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Blast fromOurthe Past recap of the biggest news stories of the year

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Drop it Like it’s Hot The Idaho® Potato Drop is back to ring in 2018

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Bottoms Up

Celebrate the holidays with these specialty drinks FREE TAKE ONE!


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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Lex Nelson lex@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Drew Dodson, Sami Godlove, Veronica Lemaster, Gustavo Sagrero, Samuel Wonacott Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Kathleen Karpal, kathleen@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Bingo Barnes, bingo@boiseweekly.com Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Andy Hedden-Nicely, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance.

EDITOR’S NOTE WRAP UP Because our office will be closed Dec. 22-Jan. 2, we have early deadlines for both the Dec. 27 and Jan. 3 editions of Boise Weekly. Because we have early deadlines, I am writing this Note on Dec. 20. Because I am not clairvoyant (my husband and children might argue I’m telepathic, but they’re creatures of habit and just easier to read than they think), I don’t know exactly what the next seven days will bring (I’m hoping for peace on Earth). I am confident, however, the following stories are in this year-end edition of Boise Weekly: On Page 5, News Editor George Prentice looks back on 2017 and some of the important local politics, policies and parking rules that do and will continue to affect life in the City of Trees. Speaking of parking, Page 5 is also where you’ll find a recap by Senior Staff Writer Harrison Berry of the Dec. 19 Boise City Council meeting, in which new rules reducing free-parking hours and increasing parking fees and fines in downtown Boise, passed in a split vote. On Page 22, Prentice continues to reflect on 2017, this time highlighting some of the people—both local and visiting—who educated, entertained and enlightened us. When we refer to “the holidays,” we don’t just mean the eve and day of Christmas. We’re including New Year’s Eve, one of the most revered and celebratory days of the year for some—especially this one, after the turmoil of 2017. The annual Idaho® Potato Drop kicks off at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 31, and the celebration is so big, it took four pages to list all the music, food, activities and events, which you’ll find on Pages 13-16, thanks to our friends at the Idaho New Year’s Commission. Last but most, if you didn’t see the note from Boise Weekly owner/publisher Sally Freeman in the Dec. 20 edition, please read it when you have a minute (it’s at boiseweekly.com under Opinion, or find it on our Facebook page). It’s honest, straightforward and poignant, and the Boise Weekly editorial team stands behind her. See you in 2018!

Digital subscriptions: 12 months-$40,

—Amy Atkins

subscribe.boiseweekly.com Boise Weekly is owned and operated by

COVER ARTIST

Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055

Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

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E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2017 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST: Jennie J. DeBusk TITLE: “New Year’s at Capitol Park” MEDIUM: Encaustic on Wood Panel ARTIST STATEMENT: New Year’s Resolution: MAKE MORE ART! Take a look at the 4 page Idaho Potato Drop insert in this issue that I designed & illustrated.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online)

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each

week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | 3


MAIL AVON CALLING

Isn’t it about time the Idaho Shakespeare Festival stopped claiming it is about Shakespeare? In 2018, it will have five productions. Macbeth is the only Shakespeare play. The rest include such gems as Mamma Mia. The Bard must be spinning under the Stratford-upon-Avon turf. George Parker, Boise

DO YOU KNOW THE WAY TO SAN JOSE?

I do, but more importantly, I know the way back to Boise. On a brief five-day visit to San Jose, California, where I lived from 1974-85, I saw all the reasons why I left in the first place, only times 10.

Don’t bother checking the population growth charts. The arrow soared off it decades ago. Ditto for the number of automobiles, pickups, vans, trucks or buses. Virtually no one rides a bike in the South Bay. Why tempt fate? Planet South Bay has mile after mile of an endless array of dwelling units which go by an equally endless array of names: Apartments, apartment homes, apartment townhomes, apartment townhouses, townhouse apartments, apartment style townhomes, condos, condo homes, condo townhomes, condo style condos. The buildings all look alike and still not enough places to live. The law of

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

LIVE COMEDY

supply and demand is in full force here, as apartments go from $1,800 to $3,000 per month or more, depending if you want plumbing and a parking space. I didn’t check the price of homes, since the prices can affect blood pressure and heart rate. There are four class divisions of people in Planet South Bay: The working stiff, the rich, the super-rich and the megarich. Adding color to the local scene are the homeless, the working homeless, street-people, transients, drifters, career bums and the walking dead. My recommendation for local business and political leaders of Ada and Canyon counties, as well as all concerned citizens, is not to let runaway growth turn Boise and the surrounding areas into a carbon copy of Planet South Bay. You will suffer a severe case of buyer’s remorse. Tom Yount, Boise

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B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


The top stories of 2017 will continue to play out in 2018

The new parking rules go into effect Thursday, Feb. 1.

BOISE CITY COUNCIL APPROVES NEW PARKING RULES IN SPLIT VOTE

GEORGE PRENTICE Whether it’s the race to determine who should be the next Idaho governor, the escalating disagreements over major policy changes from the Trump administration or the shrinking inventory of affordable housing in the Treasure Valley, 2017 saw some of the most engaged citizen debates in recent memory. Here’s a refresher course of the news that may be making a comeback in the new year:

BOISE’S PARKING DILEMMA

There may have been other news stories in 2017 that were more controversial and politicallycharged, but our articles on transportation—mass transit (or lack thereof), rerouting the most congested thoroughfares in Boise or the headaches triggered by never-ending road construction— garnered the most reader attention. And it was the challenge of finding a parking place that triggered the most feedback. This past summer, as part of the Boise Weekly Annual Manual, we sought out absolutely free parking spaces in downtown Boise. We looked for spaces with no hourly or residential restrictions whatsoever, and ended up finding hundreds of free spots. A few months later, city staff told BW they found our story surprising, but added we shouldn’t count on some of those spaces remaining free. By the end of the year, the city had unveiled a radically new parking strategy, increasing rates at many downtown meters, extending the hours of charging for metered parking and, for the first time in the Boise history, charging motorists to park in metered spots on Saturdays. Those parking increases came in the wake of the Capital City Development Corporation decision to raise rates in most downtown parking garages. All the hikes, from both the city and CCDC, will go into effect in February 2018, but more than a few critics say the real impact will be felt only when the two downtown farmers markets open next spring, and visitors are faced with feeding the meter just to buy fresh vegetables.

LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO CALL HOME This year, we were inundated with survey after survey. They were reminders that Boise is one of the most livable places in the U.S., yet more and more people in the Treasure Valley are hard-pressed to find an affordable place to call B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

The biggest stories of 2017 will likely cast big waves in 2018.

home. In our July story “For Rent,” we reported that although an unprecedented number of rental units were being unveiled in downtown Boise, the city was still facing a historically low vacancy rate. “Right now, we have people applying to 20 or 30 different places and wasting money on application fees, putting themselves in a deeper financial hole,” said Diana Lachiondo, Director of Community Partnerships at Boise City Hall. “It’s a really bad scenario.” While more than a dozen new or in-development housing units will bring nearly 1,300 apartments to downtown in 2018, it will be a bellwether year to see if the Boise working class can afford the higher rents that many of those new units require. A community assessment from the United Way of Treasure Valley summed up the problem, saying, “The percentage of individuals who are burdened by high housing expenses is higher among renters.” The study also revealed that nearly 16 percent of Treasure Valley renters are food insecure, triple the number of homeowners in the same situation.

WHO’S REALLY PULLING THE STRINGS? In our Aug. 16 story, “The Power Brokers,” we took a close look at the men and women who might have a say in who will be the next Idaho governor. Whether by way of endorsements, campaign contributions or dedicated resources to help a candidate, the most influential political advocates in the Gem State are poised to play a big role in the 2018 race for lame duck Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter’s position. The conservativeleaning Idaho Freedom Foundation, for example, has already influenced Tommy Ahlquist, the Boise-based millionaire/physician/builder who threw his hat into the ring to challenge political

veterans Lieutenant Governor Brad Little and Congressman Raul Labrador in the May 2018 GOP primary. Ahlquist’s most ambitious political statement to date was that, if elected, he would slash the Idaho state budget by $100 million within the first 100 days in office—a statement that came only two days after the Idaho Freedom Foundation announced its own blueprint to cut the state budget by an almost identical amount. “He’s listening. I appreciate that,” said IFF founder Wayne Hoffman. “I was really proud of him for saying that.”

A NEW HOPE

In our January story, “In Search of What Doesn’t Divide Us,” we introduced readers to Nora Harren and Colette Raptosh, two high school students who organized the Women’s March on Idaho, which saw thousands of citizens flood the steps of the Idaho Statehouse. It wasn’t a coincidence that the Jan. 21 event came on the first full day of President Donald Trump’s administration. The rally made national news and thrust Harren and Raptosh into the spotlight, earning them a profile in Teen Vogue. By the end of the year, Harren and Raptosh hadn’t lost their activist spark. They held another rally on Saturday, Dec. 23, again on the steps of the Statehouse, this time to protest the FCC decision to upend net neutrality. “We have to fight for equal access and resist the injustice of large companies bottlenecking access,” said Harren. “We recognize the harsh impact of repealing net neutrality on vulnerable communities.” Clearly, Harren and Raptosh have their eyes on the future—and they will be a pair to watch in 2018.

In a split vote Dec. 19, Boise City Council approved new rules extending the hours during which people must pay for parking and increasing rates across the downtown core. The regulations will go into effect Thursday, Feb. 1. Council members Elaine Clegg, Lauren McLean and Ben Quintana voted in favor of the changes; members Maryanne Jordan, TJ Thomson and Scot Ludwig voted against. “We had longtime downtown business owners saying they wanted this [change] to be made,” said Boise Mayor Dave Bieter, who cast the tie-breaking vote. Specifically, the changes include longer enforcement hours in two of the three zones dividing downtown and stiffer penalties for parking violations. An expired meter will set drivers back $20, time zone violations $25, hazard violations $60 and accessible violations $150. City Council members who opposed the measure said they agreed it was time to change parking rules downtown, but were hesitant to charge for Saturday parking. Mike Journee, a spokesman for the city, said the city would like to increase turnover in short-term parking spaces and greater use of long-term parking structures as the city works toward for greater public transportation options and enhanced pedestrian/bike infrastructure. “We recognize it’s a challenge, more so as downtown becomes complex. Transit will help to create holistic parking and alternatives,” Journee said. Some say the change doesn’t help people who work downtown. Chelsea Harada, who works at the Boise Farmers Market, said they will likely be a cost burden to those already concerned about parking availability. “There [weren’t] any solutions put in place before this for people whose options it eliminates,” she said. “Low-income people are the most affected.” Journee said an upcoming program will release some of the pressure put on workers. Passes will be available from the city that will allow people with proof of employment unlimited parking in Zone 3 after 3 p.m. every day for $15 per month. —Harrison Berry Boise Weekly intern Veronica Lemaster contributed to this story.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | 5

KE L S E Y HAWES

RYAN J OH NSON

THE PAST IS PROLOGUE

NEWS

CITYDESK


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 27

27. See the website for details. 7 p.m. $5-$18. Evergreen Business Mall-Library Plaza, corner of Cole and Ustick, Boise, 208-433-0849, boisetrolleytours.com.

Festivals & Events

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Head out to the Idaho Botanical Garden for the annual dazzling display of over 300,000 sparkling lights artfully displayed through Jan. 1. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$12. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org/winter-garden-aglow.

BOGUS BASIN GLADE RUNNER COASTER OPEN—The new mountain coaster is now open daily through Jan. 7, along with the Coach Beginner Chairlift, the Pepsi Gold Rush Tubing Hill, Frontier Point Nordic Lodge and a non-lift served (hiking only) terrain park near the Deerpoint Chairlift No. 1. Additional operations will open as snow conditions allow. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., $10, Bogus Basin Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, 208-332-5100, bogusbasin.org. HOLIDAY LIGHTS TROLLEY TOURS—Join the fun aboard the decorated open-air Molly Trolley. Hot drinks will be available to take on board during your one-hour tour. Depart from the coffee shop behind Sockeye Grill in the Library Plaza, corner of Cole and Ustick. Tours will run nightly through Wednesday, Dec

On Stage COMEDY OPEN MIC—Sign-ups at 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Art ABERTZALEAK: SACRIFICE AND HONOR—The newest exhibit at the Basque Museum and Cultural Center, Abertzaleak: Sacrifice and

SATURDAY, DEC. 30

Celebrate on the slopes.

LIGHT UP THE NIGHT AT BRUNDAGE

You don’t have to be a ski or snowboard buff to head to Brundage Mountain Resort on Saturday, Dec. 30, for Light Up the Night, the annual bash on its snow-covered slopes in celebration of the new year. Anyone in search of a good time is welcome, even the littlest snowbunnies, who can burn off energy in the “Family Zone” on the top floor of the lodge before the real fun—including a torchlight parade and fireworks display—beings. Bring a folding chair to set up slopeside to watch the action, or snack and sip hot chocolate, coffee, wine or beer around one of the firepits at plaza level. Family fun will begin at 4:30 p.m. when the chairlift closes down for the night, and the first fireworks will hit the air following the Torchlight Parade at 5:45 p.m. 4:30-8 p.m., FREE. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 208- 634-415, brundage.com. 6 | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

Honor, honors Basques and their military service in not only the U.S. military, but also the Basque, Spanish and French militaries. It will showcase unique stories of prisoners of war, victory and loss, women’s roles, home front support and more. The hope is to capture a piece of what many different immigrant groups have gone through when coming into this country as well as the heroes that currently serve in the U.S. military. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$5. Basque Museum and Cultural Center, 611 Grove St., Boise, 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com. CHERYL K. SHURTLEFF: THE ROAD IS WIDER THAN LONG— Celebrated artist Cheryl K. Shurtleff grew up on a fruit ranch near Payette, and earned a BFA and an MA from Boise State. The Road is Wider than Long explores Shurtleff’s complex body of work, much of which has a strong bent toward the uncanny, mysterious and surreal. Featuring both two- and threedimensional work alongside source imagery and objects, the exhibition showcases the incredible breadth

and depth of the work Shurtleff created before her death in 2015. Through May 20. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. CONSIDER THE SOURCE—Consider the Source looks at the physical elements used to create works of art, whether man-made or naturally occurring, through an original arrangement of works from the museum’s permanent collection. Viewers are invited to spend time looking closely at the artworks to decipher how and why the artists have employed particular materials. Through Oct. 14. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330. boiseartmuseum.org/exhibition/consider-the-source. FINE ART IN MINIATURE—This features 100 original mini paintings and photographs by 40 popular area artists. Through Jan. 5. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-888-9898, finerframes.com.

SUNDAY, DEC. 31

HIDDEN MIND: ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY AND SCULPTURES— Check out the first exhibition of these abstract photography prints and sculptures by David Whitaker. Through Feb. 3. Noon-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 3. FREE-$5. Studio Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Ste 106, Boise, 208-917-7427. studioboise.org/currentshowing. AN INTENTIONAL EYE: SELECT GIFTS FROM WILFRED DAVIS FLETCHER—Wilfred Davis Fletcher (1922-2016), a third-generation Idahoan and longtime friend and supporter of the Boise Art Museum, donated his first gift—a small graphite drawing by Maynard Dixon—to the Museum in 1984. In the years since, he has made 17 additional donations, totaling nearly 600 works of art. His incredible generosity has significantly shaped the BAM permanent collection of approximately 4,000 objects by introducing artworks by prominent artists who were previously unrepresented. Through April 14. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

IRINA NOVARESE: ONE SHOT— From found imagery and artifacts, Irina Novarese of Turin, Italy, constructs spaces identified by fiction and reality. Installations become a type of abstract storytelling that brings into question how we perceive and personify history, its relics and those who preserve it. The origin of Novarese’s site- specific, solo exhibition One Shot is an investigation into an image sourced from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation entitled “All Female Survey Crew,” taken in 1918 during the Minidoka Project. The picture is the only one available that documents a completely female survey crew until the 1950s. Through Jan. 20. 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-972-9028, mingstudios.org. MAPPING THE PAST: SELECTIONS FROM THE THOMAS J. COONEY COLLECTION—Map makers have the unique ability to collapse both time and space in their work. Mapping the Past explores what mapping means, both in the technical sense and in the metaphorical sense, looking

SUNDAY, DEC. 31

Three, two, one, spud!

NEW YEAR’S EVE IDAHO® POTATO DROP

As we say goodbye to 2017, we say hello to the big local New Year’s Eve party: the Idaho® Potato Drop, a nationally recognized event that draws 35,000 annual “SpecTaters” to downtown Boise to watch a giant glowing spud descend from the heavens and ring in the new year. The drop is always a party, and attractions this year include the USASA-sanctioned Olympic pre-qualifier “Big-Air Rail Jam” snow park, a McCall Winter Carnival Ice Sculpture pre-show in Capitol Park, a live music-powered LED dance floor, the Wrestle Club “Potato Belt” championship and the usual show-stopping fireworks display. Brave the winter chill to discover delicious eats in the food court, fun activities for the whole family and the magic of a 400-pound “GlowTato” touching down on the Capitol lawn. 1 p.m., Dec. 31-1 a.m., Jan 1, FREE. Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., 208-433-9705, idahopotatodrop.com.

Our top picks to kick off 2018.

BOISE DOES NEW YEAR’S EVE

If giant glowing spuds aren’t your style, there are plenty of other options in Boise for a kick-ass New Year’s Eve. Most downtown bars and breweries are sporting drink specials, including Mad Swede Brewing Company, which will hoist a giant hop over the brewhouse for its New Year’s Eve Hop Drop, complete with free Hop Drop pours, food truck eats and live music. Local restaurants are also doing their part, including Chateau des Fleurs in Eagle, which is throwing a swanky Pink Panther Bash that includes a five-course meal, midnight toast and dancing to the Kings of Swing, and Zee’s Rooftop Cafe, which will give party-goers access to booze, appetizers, dancing and a killer view of downtown fireworks. If you want to show the kids a good time too, try the Wahooz Noon Year’s Eve Party for daytime deals on rides and games. Times and locations vary. Check our calendar at boiseweekly. com for details. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR beyond pure cartography for deeper meaning. The works collected here, which were recently gifted to the Museum by Thomas J. Cooney, date to the 16th and 17th centuries. Through Jan. 28. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. NAMPA ART COLLECTIVE: EVERYTHING CHANGES—The NAC’s latest quarterly exhibition at the Nampa Civic Center features the work of nine member artists, including featured artist Angela Kathleen Stout. Plus Tom Bicak, Leslie Jay Bosch, Carolyn Eardley, Carolyn Greener, Betty Mallorca, Lawrence Manning, Serenity Studio and Tina Pittman. Through Jan. 8. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter. com. RACHEL TEANNALACH: PORTALS—Check out this solo exhibition of 14 major landscape paintings by Rachel Teannalach. The body of work features a geographic panorama of iconic landscapes each within 150 miles of Boise.

They are intended to be experienced as “portals” to the diverse and beautiful landscapes surrounding Idaho’s capitol city. Painting locations include the Sawtooth and White Cloud Mountains, Bruneau Sand Dunes, Hell’s Canyon and the Boise Foothills. Teannalach is a contemporary landscape painter based in Boise. She is known especially for her “tinyExpanse” daily paintings. Through March 12. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Friesen Galleries, Brandt Center, Northwest Nazarene University, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8398, teannalach.com. SEAN KENNEY: BRICKS + STONES—Sean Kenney is an artist and children’s book author. He has more than 5 million LEGO® bricks at his studio in Brooklyn, which he uses to create sculptures and wall murals. Kenney merges vintage tapestry aesthetics with op-art patterns to create abstract compositions that recall gemstones, such as jade and jasper. Accompanying Kenney’s artwork are actual stones on loan from the Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology and Stewart’s Gem Shop. Rich in history, these

MONDAY, JAN. 1

spectacular gems present many facets of transformation. Together, the wall murals and gems offer a unique opportunity for admiring dazzling representations of beauty in natural and artistic creations. Through Feb. 11. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. TVAA: OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE—This Treasure Valley Artists Alliance Art exhibition features 30 artists, 53 works and varied mediums. Through Jan. 12. 9 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, boisestatepublicradio.org.

Workshops & Classes LINE DANCE LESSONS—Join Randy to learn line dancing, with intermediate lessons from 7-8 p.m., and beginner lessons from 8-9 p.m. For all ages. 7-9 p.m. $5. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-941-4853, R2L2CountryDance.com.

Odds & Ends NAMPA CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING—Christmas trees free of stands, lights and all ornamentation may be dropped off at Kohlerlawn Cemetery through Jan. 12. Trees will be turned into mulch and used throughout Nampa Parks and Recreation parks and trails. For questions or more info, contact the parks shop at 208-468-5890. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kohlerlawn Cemetery, 76 Sixth St. N., Nampa, 208-468-5890, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Food

Catch a cold for the cause!

15TH ANNUAL POLAR BEAR CHALLENGE

Are you ready to “freeze your fur off” to improve the lives of children? If the answer is yes, join your fellow polar bears at the Lucky Peak Spring Shores Marina for the 15th Annual Great Polar Bear Challenge on Jan. 1, where you’re invited to leap into the icy waters of Lucky Peak Reservoir to raise money for Makea-Wish Idaho. Heated tents and warm drinks, including coffee and hot chocolate, will be provided post-plunge, and a costume contest and fundraising competition will keep excitement running high with prizes provided by sponsors of the event. Plus, raise $50 or more to grant wishes and you can score a Polar Bear Challenge t-shirt as proof of your big-hearted bravery. 11 a.m., by donation. Lucky Peak/Spring Shores, 74 E. Highway 21, 208- 345-9474, polarbear2018.kintera.org B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISE BREWING MYSTERY CAN RELEASE PARTY—Boise Brewing will be canning one of your favorite beers for the first time, and they’re inviting you to crack one open and enjoy while you watch the canning process in the brewery. Tony’s Tamales food truck will be there, too. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing, 521 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-3427655, boisebrewing.com.

THURSDAY DECEMBER 28 Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Head out to the Idaho Botanical Garden for the annual dazzling display of over 300,000 sparkling lights aon view through Jan. 1. 6-9 p.m. FREE$12. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden. org/winter-garden-aglow.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | 7


CALENDAR On Stage COMEDIAN GABE DUNN—8 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDY OPEN MIC WITH SOPHIE HUGHES AND K.C. HUNT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Literature SOHBAT WITH RUMI—Join hosts Sayed Naimi and Howard Olivier to discuss the thematic stages of experience in Rumi’s poetry. You’ll explore the many stages of Rumi’s poetry, from separation to union, and discuss his work as a tool for the expression of joy and for coping with difficulties. You’re invited to bring your favorite Rumi poems and share how his work has shifted your experiences. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Kids & Teens

FRIDAY DECEMBER 29 Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Head out to the Idaho Botanical Garden for the annual dazzling display of over 300,000 sparkling lights artfully displayed through Jan. 1. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$12. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org/winter-garden-aglow.

On Stage COMEDIAN GABE DUNN—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com.

Odds & Ends

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME STAY AND PLAY—Each week, children ages 3-6 become reading-ready as they sing, laugh, dance and learn with great stories and music. This storytime will help your child develop literacy, social, and communication skills. After the program, you are invited to stay while children continue to learn through play. 2:30-3 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-8884451, mld.org.

FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE—Enjoy Country, Line and Swing dancing at Nampa Eagles. The evening kicks off with a dance lesson, followed at 8 p.m. by open social dancing, including two-step, line, West Coast and East Coast swing, waltz, nightclub, mixers and more. Featuring never-too-loud DJ music; music requests encouraged. Partner optional. Inexpensive alcoholic and

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME WITH STAY & PLAY—With a focus on preparing 4- to 6-year-olds for Kindergarten, this storytime will help children develop foundations for pre-reading and math skills while building confidence and independence. Stay and Play offers opportunities for imaginative and cooperative play. Thursdays, 10-11 a.m. Continues through Dec. 28. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org.

EYESPY

non-alcoholic drinks available, plus free popcorn. Sponsored by R2L2 Dance, with gift certificates available for dance lessons (R2L2CountryDance.com), and Art by Randy Lattimer (artbyrandylattimer.com). 7-11 p.m. $6-$11. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-941-4853, R2L2CountryDance.com. NAMPA CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING—Christmas trees free of stands, lights and all ornamentation may be dropped off at Kohlerlawn Cemetery through Jan. 12. Trees will be turned into mulch and used throughout Nampa Parks and Recreation parks and trails. For questions or more info, contact the parks shop at 208-468-5890. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kohlerlawn Cemetery, 76 Sixth St. N., Nampa, 208-468-5890, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

SATURDAY DECEMBER 30 Festivals & Events LIGHT UP THE NIGHT AT BRUNDAGE—Head up to Brundage for the annual Light up the Night celebration. This year’s holiday party will feature a torchlight parade, slopeside fireworks show, beer tents and family friendly festivities in the “Family Zone” on the top floor of the lodge. Hot drinks and grab-and-go meals and snacks will be available at the Main Street Market and Eatery, and the Side Stash Cafe will be pouring beer and wine alongside their specialty coffee drinks, with

Real Dialogue from the naked city

additional food choices for hungry kids and adults alike. 4:30-8 p.m. FREE. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800-888-7544, brundage.com. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Head out to the Idaho Botanical Garden for the annual dazzling display of over 300,000 sparkling lights artfully displayed through Jan. 1. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$12. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org/winter-garden-aglow.

On Stage COMEDIAN GABE DUNN—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com.

Sports & Fitness FALUN DAFA GROUP EXERCISE—Attain a healthy body and mind by learning the five gentle exercises of Falun Dafa, an ancient self-cultivation practice based on truthfulness, compassion and tolerance. 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-490-0309, falundafa.org.

and used throughout Nampa Parks and Recreation parks and trails. For more info, contact the parks shop. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kohlerlawn Cemetery, 76 Sixth St. N., Nampa, 208-468-5890, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Food PRE-NEW YEAR’S CELEBRATION—Celebrate New Years with Vizcaya. Grab some bottles of wine for New Years Eve or stay and enjoy a glass of wine. Enjoy discounts on wine by the bottle, as well as happy hour specials all day with 2-for-1 wine by the glass and $10 growler fills of 2012 Rhone blend. Plus, the Big Valley Ranch food truck will be on site all day. Note: Vizcaya will be closed on Dec. 31. Noon-7:30 p.m. $5 tasting fee. Vizcaya Winery, 8987 S. Greenhurst Road, Kuna, 208-870-8354, vizcayawinery.com.

SUNDAY DECEMBER 31 Festivals & Events BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY HOLIDAY HOURS—The holidays mean all locations of the Boise Public Library will operate under reduced

hours or be closed: Sunday, Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve: all locations will close at 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 1, New Year’s Day: closed. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org. NEW YEAR’S EVE ABOVE THE CITY AT ZEE’S—Celebrate the end of 2017 and ring in 2018 nine stories above Boise, a great place to watch the Potato Drop fireworks. Your ticket includes champagne, appetizers, dancing and downtown parking (until noon on Jan. 1). Local beer and wine available for purchase. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. $25. Zee’s Rooftop Cafe, 250 S. Fifth St., Boise, 208-381-0034. NEW YEARS EVE AT CAPITOL CELLARS—Enjoy a four-course, prix fixe dinner with a Champagne toast, featuring a Snake River Farms Kobe beef tartare starter; beet, fennel and arugula salad and shrimp bisque; main course of pheasant breast, beef prime rib or pan seared Sea scallops; and dessert of pistachio crème brulee or chocolate tart. 5-7 p.m. and 7:30-9:30 p.m. $90. Capitol Cellars, 110 S. Fifth St., Boise, 208-344-9463, capitolcellarsllc.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE COUNTDOWN PARTY AT PINZ Z-LOUNGE—Let the good times roll this New Year’s Eve with the Countdown Party in the exclusive Z Lounge at Pinz Bowl-

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

Kids & Teens SING ALONG WITH ELSA, ANNA AND OLAF—Sing along with Elsa, Anna and Olaf as the library screens the Sing-Along edition of the popular movie. Dress-up is encouraged. Refreshments and a craft will follow the film. 1 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Bown Crossing, 2153 E. Riverwalk Drive, Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org. YOUNG ATHLETES EXPERIENCE— The Young Athletes Experience will introduce children with and without intellectual disabilities to the world of Special Olympics sports through play and other fun activities. This program engages children ages 2-7 through developmentally appropriate play activities designed to foster physical, cognitive and social development. Invite friends, family and educators to come celebrate this Young Athletes Experience with Special Olympics. Last Saturday of every month, 10-11 a.m. FREE. Special Olympics Idaho Headquarters, 199 E. 52nd St., Garden City, 800-915-6510, idso.org.

Odds & Ends NAMPA CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING—Christmas trees free of stands, lights and all ornamentation may be dropped off at Kohlerlawn Cemetery through Jan. 12. Trees will be turned into mulch and used throughout Nampa Parks and Recreation parks and trails. For questions or more info, contact the parks shop at 208-468-5890. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kohlerlawn Cemetery, 76 Sixth St. N., Nampa. 208-468-5890, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Odds & Ends

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

8 | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

NAMPA CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING—Christmas trees free of stands, lights and all ornamentation may be dropped off at Kohlerlawn Cemetery through Jan. 12. Trees will be turned into mulch

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR ing Center at Wahooz in Meridian. You’ll get your own upscale lane (4-8 people) for the entire evening, appetizer and dessert buffet and a midnight countdown party. All ages welcome. Call 208-898-0900, ext 0, to RSVP. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. $27-$52. Wahooz Fun Zone and Pinz Bowling Center, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-898-0900, wahoozfunzone.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE HOP DROP AT MAD SWEDE—Ring in 2018 with Mad Swede, where you’ll witness the dropping of a giant hop over the brewhouse at midnight. You’ll enjoy the special Hop Drop beer release, in collaboration with Mill 95 Hops, featuring comet hops and a hint of orange. Complimentary flutes of Hop Drop will be served at midnight to toast the New Year. Like A Rocket will be rocking the brewery so you can dance the night away beginning at 9:30 p.m. Plus food by Genki Takoyaki and complimentary New Year’s Party favors while they last. For ages 21 and older. 4 p.m.-1 a.m. FREE. Mad Swede Brewing Company, 2772 S. Cole Road, Ste. 140, Boise, 208-922-6883, facebook.com.

NEW YEAR’S EVE IDAHO POTATO DROP—Enjoy a huge fireworks show, rail jam, live music and food at the Idaho State Capitol before the huge spud drops from the sky. With Planes on Paper, Desert Noises, Idaho Songwriters showcase, Boise Rock School, Zack Quintana, Voice of Reason, Bread and Circus, and Red Light Challenge. 1 p.m.-1 a.m. FREE. Idaho Capitol.New Year’s Eve Party at Wahooz—Celebrate New Year’s Eve with the whole family at Wahooz Family Fun Zone and seven new attractions in the Indoor Adventure Park. Enjoy unlimited Twister, Clip ‘n Climb, Frog Hopper, Bumper Cars, Laser Maze, XD Dark Ride, Bowling, Mini Golf, Go-karts, Kiddie Cove, and $5 Game Card. Countdown at midnight with balloon drop and party favors. 5 p.m.-midnight. $25. Wahooz Fun Zone and Pinz Bowling Center, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208898-0900, wahoozfunzone.com. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Head out to the Idaho Botanical Garden for the annual dazzling display of over 300,000 sparkling lights artfully displayed through Jan. 1. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$12. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org/winter-garden-aglow.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

On Stage COMEDIAN GABE DUNN— 8 p.m. $12-$15. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Kids & Teens NOON YEAR’S EVE PARTY AT WAHOOZ—This New Year’s Eve, the entire family can celebrate at the new Indoor Adventure Park at Wahooz. No matter the weather, the seven new attractions will provide hours of exciting entertainment as you ring in the new year a little ahead of time. You’ll enjoy unlimited Twister, Clip ‘n Climb, Frog Hopper, Bumper Cars, Laser Maze, XD Dark Ride, Bowling, Mini Golf, Go-karts, Kiddie Cove, and $5 Game Card. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $20. Wahooz Fun Zone and Pinz Bowling Center, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-898-0900, wahoozfunzone.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE LOCK-IN FOR KIDS AT NAMPA REC CENTER— Kids stay locked in at the Nampa Rec Center all night enjoying movies, swimming and games. Male and female supervisors will be with the children all night. Take a sleeping bag, swim suit, towel and clothes to sleep in. Sponsored by Domino’s Pizza. Pick up at 9 a.m. Jan. 1. For ages 6-12. 6 p.m. $20$25. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. TEEN SUNDAY MOVIE MATINEE— Teens 13-18 years are invited to the teen space each Sunday for a movie matinee. December will feature stop motion animation films, which have been created one frame at a time. Dec. 31: Paranorman. 2 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org.

Odds & Ends MIDDLE OF NOWHERE ANIME CLUB—See anime on the large screen with the Middle of Nowhere Anime Club every Sunday. The club watches fresh and new Japanese animation, mostly subtitled. Members also discuss anime-related topics, such as clubs, shows, cons, cosplaying, j-pop/rock, games, the treatment of shows on American television and more. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-972-8340, boisepubliclibrary. org.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

NAMPA CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING—Christmas trees free of stands, lights and all ornamentation may be dropped off at Kohlerlawn Cemetery through Jan. 12. Trees will be turned into mulch and used throughout Nampa Parks and Recreation parks and trails. For questions or more info, contact the parks shop at 208-468-5890. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kohlerlawn Cemetery, 76 Sixth St. N., Nampa, 208-468-5890, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

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CALENDAR OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS—Is food a problem for you? No matter what your problem with food — compulsive overeating, under-eating, food addiction, anorexia, bulimia, binge eating or overexercising — Overeaters Anonymous has a solution. OA is a fellowship of individuals who are recovering from compulsive overeating through shared experience, strength and hope. They welcome everyone who wants to stop eating compulsively. For more information, visit OA.org for details on the 13 other meetings in the Southwest Idaho region. 6:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Church of Christ, 2000 N. Eldorado St., Boise, 208-409-1086, oa.org. TREASURE VALLEY SINGLES DANCE—Enjoy open social dancing to a live band every week on Sunday. Married couples are welcome, too. You’ll meet new friends and have a few laughs. The first dance in 2018 is Sunday, Jan. 7, when you can start off the New Year in style. Sundays, 7:30-11:30 p.m. Continues through Jan. 7. $6-$7. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-442-1970, facebook. com/tvsingles.

MONDAY JANUARY 1 Festivals & Events 15TH ANNUAL POLAR BEAR CHALLENGE—Gather your friends and celebrate the New Year by freezing your fur off at Make-A-Wish Idaho’s 15th Annual Great Polar Bear Challenge. Brave Polar Bears will plunge into the icy waters of Lucky Peak at the Spring Shores Marina while challenging others to do the same. The goal is to have every participant raise $50, with all the funds going back to grant wishes of Idaho’s Make-A-Wish children. There will be music and coffee or hot chocolate. Heated changing tents will make sure you stay warm and toasty. There will also be a costume contest, so be sure to wear your most creative costume. There will also be a lot of prizes up for grabs, including for the top three fundraisers in both the adult and youth categories and winners of the costume contest. 11 a.m. By donation. Lucky Peak Reservoir, 9725 E. Hwy. 21, Boise, polarbear2018.kintera.org.

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BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY HOLIDAY HOURS—The holidays mean all locations of the Boise Public Library will operate under reduced hours or be closed: Monday, Jan. 1, New Year’s Day: closed. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Head out to the Idaho Botanical Garden for the annual dazzling display of over 300,000 sparkling lights artfully displayed throughout the holiday season. Through Jan. 1. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$12. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org/winter-garden-aglow.

Odds & Ends NAMPA CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING—Christmas trees free of stands, lights and all ornamentation may be dropped off at Kohlerlawn Cemetery through Jan. 12. Trees will be turned into mulch and used throughout Nampa Parks and Recreation parks and trails. For questions or more info, contact the parks shop at 208-468-5890. Through Jan. 12, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kohlerlawn Cemetery, 76 Sixth St. N., Nampa, 208-4685890, nampaparksandrecreation. org.

TUESDAY JANUARY 2

IRINA NOVARESE: ONE SHOT— Through Jan. 20. 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-972-9028, mingstudios.org.

Citizen

NAMPA ART COLLECTIVE: EVERYTHING CHANGES—8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com.

TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. The event is nondenominational. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

Odds & Ends RANDY’S FUN DANCE—Music will play non-stop for line dances. If you don’t know the dance, try one of your own or grab a partner and dance around the line dancers. For all ages. 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-941-4853, R2L2CountryDance.com.

Art ABERTZALEAK: SACRIFICE AND HONOR—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$5. Basque Museum and Cultural Center, 611 Grove St., Boise, 208343-2671, basquemuseum.com.

RACHEL TEANNALACH: PORTALS—Through March 12. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Friesen Galleries, Brandt Center, Northwest Nazarene University, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8398, teannalach.com. SEAN KENNEY: BRICKS + STONES—Through Feb. 11. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. TVAA: OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE—Through Jan. 12. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, boisestatepublicradio.org.

Calls to Artists ARTS IDAHO FELLOWSHIPS IN PERFORMING AND MEDIA ARTS—The Idaho Commission on the Arts is accepting applications for fellowship awards, recognizing achievements in performance or media-based arts. Idaho artists working in any medium may apply. Five fellowships of $5,000 will be awarded. Recipients will be interviewed for a short film and featured on the ICA website and social media. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, Jan. 31. Idaho Commission on the Arts, 2410 N. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3342119, arts.idaho.gov/grants. SUN VALLEY CENTER 50TH ANNUAL ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE—Artist applications for the Sun Valley Center for the Arts 50th Annual Arts and Crafts Festival are available online. The 2018 festival will take place Aug. 10–12 at Atkinson Park in Ketchum. Artists in all disciplines are welcome to apply. Questions about the application process may be directed to Sarah Stavros, festival director, at sstavros@sunvalleycenter.org or 208-726-9491, ext. 121. Through Feb. 28. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, sunvalleycenter.org/arts-craftsfestival.

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History and fiction are two roads to the same place in One Shot, Irina Novarese’s exhibition at Ming Studios.

WILD WILD WEST

Fiction, identity and Idaho history merge in Italian artist Irina Novarese’s One Shot HARRISON BERRY “Little Joe” Monahan fell ill during a cattle drive on the Boise River in the winter of 1903. The frontiersman had worked in a number of cattleand mine-related industries in Idaho and eastern Oregon since 1864, but after his death in early 1904, a coroner discovered something many suspected but none knew for sure: Little Joe was a woman. Monahan’s story is one of the more dramatic elements of Irina Novarese’s One Shot, which is on display at Ming Studios through Friday, Jan. 20. During a period when dams tamed the Snake River and farmers and miners transformed the land, the people who settled in Idaho were changing and defining themselves, too—Little Joe being a standout example. Novarese’s collection of archival photos and a single video remixes and recasts the people and places of Idaho at an exciting historical period of metamorphosis. The story of One Shot began in Los Angeles, where Novarese encountered an archival photograph of the first all-woman geographic survey team in the Gem State. In it, the women hold a totemic-looking surveyor’s level, which later became a symbol of Novarese’s exhibition. “I like [the level] very much because it’s related to the work of surveyors, but it’s also related to … the idea of finding equilibrium between men’s and women’s history in society,” Novarese said. She chased down the image to in Idaho archive, where she more historical materials characterizing Idaho in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as a place in flux. Novarese selected photos of the Minidoka Dam project, survey 12 | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

missions, work sites and ranches. Some of the images she used are of Japanese people detained at the Minidoka Internment Camp. Some are of Native Americans. There’s a World War I-era Boise High School women’s basketball team, a group of women bathing and another group playing polo. On October 27, Novarese drew a crowd to Ming Studios and asked participants to “tag” the images with notes about what they thought the lives of the people in the photos were like, which she used to compile alternate histories in a chapbook that became part of the exhibition, along with wall-mounted photos and a video. Novarese was aware inventing stories about historical Idahoans could be problematic. Some of the people in the photographs come from oppressed groups, but the chapbook and exhibition tell a story that, like history, unfolds organically. The raw desert of southern Idaho gives way to pilgrims and mapmakers, agriculture and eventually industry. Not everything in One Shot is a riff. The story of Little Joe is no tall tale, nor are the internment camps or the all-woman administrative office of the Young Women’s Christian Association. In creating stories, which appear as handwritten snippets from diary entries in the chapbook, Novarese used plain language to describe women’s experiences, trying to introduce imagination while hewing closely to history. For her, fiction and reality were two roads to the same thing. “The point of leveling fiction and facts is to paint a picture, an identity,” Novarese said. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


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CITY SOUNDS The best local releases of 2017 BEN SCHULTZ This wasn’t just one of the best years for local albums. It may have been the best in recent memory, period. From all the great local releases, here are some of the best of 2017.

A TRIBUTE TO THE TRAVELIN’ LADY: ROSALIE SORRELS (SELFRELEASED)

From the canny track sequencing to the photos on the disc covers, this amazingly consistent four-CD tribute to the late folk music icon was done with love and care. Its 44 songs—which include performances by local acts as well as nationally acclaimed musicians—don’t just honor the life of a beloved artist. They celebrate the joys and sorrows that we all experience on our journey from the cradle to the grave. That emotional breadth and depth help make A Tribute to the Travelin’ Lady the best local release of the year.

SUN BLOOD STORIES, IT RUNS AROUND THE ROOM WITH US (SELFRELEASED)

This brooding, mournful follow-up to the tumultuous Twilight Midnight Morning (Obsolete Media Objects, 2015) confirms Sun Blood Stories’ status as the most exciting young rock group in Boise. It may take a couple of listens to get used to the album’s droning interludes and jarringly goofy bonus track, but the wailed vocals, malleable beats and hypnotic riffs kick in instantly.

HALF SHY, BEDROOM VISIONARIES (SELF-RELEASED) Synth-pop artist Karen Havey lives in Seattle now, but she played in Boise for several years as Hey V Kay, which qualifies B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

NOISE her for this list. Plus, her latest EP is too good to ignore. Its polished production, beguiling vocals, literate lyrics, supple beats and indelible tunes are all proof of Havey’s immense talent.

WESTERN DAUGHTER, DRIFTWOOD SONGS (TAKE THIS TO HEART)

Western Daughter had planned to break up after Driftwood Songs, but band members changed their minds after WD attracted the attention of a label. It’s a good thing. Few indie-rock groups can balance raw power, intricate arrangements and heartfelt introspection the way WD does. Here’s hoping for another album (or four).

TISPUR, SLEEPY CREATURE (OBSOLETE MEDIA OBJECTS)

With cryptic lyrics, haunting melodies and high, gender-neutral vocals, Samwise Carlson doesn’t sound like anyone around. His debut LP as Tispur captures the wistful, dreamy charm of his music—a perfect wintertime soundtrack.

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS, GRAVEL (SELFRELEASED)

One of the highlights of the Train Robbers’ debut album Gravel is “Mom’s Old Fender,” which namedrops Hank Williams, Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings, Patsy Cline, Dolly Parton and John Prine. That last might be the most telling. Like Prine, singer-lyricist Tylor Ketchum (who’s only in his mid 20s) has an eye for detail and a plainspoken evenhandedness that songwriters of any age should envy. With Johnny “Shoes” Pisano’s slick guitar and the smooth rhythms of Jason Bushman and Flip Perkins backing him up, Ketchum makes maturity sound exciting.

OCEANS ARE ZEROES, OCEANS ARE ZEROES (SELFRELEASED) In a May 2017 interview with BW,

NOISE NEWS

lead singer Joseph Lyle said he hoped his band’s self-titled album would “make people think in a big way.” Big is right. Epic sweeps, melancholic melodies and thunderous power combine to create a near-transcendental experience.

DARK SWALLOWS, II (SELF-RELEASED)

Dark Swallows’ eerie tunes, plaintive vocals and mesmerizing guitar drones have made it one of the most distinctive local groups of recent years. The band’s sophomore album captures the visceral force and seductive pull of its live performances. Also, it’s nice to actually hear what frontperson Ivy Merrell is moaning about—“Seed of Love” has some vivid lyrics about an abuse-ridden childhood.

THE JERKWADZ, FOR LOVE AND PROTEST! (SELF-RELEASED)

For Love and Protest! is worth owning just for the high-powered “Shotgun,” the single catchiest song any Boise punk has ever written. The other nine tracks are tuneful as well, with Andy A’s clear production adding muscle to Dub Wade’s nimble drums, Cacie Lee’s rumbling bass and Jimmy Sinn’s roaring riffs and disarmingly melodious vocals.

NICK DELFFS, REDESIGN (MAMA BIRD RECORDING CO.)

Nick Delffs released plenty of memorable music with The Shaky Hands and Death Songs, but he has never sounded looser or more assured than he does on Redesign. His lyrics may allude to suffering and romantic dysfunction, but they’re overpowered by spirited vocals, luminous tunes and buoyant rhythms.

OTHER GREAT LOCAL RELEASES

Ealdor Bealu, Dark Water at the Foot of the Mountain (self-released); Lounge on Fire, Lips of Calypso (self-released); Storie Grubb, From the Backyards of Eden (self-released); Like a Rocket, High John the Conqueror (self-released); Teenage Candy, Life in Pink (self-released); 2x2, 60-90 BPH (self-released); Stepbrothers, There is Always Something to Worry About (Flesh & Bone Records).

It would be a logical choice to see Unreasonable Man on Friday, Dec. 29 at The Olympic.

LOCAL BAND UNREASONABLE MAN RELEASES DEBUT ALBUM

Working as a firefighter/paramedic, Robby Cowen feels a connection to the community he serves—particularly those most in need. It’s an excellent trait for someone in his line of work. His compassion also serves him well in his sideline; As the lead singer of local rock band Unreasonable Man, Cowen gives voice to lyrics about gun violence, big business and other divisive issues. “Our goal is to send a message,” Cowen said. For band guitarist, songwriter and founder Robert Lockerby, the goal is more of a mission. “Music is a vehicle for messages,” Lockerby said. The five-person band, which formed in June 2016, will deliver its messages on Friday, Dec. 29 with a release party for its debut album, Proxima B (self-released, UNREASONABLE MAN CD Dec. 2017). RELEASE PARTY Having a With K-Spar and Twin platform is an Ivory. Friday, Dec. 29; 7 opportunity Lockp.m., $5 (via eventbrite. erby doesn’t take com). The Olympic, 1009 lightly, but he beMain. St., facebook.com/ theolympicboise. lieves the music is as important Listen to songs from as the mesProxima B at reverbnation. com/unreasonableman or sage. Melodic unreasonableman.rocks. guitar-rock riffs stack up under Cowen’s punchy talk-sing delivery, accented by powerful bass lines and, occasionally, the softening touch of violin. Most tracks open with an excerpt of a famous speech—former president Bill Clinton opens “They’ll Lie to Ya Son,” and former president Ronald Reagan provides the intro to “Challenger”—and when performing, band members wear flight suits personalized with patches. Lockerby also has a “day” job. He’s the successful owner of Summit Log and Timber Homes. For him, being in Unreasonable Man is both fun and fulfilling, especially when he and his bandmates feel they’ve made a difference. “I don’t have all the answers,” Lockerby said. “But people get trapped in their belief systems … they get stuck in an ‘idea silo.’ Maybe [by sharing our music], we change somebody’s opinion.” — Amy Atkins

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | 17


MARTA FE RRONI

LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 27

STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid ANDREW SHEPPARD—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

MARCUS EATON, DEC. 28, SAPPHIRE ROOM

Though he moved away from the Gem State five years ago, it’s likely that singer/songwriter/guitarist Marcus Eaton will always remain one of its favorite sons. Eaton will return to Boise on Thursday, Dec. 28, for a cozy concert in the Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, where he’ll put his quick-fingered acoustic guitar riffs, soulful lyrics and effortless baritone on display for a small crowd. Eaton is an internationally renowned artist who has spent much of the last few years living and performing in Italy—even his most recent album, Versions of the Truth (2015) was released on Italian label, Route 61 Music. Eaton began his musical career playing with his band The Lobby, and a few years ago, he worked with folk-rock legend David Crosby on Crosby’s 2014 album, Croz (Blue Castle Records). Eaton usually performs solo now, allowing audiences to more fully experience how skilled and engaging he really is. If you’ve never seen Eaton live, you should, and here’s your chance. But hurry—his shows sell out fast. —Lex Nelson 7:30 p.m., $25-$33. Sapphire Room, 2900 Chinden Blvd., 208-343-1871, riversideboise.com.

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DEBORAH MICHELS GANG—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

TIM SWANSON—6 p.m. FREE. Divine Wine TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THURSDAY DECEMBER 28 BEN BURDICK TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

Jack Gish

FRIDAY DECEMBER 29

Knitting Factory SEAN ROGERS—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

A TASTY JAMM—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew

SOUL SERENE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

ANDREW SHEPPARD—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THICK BUSINESS—8 p.m. $7. Neurolux

THE BLUES GROOVE—7:30 p.m. $12. Sapphire

UNREASONABLE MAN ALBUM RELEASE—With K-Spar and Twin Ivory. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers ENCORE—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s GIGGLEBOMB—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

KARAOKE—3-7 p.m. FREE. White Water

JEFF CROSBY AND THE REFUGEES—With Tylor and the Train Robbers. 8 p.m. $9-$12. Ranch Club

KARAOKE WITH DJ BONZ—9:30 p.m. FREE. Busted Shovel

JUKEBOX MADNESS—7 p.m. FREE. 127 Club

LEE PENN SKY AND NEIL GOLDBERG—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

KARAOKE—3-7 p.m. FREE. White Water

JACK GISH—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

MARCUS EATON—7:30 p.m. $25-$33. Sapphire

MATH’S ARCANA—With Feral Billy Hiccup. 7 p.m. FREE. High Note

KARAOKE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

MICHAELA FRENCH—6 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew

RENE ROSS—7 p.m. FREE. Awakenings

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

UNTAPPED: MANTRA MONTHLY—9 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s

RISE OF THE FALLEN—With Black Tooth Grin, Hatespell, and Stone Prophet. 8 p.m. $6-$12.

SATURDAY DECEMBER 30

Afrosonics AFROSONICS AND NICK DELFFS—With DJ Walter Revilla. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux ANDREW SHEPPARD—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

Gifts to Idaho Public Television received by December 31, 2017, may provide… Personal tax savings that include: Federal and state income tax deductions. • Idaho State Education Tax Credit eligibility. •

Some ways to give: by mail — must be postmarked on or before 12-31-2017. • Check or debit card online — must be processed by 11:59 PM 12-31-2017. • Credit stock — Avoid capital gains tax on the increase in value. • Appreciated stock — Sell the stock, claim the loss, and donate • Depreciated proceeds for a well-deserved deduction. charitable rollover — Make a tax-free qualified charitable • IRAdistribution directly from your IRA - now permanent! • Vehicle donation - Call 855-IDAHO-70 to donate.

Consult with your tax adviser on how you may benefit from these opportunities with your 2017 contribution. For questions regarding year-end gifts to Idaho Public Television, please contact:

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Director of Development

Call (208) 373-7220 or (800) 543-6868, or donate online at: idahoptv.org

18 | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS!

MUSIC GUIDE MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PATRICIA FOLKNER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NEW YEAR’S EVE IDAHO POTATO DROP—With Planes on Paper, Desert Noises, Idaho Songwriters showcase, Boise Rock School, Zack Quintana, Voice of Reason, Bread and Circus, and Red Light Challenge. 1 p.m.-1 a.m. FREE. Idaho Capitol

GENERATOR SAINTS—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid

GIGGLEBOMB—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

PILOT ERROR—10 p.m. $10. Reef

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GRANT WEB BAND—9 p.m. $TBA. Ranch Club

THIS END UP—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

JACK LOYD GISH—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JUKEBOX MADNESS—7 p.m. FREE. 127 Club

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—9 p.m. $TBA. Ranch Club

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KARAOKE—3-7 p.m. FREE. White Water

WILSON ROBERTS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

OPEN MIC WITH NEAL GOLDBERG—7 p.m. FREE. Dwellers

SEAN ROGERS—5:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY JANUARY 1

THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

AYRON JONES AND THE WAY— With Zack Qunitana. 7 p.m. $10. The Olympic BLAZE AND KELLY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 CHUBBY LOVIN’—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

WALT AND THERESA HUNTSMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew ZOSO: THE ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE—With Defenders of the Faith, and Pinebox Posse. 7:30 p.m. $20$45. Knitting Factory

SUNDAY DECEMBER 31 BILLY BRAUN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

QUALITY ART

CHUCK SMITH AND JULIA KETAY—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DAVID MOSS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 DIRTY MOOGS—With The Max Beefwater Band and DJ Izze Azalea. 7 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux

JR AND THE STINGRAYS—With Smooth Avenue. 8 p.m. $25, $40 couples. Mardi Gras KINGS OF SWING—7 p.m. $125. Chateau des Fleurs MICKY AND THE MOTORCARS—8 p.m. $25-$75. Knitting Factory

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

Please call 208-319-3513 or book online at www.permamentalhealth.net

BLUES TO LOSE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

CAMERON CORTENS—11 a.m. FREE. High Note

Jr and the Stingrays

We provide psychiatric evaluations, therapy, if needed medication management for children, teens, adults and geriatric patients.

TUESDAY JANUARY 2

BUFFALO FIELD CAMPAIGN BENEFIT: CERBERUS REX—With URB, Laika The Dog, The Grand Ratking, Lucid Aisle, and Grease Gun. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic

GROGGY BIKINI—With Piss Poor, King and Queen of the Losers, The Old One Two, and Throat Honey. 7 p.m. FREE. The Shredder

We don't just prescribe medication, we listen and meet you where you’re at.

NYE BUFFALO FIELD CAMPAIGN BENEFIT, DEC. 31, THE OLYMPIC

If you’d like to kick off 2018 with a bang, head down to the New Year’s Eve Buffalo Field Campaign Benefit Party, a fundraising event at The Olympic headlined by local rock group Cerberus Rex. In an unlikely partnership, Cerberus Rex and five other hard rock bands—URB, Laika The Dog, The Grand Ratking, Lucid Aisle and Grease Gun—have paired up with the Montana-based nonprofit Buffalo Field Campaign to raise funds for the permanent protection of the last free-roaming bison in North America. In addition to live music bringing down the roof for a cause, local artwork will be available for partygoers to browse and purchase, with all proceeds going to the BFC mission. Whether you’re in it for the bands, the bison herds or the serendipitous juxtaposition, The Olympic is the place to be in Boise on New Year’s Eve. —Lex Nelson 7 p.m., $5. The Olympic, 1009 Main St., 208-342-0176, theolympicboise.com.

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SCREEN THE REST OF THE BEST Some final thoughts on the top films of 2017 GEORGE PRENTICE There are still some presents under the tree for the people who brought us the best movie moments of 2017. We already unwrapped our “Movie Madness” bracket, stacking the sweet 16, Elite Eight and Final Four films of the year—but before the bells ring in 2018, let’s take a moment to recall more of the best performances, scenes, music and technical wizardry of the year gone by.

THIS BLADE WAS SHARPER THAN EVER

NOW PLAYING

On first viewing, I wasn’t over the moon for Blade Runner 2049. In retrospect, though, I think Harrison Ford’s return to the role of Rick Deckard was his best performance in decades. Kudos should also go to cinematographer Roger Deakins, who has been nominated for an Oscar a stunning 13 times without a win. It’s a streak ready to be broken. Set designer Dennis Gassner deserves a nod, as well, for creating a stunning backdrop, by making a futuristic crumbling Las Vegas look like ancient Roman ruins. It’s also worth noting that Blade Runner 2049 is still screening at few discount cinemas around the Treasure Valley, so if you haven’t seen it, don’t miss this chance to see Oscarcaliber cinematography on the big screen.

THE PERFECT ANTI-HERO SUPERHERO MOVIE

After too many tiresome X-Men reboots, this year we were treated to Logan, a thrilling action-adventure and sayonara to the two best characters of the franchise. Perhaps the most refreshing surprise was that Logan ultimately condemned the very violence the Marvel brand has exploited for so long. Logan will be the last time we see Hugh Jackman as Wolverine or Patrick Stewart as Charles Xavier, and they couldn’t have found a better way to go out in a blaze of glory.

ALL HAIL QUEEN JUDI

On Dec. 9, Dame Judi Dench celebrated her 83rd birthday, but shows no signs she plans to retire or relinquish her crown as the most reliable British box-office star. Though Dench appeared in the all-star remake of Murder on 20 | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

Clockwise L-R: Call Me By Your Name, Blade Runner 2049, Logan, Dunkirk, Victoria and Abdul, The Florida Project: Movies well worth your time and money.

the Orient Express this year, her real triumph was her turn as Queen Victoria in Victoria and Abdul, which debuted in October. Critics dismissed the film as an art-house trifle and just another historical costume drama, but I loved it. Apparently, audiences did, too: The film raked in more than $64 million internationally and earned Dench a Best Actress nomination from both the Golden Globe sand Screen Actors Guild.

THE MOST MEMORABLE 10 MINUTES OF THE YEAR

Call Me By Your Name was one of my favorite films of 2017, and landed a place in the final four of our year-end Movie Madness bracket. Though it won’t open in Boise until Jan. 19, 2018, Call Me By Your Name is an absolute must-see film. I need to warn you, though, about the final 10 minutes... A father (Michael Stuhlbarg) speaks to his son (Timothee Chalamet) in the wake of the son’s first gay relationship. The father, respectfully accepting his son’s love for another man, delivers a monologue unlike any I’ve ever seen in film. I saw the film more than once, and that speech brought me to tears each time. It will leave you speechless, and those final 10 minutes will go a long way toward making Call Me By Your Name a major contender for the Best Picture Oscar. Prepare to be wowed.

HOW DID THEY DO THAT?

I’ve been anxious to talk to anyone who has seen The Florida Project, one of my favorite

films of 2017. It ends with a provocative scene, which was shot inside the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World, something the theme park strictly forbids. The question is: How did The Florida Project get away with it? Director Sean Baker gave me the answer following the Toronto premiere in last September. I can’t divulge it here, but seek me out if you want the scoop. More importantly, the final scene triggers a few other questions: Is the Disney World moment a dream sequence? Was it a real finale for the heroine of the film, played brilliantly by 7-yearold Brooklynn Prince? Feel free to fill me in on your Florida Project theories. As for those of you who haven’t yet seen this beautiful film, go see it, then let’s talk.

RUNNING UP THE SCORE

Composer Hans Zimmer has an Oscar (The Lion King), a Golden Globe (Gladiator) and multiple Grammy awards (Crimson Tide and The Dark Knight). But he really outdid himself this year with his original score for Dunkirk, which blankets the film with start-to-finish intensity. Zimmer employed what is known as the “Shepard tone,” an auditory trick that gives listeners the illusion pitch is continually rising when the music hasn’t escalated at all. Zimmer used the tick-tick-tick of a pocket watch as inspiration for his sweeping score, and the end result contributed as much to the excitement of Dunkirk as any of the on-screen action. Dunkirk is bound to bring home a truckload of Oscars, and with luck, one will make its way onto Zimmer’s mantle. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


HOLIDAY DRINK HITLIST

BUBBLES FOR EVERY BUDGET

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: It’s a shame to relegate sparkling wine to special occasions—even though there’s no denying more bubbly corks will be popped on New Year’s Eve than any other time of year. The good news is, you don’t have to break the bank to enjoy a celebratory toast. Here are three sparkling wines priced to fit three different budgets, and they’re all well worth their cost.

L E X NE L SON, VERONICA L EMASTER

FOOD

BUBBLY-SIPPER

Try these seasonal sips before the year is out LE X NEL SON AND VERONICA LEMASTER With Christmas come and gone, Santa has already checked every item off his list. Now, it’s your turn. These 10 seasonal drinks—five naughty, five nice—can help ward off winter, and whether a coffee-based creation is your style, or you prefer a little more spirit in your libations, these delicious drinks will keep you warm.

THE HOLY HAND GRENADE OF ANTIOCH

This holiday take on a Pina Colada was the brainchild of bartender/distiller Ashley Oe, and tastes like a Christmas vacation to the tropics (on the rocks). Where: Bardenay Restaurant & Distillery What: Malibu coconut rum, Gosling’s Black Seal rum, Coco Lopez, house-brewed coldpress coffee, house-made whipped cream, toasted coconut Cost: $8.50 Suggested Pairing: Bardenay American-style Kobe beef tacos

PONY BOY

A rich, chocolate taste and gilded-lily look make this perfect sip a holiday favorite. It’s available at The Mode year-round to keep you in the Christmas mood. Where: The Mode What: Goldschlager cinnamon schnapps, house-made maple hot cocoa, house-made gold leaf whipped cream Cost: $10 Suggested Pairing: Mode sweet and savory trail mix

GINGERBREAD MAN OLD FASHIONED With more than 500 pours sold last year in December alone, this festive cocktail is a Boise favorite. Where: Eureka! What: Old Overholt Rye whiskey, house-made gingerbread syrup, BroVo Spirits Douglas Fir liqueur, chocolate and herbal bitters Cost: $12 Suggested Pairing: Eureka! Fresno fig burger B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

Plum Paradise from Juniper (left), and The Toasted Marshmallow from Thomas Hammer (right).

HOT BUTTERED RUM The rum mix in this delightful drink is a secret recipe from Bar Master Erik Schweitzer’s grandmother, made with butter, sugars and spices—he calls it “Christmas in a glass.” Where: Press & Pony What: Plantation 5-year rum, hot water, housemade hot buttered rum mix, house-made vanilla whipped cream, nutmeg Cost: $8 Suggest Pairing: Boise Fry Company sweet potato fries with maple marshmallow sauce

THE PLUM PARADISE

Juniper offers a long list of seasonal drinks, including house-made eggnog, but this wellbalanced refresher is our cocktail pick. Where: Juniper What: Warfield “No Return” gin, plum, brown sugar, lime, nutmeg Cost: $10 Suggested Pairing: Juniper Snake River Farms beef medallions

THE TOASTED MARSHMALLOW

Rich espresso balances perfectly with the sweetness of a childhood s’more in this delicious cup of joe. It will have you roasting marshmallows by the fireplace in no time. Where: Thomas Hammer What: espresso, steamed milk, graham cracker syrup, marshmallow syrup, chocolate, whipped cream, graham cracker sprinkle Cost: $5.25 Suggested Pairing: Thomas Hammer sugar cookie

THE CANDY CANE

Cool mint, sweet chocolate and full-bodied espresso meet in this holiday classic that will satisfy any candy cane craving.

Where: Goldy’s What: peppermint syrup, white chocolate, espresso, steamed milk, whipped cream, crushed candy cane sprinkle Cost: $4.10 Suggested Pairing: Goldy’s fudge bar

TOASTED REINDEER

This sugary local sip is an unusual marriage of flavors, with nutty pecan pie notes complimenting a baseline of rich chocolate. Where: Zero Six Coffee Fix What: chocolate, hazelnut syrup, pecan pie syrup, espresso, steamed milk, whipped cream, caramel drizzle Cost: $4.50 Suggested Pairing: Zero-Six chocolate brownie

SNICKERDOODLE WHITE MOCHA

This chocolatey, cinnamon-spiked drink is the perfect gift for a coffee lover who isn’t afraid to go super-sweet. Pick one up if you’ve ever wanted to try drinking a cookie. Where: Black Rock Coffee Bar What: white chocolate, brown sugar cinnamon syrup, espresso, steamed milk, whipped cream, cinnamon sprinkle Cost: $4.20 Suggested Pairing: Black Rock apple bear claw

GINGERBREAD LATTE

The mouthwatering spice of gingerbread paired with espresso and steamed milk is sure to get anyone in the holiday mood. Where: Starbucks What: gingerbread syrup, espresso, steamed milk, whipped cream, nutmeg sprinkle Cost: $4.95 Suggested Pairing: Starbucks almond croissant

2015 SAINT-HILAIRE BRUT, $13.99 Before there was Champagne, there was SaintHilaire, whose sparkling wine production predates its more famous neighbor by more than 100 years. The 2015 offers reserved yeasty aromas with a touch of bitter herb. It’s a plush, round, ripe wine with lightly sweet apple flavors and earthy undertones—a real crowd pleaser and a bargain. 2014 RAVENTOS I BLANC DE NIT ROSE, $27 A torrent of tiny bubbles explode volcanically in this lightest of pink pours. Tinges of mineral and flint color the fresh strawberrysmoothie aromas. Creamy citrus flavors dominate the palate, backed by soft red fruit with orange and lime zest on the finish. Made with indigenous grape varieties, this takes Spanish sparkling wine to a whole new level. CHAMPAGNE BILLECARTSALMON BRUT RESERVE, $60 The nose of this pour is beautifully perfumed with fresh lemon, lime and green apple aromas spiked with a hint of bread dough. The constantly evolving palate starts with blood orange and nectarine, then adds touches of strawberry, persimmon, apple and even caramel. Crisp, balanced and elegant, this one is definitely worth the holiday splurge. —David Kirkpatrick

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | 21


CITIZEN

ANNE C. RICHARD

ARIANNA HUFFINGTON

CITIZENS OF THE YEAR

The actors, advocates and activists of the Class of 2017 GEORGE PRENTICE

hats for sale at the Boise Weekly Office. $12 + TAX benefiting the WCA.

“Auld Lang Syne,” sung by many at the strike of midnight on New Year’s Eve, is a reminder of the people who have touched our lives. In the spirit of the season, we celebrate some of the old (and young) acquaintances who became our Citizens of 2017. Living legends, heroes, heroines and provocateurs, you name it—we were honored to have spent a bit of time with some of the people we thought you’d like to read about. Let’s give one last tip of the glass and toast the class of 2017. When we spoke to Arianna Huffington’s representatives about a possible interview, they made it very clear that the person that Forbes magazine once declared to be one of the most powerful women in the world didn’t want to talk about President Donald Trump. That didn’t deter us from asking. After all, Ms. Huffington has known Trump for decades. Huffington was slated to be the keynote speaker at the Sun Valley Wellness Festival this year. OK, we thought, let’s ask about Trump’s health, particularly his rather unhealthy habit of tweeting at all hours of the night. “I can definitely say he’s not a role model of sleep,” said Huffington, taking our bait. “Regardless of what you think of him politically, we know that sleep has a huge effect on decision-making, problem-solving, impulse control and judgment.” Anita Hill, who famously spoke the truth to power during the 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearing of Clarence Thomas, wasn’t shy at all about talking about her concern over Trump,

8 | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | BOISEweekly

particularly how Trump’s White House has dialed down its collection of critical data. “I’m very concerned... starting at the first removal of information from the White House website about LGBTQ people,” said Hill. “The second indication was the removal of information about sexual assault from the White House website. Since then, the administration has released businesses from a fair pay pledge.” Anne C. Richard was the guest at the Frank Church Conference on Public Affairs this year. Richard, who served as Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration for the Obama administration, spoke about the tenuous state of the U.S. State Department and the ongoing global refugee crisis, and expressed her growing concern about Trump scaling down future refugee resettlement in the U.S. “I thought most Americans were very proud of the fact we’re a nation of immigrants and refugees. I thought that was well-established,” said Richard. “The change from the Trump administration seems to go counter to our history of immigration, and a ban on Muslims coming to the U.S. is certainly counter to our history of freedom of religion and an insult to Muslim Americans.” In the age of Trump and his insistence that he is the victim of so-called “fake news,” we sat down with Dr. Seth Ashley, associate professor in the Department of Communication at Boise State University and author of multiple studies on

ALLISON WILLIAMS media literacy. We were particularly interested in Ashley’s take on more high-profile news organizations turning to “sponsored content”—advertisements disguised as news stories. “It’s a desperate time for some organizations,” said Ashley. “People are trying everything they can think of to cover the gap to get them through to whatever a better business model might be. I hope it’s not the new normal.” Asked if media should be a willing partner in improving media literacy, Ashley said it wasn’t part of media’s purview to make things any better. “Listen to the way our phones ping at us constantly. It’s not an accident. It has us salivating like Pavlov’s dogs,” said Ashley. “That, for me, comes back to the classroom, to getting students to think critically about content and how it’s produced. A lot of this is basic sociology.” Sociology was the last thing on the minds of Americans who bought tickets to see Get Out last February, but there was a deep sociological drama lying beneath one of the scariest, funniest genrebusting films of the year. During the Sun Valley Film Festival, we spoke with Allison Williams, whose co-starring performance in HBO’s Girls made her a break-out star on the small screen and whose role in Get Out added a major big-screen credential to her growing resume. “I knew that when I first read the screenplay for Get Out, [writer/director] Jordan Peele had tapped into something very special, using a genre that for a long time hasn’t been used for a greater social commentary,” said Williams. “I leapt at the opportunity.” Get Out has landed on most critics’ top-10 lists of the year’s best films and is very much a part of the conversation over which movies might land a Best Picture Oscar nomination. As for Get Out being some kind of whacked-out house of horrors B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CITIZEN NEW LOOK, SAME SMART SAVINGS

MERCHANT SPOTLIGHT ISABELL A BOYL STON

MELISSA E THERIDGE

LOUIS ANDERSON

mirror image of American society, Williams said the film continues to be incredibly relevant. “We had just finished filming and it was right after Trump’s election in November 2016. I texted Jordan, ‘I wish this could come out right now.’ He said, with great sadness, that there probably wouldn’t be a time anytime soon when this movie wouldn’t be relevant and important. And indeed, the film became relevant in a whole new way as our country seemed to be increasingly bifurcated.” One of the most anticipated movies for 2018 is a film called Red Sparrow, which will star Oscar-winner Jennifer Lawrence as a ballerina who becomes a Russian espionage agent. Idaho native and prima ballerina Isabella Boylston gave us an inside scoop on Red Sparrow. “I can’t say too much about it, but I can say that I’m Jennifer’s dance double in the film. It was a crazy awesome experience,” she said. Boylston, now a principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre, was the producer of a world premiere ballet in mid-August at the Sun Valley Pavillion. It was a homecoming for a girl who grew up in a Wood River Valley trailer park. “My dad was a drummer and basically a ski bum, so we spent all of our time on the mountain. My first memory is of skiing when i was a toddler,” said Boylston. “We lived just south of Ketchum in the Meadows Trailer Park. I just went back there to look. Believe me, it looks a lot nicer than I remember. It’s been upgraded.” Rock and roll legend Melissa Etheridge has also traveled a long way from when she first picked up a guitar at age 8 to her honors, which include multiple Grammy, Juno and ASCAP awards, and an Oscar. Etheridge’s home isn’t on a stage; it’s on the road, and she said she still loves to visit every corner of the U.S. to perform live. “All across this amazing nation, I see people

who care, but they’re a little afraid. I see people trying to overcome fear of ‘the other’ or fear of change,” said Etheridge. “Yes, I see people saddened by a lot of the current rhetoric, but I still believe that all of this makes us a little bit stronger.” Derrick Davis knows something about “the other.” He’s only the third African-American actor to wear the mask as the lead in The Phantom of the Opera, which visited the Morrison Center in Boise this past June. “We were in Atlanta when a mother, an African-American woman, brought her son to the stage door. The mother was in hysterics and grabbed her son by the shoulder and said, ‘Look at him. Look at his face. Now you know, you can do anything,’” said Davis. “Moments like that constantly remind me of the responsibility that I have, not only to tell the story but to be an example to generations that will come after me.” Comedian Louie Anderson, who has been making us laugh for more than three decades, said when he first walked out on the stage for Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show in 1984, “It was like an anointment, meeting with the pope of show business.” Anderson performed in Boise this past March, just after turning 64 years old. “I’d love this to my second act, but I’ve already had a couple of second acts,” said Anderson. “I don’t ever want to be preachy or too serious. More than anything, I want people to leave their daily grind, as if they were riding down a snowy hill on a piece of cardboard. We couldn’t afford toboggans when I was a kid.” Anderson promised to slide down Camel’s Back Park Hill on a piece of cardboard the next time he’s in Boise. It was the height of summer when Dennis Doan discussed his 27 years as a firefighter, nine

of which he has spent as Chief of the Boise Fire Department. Doan is still hot under the collar over what he says is the continued allowance on the part of the Idaho Legislature to sell illegal fireworks inside Idaho—in spite of the recent conviction and sentencing of Taylor Kemp, who admitted to setting off a Roman candle that sparked a massive wildfire in the Boise Foothills. “I’m still upset with the Legislature. I can’t think of anything that’s illegal sold openly in Idaho,” said Doan. “Especially something this dangerous. What are we teaching our children?” Perhaps the most optimistic person we sat down with in 2017 was Holli Woodings, who won a landslide victory in her race for Boise City Council. Even more impressive was the fact that Woodings ran her campaign while shuttling between Boise and her mother’s bedside in Bend, Oregon. Woodings’ mother suffered a broken neck, broken back, broken ribs and broken clavicle, and by year’s end, she was transferred to a Boise hospital to be closer to her daughter. The citywide issue Woodings said she’s most anxious to address when she’s sworn into office in the New Year wasn’t a baseball stadium, downtown circulator, new library or affordable housing. Those were all extremely important issues to be addressed sooner, rather than later, she said, but Woodings said the time is long past due to address a mounting public transportation dilemma in the City of Trees. “We need our buses to run on Sundays and evenings. I heard this time and again from citizens throughout my campaign,” said Woodings. “I kept hearing that our transportation system isn’t reflective of the size of our city and the needs of our residents.” Beginning with transportation, Woodings will have plenty to work on in 2018.

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78 Automaker sold by G.M. in 2017 79 Territory 80 White undercoat 82 Broadbrim, e.g. 83 Inits. for getting around the Loop 84 Protagonist in David Foster Wallace’s “Infinite Jest” 85 Comment from a cook who cools the cheese sauce before serving? 89 Woodwind that’s O.K. to play? 93 Something that’s free of charge 94 Weapon seen on the Kenyan flag 95 Big stinks 96 Done, slangily 97 Units for binge watchers 100 Actor Patel of “Lion” 101 “Don’t ____ me” 104 Cupid’s catchphrase? 110 Part 111 Attention hog’s cry 112 Vigilant 113 “The Dukes of Hazzard” spinoff 114 Intimidate 115 One of eight in “The 12 Days of Christmas” 116 Egg-shaped Hasbro toys introduced in 1971 117 Certain soft drinks, informally

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43 Certain Lincoln Center soprano? 45 It may pop on a plane 46 Dietary std. 47 China’s Chiang ____-shek 48 Yes or no follower 49 Light on one’s feet 51 Submissive 52 Fleet 56 “Totally awesome!” 57 Bit of food … or feud? 58 Part of a house

23 Sources of lean meat 24 Comparatively strong, like some French wine? 26 Grime 28 “Yo!” 29 Went by 30 Fearful 32 1998 De Niro thriller 34 Highway noise barriers 38 One who’s in it but doesn’t win it 40 Egyptian leader obsessed with his appearance?

1 Neighbor of Sudan 5 Queen in the “Star Wars” movies 12 Basics 16 Things that people like to have ripped? 19 First sentence of a news story 20 Party animal 21 Comedian who was a regular on “The Steve Allen Show”

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1 Score marking 2 Powerful engine, for short 3 Nighttime Cartoon Network programming block 4 Wipe off the map 5 Start of MGM’s motto 6 Quaint “I believe” 7 Like Wrigley Field’s walls 8 Brave 9 Landon who lost in a landslide 10 Pastoral locale 11 Big name in 1980s-’90s TV talk 12 State capital that’s the setting of “Ironweed” 13 Betty ____ 14 Mean, lowdown sorts 15 Court conference 16 CNN commentator Navarro

The Fellowship of the Ring

JANUARY THURSDAY, JULY627-7PM 21+ BUY BUYYOUR YOURTICKET TICKETTODAY TODAY

bbooi isseeccl laassssi iccmmoovvi ieess. c. coomm 17 The Cougars of the West Coast Conf. 18 Determination in a prenatal exam 22 Holiday meal 25 Came down 27 Long lunch? 31 It’s to be expected 32 Leveled 33 Eleven: Fr. 35 Cheesy dish 36 Seminal symbol of mass production 37 Lose 38 Paul who sang “Lonely Boy” 39 King who said, “Nothing will come of nothing” 40 Woman’s name that means “truth” 41 Disloyalty 42 Loft filler 44 Director of 1991’s “Mississippi Masala” 49 Genesis brother 50 Early Beatle 51 Sam who ran the bar on “Cheers” 53 Unconcerned with right and wrong 54 Parts of supermarkets 55 & 57 Very nearly 58 Topic at the Kinsey Institute 60 32-ounce purchase at 7-Eleven 61 Mining supply 63 Free 64 Chasm 65 It decreases a QB’s rating: Abbr. 66 Busy hosp. areas 67 Best of the best 70 Knee-highs, e.g. 72 Doesn’t know for a fact, say 73 ____ buco 75 Secreted signal 76 El ____ 77 Cricket rival of Harrow

79 Material once set afire and put in a catapult 80 Grasp, informally 81 Human, typically, diet-wise 84 Announcement upon a grand arrival 85 Entertainment with camels, maybe 86 It sank after W.W. II 87 Go cold turkey 88 Said 90 Goaltender Dominik in the Hockey Hall of Fame 91 Wrinkle-free, say 92 Lincoln’s place 96 Wild 98 Old-movie dog 99 ____ Valley 100 Give a beating 102 Go forcefully (through) 103 1979 Roman Polanski film L A S T C L E F

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104 Inc. relative 105 Win on “Hollywood Squares” 106 “I shall return,” e.g. 107 Des-Moines-to-Dubuque dir. 108 Add years 109 Sentence fragments: Abbr.

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A M I D R E V E S T I F H E Y P I D A N V R K M E S I R A R A L B A L I N G G A U G I L T U R F A L R P I C R E A S O N S I N T T M E A I D

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B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


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Biotech Regulatory Affairs Manager 2 sought by J.R. Simplot Company, (Boise, ID). Coordinate efforts for approval of biotech products in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, China & other countries; Interface & communicate w/ U.S. & Int’l regulatory agencies; Work w/ the Plant Sciences Regulatory team to plan/execute studies needed for regulatory approval; Complete the regulatory approval process for co’s biotech product lines which reqs submissions to the U.S. Dept of Agriculture, the EPA, & the FDA while pursuing approval w/ Int’l Governments in important trade mkts. Collaborate w/ country-specific teams completing studies for environmental risk, assessment, along w/ food & feed safety studies. Plan regulatory field trials, analytical testing, statistical analysis, complete final reports & write dossiers. Reqmts: Bachelor’s Deg or equiv in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Genetics, Plant Physiology, Microbiology, or Science rltd field. Min. 10 yrs in job or rltd exp in the biotech industry, w/ at least 5 yrs in biotechnology regulatory agencies internationally; Extensive exp dvlpg & submitting dossiers for Biotech Crop approvals in the North American & int’l mkts; Dvlpg & implmtg biotech regulations. Must possess significant knowl & exp in molecular biology; Practical understanding of North American & int’l regulations for biotech products. Ability to travel domestic/ overseas (10-20%). Resumes by mail to Ryan Kuhn, Global Mobility & Int’l Project Specialist, J.R. Simplot Company, 1099 W Front St, Boise, ID 83702.

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LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATES OF JAN D. SPITS AND JEANE SPITS, DECEASED. CASE #CV0117-21262 (I.C. 15-3-801) IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of the Notice to Creditors, or within 60 days after the undersigned mailed or delivered a copy of this Notice to such persons, whichever is later, or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 5th day of December, 2017. A. Denise Penton, Attorney for Personal Representative Penton Law Offices, PLLC 702. W. Idaho Street Suite 100 Boise, ID 83701 Pub. December 13, 20, 27 and January 3

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DOBBY: 1 ½ -year-old, 11-pound male shorthair. Playful, affectionate. Loves belly rubs, chasing toys. Good with cats and dogs. (#36574669–Cattery Kennel 17)

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | 25


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

#boiseweeklypic

FIND

Advice for those on the verge MULCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING DEAR MINERVA,

My wife and I have been arguing about the Christmas tree. What day should it be taken down? I want it down on New Year’s Eve, and she wants to leave it up until Jan. 5. I don’t hate Christmas, but I would just as soon get it over with. Will you please settle this argument for us? Sincerely, Mulch It

DAT MAT YOGA MATS AND PANTS DEAR MULCH IT,

Neither one of you is necessarily wrong. In fact, we live in a world where there are people who love Christmas so much, they leave decorations up year round (I consider that a “hard pass”). The truth here is that you were both probably raised with traditions about when the tree goes up and when it comes down. You and your family might not even know why these dates are always observed, but it is quite simple: Many who take the tree down by New Year’s Eve do so out of tradition based on superstition. Some people believe it’s bad luck to leave the tree up past New Year’s Eve because it symbolizes taking old problems and baggage into the new year. It is sort of a “fresh start” thing. Your wife wants to leave it up until Jan. 5, which is the Twelfth Day of Christmas and the last day before Epiphany, in the Christian tradition. I say it doesn’t really matter. Get the tree down before it becomes a fire hazard and before the City of Boise stops collecting them curbside.

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

A study conducted by Yoga Journal and Yoga Alliance in 2016 found that over 36 million people in the United States practice yoga—up from 20.4 million in 2012. Those numbers are huge, and confirm that twisting into pretzels has become a truly popular trend (although one with serious, traditional roots). Like most trend-followers—and trend-setters, for that matter—American $49.99 (plus shipping), available yogis are always on the lookout online at lookatdatmat.com. for fresh, innovative items to spice up the practice they love. Dat Mat will definitely liven up any yogis day, with its mats and pants covered in cool, bright designs and illustrations of French bulldogs, sushi, hot-pink flamingos, doughnuts with sprinkles, fat cats and more. Dat Mat calls its accessories “the dopest” around and although they aren’t cheap—$49.99 a pop for mats, $79.99 ($54.99 on sale) for pants—successfully folding yourself into ustrasana or holding garudasana while standing on a bunch of smiling sushi is pretty dope.

Taken by instagram user isabellekrake.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10

—Lex Nelson

1.

“IDA HO HO VOL. 8,” VARIOUS ARTISTS

6.

“FLOWER BOY,” TYLER, THE CREATOR

2.

“FROM A ROOM VOL. 2,” CHRIS STAPLETON

7.

“TRAVELLER,” CHRIS STAPLETON

3.

“REVIVAL,” EMINEM

8.

“TRIBUTE TO THE TRAVELIN’ LADY: ROSALIE

4.

“CONCRETE AND GOLD,” FOO FIGHTERS

5.

“DOWN HEARTED BLUES,” EILEN JEWELL

SORRELS,” VARIOUS ARTISTS

9.

“SOUL OF A WOMAN,” SHARON JONES AND

THE DAP-KINGS

10.

“A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING,” THE

WAR ON DRUGS 26 | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I need more smart allies, compassionate supporters, ethical role models and loyal friends, and I need them right now!” writes Joanna K., an Aries reader from Albuquerque, New Mexico. On the other hand, there’s Jacques T., an Aries reader from Montreal. “To my amazement, I actually have much of the support and assistance I need,” he writes. “What I seem to need more of are constructive critics, fair-minded competitors with integrity, colleagues and loved ones who don’t assume every little thing I do is perfect, and adversaries who galvanize me to get better.” I’m happy to announce, dear Aries, that in 2018, you will benefit more than usual from the influences both Joanna and Jacques seek. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the Scots language spoken in Lowland Scotland, a watergaw is a fragmented rainbow that appears between clouds. A skafer is a faint rainbow that arises behind a mist, presaging the dissipation of the mist. A silk napkin is a splintered rainbow that heralds the arrival of brisk wind and rain. In accordance with the astrological omens, I propose we use these phenomena as symbols of power for you in 2018. The good fortune that comes your way will sometimes be partially veiled and seemingly incomplete. Don’t compare it to some “perfect” ideal. It’ll be more interesting and inspiring than any perfect ideal. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 2018, half-buried residues from the past will be resurfacing as influences in your life. Old dreams that you abandoned prematurely are ripe to be re-evaluated in light of what has happened since you last took them seriously. Are these good or bad developments? It will probably depend on your ability to be charitable and expansive as you deal with them. One thing is certain: To move forward into the future, you will have to update your relationships with these residues and dreams. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Poet Diane Ackerman tells us that human tongues, lips, and genitals possess neural receptors that are ultra-responsive. Anatomists have given unsexy names to these blissgenerating parts of our bodies: Krause end bulbs, also known as bulboid corpuscles. (Couldn’t they have called them “glimmering rapture hubs” or “magic buttons”?) In any case, these sweet spots enable us to experience surpassing pleasure. According to my understanding of the astrological omens for 2018, Cancerian, your personal complement of bulboid corpuscles will be even more sensitive than usual. Here’s further good news: Your soul will also have a heightened capacity to receive and register delight.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BY ROB BREZSNY

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Mise en place is a French term whose literal translation is “putting in place.” When used by professional chefs, it refers to the task of gathering and organizing all the ingredients and tools before beginning to cook. I think this is an excellent metaphor for you to emphasize throughout 2018. In every area of your life, thorough preparation will be the key to your success and fulfillment. Make sure you have everything you need before launching any new enterprise or creative effort. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Experimental composer Harry Partch played one-of-a-kind musical instruments he made from objects like car hubcaps, gourds, aluminum ketchup bottles, and nose cones from airplanes. Collage artist Jason Mecier fashions portraits of celebrities using materials like noodles, pills, licorice candy, bacon, and lipstick tubes. Given the astrological configurations for 2018, you could flourish by adopting a similar strategy in your own chosen field. Your most interesting successes could come from using things as they’re not “supposed” to be used. You could further your goals by mixing and matching resources in unique ways. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I wish I could make it nice and easy for you. I wish I could proclaim that the forces of darkness are lined up against the forces of light. I’d like to be able to advise you that the opening months of 2018 will bring you a showdown between wrong and right, between ugliness and beauty. But it just ain’t that simple. It’s more like the forces of plaid will be arrayed against the forces of paisley. The showdown will feature two equally flawed and equally appealing sources of intrigue. And so you may inquire, Libra, what is the most honorable role you can play in these matters? Should you lend your support to one side or the other? I advise you to create a third side. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 2018, your tribe will be extra skilled at opening things that have been shut or sealed for a long time: heavy doors, treasure boxes, rich possibilities, buried secrets, shy eyes, mum mouths, guarded hearts, and insular minds. You’ll have a knack for initiating new markets and clearing blocked passageways and staging grand openings. You’ll be more inclined to speak candidly and freely than any other generation of Scorpios in a long time. Getting stuck things unstuck will come naturally. Making yourself available for bighearted fun and games will be your specialty. Given these wonders, maybe you should adopt a new nickname, like Apertura (the Italian word for “opening”), Ouverture (the French word for “opening”),

Sisi (Yoruban), Oteviraci (Czech), Öffnung (German) or Kufungua (Swahili). SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I predict that the coming months won’t bring you the kinds of opportunities you were imagining and expecting, but will bring you opportunities you haven’t imagined and didn’t expect. Will you be alert and receptive to these sly divergences from your master plan? If so, by September of 2018 you will have become as smart a gambler as maybe you have ever been. You will be more flexible and adaptable, too, which means you’ll be better able to get what you want without breaking stuff and wreaking whirlwinds. Congratulations in advance, my daring darling. May your experiments be both visionary and practical. May your fiery intentions be both steady and fluidic. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Hungarian psychiatrist Thomas Szasz dismissed the idea that a person should be on a quest to “find himself” or “find herself.” “The self is not something that one finds,” he said. Rather, “it is something one creates.” I think that’s great advice for you in 2018, Capricorn. There’ll be little value in wandering around in search of fantastic clues about who you were born to be. Instead you should simply be gung-ho as you shape and craft yourself into the person you want to be. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Is there anything about your attitude or approach that is a bit immature or unripe? Have you in some way remained an amateur or apprentice when you should or could have become fully professional by now? Are you still a dabbler in a field where you could be a connoisseur or master? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, the coming months will be an excellent time to grow up, climb higher, and try harder. I invite you to regard 2018 as the Year of Kicking Your Own Ass. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 2018, one of your themes will be “secret freedom.” What does that mean? The muse who whispered this clue in my ear did not elaborate further. But based on the astrological aspects, here are several possible interpretations. 1. You may have to dig deep and be strategic to access resources that have the power to emancipate you. 2. You may be able to discover a rewarding escape and provocative deliverance that have been hidden from you up until now. 3. You shouldn’t brag about the liberations you intend to accomplish until you have accomplished them. 4. The exact nature of the freedom that will be valuable to you might be useless or irrelevant or incomprehensible to other people.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 27, 2017 – JANUARY 2, 2018 | 27


Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 28  
Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 28  

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