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BOISE WEEKLY F E B R UA RY 7 – 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

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Brewing Storm

Why the Idaho Legislature won’t hear testimony on climate change

LOCA L A N D I N DE PE N DE N T

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Studying Slavery The message behind author Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad

VO L U M E 2 6 , I S S U E 3 4

18

Cookie Caper

A taste test of two late-night cookie delivery services FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Lex Nelson lex@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Brian Millar, Mckenzie Young Advertising Ad Director: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Kathleen Karpal, kathleen@boiseweekly.com James Sysock, james@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Sean Severud, sean@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Ken Griffith, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallasen, Zach Thomas Boise Weekly prints 25,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at almost 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Digital subscriptions: 12 months-$40, subscribe.boiseweekly.com If you are interested in getting a mailed subscription, please email subscriptions@boiseweekly.com Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2018 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online)

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

EDITOR’S NOTE SMALLER DOESN’T MEAN LESSER In the early 2000s, Boise Weekly was bigger than it is now— literally. There were more employees, more pages, more words, more paper (the actual issues were taller and wider) and more dollars in the bank. Like almost every other print-media outlet, the recession and the increasing use of social media as a vehicle for news initiated the need for BW owner/publisher Sally Freeman to adjust and evolve the business model—and it wasn’t a one-time task. Whereas a lot of industries bounced back from the economic slump, print media saw so many outlets stagnate or close. At Boise Weekly, we continued to tighten our collective belts, saving money where we could. We reduced the size of the paper, its distribution area and, sadly, the staff. At the same time, however, we expanded our way of thinking about what we do. We honed what we had learned from our colleagues and experiences in the boom years, responded to our current economic/political/ cultural climate and, just like in the early days, worked our asses off. We still do. We have an incredible amount of pride in what we do, and we are committed to both preserving the legacy of Boise Weekly and moving it into the future. If you were thinking the above paragraph was a lead-in to some dire announcement, rest assured, it isn’t. Nor is there a plea or request lurking below. The above paragraph is just a long way of getting to this: Boise Weekly isn’t going anywhere. We aren’t closing the doors. Neither the business nor the building we’re in have been sold. If you value Boise Weekly and its place in the community, thank you. You are equally (if not more) important to us, and we look forward to our future together. If you don’t like Boise Weekly, prepare to be pissed off for years to come. — Amy Atkins

COVER ARTIST

Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Fred “Coyote” Choate TITLE: “Even the buddah has monkey mind” MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: My passion as an artist is portraying Idaho in all its facets, be it mountains, desert, canyon lands or farmland. When I’m not painting, I can be found teaching classes at Quality Art in Garden City. My permanent exhibition space is at Dawson’s coffee House at 219 N. Eighth St. fredchoate.com

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each

week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

PAINTING WITH SOUND DURING CELLO SONG , THE FINAL BOISE PERFORMANCE OF CELLIST AND SUREL’S PL ACE ARTIST-INRESIDENCE DAVE EGG AR, LOCAL ARTIST JES SIE NILO SPEED -PAINTED U SING HER BRU SH AS A MU SICAL INSTRUMENT. RE AD MORE AT MU SIC/MU SIC NE WS .

BOOK BUZZ

Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad is the 2018 book pick for Read Me Treasure Valley. Read more at Arts & Culture/Lit.

2/14-2/18

QUALITY ART

SONIC SALUTE

Brad Paisley gave a big nod to American troops Feb. 2 at his Taco Bell Arena concert. Read more at Music/ Music News.

GIRL POWER

Anne Helen Petersen will speak on her new book, Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud, in Boise on Friday, Feb. 9. Read more at Arts & Culture/Lit.

OPINION

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4 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


OPINION HA HA ... NOT!

The Year of Living Humorlessly BILL COPE I’ve been working on some jokes. Tell me if you like this one: Barack Obama, Pope Francis and Donald Trump walk into a bar. Or this one: How many Trumps does it takes to change a light bulb? This is my favorite: Trump’s car breaks down on a rural road. He walks to the nearest farm and asks if he can stay the night. The farmer says yes, but he’ll have to sleep in the same room as the farmer’s daughter. And finally: “Knock, knock.” Who’s there? “Trump.” Trump who? What do you think? Any potential? I know it’s hard to judge, what without any punchlines. But ... sorry. No matter how hard I try, I just can’t think of one goddam funny thing to say about Donald Trump. *** I’m a week or two late with my reflections on the nightmare’s first year in office. But it’s not like we haven’t been subjected to lots of reflections, including reflections—and glowing reviews— from the nightmare, himself. Still, outside the turgid cesspools of Fox News, Sinclair Broadcasting and the usual Greek chorus of right-wing know-nothings, there have been few intelligent voices who would give Trump credit for anything beyond inciting thoughtful Americans into renewing their vows to the values of tolerance, integrity, decency and democracy. He has accomplished in this last year what I had begun to fear was a hopeless task, to get Americans to once more give a crap about what their country represents and where it’s heading. There’s been a surge in civic involvement like nothing we have witnessed since African-Americans decided 60some years ago that enough was enough. Another unintended consequence of having such a repulsive sleeze in our faces from Morning Joe to Late Night Seth is the endless supply of inspiration he provides the nation’s comedians, talk show hosts, and cultural wags. In a confluence of George W. Bush’s incurious mind, Dick Cheney’s black heart and Evel Knievel’s ego, Trump is a perfect storm of foolishness. One hardly needs to provide a punch-line to his daily—hourly, often—antics. After all, there can hardly be a more ridiculous twist than the man at the center of the joke. Yet as absurd a human being as Trump is, I sense little that is humorous in all the derision slung his way over the last 12 months. This dearth of authentic mirth results, I am sure, from our understanding that beyond the painted clown face and tin-pot posturing is a systematic assault on the very nature of our democracy—without which all other issues take a back seat—and our planet’s health—without which even democracy is secondary. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

We can—and do—snicker at his hair, butchered speech, family, laziness, venality, corruption, ostentation, bragging, sexual profligacy, fat ass, stupidity, stupendous ignorance, racism, misogyny, doctor’s diagnosis, tax returns, supporters ... but we realize that beneath that thick slathering of grotesque frosting is an unpalatable cake of the vilest ingredients. He, and more relevantly, the barbarians he surrounds himself with—those human termites chewing away at every institution designed to stand guard against the advent of something like Trump—are sabotaging the American house, bringing down the walls we had (mistakenly) come to think of as indestructible. Think and shudder: An FBI reconfigured in the image of Trump? A judiciary reconfigured in the image of Trump? An education system, an Interior Department, a nuclear arsenal, voting rights, foreign relations, consumer protection, banking policies? ... all reconfigured in the image of Trump. That ain’t funny. *** I have tried from my first column published in Boise Weekly 23 years past to be a humorist, wanting oh-so-dearly to be considered not only politically shrewd, but—if not downright hilarious—at least dryly droll. Whether or not I ever succeeded, it’s over now. I don’t have a funny bone left in my body. Any chuckle, guffaw, snicker or snort that overcomes you upon reading anything I’ve written since November 8, 2016, is purely accidental. If it seems I might have said something clever, witty or wiseacre, it’s only because I can’t stop going through the motions. I suspect the same is true with the pros. The Stephen Colberts and Jimmy Kimmels. The Bill Mahers and the SNLers and Samantha Bees. To this amateur, true humor comes from a warmer place than can be found in America these days. A place where a tweak in perception blends with a sprinkle of self-deprecation and a genuine sympathy for whomever may be the butt of the joke. What we have now from our pre-eminent funsters is the wicked mockery that springs from fear and loathing. Instead of Will Rogers-ish gentle jibes, or Robin Williams-ish silvertongued joshing, we hear the acid tone of internet trolls. I understand why it’s come to this. It would be too much to expect our comic relievers to have a genuine sympathy for the butt of this endless joke. I admire the professionalism it takes for Colbert, Kimmel, et al, to speak the nightmare’s name with a grin on their lips, but I don’t have it in me. Call it for what it is: bitterness. The taint of Trump on my tongue tastes like a lifetime of optimism gone sour.

THE BOISE NORDIC FOUNDATION THANKS THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR SUPPORT: 2018 BANFF RAFFLE DONORS All Raffle Proceeds Benefit the Bogus Basin Nordic Team 22 North · Back Country Pursuit · Bandanna · Barb Bergeson Studio · Barbarian Brewing · Bardenay · Bauerhaus Bikes · Big City Coffee · Big O Tires · Bogus Basin · Boise GreenBike · Brian Matteson and Anna Nyman · Butt Furr · Cascade River Gear · Christina Carlson Photography · City Peanut Shop · Clairvoyant Brewing · Craftsports · Darla McRoberts · Dawson Taylor · Decker Rolph · Deuter · EcoLounge · Elements Massage · Foot Dynamics · Foothills Physical Therapy · Frank and Marion Benzing · Galena Lodge · Genie Sue Weppner · George's · Greenwood's Ski Haus · Guru Doughnuts · Heads Up Salon · Highlands Hollow · Hollywood Market Yoga · Hollywood Market Yoga · Hyde Perk Coffee House · Hydroflask · Idaho Conservation League · Idaho Mountain Touring · Jamison Rae Jewelry · Jennifer Yewer · Jete Bars · Kay Hummel and Jeff Fereday · Kellie Wirth · Les Schwab · Max and Sharon Walker · McU's · Payette Brewing Company · PK's Ski and Sport · REI · Rossignol · Sable Baking · Sage Yoga · Salomon · Sara Park Designs · Shu's Running · Stacey Galinat · State Street Auto · Stephanie and Alex Johnson · Susan Veltman · Ted Maybach · The Boise Coop · The Flicks · Therapeutic Associates · Thriftway Ace Hardware · Trader Joe's · Treasure Valley Salsa · Urban Ascent · Verde Fulfillment USA · Whole Foods · Wildflour Bakery · Wise Guy Pizza Pie · Woodland Empire · World Cycle · Zeppole Baking Company

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 5


CITYDESK

NEWS

Kuna educator: “I don’t think teachers are compensated enough to work 70-hour weeks.”

SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS

Members of both the Idaho House and Senate Education Committees were schooled Feb. 5 when educators from every corner of Idaho appeared before the lawmakers: Many classrooms are overcrowded and too many school districts are underfunded. “I don’t think we should have to choose between paying teachers a livable wage and providing a manageable class size,” said Shelly Hopkins, a seventh-grade English teacher in the Kuna School District, adding that she usually works 15-hour days. “I don’t think teachers are compensated enough to work 70-hour weeks.” Hopkins also showed Senate and House representatives photographs of dilapidated classroom furniture. “I can only ask that everyone has a learning space [with furniture] that isn’t broken or isn’t 50 years old,” she said. Hannah Henry, who teaches first and second grades in the Bonneville School District, has 22 students in her class. “Every single one of them needs different instruction every day. We don’t have full-class instruction,” said Henry. “It’s all individualized because everyone is at a different level. I would love to give my students authentic learning from field trips. It would be an incredible resource, but we can’t because of funding.” Karen Lauritzen, a second-grade teacher in the Post Falls School District, urged lawmakers to find adequate funding so more school districts could offer all-day kindergarten. “Any amount of time where we could give our children more opportunities would be a good thing,” said Lauritzen. “A solid, full day of kindergarten would help prepare our students for the first grade.” Dave Gibson, a 24-year educator who teaches music in Twin Falls, reminded legislators that music is key for core learning. “Every child should have music every day,” Gibson said. “Test scores increase an average of 10 to 12 percent.” Meanwhile, the legislative budget writing committee is still crafting a spending plan for Fiscal Year 2019, the lion’s share of which will be dedicated to education. Just how much or how little that is will be revealed in the coming weeks. —George Prentice 6 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

ADAM RO S E NLUNC

COLD SHOULDER

Science standards hearing at the Idaho Legislature“not about climate change” GEORGE PRENTICE The temperature in Boise hit 59 degrees on Feb. 2, tying a 137-year record high. It was also the third record high temperature in Boise in two weeks and according to the National Weather Service, followed the sixth warmest January on record. The NWS reports 2017 was one of the hottest years on record across the planet, and the oceans have never been warmer. But don’t even think of talking to Rep. Julie VanOrden (RPingree) about climate change—let alone global warming. VanOrden is the Idaho House Education Committee chairwoman, and on several occasions during a public hearing Feb. 1 and 2 on revised science standards for Idaho K-12 students, she said she had little desire to hear about climate change. Those standards include revisions on how, or if, references to climate change will be included in Idaho science curricula. “We are not having a hearing on climate change,” VanOrden said continually during the hearing. “We’re here to address the changes made in the standards, not climate change.” She repeated the warning to students, parents, teachers, a scientist and even a retired wildland fire manager, all of whom were at the Idaho Statehouse to testify on the standards. She cut off testimony from Dr. Matthew Kohn, a Boise State geology professor. “This hearing is not about climate change,” VanOrden told Kohn. “But it is about education,” Kohn said. “You’re out of line,” said VanOrden, indicating the professor’s testimony had come to an abrupt end. Those who incurred VanOrden’s wrath looked on, befuddled, at the proceedings. These citizens had been invited to the Statehouse to testify on proposed science standards, only to be chastised for addressing the actual revisions to the standards, which included climate change. Before the two-day hearing was out, 29 people had testified before the Idaho House Education Committee, all in favor of the revisions—and the public has spoken up about this before. During its 2017 session, the Idaho Legislature removed references to climate change from K-12 science standards for one year. They then ordered the State Department of Education to come back in 2018 with another revision. “Happy Groundhog Day,” said Rialian Flores,

program director at Conservation Voters for Idaho on Feb. 2. “I think it’s a bit ironic that we’re back here, again revising these science standards. This is a bit like a Bill Murray movie.” As it had in 2017, the Department of Education returned to the committee with revised standards, and the education department officials once more advocated for references to climate change be included. The packet of proposed revisions was 74 pages long, but it was a handful of changes that caused the most conversation: students being asked to “construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems” (page 47); students asked to consider “human impacts on Earth systems” (page 48); and students asked to consider what “current models project that, without human intervention, average global temperatures will continue to rise” (page 70). Trent Clark, former Idaho State GOP Chairman and current lobbyist for Monsanto, the agriculture biotechnology company, stood before the committee and urged some of his fellow Republicans to include the references to climate change. Clark said it was long overdue that lawmakers embrace 21st century science standards. “Look. When I attended Sugar-Salem High School [in Madison County, Idaho], I was taught that Pluto was a planet, a toadstool was a plant and the only man-made object seen from space was the Great Wall of China,” said Clark. “Today, we know that every one of those things is wrong. Each and every day, we continue to discover

something we once had believed not to be true.” Perhaps the most stunning example of the crevasse between 20th and 21st century understanding was when Rep. Ron Mendive (R-Coeur d’Alene) asked a jaw-dropping question. Mendive had just listened to Department of Education Director of Academics Scott Cook explain some of the proposed changes, including references to human impacts on existing and new species. “Excuse me. In my lifetime, I’ve been aware of species that have become extinct; but are you saying there are new species that are being formed?” asked Mendive, a graduate of North Idaho College and a two-term lawmaker. “Am I missing something?” Mendive’s question caused more than a few students in the auditorium to look at each other with astonished expressions on their faces. Cook paused a moment before responding respectfully. “Representative Mendive. Yes, absolutely. New species continue to be formed through the process of natural selection,” Cook said. A flustered Mendive leaned into to his microphone and said, “Mr. Cook, I’m well aware of natural selection.” VanOrden brought the public testimony to a close, promising the committee would reconvene soon to vote on the proposed standards. Meanwhile, the NWS has projected that the Treasure Valley will experience warmer-thannormal temperatures and dry conditions in early February. Whether Idaho schoolchildren will understand exactly why that happens remains to be decided. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


FLEETWOOD MAC COLLECTION FEBRUARY 9 /10

MORRISON CENTER

For tickets call 208.426.1110 or visit BalletIdaho.org Thank You to our sponsors

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION WINE COLLECTION To make room for our 2018 collection, we are offering a

20% discount on our 50 anniversary collection until Feb. 14. th

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Order your bottle today with discount code BRONCOS18 at partners.vinoshipper.com/boise or call 1-866-678-8466.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 7


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 7 On Stage STEVE EATON AND FRIENDS BENEFIT CONCERT FOR THE PHILIP GARONZIK MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP—Featuring Camden Hughes, Jon Hyneman, Sandon Mayhew and Mike Seifrit, with youth group Global Beats from the Idaho Arts Charter School, and special guest Katie G. The Philip Garonzik Music Scholarship provides need-based scholarships for private instruction for talented junior-, middle- and high-school age instrumental musicians in the Boise area, and is managed by the Idaho Jazz Education Endowment, a 501(c)3 corporation whose purpose is to promote and encourage educational endeavors in jazz in Idaho. 7 p.m. $15-$25. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd,, Garden City, 208343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

Art ABERTZALEAK: SACRIFICE AND HONOR—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$5. Basque Museum and Cultural Center, 611 Grove St., Boise, 208343-2671, basquemuseum.com. BRYAN ANTHONY MOORE: BRAZEN BULL, A NATURAL MYTHSTORY OF NORTH AMERICA— Through April 30. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. College of Idaho Rosenthal Gallery, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5321, collegeofidaho.edu/rosenthalgallery. THE FRENCH CONNECTION— Check out new works by five Plein Air Painters of Idaho members returning from France’s Burgundy region. Through Feb. 28. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. The Local, 5616 W. State St., Boise, 208412-3095, thelocalboise.com. GEOFFREY KRUEGER: SEEING AND LOOKING—Through March 15. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-888-9898, finerframes.com.

SATURDAY, FEB. 10

HIGH SCHOOL EMERGING ARTISTS JURIED EXHIBITION—Check out the High School Emerging Artists Juried Exhibition at Art Source Gallery. Through February 24. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery. com. JO HAMILTON: KNOTS IN TIME— Through May 13. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. KATY ROGAN: THE IN-BETWEENS—Through Feb. 11, 7 a.m.-11 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426INFO, finearts.boisestate.edu. LAURA YAGER: PAPER PICTURES—Through March 1. 8 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Initial Point Gallery, Merdian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway St., Meridian, 208-888-4433, meridiancity.org/initialpointgallery. MICHAEL MCFALLS AND JON SWINDLER: NEW RESIDUE— Through March 16. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Whether you prefer to call it procrastination or “waiting for the perfect gift,” the fact remains that with less than a week to go you’re stuck without a Valentine’s Day gift for your special someone. If that sounds familiar, don’t worry—the Love Locally Valentine’s Pop-Up Shop hosted by Evermore Prints and Swell Artist Collective has you covered! Featuring local artists and vendors selling everything from cake pops and miniature plants to hand-made cards and bottles of wine, Love Locally is the perfect last-minute gift stop. Participants include John Warfel, Katy Rogan, Lindsey Loch, Jacey Peterson, Toby Davis, Noble Hardesty, John Irwin, Bobby Roulette, A Succulent Day, The Dapper Jackalope, Cake Ballers, Coiled Wines, Flynn Day Pottery and EMC Sugar. Stop by the find something awesome and support a local business. Noon-6 p.m., FREE. Evermore Prints, 780 W. Main St., 208991-3837, evermoreprints.com. 8 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

NAMPA ART COLLECTIVE QUARTERLY EXHIBITION—Through March 26. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. RACHEL TEANNALACH: PORTALS—Through March 16. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Friesen Galleries, Brandt Center, Northwest Nazarene University, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8398, nnu.edu. SAMUEL PADEN: NARRATIVES— Through Feb. 8, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242, finearts. boisestate.edu. SEAN KENNEY: BRICKS + STONES—Through Feb. 11. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

SEATTLE ISTANBUL POSTER SHOW—Through March 25. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter. TVAA JURIED ART EXHIBITION— Through March 23. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

Talks & Lectures SCOTT YENOR: WORLD WAR I AND THE SOVIET REVOLUTION, SOLZHENITSYN’S RED WHEEL— Author Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s “Red Wheel” series shows how World War I ended a dynasty and inaugurated the Soviet tyranny. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Lookout Room, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4262468, english.boisestate.edu/ hemingway-literary-center.

A “brief” Boise fun run.

CUPID’S UNDIE RUN

SPEAKING AS (SIGNIFICANT) OTHER—Join Amy Arellano and Dr. Christina Ivey to explore how we tell our narratives, and how those narratives are perceived. In this culminating event of the Speaker Series, Arellano and Ivey present their research as it questions the lenses, the theories and the consequences of the stories we tell ourselves, the stories we create ourselves, and the stories people tell about us. Speaking as (Significant) Other casts an academically researched and personally humorous spotlight on identity and ethnography. Light refreshments will be served. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Farnsworth Room, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4263275, finearts.boisestate.edu.

Citizen MERIDIAN MAYOR’S 2018 STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS AND TASTE OF MERIDIAN RECEPTION—Join Mayor Tammy de Weerd for her 2018 State of the

THURSDAY-SUNDAY, FEB. 8-18

FRIDAY, FEB. 10

Give the gift of local swag.

LOVE LOCALLY

FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter.

Cupid’s Undie Run, a fun run to raise money for research into curing Neurofibromatosis, is “brief” in more ways than one. The run will take off from Tom Grainey’s on Sixth Street at 2 p.m, and although it’s just a mile long, it comes with a catch—you’re encouraged to go the distance in your most show-stopping Valentine’s Day underwear. If heading out the door in your unmentionables is off the table, no worries; crazy costumes are good too. The run is sandwiched between hours of boozy partying for charity, and has been known to bring out folks in everything from heart-covered bras to unicorn head dresses. Though the afternoon is guaranteed to be light-hearted, Neurofibromatosis, a genetic disorder that causes tumors in the nervous system, is serious business, so don’t forget to snag sponsors for your sprint to help Cupid’s Charity reach its $64,000 goal. Noon-4 p.m., $40 fee. Tom Grainey’s, 109 South Sixth St., 208345-2505, cupids.org/city/boise.

Where coffee, art and charity meet.

VALENTINES FOR AIDS

As of this year, Flying M Coffeehouse on Idaho Street has been fundraising to fight HIV and AIDs for a quarter century with its annual Valentines for Aids silent auction, a love-themed event that offers up top-notch local art for a cause. Once again, dozens of Boise-based artists will bring their A game by donating sculptures, paintings, collages, textiles, jewelry and more to the coffee shop, which will put them on display for a ten-day silent auction. Proceeds—which in 2017 totalled $26,000—will benefit SNAP, an organization that assists those living with AIDs and HIV, and in the meantime the quirky, heart-covered art pieces will fill Flying M with hopeful shades of pink and red. So stop by, grab a cup of joe and check out the work; You might just find something to love. Regular business hours, FREE. Flying M, 500 W. Idaho St., 208345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR City address to learn about what’s been accomplished since last year’s speech, and what’s ahead for the city in the new year. It will be followed by the Taste of Meridian reception featuring a lineup of fantastic local restaurants. The speech is free but tickets to the reception are $10; available online or by calling 208-489-0529. 4:30 p.m. FREE-$10. Meridian Middle School, 1507 W. Eighth St., Meridian, meridiancity.org/sotc.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 8 Festivals & Events FETTUCCINE FORUM: JEWISH AMERICANS AS INTERRACIAL ACTIVISTS—Join Northwestern University Professor Shana Bernstein to learn about Jewish Americans’ central role in civil rights activism in mid-20th century Los Angeles and the widespread effects of their actions. 6 p.m.

FREE. Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-433-5670, boiseartsandhistory.org.

On Stage COMEDIAN TONY HINCHCLIFFE—8 p.m. $20. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. OPERA IDAHO OPERATINI: ONE FINE DAY—Join Opera Idaho for a fun evening of music, food and drinks. Your ticket includes the cast of Opera Idaho’s upcoming production of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly serenading you with some of their favorites from the canons of opera and musical theater, and an Asian-inspired dinner, desserts and no-host bar. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and 8:15 p.m. for dinner and cocktails. $22-$30. Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, 1718.operaidaho.org. PLAYHOUSE BOISE: MURDER ON THE ORIENTAL RUG—It’s another opening night of Murder

FRIDAY, FEB. 14

on the Oriental Rug. The show has been traveling from small town to small town playing to small audiences. The cast hasn’t been paid for weeks, but they continue to perform because they’ve been promised starring roles and a piece of the pie if the show goes to Broadway. A crisis arises when five members of the eight-member cast do not show up. They call the director to say they’ve had it and are quitting the show. You’ll look in on the remaining cast and director as the call arrives. You can enjoy a three-course dinner with the show (must be ordered by 5 p.m. the day before your show). 7 p.m. $15-$25, $26 dinner add-on. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

Electric

Classic 80s & OTHER PRE-2K MUSIC 80s cocktails at Brat pack prices

609 W MAIN ST

every Thursday

Literature MEET AUTHORS LEE AND STEVEN HAGER—Meet distinguished authors Lee and Steven Hager, whose books explore the synergy of science and spirituality, gnosis, the perennial philosophy and our innate Oneness within Divine Love. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, facebook.com/consciousnessacademy. READ ME TV UNDERGROUND RAILROAD DISCUSSION—Join the Second Thursday Book Club in a lively discussion of Colson Whitehead’s engrossing novel. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Eagle Public Library, 100 N. Stierman Way, Eagle, 208939-6814, readmetv.com.

.com

Odds & Ends ISU BENGAL LAB HEALTH FAIR— Idaho State University’s Bengal Lab offers deeply discounted blood-draw services, including coronary risk profile, comprehensive metabolic panel screening, blood count, diabetic monitoring and prostate screening. 7 a.m.noon. $5-$45. ISU-Meridian, 1311 E. Central Drive, Meridian, 208373-1700, isu.edu/meridian. Love stories from behind bars.

ROMANCING THE PEN

Only in Boise is it romantic to turn to your significant other on Valentine’s Day and say, “Hey babe, want to go to prison?” That’s because the Old Idaho Penitentiary is once again celebrating the most lovey-dovey day of the year with “Romancing the Pen,” an event that invites couples to either enjoy a night strolling hand in hand or “find the true meaning of ball and chain” at the retired prison. The event runs from noon to 9 p.m. and will offer Valentine’s-themed games, presentations from historians, selfguided tours, a display of behind-bars love letters and more. While snuggling is “encouraged,” according to the Pen, “canoodling is strictly forbidden” at this kid and singles-friendly event. Come for the stories of unlikely romance, stay for the free hot chocolate. Noon-9 p.m., last admission 8 p.m., $4-$11. Old Idaho Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Rd., 208-334-2844, tickets and info at brownpapertickets.com. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

TREASURE VALLEY BOAT SHOW—Noon-9 p.m. FREE-$5. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, expoidaho.com.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 9 Festivals & Events IDAHO BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY EXPO—Attention business owners and entrepreneurs: Learn about the latest technology applications and business resources. You’ll find exhibits, ideas, educational seminars, serious investment, quality value and unlimited B2B networking. Check online for a complete list of activities. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE.

Transform the way you... Ride, Hunt, Farm, Fish, Play Test Drive this Electric Dual Drive Bike Today! Learn about the Ubco 2x2 eMotors West at emotorswest.com 208.466.6250 5803 Cleveland Blvd, Caldwell Only 25 minutes from downtown Boise BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 9


CALENDAR Riverside Hotel, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-376-0464, ibleventsinc.com.

On Stage BALLET IDAHO: FLEETWOOD MAC COLLECTION—Join Ballet Idaho for a phenomenal evening of culture and dance, featuring three spectacular ballets on one program. You’ll enjoy the world premiere of Fleetwood Mac Collection, a new ballet to the music of Fleetwood Mac with choreography by company dancer Daniel Ojeda. Commissioned especially for Ballet Idaho, this breakthrough piece is sure to set the stage alight. Plus Agon, danced to music by Igor Stravinsky with choreography by George Balanchine; and Raymonda’s Wedding, with choreography by Ballet Idaho Artistic Director Peter Anastos. 7:30 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, balletidaho.org. BOISE BAROQUE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA—Enjoy a program featuring works by Dvorak, Wagner and Mozart, with guest pianist Del Parkinson. 8 p.m. FREE-$28. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-7511, boisebaroque.org. COMEDIAN TONY HINCHCLIFFE—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $20. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise. com.

NAMPA HIGH BAND BOOSTERS MARDI GRAS GALA—Join the The Nampa High Band Boosters for their Third Annual Gala in downtown Nampa. Mike Kasper from The New Mix Morning Show on Mix 106 will be hosting the event. Brick 29 Bistro will be serving dinner, with Dutch Bros. making specialty drinks. Entertainment will be provided by the Nampa High Jazz Bands. All proceeds from the event will go to help the Nampa High Band Program. 7 p.m. $30, $40 VIP. Belle Event Center, 120 13th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-283-5127 mardigrasgala. splashthat.com. PLAYHOUSE BOISE: MURDER ON THE ORIENTAL RUG—7 p.m. $15-$25, $25.95 dinner add-on. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-7790092, playhouseboise.com.

Literature ANNE HELEN PETERSON: TOO FAT, TOO SLUTTY, TOO LOUD— Buzzfeed columnist Anne Helen Peterson documents the rise of unruly women in her uncompromising new book. Tickets include a copy of the book and a $10 donation to the Women’s and Children’s Alliance. 7-9 p.m. $35. Title Nine Boise, 170 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-1493, rdbooks. org. DEATH RATTLE WRITERS THE SPILL DUEL—Death Rattle Writers challenge you to a duel with true stories at The Spill. Attendees are invited to tell a five-minute true

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

story that relates literally or figuratively to the poem of the night, which is about dueling forces. The event will start with the evening’s inspiration: Catherine Kyle will be at the event to read her poem “Duel” live. So prepare your stories and prepare your ears. Also, PreFunk Beer Bar Nampa will serve some tasty libations. Check out the event page on Facebook for more information. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

Talks & Lectures THE BIG BOISE RIVER CHANNEL MAKEOVER OF 2017—Join the Boise River Enhancement Network to hear from City of Boise Environmental Data Analyst Darcy Sharp about the October 2017 channel survey of the Boise River. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Banner Bank Building, 950 W. Bannock, Boise, 208-761-2989, boiseriverenhancement.org.

Sports & Fitness BOISE GOLF SHOW VIP EARLY OPENING NIGHT—Grab your favorite golfing partners to kick off the season and the Boise Golf and Travel Show. Tickets include exclusive access to the manufacturers, hitting net and exhibitors. You’ll also receive weekend admission to the golf show, a free round of golf at Eagle Hills (bonus offers too if you purchase online), a free drink, free play in the long drive and long putt contests with special prizes for that night, instruction from local PGA pros and so much more. 5-8 p.m. $20. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, boisegolfshow.com/ vip-night.

Odds & Ends ABSOLUT BALCONY BARLYMPICS—Let the games begin at The Balcony Club’s own Olympics. On the first three Fridays this February, they’ll host qualifying events with the top three winning $10-$40 Balcony Gift Cards. Those placing at any of the qualifying events are entered into the championship set for Feb. 23. The winners of this event will take home $200 cash for first place, $100 cash for second, and $50 cash for third. Check the Facebook even page for details. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com. CANYON COUNTY SPRING HOME AND GARDEN SHOW—59 p.m. FREE-$3. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

10 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

ISU BENGAL LAB HEALTH FAIR— Idaho State University’s Bengal Lab offers deeply discounted

blood-draw services, including coronary risk profile, comprehensive metabolic panel screening, blood count, diabetic monitoring and prostate screening. 7 a.m.noon. $5-$45. ISU-Meridian, 1311 E. Central Drive, Meridian, 208373-1700, isu.edu/meridian. TREASURE VALLEY BOAT SHOW—Noon-9 p.m. FREE-$5. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, expoidaho.com.

Food HUSTON VINEYARDS WINE AND CHOCOLATE WEEKEND—Enjoy decadent wine and chocolate tastings. Friday, Feb. 9, will feature chocolate-dipped strawberries with a tasting; Saturday, Feb. 10, Fireside Mallow Co. will be serving up s’mores; and on Sunday, Feb. 11, Dream Chocolate will be on hand for sampling and sales. Enjoy Huston’s award-winning wines and pick some up for your Valentine. Tasting fee refundable with bottle purchase. Noon-5 p.m. $5. Huston Vineyards, 16473 Chicken Dinner Road, Caldwell, 208-4557975, hustonvineyards.com. VALENTINE’S WINE AND CHOCOLATE WEEKEND—What better way to celebrate Valentine’s Day than with a wine and choco-

late pairing? You’ll enjoy fantastic chocolates from the Chocolat Bar paired with Vizcaya Wines. Noon-6 p.m. $5. Vizcaya Winery, 8987 S. Greenhurst Road, Kuna, 208-8708354, vizcayawinery.com. ZHOO ZHOO VALENTINE’S OPEN HOUSE—Join local wine sisters, the Zhoo Zhoo girls, for their annual Valentine Open House at Hells Canyon Winery. You’ll enjoy wine tastings, sweet treats and specials from both wineries on bottle purchases. Noon-5 p.m. $5$10. Hell’s Canyon Winery, 18835 Symms Road, Caldwell, 208-4543300, hellscanyonwinery.org.

SATURDAY

FEBRUARY 10 Festivals & Events BEER PROM 2018—Dig up your old prom attire that hasn’t seen the light of day since the cold war ended and parachute pants were in style. You can also channel your favorite ‘80s icon and dress appropriately for the decade’s fashion trends. A DJ will be spinning ‘80s favorites all night along with as many smoke and laser machines they can get their hands on. Admission is free but $15

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

buys you a stainless steel pint and three fills. Food by Meraki Greek Street Food. 7-11 p.m. FREE. Powderhaus Brewing Company, 9719 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-376-4026, powderhausbrewing.com. CUPID’S UNDIE RUN—Strip down to your skivvies and join more than 14,000 scantily clad do-gooders across the United States to raise awareness of neurofibromatosis (NF) at the Cupid’s Undie Run. Recognized as the nation’s largest pantless party and mile-ish run for charity, the run gives participants the opportunity to take off the usual weekend wear, show their support for the NF community and fundraise, with 100 percent of net proceeds funding research through their partner, the Children’s Tumor Foundation (CTF). Noon. $35. Tom Grainey’s, 109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-2505, cupids.org/city/boise. LOVE LOCALLY VALENTINE’S DAY POP-UP—Feel free to procrastinate getting your V-Day gifts because you’ll want to check out this special pop-up event at Evermore Prints. You’ll find local wine, art, pottery and decadent treats for your Valentine from Coiled Wines, Flynn Day Pottery, Dapper Jackalope, Cake Ballers, A Succulent Day and EMC Sugar. Plus local art by Lindsey Loch, John Warfel, Katy Rogan, Toby Davis, John Irwin, Jacey Peterson, Noble Hardesty and Bobby Roulette. Noon-6 p.m. FREE. Evermore Prints, 780 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-3837, evermoreprints. com.

On Stage BALLET IDAHO: FLEETWOOD MAC COLLECTION—7:30 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, balletidaho.org. COMEDIAN TONY HINCHCLIFFE—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $20. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise. com. PLAYHOUSE BOISE: MURDER ON THE ORIENTAL RUG—7 p.m. $15-$25, $26 dinner add-on. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

Literature JULIA MURPHY: WESTERN KNIGHT—Local writer Julie G. Murphy will be signing copies of her book, Western Knight. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org. READ ME TV UNDERGROUND RAILROAD DISCUSSION—Join the Beyond the Book Club in a lively book discussion of Colson Whitehead’s engrossing novel. 10 a.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Star Branch, 10706 W. State St.,

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR Star, 208-286-9755, readmetv. com.

Kids & Teens DADDY DAUGHTER DATE NIGHT—Dads, this is the perfect opportunity to spend an evening of fun, entertainment and refreshments with your daughters. For ages 3-13. 7:30-9:30 p.m. $9-$11 per person. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. IDAHOPTV FREE SCREENING OF NEW PBS KIDS SERIES—Join Idaho Public Television for a free screening of the premiere episode of Pinkalicious & Peterrific, a new animated series from PBS KIDS. Prize giveaways will be provided by the founding sponsors of the new Idaho PBS KIDS Channel (prize quantities are limited while supplies last). Pinkalicious imagines creative possibilities everywhere she looks. Like most creative people, she sees the world differently from others. She knows what she likes, and she’s not afraid to express herself, though she sometimes needs help from her brother

Peter and her neighborhood friends. The hourlong premiere of Pinkalicious & Peterrific will also air Monday, Feb. 19, at 5 p.m. on the PBS KIDS Channel, and at 8:30 a.m. and again at 1:30 p.m. on the IDAHO Channel. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Overland Park Cinemas, 7051 Overland Road, Boise, 208377-3072, goo.gl/sfaEdY.

Odds & Ends BOISE CONTRA SECOND SATURDAY DANCE—For all ages. 8-10:30 p.m. $5-$10. Broadway Dance and Event Center, 893 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-342-6123. CANYON COUNTY SPRING HOME AND GARDEN SHOW—11 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE-$3. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com. SWIG AND SWING—Grab your Valentine and get your swing on at this free group swing dance class, taught by Jennifer Babione, followed by dancing in the brewery. Go in before the class and fuel up on Kilted Kod fish and chips paired with one of Mad Swede’s

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

beers. 7-10 p.m. FREE. Mad Swede Brewing Company, 2772 S. Cole Road, Ste. 140, Boise, 208-922-6883, madswedebrewing.com. TREASURE VALLEY BOAT SHOW—10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$5. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, expoidaho.com. TVCWDA SECOND SATURDAY DANCE—7:30-11 p.m. $2-$8, $15 family/couple. Boise Square and Round Dance Center, 6534 W. Diamond Street, Boise, 208-9414853, treasurevalleycwda.org.

Animals & Pets I LOVE THE ZOO KIDS EVENING—Need a place for the kids while you enjoy some much-needed alone time? Look no further than Zoo Boise. Kids will enjoy an evening of animal-themed fun. It all starts with a pizza dinner, followed by a guided zoo walk to see what critters do at night and a sneak peek at the Zoo Kitchen. They will also enjoy a fun game, craft and up-close animal encounter. For ages 5-10. 4-7 p.m. $20. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise. org. WOO AT THE ZOO FOR ADULTS— Birds do it. Bees do it. Snow leopards do it. Find out how animals at Zoo Boise woo each other. Open to both singles and sweethearts 18 and older, this memorable Valentine’s Day event will reveal the intimate secrets of exotic animal mating and dating, from the humorous and tawdry to passionate and subtle. A pasta dinner, dessert, drinks, photos with your sweetheart and take-home chocolate are included. Need someone to watch the little ones while parents enjoy an evening at the zoo? Enroll your kiddos in the “I Love the Zoo” program. 4-7 p.m. $45-$50. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise.org/event/3630.

JOIN THE CLIQUE, BE IN THE KNOW. ALL THE

COOL KIDS ARE DOING IT. posting.boiseweekly.com/boise/newsletter

Food HUSTON VINEYARDS WINE AND CHOCOLATE WEEKEND—Noon-5 p.m. $5. Huston Vineyards, 16473 Chicken Dinner Road, Caldwell, 208-455-7975, hustonvineyards. com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

VALENTINE’S WINE AND CHOCOLATE WEEKEND—Noon-6 p.m. $5. Vizcaya Winery, 8987 S. Greenhurst Road, Kuna, 208-8708354, vizcayawinery.com. WINTER BEER-LYMPICS PUB CRAWL—Join the first Winter BeerLympics Pub Crawl. It’s free to participate, and you can pick up your team’s scorecards and wristbands at any participating location, which can be found on the event Facebook page. Teams of two to six members will participate in different events at each location and will be awarded points, plus bonus points for athletic/Olympic cos-

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 11


CALENDAR

FOOD/VALENTINES DAY

tumes. Teams can complete each challenge in any order. Finish at The HandleBar, 1519 W. Main St. Teams must have their scorecards in by 7 p.m. The winning team will be announced at 7:30 p.m. There will be prizes for first-, secondand third-place teams. 2-8 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing, 521 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-342-7655, boisebrewing.com. ZHOO ZHOO VALENTINE’S OPEN HOUSE—Noon-5 p.m. $5$10. Hell’s Canyon Winery, 18835 Symms Road, Caldwell, 208-4543300, hellscanyonwinery.org.

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 11 On Stage WHERE TO WINE AND/OR DINE YOUR SWEETHEART ON VALENTINE’S DAY

While Valentine’s Day is billed as the most romantic day of the year, it could also easily claim the title of most delicious. In and around Boise, restaurants, breweries and wineries are going all-out on Feb. 14 with complex, aphrodisiac-heavy menus for every taste. Smitten foodies can try to snag last-minute reservations at The Melting Pot, which offers a romantic five-course dinner package for $70 per person; Chandlers, which is touting a three-course prix fixe menu for $36 per person; or Ruth’s Chris, where diners will find a special surf-and-turf menu starting at $50 per person. Other solid options in Boise include upscale Italian restaurant Alavita, which will offer a $50 per person, three-course prix fixe menu; Barbacoa, which will host an $85 per person, four-course dinner including a dozen roses; Capitol Cellars, where a four-course prix fixe menu will be on offer for $91 per person; and Camel’s Crossing, which will host a threecourse dinner for $69 per person with optional wine pairing. For Meridian diners, Deja Brew Laugh a Latte will offer a fourcourse dinner for $33 per person. Plus, at Chandler’s and Ruth’s Chris, the special menus are available multiple nights, in case the big day itself is booked solid. Wine and cider lovers can create the perfect date night at a number of places. Meriwether Cider is hosting a chocolate, cheese and cider event in its Garden City taproom. At Hells Canyon Winery, get wine samples from Hells Canyon and Zhoo Zhoo Wines, along with dessert bites for a $5-$10 per person entry fee. Huston Vineyards in Caldwell is offering a weekend of wines Feb. 9-11, pairing a different locally made sweet each day for a $5 tasting fee (refundable with bottle purchase). At Vizkaya Wines, $5 each will earn lovebirds entry to a wine and Chocolat Bar chocolate pairing event, and Helina Marie’s Wine Bar in Star is hosting a wine tasting with truffles for $20 per person. For an over-the-top evening of romance, couples can dine in one of the most beautiful buildings in Boise at the Valentine’s Dinner at the Bishop’s House, a four-course Italian feast catered by Luciano’s for $50 per person; or indulge in the Le Coq d’Or Valentine’s Day Dinner in Eagle, and get three courses served in the stunning gold and platinum ballrooms for $85 per person (see Page 19 for more on what Chef Richard Jimenez of Le Coq d’Or has planned for dinner). —Lex Nelson

12 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

BOISE BAROQUE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA—Enjoy a program featuring works by Dvorak, Wagner and Mozart’, with guest pianist Del Parkinson. 2 p.m. FREE-$28. Cathedral of the Rockies, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208343-7511, cathedraloftherockies.org. BOISE’S NEXT DRAG SUPERSTAR—Boise’s Next Drag Superstar pits local up-and-coming drag performers against each other in an eight-week competition to take the title of The Balcony Babe. Each Sunday through March 4, they will wow you with their talents, comedy, creativeness, dance moves and lip syncing. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com. COMEDY SHOWCASE—8 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. NERDY VALENTINE’S BURLESQUE—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344, facebook.com/ PengillysSaloon.

Sports & Fitness BOISE GOLF AND TRAVEL SHOW—9 a.m.-5 p.m. $12. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-2875650, boisegolfshow.com.

Odds & Ends CANYON COUNTY SPRING HOME AND GARDEN SHOW—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$3. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Church of Christ, 2000 N. Eldorado St., Boise, 208-409-1086, oa.org.

TREASURE VALLEY BOAT SHOW—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$5. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, expoidaho.com.

Animals & Pets FAMILY FIELD TRIP WEEKEND— Is winter giving your family a case of cabin fever? Grab the kids and head for The Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey for an affordable day of fun and educational programs focused on conserving birds of prey. Visitors will see live bird demonstrations, tour the Archives of Falconry, participate in family-friendly crafts and activities, and enjoy spending time outdoors on the scenic interpretive trail. Children 16 and younger admitted free. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$10. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org/calendar.

Food HUSTON VINEYARDS WINE AND CHOCOLATE WEEKEND—Noon-5 p.m. $5. Huston Vineyards, 16473 Chicken Dinner Road, Caldwell, 208-455-7975, hustonvineyards. com. VALENTINE’S WINE AND CHOCOLATE WEEKEND—Noon-6 p.m. $5. Vizcaya Winery, 8987 S. Greenhurst Road, Kuna, 208-8708354, vizcayawinery.com. ZHOO ZHOO VALENTINE’S OPEN HOUSE—Noon-5 p.m. $5$10. Hell’s Canyon Winery, 18835 Symms Road, Caldwell, 208-4543300, hellscanyonwinery.org.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 12 Festivals & Events 4TH ANNUAL IDAHO TYPE 1 DIABETES AWARENESS DAY— Join the Junior Diabetes Research Foundation at the Idaho Capitol to help spread awareness of type 1 diabetes (T1D). You’ll hear from Claire Shelton, Idaho’s JDRF Children’s Congress Delegate, and McCall Salinas, Miss Boise’s Outstanding Teen in the Miss Boise Scholarship Program. You’ll also have a chance to get information from vendors, including Camp Hodia Idaho Diabetes Youth Programs, Dexcom, Central District Health Department, JDRF and Lilly. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705.

Talks & Lectures ANDRUS LECTURE: WHAT DOES QUALITY EARLY EDUCATION LOOK LIKE?—Join this nonpartisan dialogue that engages many voices on the subject of early

learning opportunities, whether these children are learning at home, at a center-based provider or in private, in-home care. You’ll hear from Professor Steven Barnett, director of the National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers University. His research includes studies of the impact of early care and education, including the return on investment, the long-term effects of preschool programs on educational outcomes and the importance of quality early interactions for children’s brain development. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Simplot Grand Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3784, sps. boisestate.edu/andruscenter.

Animals & Pets SNIP LOW COST SPAY NEUTER CLINIC OPENS—SNIP Low Cost Spay Neuter Clinic opens to everyone. Their professional and compassionate staff will fix over 8,100 cats, dogs and feral cats per year. Prices are $30-$50 for cats and $75-$110 for dogs. Pain medications before and after surgery are included, with no additional costs for in heat, pregnant and cryptorchid pets. Plus vaccines $12-$15, rabies $15 and microchips $15 at time of surgery. Make your appointments at snipidaho.org. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. SNIP Low Cost Spay Neuter Clinic, 1785 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-576-7660, snipidaho.org.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 13 On Stage BOISE BLUES SOCIETY FAT TUESDAY BENEFIT CONCERT— Enjoy performances by Blues Addicts, Billy Blues Band and Mojo Boogie. Proceeds from the society’s biggest fundraiser of the year benefit the BBS Scholarships for young musicians and Blues In The Schools program. 6:30 p.m. $15-$25. Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, boiseblues.org.

Literature THE CABIN READINGS AND CONVERSATIONS: COLSON WHITEHEAD—Colton Whitehead is a New York-based writer whose newest novel, The Underground Railroad, is an Oprah’s Book Club 2016 selection, a No. 1 New York Times bestseller and the winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Fiction. Whitehead is the New York Times bestselling author of The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, The Colossus of New York, Apex Hides the Hurt, Sag Harbor, Zone One and The Noble Hustle. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, New York Magazine, Harper’s and Granta, among other publications. 7:30

p.m. SOLD OUT. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org. COLSON WHITEHEAD RECEPTION—Have a drink with bestselling author Colson Whitehead at Beside Bardenay before his Readings and Conversations lecture at the Egyptian Theatre. There will be a cash bar. Your ticket includes appetizers. 5-7 p.m. $20-$25. Beside Bardenay, 612 Grove St., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org. READ ME TV UNDERGROUND RAILROAD DISCUSSION—Join the Second Thursday Book Club in a lively discussion of Colson Whitehead’s engrossing novel. 1:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, readmetv.com.

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. Volunteer at ilcdinners. ivolunteer.com. 5:15-7 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

Kids & Teens SUMMERWIND SKIPPERS DADDY DAUGHTER DANCE—The Summerwind Skippers are hosting a Daddy Daughter dance complete with DJ, ballroom dance lesson, refreshments, pictures and a Summerwind Skipper performance. Your ticket purchase helps the Summerwind Skippers get to Nationals. 6-9 p.m. $25 per pair. Summerwind Elementary, 3675 N. Jullion Way, Boise, squareup.com/ store/summerwind.

Odds & Ends RANDY’S FUN DANCE—Randy’s Fun “Night Off” Line Dance features nothing but dancing. Music will play non-stop for line dances. If you don’t know the dance, try one of your own or grab a partner and dance around the line dancers. Plus free popcorn and inexpensive drinks. For all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-941-4853, r2l2countrydance. com.

Food VALENTINE’S DINNER AT THE BISHOPS’ HOUSE—Celebrate this holiday with a romantic dinner catered by Luciano’s. Limited space; reserved seating only. 6:30-9 p.m. $50. Bishops’ House, 2420 E. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-342-3279, thebishopshouse. org.

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


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Local musician Brenton Viertel is serious about fun Brenton Viertel has some impressive musical credentials. He holds a BA from Duquesne University and a MFA from Youngstown University. He currently plays bass with the Boise Philharmonic and teaches music and orchestra for the Boise School District. This isn’t the CV one might expect from a guy who writes goofy odes to tight pants, androids and attack helicopters from cheesy ’80s TV shows. According to Viertel, that’s the whole point of his mock-Krautrock group The Dirty Moogs and his pop-punk band Jetski: To get away from the discipline and pretensions of the classical music world. “I definitely wanted escapism,” he said. “On a Friday night, you come out and just kind of forget about the week. You work really hard, and [a Dirty Moogs or Jetski show] is a place to party and have a lot of fun. … Because, you know, I play serious stuff all the time. And I like serious music. It’s not that I dislike it. I honestly find this stuff to be enjoyable also.” Viertel’s extracurricular music might be fun, but he and his bandmates still work hard. The Moogs’ EP And Now for Something Completely the Same (Sunless Sea Records) was a standout release of 2017. Released on Feb. 2, Jetski’s debut album 2PM (Missing Beats Record Company, 2018) is just as excellent, boasting catchy tunes, high-powered performances, bold production by ZV House and sly, funny lyrics by both Viertel and young musician Marcus Roberts. Born in Wisconsin, Viertel was introduced to music at a young age. “My mom was a pianist,” he said. “I played the piano as a little kid, and then I started to play the violin. I was in orchestra for a long time, and then in eighth grade, I started playing string bass.” In addition to classical music, Viertel soaked up the punk and alternative rock of the 1990s. He attended high school in San Diego as a local band called Blink—later known as Blink-182—was building a following. “They were blowing up at that time,” Viertel remembered. “It was when they were becoming really popular. And there was a lot

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Brenton Viertel (left) is a musical Renaissance man, playing in the Boise Philharmonic and releasing albums with bands The Dirty Moogs (top right) and Jetski (bottom right).

of ska going on. But I really love stuff like Weezer [and] Fountains of Wayne.” Viertel played in various orchestras and a couple of alt-country bands before landing in Boise. He met Dirty Moogs bandmate Will Gillett when they played together in Gia Trotter’s country band Larkspur. A veteran of Boise’s punk scene, Gillett was the perfect person to help Viertel cut loose. “I was in punk bands in town [that played in] garages and gravel driveways and shit since I was 13,” Gillett said. Not cool enough for The Brass Lamp or old enough for Neurolux, his bands would play venues, such as “Bug’s House and The Oil House that was right around the corner, [which was] the worst place you could possibly play music. They would appreciate that [quote] for sure.” Viertel and Gillette formed The Dirty Moogs with musician Peter Thomas in 2011. While the name was inspired by a malfunctioning synthesizer, the original idea for the group came from Trotter, who was in local group Mostly Muff. “I don’t know. We were talking about synthesizers or something, and Gia was like, ‘You should get out your keyboards and play a bunch of 80s tunes,’ Viertel said. “And we were just like, ‘Oh, okay.’” Viertel’s connection with Trotter helped bring Jetski about as well. Drummer Robert

Reeves and guitarist Brian Anglin play with Trotter in 2x2. Also, singer-guitarist Roberts is Reeves’s nephew. The idea for the group arose from Viertel and Reeves’ mutual love of Weezer. “He was like, ‘Yeah, I just kinda miss the 90s sort of aesthetic. Do you want to do a recording-project band?’” Viertel remembered. In Viertel’s words, the idea of 2PM was to make “this throwback 90s record on a very limited budget—not a lot of production, just play the songs and go.” Jetski recorded the album at ZV House’s Rabbitbrush Audio studio in a weekend. Viertel and company told House that they wanted the album “to sound like these Weezer records, right? The old Weezer records.” “So then we got it, and then we were like, ‘I don’t know,’” Viertel said. But soon, the band realized “he did it exactly like the Weezer records. We just realized that we wanted it a little different.” Viertel’s various projects and plans keep him busy. He and his Dirty Moogs bandmates are trying to brainstorm gimmicks for upcoming shows. Don’t expect any classical influences to seep in, though. “I don’t think we’re gonna be like a rockopera band,” Viertel said. “I think we like doing what we’re doing: Simple pop songs that aren’t too serious.”

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RESERVATIONS ARE FOR PARTIES OF 8+ Smaller parties may call ahead or download our app “No Wait” to get on our call ahead seating list.

Gift Cards Available! Complete Italian Wine List Hours 11 North Orchard Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Boise, ID 83706 Fri-Sat 11am-10pm Sun 12pm-9pm 208-577-6415 | Fax 208-577-6428 www.lucianos boise.com BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 13


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MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 7 CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

STEVE EATON AND FRIENDS BENEFIT CONCERT FOR THE PHILIP GARONZIK MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP—With Camden Hughes, Jon Hyneman, Sandon Mayhew and Mike Seifrit, plus Global Beats, and special guest Katie G. 7 p.m. $15-$25. Sapphire Room

CITYFOLK—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

DESTROYER—With Mega Bog. 7 p.m. $17. The Olympic

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 8

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BETH HART, EGYPTIAN THEATRE, FEB. 9

Though she first burst onto the blues rock scene in the 1990s, it would be a mistake to write off Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Beth Hart before her time. In 2018, Hart is still an on-stage powerhouse, and will bring her smoldering sound—courtesy of mixed-bag influences ranging from gospel and soul to blues and classic rock— to Boise to promote her newest album, Fire On The Floor (Provogue Records, 2016). Hart has paired up with Joe Bonamassa, Jeff Beck and Slash, complementing their guitar mastery with a voice described as “burnt honey.” Fire on the Floor showcases her rasp at its finest, her raw emotion bursting from every track. According to Hart’s website, “If there’s a theme that ties these 12 songs together, it’s a sense of escapism following the hardest of times,” reads Hart’s website biography—and no wonder, considering it was written in part as a goodbye to producer Michael Stevens, who was terminally ill with cancer. “We recorded 16 songs in three days,” writes Hart, calling the emotional dive “a brutal experience.” —Lex Nelson 8 p.m., $30-$55. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-3450454, egyptiantheatre.net

14 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

DIZZY WRIGHT: THE GOLDEN STATE OF MIND TOUR—With Eli, Reezy, Zero, and Freedom Renegades. 8 p.m. $13-$75. Knitting Factory FALL CREEK—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—6 p.m. FREE. Sofia’s LEE PENN SKY—8 p.m. FREE. Reef MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers PRAWN—With Midnight Legs // Marathon Lungs, Caravela, and Whippin Shitties. 7 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BEN BURDICK TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CHUCK SMITH—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SIGNAL CH. 7: RETRO-FUTURE— With Checkmvte, Dose Amigos, Tracer, and Orracle. 9 p.m. Fatty’s

DIET CIG—With Great Grandpa, and Spook School. 8 p.m. $12$15. Neurolux

THUMP: HEART BEATZ—With DJ Auzomatik. 8:30 p.m. $5. 9th St. Parallel

JACK LOYD GISH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 9

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lost Grove

AARON EINHOUSE—With The Tumbleweeds. 9 p.m. $8.38. The Ranch Club ADDAM C.—Followed by DJ at 11 p.m. 9 p.m. $3, $5 for 2. Reef AFTERHOURS AT PARALLEL— With DJ Auzomatik. 11:30 p.m. FREE-$5. 9th St. Parallel

DOPE KNIFE: THE WEST COAST TOUR—With Dubldragon, Zeus Lee, Oso, Weighn, and Andy O. 7 p.m. $7. The Olympic

BETH HART: FIRE ON THE FLOOR TOUR—8 p.m. $30-$55. Egyptian

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BOISE BAROQUE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA—8 p.m. FREE-$28. Cathedral of the Rockies

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JAKE ALLEN—7 p.m. FREE. High Note OPERA IDAHO OPERATINI: ONE FINE DAY—5:15 p.m. and 8:15 p.m. $22-$30. Sapphire

BIG WOW—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CITYFOLK—7 p.m. FREE. SockeyeCole

JIM LEWIS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

MØ AND CASHMERE CAT: THE MEØW TOUR—With Darius. 8 p.m. $26-$65. Knitting Factory MULE TRAIN—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s NAMPA HIGH BAND BOOSTERS MARDI GRAS GALA—With the Nampa High Jazz Bands. 7 p.m. $30, $40 VIP. Belle Event Center RICHIE KENT—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny SEAN ROGERS—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SPUDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard-Meridian SUNSET GOAT—With Tsun Dog. 8 p.m. FREE. Ironwood Social TREASURE VALLEY SWING BAND SWEETHEARTS DANCE—7 p.m. $10-$12. Valley Church, Caldwell

DAWSON RUTLEDGE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MUSIC GUIDE SATURDAY FEBRUARY 10 AUDIO MOONSHINE—9 p.m. FREE. The Ranch Club BROKEN OUTLAWS—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny CLAY MOORE TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers COMMON GROUND COMMUNITY CHORUS—7 p.m. $5. First Congregational CRAIG BERNAUER AND DOUBLE WIDE—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s JACK HALE AND FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel KARIN COMES KILLING—With Black Tooth Grin, Final Underground, and Abassy. 8 p.m. $6$12. Knitting Factory KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Destination 112

TRIPLE NICKLE BAND COUNTRY WESTERN DANCE—6:30 p.m. $7. Eagles Lodge Boise WAYNE WHITE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

MONDAY FEBRUARY 12 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid A VERY WHISKEY GINGER HEARTBREAK SHOW—7 p.m. FREE. High Note WILSON ROBERTS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 13 BOISE BLUES SOCIETY FAT TUESDAY BENEFIT CONCERT— With Blues Addicts, Billy Blues Band and Mojo Boogie. 6:30 p.m. $15-$25. Sapphire

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MOJO BOOGIE—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

6 NIGHTS A WEEK

BRANDON PRITCHETT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CONAN AND THE DITCH AND THE DELTA—7 p.m. $10-$12. Neurolux DEAD BY DAWN TOUR—Featuring In Confidence, Artificial Aliens, Separating the Seas, Us Underwater, and Gravity, with locals Roses are Dead, Fall of Fathom, and Life Upon Liars. 7 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder

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DENT MAY—With Moon King. 7 p.m. $8. The Olympic LIKE A ROCKET—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

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MUSIC BOX—6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard-Meridian THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

LYLE SINCLAIR—6:30 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew A MIGHTY BAND OF MICROBES—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

LIVE COMEDY

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

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MOODY JEWS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PAMELA DEMARCHE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 PLEASANCE HOUSE—With Sea’s Apprentice. 7:30 p.m. $5. The District SOUL SERENE—10 p.m. $5. Reef STEVE EATON AND THE STEVETTES: LOVE SONGS—7:30 p.m. $18-$25. Sapphire THE TALBOTT BROTHERS—7 p.m. $12. The Olympic TEJANO OUTLAWS—With Zack Quintana. 9 p.m. $10. Destination 112 TREBELLE PIANO TRIO:—7:30 p.m. $10-$15. Jewett Auditorium

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 11 BOISE BAROQUE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA—2 p.m. FREE-$28. Cathedral of the Rockies BOISE STATE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—7:30 p.m. FREE-$7. Morrison Center ELLIE SHAW QUARTET: LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON—4 p.m. $12$19. Sapphire IRISH MUSIC—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TREBELLE PIANO TRIO—3 p.m. $10-$15. Eagle United Methodist

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

MUSIC FROM THE FRONT, AFTERMATH AND HOMEFRONT, MC RECITAL HALL, FEB. 9

Music from wartime can run the emotional gamut, from booming calls to charge into battle to triumphant victory tunes and sad laments for those lost. This season, the Hemingway Literary Center at Boise State University will put war songs of hubris and heartbreak center stage as part of its 100-year anniversary tribute to World War I. Dubbed, “Music from the Front, Aftermath and Homefront” the concert will feature Boise State Department of Music faculty and alumni as well the Graduate String Quartet, playing chamber music by Bela Bartok, Claude Debussy, Igor Stravinsky, Francis Poulenc, Sergei Prokofiev and Charles Ives written between 1895 and 1922. The selection will explain the impact of the Great War on concert music in Europe and America through sound, using instruments as diverse as piano, piccolo and clarinet. “The people, nations and empires drawn into the conflict of 1914 were also the creators of the core tradition of over 400 years of Western art music,” a Boise State press release explained. Hear the full story Friday, Feb. 9. —Lex Nelson 7:30 p.m., FREE-$7. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1110, morrisoncenter.com. BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 15


ARTS NEWS

BIG SHOP OF HORRORS

GOT ART? DEADLINES FOR CALLS TO ARTISTS ARE LOOMING

January was rich with calls to artists from businesses, nonprofits and the City of Boise, and February and March are following suit. So, if you’re a painter, sculptor, jewelry maker or creator in any other medium, and you’re looking to exhibit your work, sell it or find funding to make more, here are a few opportunities ending soon. You can find many more online at boiseweekly.com in Arts News.

CITY OF BOISE LINEN DISTRICT FENCE DESIGN

The City of Boise Department of Arts & History is seeking an artist to design artwork for the Linen District Fence. Artists must submit an application package including a resume, digital images and more. The winning artist receives $4,000. boiseartsandhistory.org Deadline: Wednesday, Feb. 14

BWCOVER AUCTION GRANT

Boise Weekly encourages art organizations and individual artists to apply for a Cover Auction Grant. Winners will be selected by a panel, and amounts will depend on available funding. Artists are asked to submit an application, a proposal and two or more samples of original work. boiseweekly.com Deadline: Friday, Feb. 16

ALEXA ROSE FOUNDATION GRANT

Artists living in Ada or Canyon counties can apply for a grant of up to $5,000 from the Alexa Rose Foundation. Submit an online application with samples of work (digital images, pages of written work, film, etc.) and other documents. alexarosefoundation.org Deadline: Wednesday, Feb. 28

JAMES CASTLE HOUSE ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

The City of Boise is looking for “emerging and mid-career artists” interested in a threemonth residency at the James Castle House in Boise. Artists are asked to submit work samples, a resume, proposal and more. The selected artist will receive studio access, furnished living quarters and a monthly $2,000 stipend. boiseartsandhistory.org Deadline: Wednesday, March 7 —Lex Nelson

16 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

MADE L INE WHITE H E AD

ARTS & CULTURE Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad fills in some gaps in U.S. history HARRISON BERRY In classrooms, “King Cotton” and the “peculiar institution” of slavery are terms used to describe the political and economic wedges that split the Union in the bloodiest war on U.S. soil. Idaho Black History Museum Director Phillip Thompson said Americans still avert their eyes from the human cost of millions living in bondage. “I think we have a romanticized and selffulfilling vision of slavery,” Thompson said at the Feb. 1 kickoff of Read Me Treasure Valley, a community-wide “big read” comprising discussions at libraries, after-school activities, film screenings and more. This year, RMTV organizers selected as the recommended title The Underground Railroad (Doubleday, 2016) by Colson Whitehead, who will speak at The Egyptian Theatre on Tuesday, Feb. 13, as part of the Readings & Conversations series put on by The Cabin literary center. (The event is sold out.) The Underground Railroad tells the story of Cora, a Georgia slave girl who escapes the plantation she lives on to get to a literal underground railroad built and managed by sympathizers and former slaves. Her trip to the free states initially stalls, and her journey becomes a guided tour of the Big Shop of Horrors that was antebellum America. The idea of depicting the network of abolitionists who shepherded people to freedom as an actual train came to Whitehead about 18 years ago. Over time, he innovated, drawing from history to make every “stop” on Cora’s journey an illustration of a different event or period. “Since each state is a different world with its own rules, with white supremacy or a black utopia...the structure allowed all kinds of cool things that a novel does,” Whitehead told Boise Weekly. “Before I knew who Cora was … there was a structure that allowed me to explore a different dynamic of American history.” This literary device allowed him to aggregate scenes to show how slavery has chased its victims, however far they may go. After escaping from Georgia, where slaves are regularly beaten and killed, Cora first settles in South Carolina. There, social workers teach her to read and give her a job, but the dioramas in the natural history museum where she works are illustrations of the stories white people tell

The Underground Railroad, the newest novel from award-winning author Colson Whitehead, could—and should—change the way we talk about slavery and racism.

themselves about their superiority. Her first trip to a hospital recalls instances of unethical, often fatal experimentation on black people, like the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment. Other stops evoke brutal exclusion laws and the Tulsa race riot. The Underground Railroad issues a challenge to the way Americans talk about slavery and its legacy, and organizers of RMTV expect the novel to spark conversations about justice and equity. According to a January 2018 report by the Southern Poverty Law Center, U.S. history teachers scarcely cover key concepts of slavery, such as its magnitude and centrality to the American economy, as well as the experiences of slaves based on location, gender or burden. Instead, the report reveals the period is with a focus on the economic and political ramifications of slavery— at the expense of the lived experiences of people affected by the practice. The SPLC study showed many textbooks cover slavery in a just a few paragraphs, often in the context of how central it was to economies on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line. Few students learn about how a siege mentality in the South led to vicious population control efforts and contributed to stereotypes about AfricanAmericans that persist to this day. Whitehead is acutely aware there are dots connecting the Middle Passage to the present. He brings them close together so readers can’t help but see the relationships between them. “People read the book and wonder, ‘When

did those forced sterilizations happen? Who were these scientific racists who developed these eugenics theories in the 19th century that influenced the Nazis?’” Whitehead said. The imaginative feat of The Underground Railroad is, in Whitehead’s words, “treat[ing] American history in a different way from the way it’s taught,” showing how the most gruesome and unjust facets of bondage can live side by side with ideas of freedom, civility and justice. His characters are beaten, raped, lynched, starved, whipped and more; their freedom is hard-won and often illusory. Even in freedom, Whitehead depicts black people as refugees from a world where their rights are hotly debated by politicians and their labor is stolen by people who could kill them with impunity. At no point are black people allowed to have the same expectations of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness as white people. The Underground Railroad lays bare the violence of slavery and unmasks the many faces of white supremacy with an immediacy that will leave readers feeling the events it describes could be happening today. Whitehead said if there are echoes between the book and the present day, it’s because the story of African-Americans’ flight from slavery isn’t over. “If you write about race and racism in 1850, you end up with what’s going on now, because obviously we’ve made some progress, but obviously we have a lot further to go,” Whitehead said. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


SCREEN SIZE DOESN’T MATTER

The 2018 Oscar-nominated shorts are not only better than ever, some are better than anything GEORGE PRENTICE There are at least a dozen reasons why some people hate the Oscars, like the pomposity of the Motion Picture Academy, as well as its bloated ceremony and the disproportionate weight given to which films take home the trophies. But I’ve always looked at Hollywood’s biggest night through the original lens of why it was first conceived 90 years ago: to promote a struggling industry that has The 2018 nominees for Best Animated Short Subject include Dear Basketball, Kobe Bryant’s ode to the game he loves (top), and LOU, from Pixar animator Dave Mullins (bottom). survived the advent of theme parks, television and, most recently and most damning, streamand Beauty and the Beast. Adding to the inten- playful twists on classic fairy tales, is wickedly ing video platforms. I think the Academy is sity of Dear Basketball is its lush score, written funny and offers a look at what happens after at its best when it shares its spotlight with happily ever after. and conducted by five-time Oscar winner under-the-radar films, particularly documen*** John Williams. taries, foreign-language films and short subMost of this year’s Live Action Shorts are If it weren’t for the sheer brilliance of Dear jects. At least for me, it’s those animated and much more serious, but there is one lovely bit live-action short subjects that are, reel-for-reel, Basketball, LOU might be a shoo-in for the of fun in The Eleven O’Clock from Australian the most entertaining films every year, and I’m Oscar. LOU is the creation of Pixar animadirector Derin Seale. It weaves the story of a tor Dave Mullins, who worked on Finding thrilled to report the 2018 Oscar-nominated Nemo, Monsters, Inc. and The Incredibles. LOU psychiatrist and his delusional patient, who entries are the best yet. believes he is actually the psychiatrist. Each is an adorable monster-like character who For the past dozen years, the Academy of man insists he’s the real doctor and things emerges from a lost and found box outside of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, ShortsTV get really out of hand when a temp shows an elementary school. (His name is made up and Magnolia Pictures have sent the Oscarup to take over for the psychiatrist’s regular of the three letters missing from nominated short subjects receptionist. the lost and found sign: L, O to first-run cinemas. For OSCAR NOMINATED SHORTS Animated and live-action shorts The best of the live action shorts, and my and U). The kids at the school the past several years, I will be screened separately pick to take home the Oscar this year, is My are being terrorized by a bully have been granted me Nephew Emmett, written and directed by who has been stealing toys, so an advance look at the Opens Friday, Feb. 9 at The Flicks Kevin Wilson Jr., who is a student in the gradit’s up to LOU to scare the bully nominated shorts (thank straight and then turn him into a uate film program at New York University. My you, ShortsTV and the Nephew Emmett, an extremely jarring drama, Academy), so I can give Boise Weekly readers a warm-hearted hero. Think of LOU as “Three is based on the 1955 murder of a young black Billboards Outside Cartoonland.” sneak peek. The nominations are culled from Mississippi man lynched for whistling at a Another nominee is Revolting Rhymes, a field of 63 qualified films, and they represent from German animators Jakob Schuh and Jan white woman. some of the most compelling creative efforts Finally, the best performance in any of the Lachauer. This gem opens with a wolf, wearing in recent memory. a trench coat and fedora, walking into a coffee nominated short subject films is delivered by Among the five nominees of Animated Short Films, the top of the heap is Dear Bas- shop and approaching a young woman who is 5-year-old Maisie Sly in The Silent Child. Sly portrays Libby, who is born into a middle-class ketball, based on a love letter by NBA legend holding a book of nursery rhymes. The wolf family living in denial of her deafness. When (voiced by Dominic West) dismisses the fairy Kobe Bryant to the game that brought him a caring social worker gives Libby the gift of fame, fortune and a fundamental understand- tales as rubbish and tells the young woman communication by teaching her sign language, ing of greatness. Bryant narrates the 5-minute “real” tales, including stories about three little pigs, a little girl who wears a red hooded Libby’s family rebukes the social worker’s effort film, beautifully animated by Glen Keane, a and insists that Libby learn to read lips instead. Disney veteran who created countless beloved cape and a young lady whose skin is white as characters such as The Little Mermaid, Aladdin snow. Revolting Rhymes, based on Roald Dahl’s You’ll never forget this film. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

STARTS FRIDAY, FEB. 9th

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 17


Call them Hazy, New England or Northeast style, they’re all the rage on the east coast. Though loaded with hops, these small-batch brews tone down the bitterness by using milder varieties like Citra and Mosaic, and adding them late in the brewing process. Unfiltered, these beers are meant to be drunk young and fresh. It was just a matter of time before the craze spread west, and while they don’t quite achieve the same freshness, here are three IPAs tilting toward the Northeast style: BREAKSIDE WHAT ROUGH BEAST, NEW ENGLAND STYLE IPA, $5.49-$6.99 The head is thin but persistent on this cloudy, faded, orange peelcolored brew. The floral nose mixes soft hops with ample sweet citrus aromas. In this mellow IPA with biscuit flavors backed by subdued tropical fruit and ripe melon, the hop profile comes through mainly on the dry finish. REVISION SMOKE & MIRRORS, NORTHEAST STYLE IPA, $3.99-$4.69 A thin head that leaves little lacing tops this muddled lemon peelhued pour, and the hops are a bit more aggressive than may be typical of the style, both on the nose and on the palate. Besides resiny hops, it combines toasted-oat flavors with grapefruit, pineapple and tangerine. It’s light but satisfying. SIERRA NEVADA HAZY LITTLE THING IPA, $1.59$1.99 The pour is a goldenstraw color with an ambitious egg-white head that fades quickly but leaves admirable lacing. This lighter-bodied brew has lots of fruity hops on the nose, backed by pine, papaya, lime and grapefruit, and it has an ample hop profile but a subdued bitterness. Creamy, tropical fruit flavors stand out with orange, lime and Meyer lemon. —David Kirkpatrick 18 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

FOOD CHIP COOKIES

NORTHEAST STYLE IPAS

COOKIE RIOT

BEERGUZZLER

CHIP COOKIES

COOKIE RIOT

T YPE OF COOKIE

CHOCOL ATE CHIP

CHOCOL ATE CHIP

NUMBER OF COOKIES

4

5

INDIVIDUAL COOKIE SIZE

6 OZ

3 OZ

COMBINED COOKIE SIZE

20 OZ

15 OZ

COOKIE COST

$10

$8.25

MILK OP TIONS

2% , CHOCOL ATE

2% , WHOLE

MILK COST

$2

$1 .75

MILK SIZE

1 QUART

1 QUART

DELIVERY FEE

$2.99

$2.99

TA X INCLUDED

NO

YES

TOTAL COST

$13.59

$11 .24

OP TION TO TIP ONLINE

YES

YES

CALLING IN THE CHIPS

Two new Boise-based cookie delivery services help kick late-night cravings LE X NEL SON From omelets and pancakes (Jax Inn) to kidney sandwiches (New Ivoire) to s’mores-stuffed empanadas (Empanadas, Son!), it’s possible to get just about anything delivered after midnight in New York City. Though Boise has a lot of ground to cover before it comes close to an NYC level of delivery badassery, businesses like Chip Cookies and Cookie Riot are doing their best making it happen. Both companies deliver still-hot-from-the-oven chocolate chip cookies and milk starting after the dinner hour, and both are relatively new to the Treasure Valley. Home-grown Cookie Riot came first, opening its doors in May of 2017, and Chip Cookies, an expanding family business headquartered in Provo, Utah, followed a few months later. Cookie Riot and Chip Cookies also share nearly identical business models: They cater to late-night snackers who want something sweet but don’t want to leave their dorm/apartment/house. “I think the reaction has just been incredible,” said Chip Cookies co-owner Sarah Wilson. “...We were really targeting college towns, but the demographic is every age, every gender.” Cookie Riot delivers Thursday-Saturday, 6:30 p.m.-11:59 p.m., while Chip Cookies offers a slightly later window: 8 p.m.-2 a.m. MondayFriday, and 8 p.m.-midnight Saturday. Both companies do same-day delivery and take orders online, so customers can visit their websites, pick a delivery window and have a box of cookies in hand in as little as 30 minutes, as long as the order comes in at least a half hour before closing.

While the way the businesses work is similar, the cookies they offer are distinct. Both are nods to the American classic, but appeal to different camps of cookie connoisseurs: For those who prefer them thick and cake-like, Chip Cookies is ideal. Those who go for more of a thin, chewy style can rely on Cookie Riot to satisfy. Chip Cookies delivers the goods in elegant white boxes sporting the company logo in gold. Their cookies are true monsters, weighing in at a hefty 6 ounces each. They have a structured, almost fluffy texture and sweet milk chocolate chips are generously distributed throughout the half-inch thick discs. The box comes with four cookies, and although that sounds like a reasonable amount for one sitting, each cookie could easily be two servings. Plus, consider the joy of having cookie leftovers. Cookie Riot sends its delights in what look like miniature pizza boxes adorned with the company’s bright blue logo. The cookies are soft, thin discs of just-baked dough, with a deliberate scattering of chocolate chips oozing through the chewy edges. At 3 ounces each, the Cookie Riot cookies are half the size of Chip Cookies’, but each box comes with five cookies. Be warned: It’s almost impossible to eat just one. The cost of cookie delivery from either company comes in at $10plus, and though it may push the price limit for a “treat yourself ” midnight snack, it’s right in the sweet spot for a gift. A delivery of warm chocolate chip cookies says “I love you” better than any card. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MIC HAE L A HIL L

CITIZEN CHEF RICHARD JIMENEZ

RV and Van Conversions Free Estimates 100% Guarantee

On veggies and Valentine’s Day dinner at Le Coq d’Or AMY ATKINS

Cooking has long been an important part of Chef Richard Jimenez’s life. The son of Paul and Mary Jean Wegner, proprietors of popular Boise bistro Cucina di Paolo, Jimenez felt a deep connection with food and, more importantly, preparing it, from a young age— he was 15 when he got his first cooking job. Locally, he worked at restaurants like Angell’s, Bardenay and Cottonwood Grille to name a few, and he even trained under Chef Scott Leibfried of Hell’s Kitchen fame while living in Southern California. Now, at age 37, Jimenez is the executive chef of Le Coq d’Or, located in Chateau des Fleurs on the grounds of the world-renowned Camille Beckman facility in Eagle. He has been there less than a year, but with unfettered access to the nearly 40-acre on-site garden/orchard/vineyard, and the support and encouragement of Camille Beckman founder Susan Roghani, his enthusiasm and passion for fine dining, innovating with high-end ingredients and bringing together Asian, French and American cuisines is flourishing. Speaking of love, Jimenez has been busy planning what promises to be an exquisite menu for the Le Coq d’Or Valentine’s Day Dinner— but he took some time to chat about tenacity, timing and trusting his instincts. Tell me about how your professional cooking career. I got a job at Murphy’s working for Chef Mitchell Maricich [co-owner of former Boise restaurants Milky Way and Tapas Estrella]. He saw how hard I worked as a busser and asked if I wanted to work the pantry. It had a little bit better hours and money, so I said yes … but kept harassing him to let me cook. I came in one day and said, “Are you going to let me cook?” He said, “No.” I said, “C’mon.” He said, “No! Get outta here.” But I hung around B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

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for a few hours, and finally he said, “What do you want?” I said, “To cook.” So he showed me how to cook a steak by touch—using my fingers to test the doneness. We had a really busy night, and he was coaching me while he was cooking. I only fucked up two steaks out of like 50, and he said I could start cooking full-time on the weekends. I was like, “Oh, no. I’m a kid and I want to hang out with other kids on the weekend.” He said, “Do you want the job or not?” I took it, and I loved it. I was just a kid, and I was running the broiler. I held my own with a bunch of grown men. It was one of the most rewarding feelings ever. How long have you been at Le Coq d’Or? About 10 months. Where were you before that, and for how long? Red Feather. Two years. Did someone from Le Coq d’Or come into Red Feather? Were you poached? Here’s the thing: I heard [the previous chef ] quit, and fine dining is my style of food. I went out to talk to them, but [Roghani] was really skeptical about who she was going to bring on next. She had a sous chef, so she decided to kind of let him do his thing, but I think he didn’t really fit the vision for a fine dining crowd. I was actually getting ready to head to Seattle to be a culinary director for about four restaurants. I was packing just for the weekend to go up there and check things out when I got a phone call from [Roghani]. At the time, I hadn’t talked to her in a year. She said, “I came into the restaurant looking for you, but I didn’t want to poach you.” It worked out because I was quitting anyway. So I talked to her, and I saw the facility. We talked for a couple of hours. Our conversation

was literally about seeds. About plants. About all the veggies. The Le Coq/Chateau garden is stunning. What are you most excited about growing? We didn’t yield quite as much as we would have liked this year, but we’re really on deck with the things I like. We’ll have thumbelina carrots, sunchokes [Jerusalem artichokes]—all the ingredients I’m really proud to use are coming out of the garden this year. We’ve been trying to plant in small batches so I have continuous vegetables instead of one big push of one vegetable at a time. For a chef, that’s pretty kick-ass. I’m really happy. What’s on the menu at Le Coq for Valentine’s Day? Well, I have a flavor profile in there that I love: passion fruit and chiles. I know it makes a beautiful dressing, so I’m going to use it on a shrimp salad. I haven’t figured out the lettuce I’m going to use yet. I’ll probably have some kind of chicory and a neutral lettuce, like a Miner’s lettuce. The dish I’m going to do, I’m doing it for 350-400 people, and I wanted something sumptuous. For me, there’s not much better than a properly cooked short rib. We’re using Snake River Farms Kobe, which has a huge amount of marbling, and the collagen in it is delectable. I’m going to be serving it on top of my polenta, which has a base recipe that’s unique to me. I’ll be using smoked cipollini [small Italian onion], and I’ll fold it into the polenta to make polenta cakes. I’ll serve the short rib on the polenta with some creme fraiche and a little watercress to clean it up, because it’s a heavy dish. I have an unorthodox approach to flavor profiles. Sometimes it doesn’t make sense—until you eat it. [Jimenez hasn’t yet decided on dessert.]

Join us for Valentine’s Day!!! Appetizer

Fried Oysters

Entree

1/2 a Dungeness Crab Served With a 14oz Porterhouse. Served with grilled asparagus tossed in a brown butter caper buerre blanc.

Dessert

Flourless Chocolate Mousse Cake.

RESERVATIONS ARE FOR PARTIES OF 8+ Smaller parties may call up to one hour in advance.

Gift Cards Available! Complete Italian Wine List Hours Sun-Thurs 8am-9pm Fri-Sat 8am-10pm

3588 N Prospect Way Garden City, ID 83714

208-577-6010 www.caffe lucianos.com BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 19


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NYT CROSSWORD | CRACKING WISE ACROSS

28 More than willing 30 For whom the Lorax speaks 31 Internet home to “Between Two Ferns” 34 Latin for “womb” 38 Monsieur’s mate 41 Y or N, maybe 42 Shakespeare character who says, “This above all: to thine own self be true” 45 Actor Jason 47 Zugspitze, e.g.

1 52-story Boston skyscraper, familiarly 7 Brass instrument with a mellow sound 15 ____ Malfoy, student at Hogwarts 20 Sorkin and Spelling 21 Kind of equinox 22 Puerto ____ 23 “Stop! You’re killing me!” 25 ____-garde 26 Give some lip 27 Uncut 1

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73 Novo-Ogaryovo is the official one of the Russian president 74 Lavatory sign 75 Hawke of “Training Day” 76 Regrettable 79 Broadway’s Hagen 81 “Roméo et Juliette” segment 85 Coin-toss call 86 Stand-up chain started in Los Angeles 92 Big engine additive 93 Log-in needs 15

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50 A person skilled at deadpan has one 52 What “4” may stand for 54 French river or department 55 Beseech 56 Advert’s ending? 57 Designer Geoffrey 58 Carrier to Karachi 61 Tugboat sounds 65 Decked out 67 Unimpressed response to someone’s one-liner 72 ____ intolerance

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BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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94 Verbally assail 95 “Iglu,” for “igloo”: Abbr. 97 Cover over, in a way 99 Start limping 100 It might involve someone being “so poor” or “so old” 104 “____, amigo” 107 Count ____ 108 Nail-salon employees, at times 110 Its “reeds are a pain / And the fingering’s insane,” per Ogden Nash 114 Lipinski and Reid 115 “Jeez … lighten up!” 120 Be grandiloquent 121 To this day, Marie Curie’s are still radioactive 122 Mystery 123 Lacoste and Descartes 124 Star of 1976’s Oscar winner for Best Picture 125 Smoothed in a shop

DOWN

1 Some body art, for short 2 “Hilarious!” 3 Noteworthy times 4 Lobster traps 5 Med. professionals who take a pledge named for Florence Nightingale 6 Welcomes 7 Plaster 8 Condition for filmdom’s Rain Man 9 Suffix with speed 10 “Oh, what the hell … I’ll do it” 11 “Uh, you’ve told me quite enough” 12 Where Michael Jordan played coll. ball 13 Meadow call 14 Poet Ginsberg 15 “Game of Thrones” creature 16 Joan who quipped ”A Peeping Tom looked in my window and pulled down the shade” 17 “Pick ____ …” 18 “Pretty please?”

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boiseclassicmovies.com 19 Doing a pirouette, say 24 Poison ivy, e.g. 29 Some sneakers 30 Something carried onstage? 31 “Terrif!” 32 Fifth category of taste with a Japanese name 33 “Peter ____ Greatest Hits” (1974 album) 34 High hairstyle 35 Doughnut figures 36 Late ’50s singing sensation 37 One of many scattered in a honeymoon suite, maybe 39 Light bark 40 Cry from Homer 43 Kind of port for a flash drive 44 Manage 46 Night vision? 47 Bowl 48 Maid’s armful 49 Made an appeal 51 Hymn starter 52 Habitation 53 Around the time of birth 59 Chains 60 Car-rental giant 62 Poet who wrote “Fortune and love favor the brave” 63 Org. that offers Pre✓ enrollment 64 ____ fly 66 One on the left?: Abbr. 67 Greatly bother 68 TV blocking device 69 Tops 70 Finish all at once, in a way 71 Things taken by government officials 72 “Sounds like a plan!” 77 “Don’t be ____!” 78 ____ Walcott, Nobel Prizewinning poet

80 Patriots’ org. 82 Bad state to be in 83 Mine transport 84 Modern party summons 87 Euros replaced them 88 Bustle 89 Grp. that puts on a show 90 Fleets 91 Wall St. bigwigs 93 Like Mount Narodnaya 95 Empty 96 Brings a smile to 98 Like some angels and dominoes 100 Champion 101 Airport that J.F.K. dedicated in 1963 102 Erin of “Joanie Loves Chachi” 103 Locks up 105 Concoct L A S T C A R P

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106 Bug 108 Jester 109 Feeling 110 Anthony Hopkins’s “Thor” role 111 City NNE of San Antone 112 “My treat!” 113 “My stars!” 116 Cambodia’s Angkor ____ 117 Court org. 118 Skit show, for short 119 What makes you you?

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S B E H P A I V C E

L A U D E D

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF: DREGER DANIEL SCHLICHTING, Minor Child Case No. CV01-17-21484 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition for Change of Name has been filed on behalf of DREGER DANIEL SCHLICHTING, a minor requesting a change of name from DREGER DANIEL SCHLICHTING to DREGER JRUE SCHLICHTING. The Petition alleges substantially that Petitioners are residents of Idaho, that they are married, that their son DREGER DANIEL SCHLICHTING, a minor, wishes to change his middle name from “Daniel” to “Jrue” as the name “Daniel” is a reference to Dreger’s biological father whose parental rights have been terminated. Dreger does not wish to have any association with his biological father, including his name, as it is a reminder of a father who legally abandoned him. Further that the requested name change is not for any illegal, fraudulent, or immoral purpose, and neither Petitioners nor the minor child are requesting a change of name with the intent or purpose of avoiding registration as a convicted sexual offender pursuant to chapter 83, title 18, Idaho Code. Such Petition will be heard on the 13th day of March, 2018 at 1:30 pm, or at such other time as the court may appoint; any objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show to the court a good reason against such

a change of name. Dated January 23, 2018 CHRISTOPHER D RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT Published on February 7, 14, 21 & 28 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the matter of the Estate of Darla Jean Martin, deceased Case No. CV01-18-00076 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Notice is hereby given that Iver J. Longeteig has been appointed personal representative for the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against said deceased or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to Iver J. Longeteig, Personal Representative, c/o IVER J. LONGETEIG, 5304 N. Turret Boise, ID 83703, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. January 26, 2018. Published: January 31, February 7 & 14, 2018.

ADULT

OFFICE HOURS

ADOPT-A-PET

MAILING ADDRESS

Noodle Says...

P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

Dental health affects the whole body! Cats need preventive cleanings, too. Call Today!

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

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FAX (208) 342-4733

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LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. NEEKO: 5-year-old, 13-pound male shorthair. Sweet, likes to be held once comfortable. Loves head-rubs.Best with older kids. (37551700-Cattery Kennel 101)

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PAYMENT REBEL: 8-year-old, 88-pound male Akita mix. Sweet, cuddly, Knows commands. Dog intro. required. Kennel-mates w/Rhona (37662385 -Kennel 311)

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BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | 21


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN Advice for those on the verge DISAPPOINTMENT

DEAR MINERVA,

Why would you ask victims of sexual abuse to come forward to the police when cops are often abusers themselves, with one of the highest rates of domestic violence by profession? Vulnerable communities are the first to be harrassed and profiled by police, so your suggestion is deeply disappointing. I appreciate your intention to help protect our community, but as a victim, I want access to resources to help heal, not punitive retribution and a chance to be harrassed and surveilled by cops. Signed, Queer and Upset

DEAR QU,

I acknowledge that, as a victim, you feel deeply disappointed. I, as a person who has been victimized, want a world where people are empowered to help stop the crimes that have happened to them from happening to others. As a victim of harassment and sexual assault, I long ago vowed that although I was victimized, I would not live as a “victim.” I want to be part of the solution. Please note: I provided resources for help (Faces of Hope Victim Center), and I offered that as a resource regardless of whether a victim decides to come forward or not—that is an individual’s prerogative. We all have the choice to wallow or to rise from the ashes. I understand your disdain for the police, but I’d like to point out that 100 percent of abusers are people, whether they wear a badge, hold office or bag your groceries. Don’t let fear stand in the way of what is right.

#boiseweeklypic

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Adulting is often unreasonably difficult, so it can feel good to treat yourself like a kid again—albeit with a 21-andolder twist. Buzzbox Premium Cocktails are packaged like juice boxes, complete with bendy straws, but contain 12 to 14 percent alcohol (200 milliliters each) and come in come in eight premixed boozy varieties: Perfect Margarita, Classic Greyhound, Long Island, Classic Cosmo, Cuban Mojito, Bloody Mary, Extreme Coconut and Whiskey Lemonade. According to the company website, the cocktails are made with premium spirits and fresh juices, and they are “specially packaged in a recyclable, green and energy efficient design” that, despite the no-preservatives rule, “can be easily stored unrefrigerated for up to 18 months, making it easy and convenient for consumers and retailers. $15/four-pack. Available at Although Buzzbox Premium Whole Foods, Prefunk Beer Cocktails were ostensibly creBar, Space Bar and more. Find ated by the company founder/ a full list of locations or order CEO Rod Vandenbos as a way to online at buzzbox.com cut down on long lines at concession stands and still serve high-quality drinks, they also make a great take-home treat, when all you want to do is put your feet up and get your Buzz(box) on. —Lex Nelson

Taken by instagram user sarge_thegsdog.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

1.

22 | FEBRUARY 7–13, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

6.

“A LONG WAY FROM YOUR HEART,” TURNPIKE TROUBADOURS

“DIAMONDS AND GASOLINE,” TURNPIKE TROUBADOURS

2.

“TRINITY LANE,” LILLY HIATT

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“RUINS,” FIRST AID KIT

3.

“DEAD REFLECTION,” SILVERSTEIN

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“FREEDOM’S GOBLIN,” TY SEGALL

4.

“CHOKE IT DOWN/DESPISE,” TROJECT

9.

“FROM A ROOM VOL. 2,” CHRIS STAPLETON

5.

“TURNPIKE TROUBA“THE THREAD THAT DOURS,” TURNPIKE KEEPS US,” CALEXICO TROUBADOURS

10.

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): British athlete Liam Collins is an accomplished hurdler. In 2017, he won two medals at the World Masters Athletics Indoor Championships in South Korea. Collins is also a stuntman and street performer who does shows in which he hurdles barriers made of chainsaws and leaps blindfolded through flaming hoops. For the foreseeable future, you may have a dual capacity with some resemblances to his. You could reach a high point in expressing your skills in your chosen field and also branch out into extraordinary or flamboyant variations on your specialty. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When he was 32, the man who would later be known as Dr. Seuss wrote his first kid’s book, And To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. His efforts to find a readership went badly at first. Twentyseven publishers rejected his manuscript. On the verge of abandoning his quest, he ran into an old college classmate on the street. The friend, who had recently begun working at Vanguard Press, expressed interest in the book. Voila! Mulberry Street got published. Dr. Seuss later said that if, on that lucky day, he had been strolling on the other side of the street, his career as an author of children’s books might never have happened. I’m telling you this tale, Taurus, because I suspect your chances at experiencing a comparable stroke of luck in the coming weeks will be extra high. Be alert! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A survey of British Christians found that most are loyal to just six of the Ten Commandments. While they still think it’s bad to, say, steal and kill and lie, they don’t regard it as a sin to revere idols, work on the Sabbath, worship other gods or use the Lord’s name in a curse. In accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to be inspired by their rebellion. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to re-evaluate your old traditions and belief systems, and then discard anything that no longer suits the new person you’ve become. CANCER (June 21-July 22): While serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Don Karkos lost the sight in his right eye after being hit by shrapnel. Sixty-four years later, he regained his vision when he got butted in the head by a horse he was grooming. Based on the upcoming astrological omens, I’m wondering if you’ll soon experience a metaphorically comparable restoration. My analysis suggests that you’ll undergo a healing in which something you lost will return or be returned. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The candy cap mushroom, whose scientific name is Lactarius rubidus, is a burnt orange color. It’s small to

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BY ROB BREZSNY

medium-sized and has a convex cap. But there its resemblance to other mushrooms ends. When dried out, it tastes and smells like maple syrup. You can grind it into a powder and use it to sweeten cakes and cookies and custards. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, this unusual member of the fungus family can serve as an apt metaphor for you right now. You, too, have access to a resource or influence that is deceptive, but in a good way: offering a charm and good flavor different from what its outer appearance might indicate. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A grandfather from New Jersey decided to check the pockets of an old shirt he didn’t wear very often. There Jimmie Smith found a lottery ticket he had stashed away months previously. When he realized it had a winning number, he cashed it in for $24.1 million—just two days before it was set to expire. I suspect there may be a comparable development in your near future, although the reward would be more modest. Is there any potential valuable that you have forgotten about or neglected? It’s not too late to claim it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The U.S. Geological Survey recently announced that it had come up with improved maps of the planet’s agricultural regions. Better satellite imagery helped, as did more thorough analysis of the imagery. The new data show that the Earth is covered with 618 million more acres of croplands than had previously been thought. That’s 15 percent higher than earlier assessments! In the coming months, Libra, I’m predicting a comparable expansion in your awareness of how many resources you have available. I bet you will also discover that you’re more fertile than you have imagined. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1939, Scorpio comic book writer Bob Kane co-created the fictional science-fiction superhero Batman. The Caped Crusader eventually went on to become an icon, appearing in blockbuster movies as well as TV shows and comic books. Kane said one of his inspirations for Batman was a flying machine envisioned by Leonardo da Vinci in the early 16th century. The Italian artist and inventor drew an image of a winged glider that he proposed to build for a human being to wear. I bring this up, Scorpio, because I think you’re in a phase when you, like Kane, can draw inspiration from the past. Go scavenging through history for good ideas! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I was watching a four-player poker game on TV. The folksy commentator said that the assortment of cards belonging to the player named Mike was “like Anna

Kournikova,” because “it looks great but it never wins.” He was referring to the fact that during her career as a professional tennis player, Anna Kournikova was feted for her physical beauty but never actually won a singles title. This remark happens to be a useful admonishment for you Sagittarians in the coming weeks. You should avoid relying on anything that looks good but never wins. Put your trust in influences that are a bit homely or unassuming but far more apt to contribute to your success. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A Chinese man named Wang Kaiyu bought two black-furred puppies from a stranger and took them home to his farm. As the months passed by, Wang noticed that his pets seemed unusually hungry and aggressive. They would sometimes eat his chickens. When they were two years old, he finally figured out that they weren’t dogs, but rather Asian black bears. He turned them over to a local animal rescue center. I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because I suspect it may have a resemblance to your experience. A case of mistaken identity? A surprise revealed in the course of a ripening process? A misunderstanding about what you’re taking care of? Now is a good time to make adjustments and corrections. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Charles Nelson Reilly was a famous American actor, director, and drama teacher. He appeared in or directed numerous films, plays, and TV shows. But in the 1970s, when he was in his forties, he also spent quality time impersonating a banana in a series of commercials for Bic Banana Ink Crayons. So apparently he wasn’t overly attached to his dignity. Pride didn’t interfere with his ability to experiment. In his pursuit of creative expression, he valued the arts of playing and having fun. I encourage you to be inspired by his example during the coming weeks, Aquarius. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According to ancient Greek writer Herodotus, Persians didn’t hesitate to deliberate about important matters while drunk. However, they wouldn’t finalize any intoxicated decision until they had a chance to re-evaluate it while sober. The reverse was also true. Choices they made while sober had to be reassessed while they were under the influence of alcohol. I bring this to your attention not because I think you should adhere to similar guidelines in the coming weeks. I would never give you an oracle that required you to be buzzed. But I do think you’ll be wise to consider key decisions from not just a coolly rational mindset, but also from a frisky intuitive perspective. To arrive at a wise verdict, you need both.

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“Civil Discourse In the Western States” STATE CAPITOL • LINCOLN AUDITORIUM Feb 15 • 5:15 PM • Panel Discussion

Bill Manny of the Idaho Statesman will moderate a panel focusing on Idaho efforts to build consensus and seek common ground on some of the West’s thorny lands issues, an area of collaboration where Idaho has set an example for the nation. (The event is FREE, but please register.)

Register at: IdahoPTV.org

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Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 34  

Brewing Storm: Why the Idaho Legislature won’t hear testimony on climate change.

Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 34  

Brewing Storm: Why the Idaho Legislature won’t hear testimony on climate change.