. High Note

WHISKEY MYERS—With Jobe Fortner. 8 p.m. $15-$40. Knitting Factory YOUNG, PLANETARY—With Till I Fall, TOSO, Golder Strange, and Sportscourt. 7 p.m. $5. Shredder

MONDAY APRIL 16 BROADWAY IN BOISE: RAIN, A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES—7:30 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center EMILY TIPTON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

HILLSTOMP—With Columbia Jones. 9 p.m. $7-$10. Reef

C OURTESY LOUNGE ON FIRE

LISTEN HERE

JOHN 5—With The Haxans. 7 p.m. $16-$18. Neurolux KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Terry’s MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

Fri | Apr 13

Boise Philharmonic Eric Garcia, Music Director

NNU Brandt Center 7:30pm

Sat | Apr 14

Morrison Center 7:30pm

GRAMMY™ winning cellist, Zuill Bailey, returns to Boise to perform Michael Daugherty’s GRAMMY™ winning

Tales of Hemingway Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3 “The Scottish” Wagner: Die Meistersinger Prelude Tickets Starting at $22.50

TIX at (208) 344-7849 or boisephil.org

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND EMILY TIPTON—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s REBELS AND REJECTS—8 p.m. $5. Liquid RED SUN RISING—With Them Evils, and Stone Prophet. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Knitting Factory REVEREND JUSTIN HYLTON AND COREY JAMES GRUBB—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

TUESDAY APRIL 17 LOUNGE ON FIRE, GROVE PLAZA, APRIL 13

Like a winning lottery ticket in the hand or a gold nugget underfoot, Lounge on Fire has been a stroke of good luck for the City of Trees. Even before the 2016 release of its selfreleased debut album, Lips of Calypso, it was the go-to band for good times and dancing at big outdoor shows, with a huge cast of musicians fronted by guitarist/vocalist Nathan Norton. The first album captured a lot of its funky, sexy energy as a live music act, leading Boise Weekly music reviewer Ben Schultz to speculate it was one of the best local albums of the year. Catch the band’s next much-anticipated appearance Friday, April 13, when it plays with Tylor & The Train Robbers at the Beers, Bands and Public Lands event to kick off the Backcountry Hunters and Anglers’ 2018 National Rendezvous in the Grove Plaza. Twenty bucks will buy attendees a beer mug and three drink tokens. —Harrison Berry With Tylor & The Train Robbers. 5-9 p.m., FREE-$20. Grove Plaza, downtown Boise, backcountryhunters.org/ boise_brewfest. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GABE HESS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Terry’s KING LIL G—8 p.m. $20-$50. Knitting Factory THE LIKE ITS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers OPEN JAM WITH NEAL GOLDBERG—7 p.m. FREE. Dwellers RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: JESSE DAYTON—With Scott Biram and Rod Melancon. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Neurolux THE SUBURBANS—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE SAWTOOTH SERENADERS—7 p.m. FREE. BarbarianDowntown

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | 17


SCREEN

C OU RTES Y 20TH C ENTU RY FOX ANIM ATION

GOOD DOGGIE, DOGGIE, DOGGIE

Isle of Dogs is a boundless blend of soul and sass GEORGE PRENTICE Whether or not you like Isle of Dogs will greatly Isle of Dogs is a love letter to childlike fantasy and a boundless blend of soul and sass. depend on your love for dogs. And Japanese cinema. And stop-motion animation. And witty back at Megasaki City, an American exchange a love letter to childlike fantasy and a boundless vocalizations. And quirk. And Wes Anderson. student (Gerwig) leads an underground revolublend of soul and sass. And movies. Wait, did I say dogs? Nonetheless, tion in an attempt to overthrow the maniacal Another of Anderson’s great gifts is attracting it was check, check, check, check, check, check mayor. Anderson’s screenplay has plenty of and check for me. Isle of Dogs is the best movie of top dogs to voice his animated films. The Isle of narrative detours; it zigs and zags, but ultimately Dogs cast includes Bill Murray, Greta Gerwig, 2018 thus far. Two paws up. moves with the skilled precision of a border Frances McDormand, Scarlett Johansson, Jeff There’s a wide chasm in the current state of collie. Goldblum, Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, animated features. On one side, there’s Anna, Now, a word or two about some of the Liev Schreiber, Anjelica Huston, Harvey Keitel, Elsa (Frozen) and all of their Disney sisterhood; controversy casting a shadow across Isle of Dogs. F. Murray Abraham and Yoko Ono. and on the other side of the canyon there are A handful of film critics have accused the film of The story takes place in and naughty animated flicks like racial stereotyping or cultural appropriation in its near the fictional Japanese meAnomalisa (2015), which feaISLE OF DOGS tropolis of Megasaki City, where portrayal of the Japanese characters. Yes, some of tured R-rated puppet sex (I’m (PG-13) a fiendish mayor plots to banish them are bad, just as some of them are good, like still trying to shake that one). Written and directed by Wes Anderson characters in any other film. I respectfully disall dogs to an island garbage Despite the far-reaching gap agree with the criticism, particularly considering dump, and further schemes to between G-rated Disney fare Starring Bill Murray, Greta Gerwig and Scarlett Johansson have the dogs destroyed. There’s that Anderson has such great appreciation and and adults-only cartoons, there knowledge of the rich legacy of Japanese cinema; only one person who can stop have been very few animated Opens Friday, April 13, such a dastardly deed: a 12-year- the mayor in Isle of Dogs is actually modeled after films for discerning moviegoers. at The Flicks some of filmdom’s most iconic characters from old boy named Atari who sets Only the Wallace and Gromit out to find his own pooch, Spots classic Kurosawa films. I see it as a tribute. franchise or Fantastic Mr. In years past, I have likened Anderson’s pre(Schreiber), also banished to the canine penal Fox (also created by Anderson) come to mind. vious films (The Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise colony. Once on the island, Atari teams up with Anderson knows a thing or two about fantastic. a pack of alpha male dogs named Boss (Murray), Kingdom) to giant boxes of chocolates, not unWith inspiration from the Rankin/Bass Produclike old-timey Whitman Samplers. Isle of Dogs Chief (Cranston), Duke (Goldblum) and Rex tions of the 1960s (Rudolph, Frosty, Santa, et al.) is just as delicious. This time, just imagine the (Norton). There’s also a mysterious female show and classic Japanese filmmakers such as Akira chocolates are shaped like dog bones. dog named Nutmeg (Johansson). Meanwhile Kurosawa (Rashomon), Anderson’s Isle of Dogs is

SCREEN EXTRA I48 DOCUMENTARY DEBUT A STUNNING SUCCESS

STARTS FRIDAY, April 13 18 | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

Cinema No. 2 at The Flicks was as packed as any Boise movie theater playing opening-weekend feature films April 7. But for this particular Saturday matinee, the nearly sold-old theater was screening a one-and-done compilation of documentaries, an ambitious new project from the 48-hour film festival, i48. I48 co-founder Andrew Ellis

looked out at the packed cinema and announced, “For those of you who are here, wondering why your friends have brought you here, let me explain so you can have some context for the next hour of your life.” Ellis said that teams of filmmakers were tasked with crafting documentaries, no longer than 10 minutes. Their efforts resulted in a unique compilation of six films which, at least for me, was pound

for pound the best i48 bundle of films in the festival’s 15-year history. The subjects ran the gamut, from the resettlement of an Iraqi family in Boise to an undercover glimpse of some of Boise’s clandestine graffiti artists. “How did you choose your subjects?” an audience member asked film director Erica Cornwall, whose documentary, Rhodes to Bogus chronicled Boise’s history of skateboarding and snowboarding.

Cornwall turned to the subjects of her film, already beaming from the their big-screen debuts. “I don’t know. How should I answer that?” she asked. “We actually chose you,” the boarders said, and laughter rose from the audience. The completed i48 documentary films should appear soon on the i48 Vimeo platform. —George Prentice B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


C OURTESY C OTOPA X I/QUESTIVAL

ARTS & CULTURE © Kylie Morgan Photography

ATTENTION ALL COUPLES CULTIVATING LOVE

Questival challenges locals to dare and care in equal measure.

QUESTIVAL RETURNS TO BOISE Join the 24-hour cross-town scavenger hunt LE X NEL SON Can you mentally assemble a group of six or so friends who’d help you survive a zombie apocalypse? Are they both badass adventurers and good, giving people? If your answer was yes to both, you just picked out your team for Questival 2018, the 24-hour, cross-town scavenger hunt coming to Boise this weekend. From February through October, Questival events pop up across the country to encourage people to both venture into the outdoors and give back to their communities. Cotopaxi, an outdoor gear company and that makes brightly colored sweaters, backpacks, jackets and more, started hosting Questivals in 2015, partly as a marketing gambit and partly to raise funds for its nonprofit partners. Last year, Questival made its Boise debut, and on Friday, April 13, Cotopaxi and the International Rescue Committee, a nonprofit that assists in refugee resettlement, will be back again for round two. “We’re a registered B Corp, so we give a lot back, we give a lot to nonprofits. ‘Do Good’ is our mantra,” said Cotopaxi Event Director Callan Graham. “So the purpose of Questival is to get people to learn about our event, to get one of our products in their hands and to get them to go out and have a meaningful adventure experience where they’re also incentivised to do good along the way for 24 hours.” The process is easy. Questival teams can pay a race fee to sign up on the company website, then download the Questival app to their smartphones to get the list of more than 200 local challenges, which will appear 24 B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

hours before the race. On the day of, teams check in at Ann Morrison Park to pick up their race materials (including a free 18-liter Luzon daypack from Cotopaxi and a team flag) and take in some food and live music before setting of on their whirlwind adventures. Each time the group completes a challenge, they have to prove it by posting a photo with their team flag to the Questival app. “There are a lot of generic outdoor challenges, like ‘go camping’ or ‘go rock climbing.’ There are some local-themed ones like ‘hike up to Tablerock’ or ‘go to Bruneau Sand Dunes,’ and a lot of challenges are more focused on downtown, like ‘go to the Basque Block, do a little research on the Basque people and tell us what you’ve learned,’” explained Graham, adding that the app will also challenge groups to pay it forward by buying someone a coffee or donating to a local charity. The range of challenges means teams can pick the ones that appeal to them, and this year they’ll compete for reactions in the app rather than checking the most challenges off the list. As Graham described it, the competition this year is “qualitative rather than quantitative.” “Teams will win prizes for having the most love reactions [on their challenge completion photos] from other teams, or the most laugh reactions,” he said. More than 20 teams will take home prizes, including lots of Cotopaxi swag. Boiseans thirsty for adventure with mad smartphone video and photo skills still have time to head to the Questival website to register.

“CELEBRATING 20 YEARS OF MARRIAGE IN THE GARDEN.” Did you, or someone you know, get married in the English Garden? Are you currently planning a wedding and looking for the perfect venue? Submit your photo and share the story of how you found love, and join us at our exclusive Cultivating Love Event. Submissions are due May 15 to be eligible to win prizes and be included in the celebration. Visit CultivatingLove.BoiseWeekly.com for more information.

• Champagne Toast • Live DJ

Idaho Botanical Garden Thursday, May 31, 2018 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

• Door Prizes • Dream Wedding Giveaway

For more information email: Adan@Idaho.BotanicalGarden.org In Partnership with:

Rhodes Entertainment, Mist and Pine Photography, Sprout Designs, Coiled Wines, Wild Plum Events, Idaho Tents and Events, The Inn at 500, Boise Weekly, Thistle and Pine Creative, and Wildflower Florals and Events, Flour Child Custom Cake Studio, Thistle and Pine Creative.

Wednesday, April 18 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Student Union Building, Simplot Ballroom

boi.st/CelebrateEarthDay

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | 19


WINESIPPER Chardonnay is arguably the most popular white wine in the world, with oaked versions leading the charge. You’ll find examples from most every wine region around the globe, and it’s a grape that lends itself to a variety of styles, making it a winemaker’s favorite. But what happens when you hold the oak, and let the varietal characteristics shine. Here are three very different Chardonnay, all without any oak influence: 2016 ALOIS LAGEDER CHARDONNAY, $14.99 German is the language of choice at this family owned winery located in the Alto Adige, Italy’s northernmost wine region. Their Chard opens with apple blossom and green apple aromas. There’s a definite richness to the sweet pear and peach fruit flavors, while a light hit of herb (thyme?) comes through on the creamy finish.

2017 SCHILD ESTATE UNWOODED CHARDONNAY, $15.99 Restrained is not an adjective typically used to describe the wines from Barossa, but this Aussie Chard from that region has outstanding balance and elegance. The richly floral nose offers honeyed apple and a touch of ginger. The creamy, complex palate is filled with bright peach and melon flavors, while an intriguing ocean mist salinity and minerality comes through on the long, crisp finish. –David Kirkpatrick 20 | APRIL 11-17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

SMILE, THERE’S PIZZA

A Meridian eatery serves up pizza in cones for kids big and small LE X NEL SON Eating pizza out of a cone is both nothing and everything like eating ice cream: The process is the same, but it rings an entirely different bell in the brain. While licking an ice cream cone is simple, biting into a cone-shaped sheet of dough brimming with melted cheese, mushrooms, black olives and sauteed onions somehow requires brow-furrowing concentration at every bite, following by pauses to marvel at the fact that the operation went well. At Coned, the Meridian brick-and-mortar location of the food truck with the same name, employees get to watch kids and adults have this first-time experience every day, and it’s hard to imagine it would ever get old. Similarly, it’s difficult to fathom ever getting tired of using the machine one employee called the “cone press”—a futuristic silver contraption that turns dough balls into par-baked cones in 20 seconds flat. To operate the press, a woman in blue rubber gloves drops golf ball-sized rounds of dough

into cone-shaped slots; when the dough is in place, aluminum cones descend from above, squishing the dough and cooking it just enough so that it holds its shape. The half-baked cones sit in rows behind the counter, waiting to be filled with layers of pizza toppings and baked the rest of the way upright in an oven. The whole process, from ordering at the counter to having a pizza cone in hand, takes less than five minutes. Cone presses—technically called commercial pizza cone forming machines—go for just under $2,000 on Amazon. Painted on one wall of the shop, which is filled with long bar-style tables, are the words: “Smile, There’s Pizza,” and that childlike glee at the novelty of the concept takes center stage. It would be a stretch to call Coned’s pizza artisan; clearly, the restaurant is all about the experience. Still, the ingredients, like pineapple, sausage, pepperoni and locally sourced mozzarella cheese, are fresh and hand-packed to order, layered inside

One pizza cone is the equivalent of two slices of pizza.

each $6 cone. They also offer half-sized cones for kids (PB&J cone, anyone?) and will fill pizza dough with Bavarian cream or ice cream from The STIL in downtown Boise for dessert. No matter what the filling, the speed-cooked cones seem to be leak-proof, maintaining a crispy crust that crunches with every bite. For both children and children at heart, eating at Coned is an adventure to undertake at least once. HARRISON BERRY

2016 LA MISION RESERVA CHARDONNAY, $9.99 This Chilean winery has a French connection. It is the newest project of famed Chablis winemaker William Fevre. The aromas are a lively mix of lemon, lime and quince. The gingered citrus and racy stone fruit flavors are colored by touches of mineral and spice. Zingy acidity comes through on the finish. This is an exceptional bargain.

FOOD

L E X NE L SON

CHARDONNAY, PLEASE, BUT HOLD THE OAK

BLUE TIGER, RED SAUCE

Varsity Pizza, formerly Blue Tiger Pizza, upgrades (and upscales) the pizza parlor HARRISON BERRY Pizza parlors have long been common ground for kids and adults. In these low-lit, grungy spaces, children poured every soda in the fountain into indestructible plastic cups while parents sipped their beers, everyone united in the wait for piping-hot pizza. Varsity Pizza, formerly Blue Tiger Pizza, is an update of that model, tailored for a more highbrow Meridian clientele. Absent are the filthy carpets and wooden benches. A bank of large windows lets in natural light and a stylish wine bar is stocked to accommodate a new brand of customer. The communal vibe lives on there in the form of plenty of family seating, an easygoing atmosphere and classic parlor-style, medium-crust pizza that patrons will remember from childhood. Case in point: The Combo ($16 for a medium) comes with red sauce, pepperoni, sausage, peppers pickled in-house, mushrooms, olives and two kinds of cheese. Calling this pie “loaded” is an understatement—a better word would be “besieged.” Each slice is bound to its neighbors by ropes of mozzarella and provolone, and the toppings nearly buckle the crust. It’s worth the mess. Each bite is deeply cheesy, and the flavor of the pickled peppers is a bright counterpoint. The real star is the crust. Neither too heavy nor too light, it has a pronounced and complex flavor with a hint of barley.

The Combo at Varsity Pizza, $16.

No pizza joint would be worth its salt if it didn’t have a few salads on the menu. The Caesar ($4 for a side) is elegant. Topped with parmesan, the romaine is crisp and the dressing has a mild, seafood-y funk. The lemon slice on the side can be either a garnish or a citrus fix. Varsity Pizza first opened as Blue Tiger Pizza in October 2017, but quickly fell into the orbit of nearby Varsity Pub, and is now in the process of rebranding, though a Blue Tiger logo still hangs over the door and a chalk illustration of the large feline crouches near the bar. That discolored cat is a fitting symbol for the restaurant, a throwback to the pizza parlors of yore that has made upgrades to the kinds of pies bought for Little League teams and childhood birthday parties. Meridianites looking for a place to take the family—or, alternatively, escape the family for a reasonably-priced date night—may find their standby at Varsity Pizza. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


"Letters from Anne and Martin" April 26, 2018, 7-8:30pm The Morrison Center for the Performing Arts

$25 (premier seating

w/post-performance reception in the Founders Room)

$10 (general seating)

The courage and eloquence of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Anne Frank is interwoven in a unique production called "Letters from Anne and Martin,"combining texts from "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl" and from Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

They both were utopian thinkers " spite of living in dystopian times, in in a world that hated and persecuted them." (Fran Levy, Anne Frank Moral Courage Project)

T

he performance will be followed by a 30-minute music set featuring the powerful compilation of "We Will Always Stand as One." Music by Steve Eaton, Take Three (Gayle Chapman, Mike Barriatua and Steve Eaton), Cherie Buckner-Webb, and the Idaho Diversity Singers.

P

resentation of the Upstander C.A.R.E. awards and Community Upstander Tribute to Mark Johnson, KTVB Channel 7 Anchor.

WASSMUTHC ENTER.ORG

Tickets available through the box office (208) 426-1110 or at www.morrisoncenter.com

TAX TIME

BOISE

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2018

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CITIZEN HOLLIS WELSH

The new executive director of Boise Philharmonic shares a renewed sense of harmony GEORGE PRENTICE

It won’t be difficult for the Boise Philharmonic to introduce its new executive director to the community. As an actress, Hollis Welsh has performed on stages across the region. She was also one of the co-founders of Alley Repertory Theater, has penned plays and, until very recently, was the interim managing director of Boise Contemporary Theater. Now, she has the corner office at the Boise Philharmonic. Among the first items that Welsh brought to her new office were photos of her daughters, 5-year-old Ode and 7-year-old Sibelle. She also hung a few pieces of personal art on the walls, but admitted she was only just digging into the files and documents left on her desk by her predecessor. It was only Welsh’s third day on the job when she sat down with BW, but she was anxious to talk about getting to know her colleagues; the professional challenges ahead; and how Idaho’s largest and oldest performing arts organization honors its history, has a firm foundation in the present and sets its sights on the future, all at once. Please take this the right way: It was surprising when the Philharmonic announced that you would be its new executive director. I think you’re not alone in that. I was surprised, too, in a wonderful way. I think it was the right fit for the Philharmonic. They wanted someone who has experience running a performing arts organization, but who is also local and knows this community. Were you ready and looking for a change? I was the interim director at BCT and they were doing their own search for a new director. So, my feeling was, well, I’m going to do my own search to see what options [are] out there. When did your search start? Fairly recently. February. Wow, that is very recent. I think my resume came to [the Philharmonic] under the wire. I had a wonderful meeting with the Philharmonic board in early March and the announcement was made March 7. 22 | APRIL 11-17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

What did the board say they were looking for? Outreach. They want help in expanding our audience, to tap into people who have recently moved into town and to tap into a constituent base that maybe we haven’t yet appealed to. We have this amazing, wonderful patronage that returns year after year. And beyond these people, we clearly need to continue to grow. Being from Boise, I’m assuming you knew exactly what they were talking about. Starting as an artist and becoming an arts administrator, I like to think that I had my finger on the pulse of what draws people to shows, to concerts, to events. Sometimes you’ll draw a new audience with a game-changing event, but sometimes you’ll draw a new audience through a slower, more gradual evolution. I think it’s a bit of both. Speaking of game-changers, when I saw that the Philharmonic would be featuring an evening of Star Wars music, all I could say was, “Just tell me how much and when. I’m there.” What’s really thrilling is that we’ve created a separate Pops series. In the past, our Pops concerts have been part of [our] classical series, but now, we have a separate Pops series. That’s long overdue. I’m glad to hear you say that. And you can’t get much bigger than Star Wars to start this new series off. I think it will help us reach some new people that hadn’t thought about the orchestra as something relevant to them before. Will you always look at what you do through the lens of being an artist, or is it a different lens you’re looking through now? I know what it’s like to be an artist, to communicate to an audience. And through our artists, our orchestra, that’s how we’re communicating with our audience. I know how critical that is. I know that happy artists create really beautiful work. They thrive and help the organization grow, so I’ll always be an advocate for artists. That

said, I also know how to represent what is being offered to our community and say, “This is why this is valid. This is why this matters to all of us.” These are interesting times for the arts: Congress recently approved funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. But here we are again, with some political leaders, including President Trump, threatening to cut funding to the arts. We know that kids who study music are better mathematicians, they’re more engaged citizens, they’re more supportive of a community. It’s a fact. And the kids who deserve exposure to the arts have infrequent access. So, we’re big advocates of exposing our children to the arts. The Philharmonic has an incredible education wing which I don’t think the general public knows too much about. We reach thousands of Idaho children through our Artists in the Classroom and Conductors in the Classroom programs. Then we have programs where we’ll bus school kids to the Egyptian Theatre to watch a free concert. I would love to see more children’s concerts at some point.

Let’s talk about this community’s commitment to the arts. We are a fickle lot. We know what we love, and we love what we know. But one of the great opportunities the Philharmonic has right now is to give our audience what they’ve come to know and love: music they’re familiar with. But then, we can introduce, in little morsels, new music from new artists that will be the canon of classical music 100 years from now. What feels new to us right now won’t in 50 years. Let’s say you’re at the Saturday market and you meet a young couple or family. What’s your pitch to them if they’ve never attended the Philharmonic before? Music matters to all of us. There’s something that comes alive in us when we hear live music, especially on such a grand scale as the orchestra. It can be quite sweeping, moving and uniting. You can experience the Boise Phil for less than $50 a couple and less than $70 for a family of four. Subscribers save even more. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


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NYT CROSSWORD | TRIPLE SPOONERISMS ACROSS 1 6 12 18 19 21

Anesthetic of old Forcefully remove Very good, as a job Purple candy’s flavor, often Sea-dwelling Things a spy may have many of 23 Stares slack-jawed 24 What caused the nosebleed on the playground? 1

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26 Sponsor of U.S. Olympic swimmers 28 Ball hit for fielding practice 29 Burro’s call 30 Tagline in an ad for Elmer’s Glue-Ale? 35 Holiday-song closer 36 Bygone channel that aired “Veronica Mars” 37 Chill in the cooler 38 Finish filming 40 Gets up

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90 One-room apartment, to Brits 92 Motifs 95 Like the questions in 20 Questions 96 Very worst 99 “Law & Order” actor Jerry 101 Sealer for sailors? 102 Drawbacks 106 Best place to buy a platter of fruit-flavored sodas? 111 Square footage 112 Bishop’s headgear 113 Paradisiacal 114 Mend fences after Caesar’s civil war? 120 Maker of PowerShot cameras 122 Apathetic response to “What’s new?” 123 Leave behind 124 Something to live by 125 Market offerings 126 Trick-taking game 127 “Napoleon Dynamite” star Jon

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Ingredient in a Roy Rogers Coarse What a Möbius strip lacks Containers for electric guitars? They’re easy to take Unfamiliar Quite a few It hangs around the neck Sandwich with Russian dressing

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Bernadette of Broadway Succumb to sleepiness High-flown, as writing Big ox Discreet attention-getter Lash with a bullwhip Deliberative bodies Description of a yeti? Parodied Capacitate Tip jar fillers Novice parasailer’s fear?

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Easter ____ It’s a bunch of garbage Discovers by chance Pentathlon items Complete policy overhaul, in D.C.-speak 1987 action film originally given an X rating for violence Winter driving hazard Shell-game object Cooper’s wood Game with 108 cards Small scraps Hedgehog predator Second, or worse Quibble Dresses There’s enormous interest in it

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boiseclassicmovies.com 17 20 22 25 27 30 31 32 33 34 39 41 42 44 46 47 48 49 51 54 55 56 59 61 62 64 67

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Nut in pralines Caddie’s selection ____ terrier From scratch Fizzler Lays down the lawn? Classic seller of compilation albums Seek moolah from Alphabet ender According to Cal ____ Setting for a period piece Instrument whose name means “three strings” What shopaholics do “The Martian” star Long-armed climber, for short Joins Own (up) Kick out Dance akin to the jitterbug Prized Siberian animal Bathroom floor, often Podcast that won a 2014 Peabody Award Detectives run them down More rare, perhaps Resonator guitar John Kennedy ____, author of “A Confederacy of Dunces” Charlton Heston title role Aids in golf course maintenance Irrefutable point Play at maximum volume

102 “High Hopes” lyricist Sammy 103 Snacks in stacks 104 Opposite of o’er 105 “Frida” star Hayek 107 Spanakopita ingredient 108 Ones who grasp elbows in greeting, by tradition 109 “How revolting!” 110 Drum-kit component 115 Lab coat? 116 FISA warrant objective 117 Genetic macromolecule 118 Unmatched 119 One of the Three Stooges 121 Winner of the most medals at the 2018 Winter Olympics: Abbr.

R.&B.’s ____ Brothers Sideways scuttler Cutlet? “Life Itself” memoirist Roger 79 Swahili for “lion” 81 Actor’s last line, maybe 82 Stayed sober 83 Rules for forming sentences 84 Mock sound of disinterest 88 Exhausted 91 Tufted songbirds 93 Sweetie 94 Multiplex count 97 Dark-meat options 98 Jimmy’s “Late Night” successor 100 Deceived 72 73 77 78

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I T I V M A R I P R E S G N A G E E S O T S S I A T A D E M A A W P DY O T A M I B R A V C A N E U M P I A S C A O C U L L E D E A D E S C E N

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l Publish your Lega ise Weekly Notices in the Bo termined by the state of de as te ra t fla a rs fe of y kl ee Boise W of Publication that will be it av fid Af e th es lud inc ich wh Idaho, of publication of your notice. te da t las e th on up u yo to ed le mail e affidavit can also be availabn. th u, yo r fo t ien en nv co e or m If e on the last date of publicatio fic of r ou at up k pic to u yo r fo your legal notice, contact st po to or ion at m or inf e or m For Classifieds at Boise Weekly.

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PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN Advice for those on the verge WHAT WILL THE KIDS THINK? HONORABLE MINERVA,

I’ve been a reader for awhile and I’ve come to trust the type of advice you give. I’m a father of three, separated from my children because the relationships with their mothers didn’t work out. I’ve worked through most of my issues, and soon, I’ll be working my way back into their lives. One of those “issues” is gender dysphoria. I’m a MTF transgender woman and I’m already on hormone therapy with plans for Gender Reassignment Surgery in the future. The majority of people from my past will understand. How do I explain this to my children? Sincerely, Out and Distraught

DEAR OUT,

Congratulations on living your authentic life. Authenticity takes bravery and especially with trans issues, it takes knowing that sometimes, unfortunately, while science can understand it, that isn’t always the case for our family and friends. Fortunately, trans issues are in the news a lot more these days and a dialogue has at least started. Depending on the age of your children, it may be a non-issue for them. Since you are turning over a new leaf in your life, my suggestion is to be open with them. If you don’t want to have this conversation alone, enlist the services of a mental health professional who is well versed in transgender issues and have a safe, candid conversation. With other family issues that may need sorted out, start off in a safe space where everyone is heard and respected. I wish you the best of luck and remember, time is often the greatest of healers. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

26 | APRIL 11–17, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

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Condiments are a versatile bunch; but one that may just be the king of versatility—and also supremely underrated—is pepper jam, perfect for anything from kicking your afternoon sandwich up a notch to topping a brownie, alongside a scoop of ice cream. If you aren’t yet a pepper jam believer, a Meridian, Idaho-based company called Idaho Pepper just might convert you into a fan. The boutique brand offers seven unique jam flavors, ranging from mild to “expert” in heat level, including Pina Colada, Fuzzy-Navel, Lemon-Drop, raspberry-mandarin, grapefruit and tropical. Each jam features a pepper specifically paired with its signature citrus. The medium-heat raspberry jam, for example, combines raspberry, mandarin orange and lime with the essence of Jay’s Peach Ghost Scorpion Pepper. The jams, along with honey and spice-roasted peanuts, are available through Etsy in 4- or 8-ounce glass jars. Before you buy, though, be sure to heed the label: these exotic concoctions “are not for the faint of heart.” —Lex Nelson $4.50 4-ounce, $8 8-ounce, $12 four-jam sampler pack. Visit etsy.com/shop/idahopepper for details.

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ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Aries statesman Thomas Jefferson was the third President of the United States. He wrote one of history’s most famous documents, the Declaration of Independence. He was an architect, violinist, inventor and linguist who spoke numerous languages, as well as a philosopher who was knowledgeable about mathematics, surveying and horticulture. But his most laudable success came in 1789, when he procured the French recipe for macaroni and cheese while living in France, and thereafter introduced the dish into American cuisine. JUST KIDDING! I’m making this little joke in the hope that it will encourage you to keep people focused on your most important qualities, and not get distracted by less essential parts of you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the early 1990s, Australian electrical engineer John O’Sullivan toiled on a research project with a team of radio astronomers. Their goal was to find exploding miniblack holes in the distant voids of outer space. The quest failed. But in the process of doing their experiments, they developed technology that became a key component now used in Wi-Fi. Your digital devices work so well in part because his frustrating misadventure led to a happy accident. According to my reading of your astrological omens, Taurus, we may soon be able to make a comparable conclusion about events in your life. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the fictional world created by DC Comics, the superhero Superman has a secret identity as a modest journalist named Clark Kent. Or is it the other way around? Does the modest journalist Clark Kent have a secret identity as the superhero Superman? Only a few people realize the two of them are the same. I suspect there is an equally small number of allies who know who you really are beneath your “disguises,” Gemini. But upcoming astrological omens suggest that could change. Are you ready to reveal more about your true selves? Would you consider expanding the circle that is allowed to see and appreciate your full range and depth? CANCER (June 21-July 22): Playwright Tennessee Williams once spent an evening trying to coax a depressed friend out of his depression. It inspired him to write a poem that began like this: “I want to infect you with the tremendous excitement of living, because I believe that you have the strength to bear it.” Now I address you with the same message, Cancerian. Judging from the astrological omens, I’m convinced you currently have more strength than ever before to bear the tremendous excitement of living. I hope this

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BY ROB BREZSNY

news will encourage you to potentize your ability to welcome and embrace the interesting puzzles that will come your way. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Are you finished dealing with spacious places and vast vistas and expansive longings? I hope not. I hope you will continue to explore big bold blooming schemes and wild free booming dreams until at least April 25. In my astrological opinion, you have a sacred duty to keep outstripping your previous efforts. You have a mandate to go further, deeper, and braver as you break out of shrunken expectations and push beyond comfortable limitations. The unknown is more inviting than you can imagine. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Between December 5 and 9, 1952, London was beset with heavy fog blended with thick smog. Visibility was low. Traffic slowed and events were postponed. In a few places, people couldn’t see their own feet. According to some reports, blind people, who had a facility for moving around without the aid of sight, assisted pedestrians in making their ways through the streets. I suspect a metaphorically comparable phenomenon may soon arise in your sphere. Qualities that might customarily be regarded as liabilities could at least temporarily become assets. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your allies are always important, but in the coming weeks they will be even more so. I suspect they will be your salvation, your deliverance, and your treasure. So why not treat them like angels or celebrities or celebrity angels? Buy them ice cream and concert tickets and fun surprises. Tell them secrets about their beauty that no one has ever expressed before. Listen to them in ways that will awaken their dormant potentials. I bet that what you receive in return will inspire you to be a better ally to yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the coming weeks, I suspect you will be able to find what you need in places that are seemingly devoid of what you need. You can locate the possible in the midst of what’s apparently impossible. I surmise that you’ll summon resourcefulness akin to that of Scorpio writer Albert Camus, who said, “In the midst of hate, I found there was, within me, an invincible love. In the midst of tears, I found there was, within me, an invincible smile. In the midst of chaos, I found there was, within me, an invincible calm. No matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger—something better, pushing right back.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1936, Herbert C. Brown graduated from the University of Chicago

with a bachelor’s degree in science. His girlfriend Sarah Baylen rewarded him with the gift of a twodollar book about the elements boron and silicon. Both he and she were quite poor; she couldn’t afford a more expensive gift. Brown didn’t read the book for a while, but once he did, he decided to make its subject the core of his own research project. Many years later, he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries about the role of boron in organic chemistry. And it all began with that two-dollar book. I bring this story to your attention, Sagittarius, because I foresee you, too, stumbling upon a modest beginning that eventually yields breakthrough results. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 20 B.C., Rome’s most famous poet was Quintus Horatius Flaccus, known to us today as Horace. He prided himself on his meticulous craftsmanship, and advised other writers to be equally scrupulous. Once you compose a poem, he declared, you should put it aside for nine years before deciding whether to publish it. That’s the best way to get proper perspective on its worth. Personally, I think that’s too demanding, although I appreciate the power that can come from marshalling so much conscientiousness. And that brings me to a meditation on your current state, Capricorn. From what I can tell, you may be at risk of being too risk-averse; you could be on the verge of waiting too long and being too cautious. Please consider naming a not-too-distant release date. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Luckily, you have an inventive mind and an aptitude for experimentation. These will be key assets as you dream up creative ways to do the hard work ahead of you. Your labors may not come naturally, but I bet you’ll be surprised at how engaging they’ll become and how useful the rewards will be. Here’s a tip on how to ensure you will cultivate the best attitude: Assume that you now have the power to change stale patterns that have previously been resistant to change. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): May I suggest that you get a lesson in holy gluttony from a Taurus? Or perhaps pick up some pointers in enlightened self-interest from a Scorpio? New potential resources are available, but you haven’t reeled them in with sufficient alacrity. Why? Why oh why oh why?! Maybe you should ask yourself whether you’re asking enough. Maybe you should give yourself permission to beam with majestic self-confidence. Picture this: Your posture is regal, your voice is authoritative, your sovereignty is radiant. You have identified precisely what it is you need and want, and you have formulated a pragmatic plan to get it.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2018| 27


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Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 43  

Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 43