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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

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Holy War

The fight to remove faith-based exemptions continues

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Food for Thought

A smorgasbord of new in eats and drinks in or coming to Boise

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INSIDE Gift

Guide 2017

Holiday shopping made easier: Our gift to you FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com

EDITOR’S NOTE THE GIFT OF GIFTS

News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Lex Nelson lex@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Drew Dodson, Sami Godlove, Veronica Lemaster, Gustavo Sagrero, Samuel Wonacott

House Stark would laugh at our version, but winter is definitely coming. It’s difficult not to remember the topographical transfigurations across the city last year, when parking lots, sidewalks and driveway entries filled with giant, frozen snow/dirt mountains, and side roads and surface streets became untraversable under layers of thick ice. The forecast calls for sunny, mild, cool weather between now and Thanksgiving, but it’s like someone hits a switch on Black Friday, Nov. 24. According to The Farmer’s Almanac, here’s what to expect for the rest of 2017:

Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Kathleen Karpal, kathleen@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Bingo Barnes, bingo@boiseweekly.com Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com

Nov. 18-23: Rain and snow showers, then sunny, mild Nov. 24-30: Showers, then snowy periods, very cold Dec. 1-4: Flurries north; snowstorm south, frigid Dec. 5-8: Snow showers, frigid Dec. 9-20: Rainy, mild north; flurries, cold south Dec 21-26: Flurries, mild north; heavy snow then flurries, cold south Dec 27-31: Snow then flurries, very cold

Contributing Artists: Ryan Johnson, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Andy Hedden-Nicely, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy

Even though it looks like Mother Nature is going to give us the cold shoulder, Father Christmas will be there with open arms, so welcome the warm embrace of the holidays with a little help from Boise Weekly. Inside this edition, you’ll find the 2017 Holiday Gift Guide, which is chock full of brilliant gift ideas from a host of local businesses. We (and they) make it easy to check off a big chunk of your holiday shopping list with all kinds of cool items in a wide range of prices. It’s our little pre-holiday present to you.

per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1,

—Amy Atkins

payable in advance. Boise Weekly is owned and operated by

COVER ARTIST

Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055

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E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2017 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by

ARTIST: Amy Granger TITLE: “Hexagon Sampler No. 1” MEDIUM: Fabric, thread, ink ARTIST STATEMENT: I’m inspired by repetition, utility, folk art and color. Recently, I’ve started block printing and painting my own fabric. I come from five generations of quilt makers, and I feel a deep connection to them when I’m working with textiles.

Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online)

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SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 3


You have the

BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

FULL-BODIED BEER BOISE-BASED KEGFIT CO. H O ST S I T S OWN T WI C E- WE E KLY VERSION OF KEG TR AINING— LIF TING AND TO S SING BEER KEG S — AT WO O D L A N D E M PI RE A L E C R A F T A N D U P CYC L E B O I S E. THE $8 DROP-IN FEE INCLUDES A UNIQUE WORKOUT AND “REC OVERY BEER.” RE AD MORE AT FOOD & DRINK/FOOD NE WS.

to o energy ergy y & mo oney. Don’t know where to start? Get a professional Home Energy Audit for a discounted rate to pinpoint ways to boost comfort and reduce energy bills. Live comfortably. Save money.

HOT, HOT, HOT Members of Boise Fire Fighters Local 149 sashayed down the runway Nov. 2 for their first-ever fashion show benefitting the Community Assistance Fund. Read more at Arts & Culture/Culture.

DARK DANCING Frankly Frankie Burlesque returns to the Visual Arts Collective on Saturday, Nov. 18 with special guest, U.K.-based “Demon Queen of Sleaze” DisCharge. Read more at Arts & Culture/Stage.

DIRTY BUSINESS The City of Boise will begin dishing out the results of its curbside composting program on Saturday, Nov. 18 for participants to use at home. Read more at News/ Citydesk.

idahopower.com/save

OPINION

4 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

WHY WOULD KIM JONG-UN INSULT ME BY CALLING ME “OLD,” WHEN I WOULD NEVER CALL HIM “SHORT AND FAT?” —Donald Trump tweeting from Vietnam Nov. 11 during his trip to Asia

MAIL BW BLOVIATIONS I have mixed feelings about the return of Bill Cope to Boise Weekly. Sometimes he is spoton, but usually I have to wade through a whole lot of puff and drivel to find the gem. But that’s beside the point. My point is that in this era of extreme polarization, I wish BW would make more of an effort to refrain from blathering Trump-bashing. It only damages BW’s credibility and increases the polarization. Once I got tired of wringing my hands over the stunning election results of Nov. 2016, I began trying to understand why and how, and to try and find common ground with some Trump voters. They are not evil. When I hear someone whine about Obamacare I ask, “Well, how do you feel about pre-existing conditions, lifetime maximum payouts, letting your kids stay on your plan ‘til they’re 26, etc.?” To NRA supporters, I ask, “Do you think the framers of the constitution intended to protect our right to own bump stocks? Do you think that if someone is on the terror watch list and can’t board a plane, that they should be able to buy a gun?”

I recently came up with my sound bite for the tax reform debate, and made a bumper sticker: “The rich don’t need more tax cuts.” It’s been more than a week, and no one has flipped me off, yet. One of the many challenges our country faces is learning to talk again over the grand canyon of our polarized perspectives. I hope BW will embrace a commitment to that and exert your editorial powers over the bloviations of Bill Cope. David Peckham, Boise

SO SCARED I have no fear of goblins, witches, or evil clowns lurking on Halloween. What really scares me is the meat industry. This is the industry that mutilates and cages, then butchers billions of cows, pigs, turkeys and chickens—animals who feel joy, affection, sadness and pain, as we do… That exposes undocumented workers to chronic workplace injuries at slave wages and exploits farmers and ranchers by dictating market prices... The industry that contributes more to our epidemic of diabetes, heart disease,

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

stroke and cancer than any other, then bullies health authorities to remove warnings from dietary guidelines… That sanctions world hunger by feeding nutritious corn and soybeans to animals instead of people… That generates more water pollution than all other human activities, that spews more greenhouse gases than all transportation, that destroys more wildlife habitats than all other industries... These are the things that keep me up at night. Fortunately, my local supermarket offers a rich selection of plant-based meats, milks, cheeses and ice creams, as well as a colorful display of fresh fruit and veggies. It gives me hope and courage for my future, but I still fear for my friends and neighbors. Ike Schneider, Boise

CORRECTION: In our story “No Parking Any Time, News, Nov. 8-14,” we wrote, “As of press time, calls to CCDC for comment have not been returned,” inadvertently implying CCDC had not returned calls to Boise Weekly instead of to the Anderson brothers. However, CCDC not only returned calls to the Anderson brothers but a CCDC official met with one of the brothers prior to our story. We apologize for any inconvenience our error may have caused.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 5


CITYDESK

Officials at St. Luke’s Nampa hope to have Medicare and Medicaid accreditation in December.

NEW ST. LUKE’S NAMPA MEDICAL CENTER NOT YET MEDICARE OR MEDICAID ACCREDITED When St. Luke’s swung open the doors of its new $114 million, 200,000-squarefoot medical center in Nampa on Oct. 30, hospital officials were anxious to show off the 87 patient rooms, four operating rooms, 10 intensive care units, one cardiology lab and one radiology lab. Not everything was in place, however, at the medical center, St. Luke’s eighth and newest. The hospital hasn’t yet secured accreditation to bill Medicare or Medicaid—although some Medicare and Medicaid patients have received services during first few days of operations. According to Vice President for Communications and Marketing of St. Luke’s Health System Beth Toal, the hospital will be unable to recoup those costs. “There have been some [Medicare and Medicaid] patients that had been cared for in Nampa,” said Toal. “But because we hadn’t issued the formal Advanced Benefits Notice communicating this difference to them, they are not going to be held accountable for those charges.” She stressed that the accreditation delay would not affect any Medicare or Medicaid patients seeking emergency care. Toal said hospital administrators made incorrect assumptions based on a previous experience opening a medical facility in Meridian. “What’s different about St. Luke’s in Nampa is that it’s a brand new facility operating under a brand new license,” Toal said. “And so, as our team was looking at the information about the opening, there was some of the information that they misunderstood or didn’t quite interpret correctly, which created this.” The accreditation required to bill Medicare and Medicaid is administered by the Illinois-based non-profit Joint Commission, which has certified more than 21,000 health care organizations and programs across the United States. Toal said the accreditation process for St. Luke’s Nampa is expected to conclude sometime in December. —Sam Wonacott 6 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

RYAN J OH NSON

NEWS KEEPING THE FAITH, FIGHTING EXEMPTIONS

The battle against religiousbased exemptions from civil or criminal liability in Idaho will continue in 2018 GEORGE PRENTICE Bruce Wingate was ready to get serious about the sobering topic of Idaho children dying due to parental neglect when someone interrupted, asking about a recipe for gingerbread. “Don’t worry. Gingerbread is pretty easy,” he said, calming a flustered kitchen volunteer at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Boise. “I’ve got the baking pans out in in my car, and we can whip up some gingerbread in a jiffy.” The brief gingerbread conversation broke the tension, if only for a moment. Wingate, founder of the Protect Idaho Kids Foundation, spends many of his days and nights at Immanuel Lutheran. “I think we’ve served more than 50,000 meals here to the homeless, the lonely or to those who hunger in different ways,” said Wingate. “I also think it’s very appropriate for us to be having a conversation here in a house of worship about protecting children. Many people of faith truly oppose special religious-exemptions which have resulted in the suffering of too many children.” Getting people of faith, let alone Idaho lawmakers, involved in a debate about faith-based exemption from civil and criminal liability is tricky business—which is why Wingate said it’s time to frame that debate more simply. “If you ask Idaho legislators whether they support the state’s faith-healing exemptions, suddenly, some of them start talking about ideals and principles,” said Wingate. “But all of that talk about ideals and principles can get in the way of reality. The reality is that 182 children have died unnecessarily in Idaho because of faith-healing exemptions, which continue to protect those children’s parents from any liability.” That stunning statistic, Wingate argues, requires a more direct question. “Do those legislators really want to be responsible for supporting a law that, since it has been in effect, has seen 182 children die and even more children suffer?” he asked.

IDAHO HAS A CHECKERED PAST REGARDING CHILD ENDANGERMENT In 1887, before officially becoming a state, the Idaho territory enacted a law: “Every parent of any child who willfully omits, without lawful excuse, to furnish necessary food, clothing, shelter or medical attendance for such child, is guilty of a misdemeanor.” Even after Idaho became the 43rd state, the law remained in effect for the better part of a century. It wasn’t until 1972 that the Idaho Legislature voted unanimously to institute religious exemptions for child endangerment in the criminal code. In 1976, the Idaho Legislature went a step further and added religious exemptions, this time in the civil code. As reports grew of more Idaho children suffering and dying while their parents turned to prayer instead of medicine, the Governor’s Task Force on Children at Risk was convened in 2015 and conducted a full review of Idaho religious exemptions. In his summary, task force chairman Kirtlan Naylor concluded, “Religious freedoms must be protected, but vulnerable children must also be appropriately sheltered from unnecessary harm and death.” That, in turn, prompted a separate 10-member joint legislative panel to convene in August 2016, which took testimony from Idaho prosecutors, and opponents and proponents of the exemptions.

“This religious exemption is the only place in the [Idaho] Child Protective Act that places the parent’s right before the child,” said Mary Jo Beig, from the office of the Idaho Attorney General, urging the task force to recommend a change. The office of the Ada County Prosecutor felt much the same. “We would like to see this exemption lifted,” said Jean Fisher, special crimes unit chief, agreeing change in Idaho was long overdue. The debate shifted to the Idaho Statehouse in March this year when Senate Bill 1182 was introduced as a proposed compromise. The bill to “amend existing law to revise a provision regarding medical treatment by prayer through spiritual means,” would make changes to the faith-healing exemption from civil liability for child neglect, but it made no change to the exemptions in idaho criminal code. “It was a terrible bill,” said Wingate. “First of all, it actually tried to broaden some of the existing exemptions. Secondly, it would have left it up to children to say something when things went wrong. [No] dying 10-year-old is going to say, ‘Mommy, I want you and Daddy to be penalized. I need a doctor.’ A child is just not going to say those words.” When SB 1182 came up for debate March 21, there was little support from either side of the issue. Some Idaho senators argued the measure BOISE WEEKLY.COM


NEWS violated freedom of religion while others argued the bill didn’t go far enough. “I think it’s fundamentally wrong to criminalize people for the free exercise of religion,” said Sen. Jim Rice (R-Caldwell). “People of faith, the medical community [and] law enforcement, not to mention many parents, are very much against this bill,” said Senate Minority Leader Michelle Stennett (D-Ketchum). The bill was defeated 11 to 24. “Which brings us to where we are today,” said Wingate. “Have you seen the Halloween cards we recently sent out to all of the Idaho legislators?” In his hand, Wingate held a greeting card with a picture of a frowning pumpkin on the front. “Even the Pumpkins Are Sad This Halloween. Why?” read the message below the photo. Inside the card, another message read, “Because three more children died in Idaho’s anti-medical sects in two months this year. No action was taken because of Idaho’s religious exemptions.” Protect Idaho Kids Foundation will next send out Christmas cards to lawmakers, with a similar message: “We can respect religious freedom and a parent’s right to prayer while also demanding that children receive life-saving medical care.”

THE LEGACY OF MATTHEW SWAN Rita Swan doesn’t hesitate for a moment when she’s asked about faith-based exemptions in Idaho. “This state is the worst in the nation when it comes to children who have died due to faithbased medical neglect,” she said. Rita, 74, is more soft-spoken when she talks about her son Matthew Swan. “This year is... Well, it has been…” she took a breath. “It has been 40 years now, hasn’t it? It was 1977. Matthew is the reason why I’m here talking to you today.” Rita grew up in a family of six. She was five years old and living in Idaho when her parents converted to Christian Science. Because followers of her parents’ newly-embraced faith didn’t believe in traditional medical care, Rita suffered from mumps and pinkeye as a child. “Quite frankly, our family felt superior to people who were treated by doctors,” said Rita. Eventually, Rita married Doug Swan, a fellow Christian Scientist, and both became teachers at a Christian Science college. “At the time we didn’t question anything, but in retrospect, when I saw one woman with an enormous growth on her neck and another woman with a withered arm, I should have questioned,” said Swan. “Oddly, we thought we were in a comfortable place to be and Christian Scientists are pretty pleasant people to be around.” That pleasantness would soon fade. In 1977, when the Swan’s 16-month-old son Matthew deBOISE WEEKLY.COM

two daughters and a grandson named Matthew. The Swans would also go on to create Children’s Healthcare Is a Legal Duty, or CHILD, and for more than three decades, they effectively lobbied state legislatures throughout the United States, turning the tide against faith-based exemptions from liability when parents deny a child medical care. “When we started our fight in the early 1980s, nearly every state had some kind of religious exemption, but look where we are today,” said Rita, pointing to a colorcoded U.S. map. “Today, there are nine states that still allow religious exemptions for negligent homicide or manslaughter— Idaho is one of those nine. But Idaho’s neighbors Montana, Wyoming and Nevada don’t allow any criminal exemptions, and Oregon has eliminated all criminal or civil faith-healing exemptions.” The Swans recently decided to step away from the day-to-day operations of their nonprofit to spend more time with their family, and Philadelphia-based CHILD USA has folded the mission of CHILD into its fight against child abuse and Rita Swan and husband Doug created Children’s Healthcare Is a neglect. Rita will still travel just about anyLegal Duty, effectively lobbying against faith-based exemptions. where at any time to talk to anyone about ending faith-based exemptions. “My husband and I always said if we veloped a high fever, the family didn’t take him to could save the life of just one child, it was all a doctor or hospital. Instead, a Christian Science worth it,” she said. “A Christian Science practichurch practitioner ordered prayer and told the Swans not to tell anyone about Matthew’s illness. tioner even called me one day to say, ‘My child is alive today because of you. I would rather be a The baby’s condition deteriorated. He stopped accepting food, he began having convulsions and bad Christian Scientist and have a daughter who is alive.’” his spine began to stiffen. A church practitioner Recently, Swan traveled to Boise from her insisted Matthew’s complications were due to the sins of his parents. When the Swans could bear no home in Kentucky to spend time with Wingate and other members of the Protect Idaho Kids more, they took Matthew to a hospital. Foundation and discuss a new strategy to over“The doctor took one look at Matthew, turn Idaho’s faith-based exemptions. looked up at us and asked, ‘How long has this “Isn’t she amazing?” asked Wingate. “If Rita child been like this?’ In less than a minute, six can accomplish this in so many other states, we nurses surrounded Matthew,” said Rita. “When know we can accomplish this in Idaho.” a second Christian Science practitioner had Wingate said his group isn’t deterred because heard that we took Matthew to the hospital, she the 2017 Idaho Legislature failed to respond to was hysterical. Her biggest concern was that the their cause. church was somehow going to blame her for “I can tell that , yes, there are two bills we’re sending us to a doctor.” working on right now and will be introduced at After suffering a few days more, Matthew the next legislative session,” he added. died on July 7, 1977. The formal diagnosis was In the meantime, Wingate said his group will spinal meningitis and irreversible brain damage. be busy sending out some more greeting cards to Nothing would ever be the same for the Swans. The only time Rita set foot in a Christian Science Idaho lawmakers, wishing them a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. church again was to deliver a letter that she and “In 2018, the debate isn’t about faith. It will her husband were withdrawing from the faith. “They said we were too confused to make a big be about the future, the future of Idaho’s childecision like that. They kept telling us about other dren,” he said. “It’s always about the children; not the parents but the children. And this is families that had lost children but went right on not a matter of faith. It’s a matter of protecting with the faith,” she said. “It was frightening but, children. And when the law in Idaho prevents yes, we left.” that from happening, then we need to reconsider Since then, the Swans have turned to tradithat law.” tional medical care for their family—they have

CITYDESK

Only 20.9 percent of registered voters in Boise cast ballots this November.

BOISE ELECTION RESULTS: A MAJORITY OF THE MINORITY With all of the issues swirling around Boise—a controversial proposal to build a sports stadium, the possibility of F-35 fighter jets at Gowen Field, the lack of a robust public transit system and the widening gap between affordable and high-end housing—it would have been natural to conclude that more citizens would want to have a say about who’s making the city’s toughest decisions. Additionally, Boise had three city council seats on this year’s ballot, two of them open to newcomers. No fewer than 13 candidates vied for the three seats. But Ada County election officials report that only 20.9 percent of Boise’s 118,434 voters cast ballots Nov.7. Simply put, a small minority of citizens had the greatest say on who should be in charge at City Hall. In the race for Boise City Council Seat 2, vacated by Ben Quintana, community activist Lisa Sanchez won convincingly with 44.1 percent of the vote, leading in 71 of Boise’s 88 precincts. She was followed by Frank Walker (25.4 percent of the vote), Logan Kimball (18.5 percent), Rachel Misnick (7.6 percent) and Paul Fortin (4.4 percent). Council TJ Thomson, the only incumbent on this year’s ballot, retained Council Seat 4 with 46.8 percent of the vote, leading in 61 of the city’s 88 precincts. He was followed by Naomi Johnson (38.4 percent), Crispin Gravatt (7.5 percent) and Nicolas Way (7.4 percent). Holli Woodings was the most successful candidate of the night, winning 52.3 percent of the vote in the race for Boise Council Seat 4. She was followed by Caleb Hansen (28.8 percent), Michelle Doane (10.2 percent) and Nicholas Jones (8.6 percent). But the most lopsided vote this November came when 83.4 percent of Boise voters gave their support to the city’s open space levy, which won handily in all but one of the city’s 88 precincts. Only in precinct 1804 in south Boise did the majority of voters come out against the levy—but only eight ballots were cast in that entire precinct. —George Prentice BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 7


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 15 Festivals & Events YOUR HEALTH IDAHO OPEN HOUSE—If you aren’t covered by workplace health insurance, you may need to enroll in Your Health Idaho. You can get answers to your questions and learn how to navigate through the YHI website at workshops at Boise Public Library. Amanda Davison, a YHIcertified agent, will be presenting information about plans available this year. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-602-9894, boisepubliclibrary.org.

On Stage AN EVENING WITH CURTIS STIGERS AND HIS BAND—Curtis Stigers returns home with his jazz quintet for an intimate evening

of song at the historic Egyptian Theatre. He’s been out on the road promoting his new album. One More for the Road brings two worlds together—old-school pop and big band jazz—with Stigers’ own version of the Frank Sinatra/ Count Basie Orchestra marriage. Stigers captures the rare alchemy of hipness, elegance, playfulness and feeling that made Sinatra’s renditions of these songs immortal while adding his own unique twist. 8 p.m. $25-$55. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, curtisstigers.com. MICHAEL W. SMITH AND AMY GRANT: CHRISTMAS—Multi-platinum, Grammy winners Amy Grant and Michael W. Smith co-bill their popular Christmas tour this holiday season, which will be joined for the second consecutive year by Republic recording artist Jordan Smith, season 9 winner of NBC’s The Voice, and a full symphony orchestra. 7:30 p.m. $29-$122. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-4681000, fordidahocenter.com.

THURSDAY-FRIDAY, NOV. 16-17

Save the planet, save your wallet.

SAPPHIRE VINTAGE MOVIE NIGHT: CASABLANCA—The Vintage Movie Night Series features classic movies paired with bottomless movie snacks and a full bar and dinner menu. 7:30 p.m. $13-$20. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

Workshops & Classes BROWN BAG LUNCH: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW FOR YEAR-END PLANNING—Get a jump start on 2018 and save yourself from common financial headaches. At this free brown bag lunch, you will walk through easy year-end planning steps that will help you meet your goals in the new year. You will get a checklist of things you can do on your own and questions to ask your attorney, accountant and financial adviser. Presented by Perpetua Group Partner Raleigh Vachek. Lunch provided. RSVP: 208-333-1433 or info.pg@ theperpetuagroup.com. Noon-1

p.m. FREE. US Bank Plaza, 101 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3331433, unicoprop.com. PACKING AND UNPACKING FOR INNOVATION—This one-day workshop is best suited for groups of change leaders within an organization that have decision-making capabilities and their teams. You will be equipped with the tools needed to achieve your 2018 goals. With clarity about priorities, your team will be able to discard habits that are not currently supporting your business endeavors in order to make room for innovation and other initiatives which support and help guarantee success. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $100, $250 for 3. Wyndham Garden Boise Airport, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-376-4999, mycpid.com/events. TURN YOUR PASSION INTO AN ONLINE BUSINESS—Discover how to turn practically any hobby, interest or passion into a new online business. For ages 18 and older. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY, NOV. 16-18

ABERTZALEAK: SACRIFICE AND HONOR—The Basque Museum and Cultural Center’s newest exhibit, Abertzaleak: Sacrifice and Honor, honors Basques and their military service in not only the U.S. military, but also the Basque, Spanish and French militaries. It will showcase unique stories of prisoners of war, victory and loss, women’s roles, home front support, and more. The hope is to capture a piece of what many different immigrant groups have gone through when coming into this country as well as the heroes that currently serve in the U.S. military. Through April 5. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$5. Basque Museum and Cultural Center, 611 Grove St., Boise, 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com.

Literature

WARREN MILLER FILM FESTIVAL: LINE OF DESCENT

Over two days, businesses and environmental activists from across Idaho will come together at Gem State public universities and the Henry’s Fork Foundation Office to map out the future of the Gem State. The summit will attempt to reconcile environmental concerns and economic growth, searching for “market-based solutions and innovations to the realities of how a changing climate is impacting our water, our land, our health and our future.” Representatives from Idaho Power, HP, the Sierra Club, Monsanto and more will be there to brainstorm. If you have an interest in the future of the state and the planet, this summit is the place to be. Nov. 16, 9:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. and Nov. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., $99. Boise State University, Boise State Student Union, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-5800, idahoclimatesummit.com. Check online for dates and times at other locations.

The Bogus Basin Ski Club is celebrating the first snowfall with a film festival homage to winter sports: the Warren Miller film Line of Descent, which promises “downhill thrills, global adventure and a nod to those who taught us to slide on snow.” Stop by Zee’s Rooftop Cafe Thursday, Nov. 16, before the first showing for appetizers and a meet and greet with the College of Idaho Ski and Snowboard Team. Ticket sales for both events will go to the Bogus Basin Ski Education Foundation, Bogus Basin Ski Patrol, the College of Idaho Ski and Snowboard Team, the Bogus Basin Ski Club and Recreation Unlimited. Pre-party: Nov. 16, 5 p.m., $10-$40 (includes showing). Zee’s Rooftop Cafe, 250 S. Fifth St. Showings: Nov. 16-18, 7 p.m. nightly, plus 4:30 p.m. Saturday matinee, $13-$15. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Miller and Laurie Buchanan share their expertise and experiences with emotional healing. They offer new perspectives and ideas about how we interact with our thoughts and emotions. Miller is the author of Wonder and Beauty: My Journey from Heartbreak to Healing Through the Wonder of Horses, published by Balboa Press. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

Citizen FOOD FOR FINES—Take nonperishable foods for donation to the Idaho Food Bank and the library will waive up to $10 in late fees from every library card in your home. Through Nov. 18. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org/ victory/events-calendar.

CHARLA MILLER AND LAURIE BUCHANAN: COLOR THERAPY HORSES AND HEALING—Charla

SATURDAY, NOV. 18

It’s the time of the season / when snow runs deep.

SAFEGUARDING IDAHO’S ECONOMY IN A CHANGING CLIMATE

8 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

Art

Boise GreenBike cranks up the giving.

CRANKSGIVING BOISE How hard would you pedal to feed the hungry this Thanksgiving? If you love bikes, challenges and doing something for others, the Boise GreenBike Cranksgiving “scavenger hunt/alley cat race” is the perfect way to spend a Saturday this holiday season. Grab three or four adventurous pals (sign up in advance online or in person 8 a.m.-10 a.m. the day of) and whip around town on GreenBikes while your team completes a list of tasks, including buying enough edibles to fill a Thanksgiving food box, within a four-hour time limit. Participants get free hours of zoom time on a GreenBike in exchange for spending $10-$15 on food items and will be rewarded with prizes for the speediest racers, free beer and snacks at Clairvoyant Brewing upon finishing the challenge. The hunt/race kicks off from Boise GreenBike HQ. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., FREE. Boise GreenBike World Headquarters, 421 N. 10th St., 208-345-7433, boise.greenbike.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


LIVE COMEDY

CALENDAR Food OKONOMIYAKI: JAPANESE SOUL FOOD—Join Genki Takoyaki’s Rhett and Christy for a hands-on class on Japanese soul food. Okonomiyaki is a traditional cabbage crepe, made to order with variations like crisp pork belly, seafood or vegetables, piled high with bonito flakes and specialty sauces. Participants will learn how to make their own custom okonomiyaki and then you will enjoy a shared meal. Beverages available for purchase. For ages 13 and older. (Registration ended Nov. 13.) 6-8 p.m. $40. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, jumpokonomiyaki.eventbrite.com.

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16 Festivals & Events AFTER HOURS JOB FAIR—Whether hoping to find a fresh start, a better job or a new career direction, job seekers will find lots of exciting opportunities at this free job fair. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Courtyard by Marriott Boise West-Meridian, 1789 S. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-888-0800, ibleventsinc.com. NEXTITLE PRESENTS 3RD ANNUAL HELPING HIGH HOMECOMING—This annual fundraiser benefits the Frank Church Foundation for Student Achievement, which helps at-risk students by providing day-to-day needs, increasing attendance and improving academics. Enjoy music, live and silent auctions and more. 7-10 p.m. $50. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, helpinghighhomecoming.com.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, NOV. 18-19

SAFEGUARDING IDAHO’S ECONOMY IN A CHANGING CLIMATE—Check out this two-day economic summit focused on market-based solutions and innovations to the realities of how a changing climate is impacting our water, our land, our health and our future. 9:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. $99. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, idahoclimatesummit.com. SCENTSY TURNS ON THE CHRISTMAS LIGHTS—Join Scentsy for the lighting of 724,000 Christmas lights. That’s 34 miles of lights, even more than last year. The grounds will be open to the public so you can stroll, ohh and ahh, and take your holiday photos with this winter wonderland as your backdrop. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Scentsy Commons, 2701 E. Pine Ave., Meridian, 208-855-0617, scentsy.net.

On Stage OPERA IDAHO OPERATINI: COCKTAILS AND CABARET—Enjoy a fun evening of music, food and drinks. Your ticket includes Opera Idaho Resident Company members Jena Carpenter, Emily Hansen, Leslie Mauldin and Rebecca Pierce serenading you with Bolcom’s Cabaret Songs, and a dinner bar with salad and assorted dressings, rolls with butter, roasted turkey with a savory sage dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, cranberry sauce, seasonal vegetables and a dessert display. There will also be a no-host bar where you can purchase anything from a soda, wine or beer to a cocktail or martini specially designed by a local mixologist for this Operatini that’s only available inside the Sapphire Room. 5:30 p.m. and 8:15 p.m. $22-$30. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

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TREASURE VALLEY CHILDREN’S THEATER IMPROVISION SHOW—7 p.m. $3. New Ventures Lab, 38 E. Idaho Ave., Meridian, 208-870-0674, newventureslab. com. Get a JUMP on your holiday shopping.

WINTRY MARKET: HANDMADE FOR THE HOLIDAYS Boiseans have gotten smart about shopping local. This holiday season, grab locally sourced and locally made gifts for everyone on your list at the Wintry Market, which will fill the Pioneer Room at JUMP with meticulously crafted gifts, including jewelry, clothing, candles, artisan soaps, baby toys and more, from 85 Idaho vendors Saturday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 19. Along with plenty of gift options, there will be food and drink, activities for kids, a popup library, dance performances, music and more. To get a jump on rest of the shoppers, pick up a ticket to the VIP Opening Night Party on Friday, Nov. 17, to browse the vendors and enjoy snacks, a raffle and a no-host bar before the market goes public. VIP party: 6-8 p.m., $15, market: 10 a.m.-5 p.m., FREE. JUMP Pioneer Room, 1000 W. Myrtle St., 208-639-6610, wintrymarket. com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

WARREN MILLER FILM FESTIVAL: LINE OF DESCENT—Join the Bogus Basin Ski Club to celebrate 53 years of kicking off the start of winter with Warren Miller ski and snowboard films. The 2017 edition of the Warren Miller Film Festival, Line of Descent, delivers downhill thrills, global adventure and a nod to those who taught us to slide on snow. Ticket proceeds benefit the Bogus Basin Ski Education Foundation, Bogus Basin Ski Patrol, the College of Idaho Ski and Snowboard Team, Bogus Basin Ski Club and Recreation Unlimited. 7 p.m. $13-$15. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre. net.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 9


CALENDAR MERCHANT SPOTLIGHT

Literature

Odds & Ends

STEPHEN BRAMUCCI : THE DANGER GANG AND THE PIRATES OF BORNEO—Meet David Bramucci, children’s author, award-winning travel writer and adventurer. He’s rowed down the Mekong Delta, crossed the Australian outback in a car powered by french fry oil and explored ancient pirate islands in Madagascar. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

FREE COMMUNITY HEALTH SCREENING—No insurance? No access to health care? Then check out these Community Health Screenings provided by Idaho State University health program professionals. All screenings are provided free to participants ages 18 and older. The comprehensive screening includes basic physical exam, blood pressure check, medication review, dental evaluation, flu shots, hearing and eye screenings in addition to many other services. Questions? Contact healthyu@isu.edu or visit facebook.com/isu.meridian. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Hispanic Cultural Center of Idaho, 315 Stampede Drive, Nampa, 208-442-0823, facebook. com/isu.meridian.

Talks & Lectures

Text “Smartcard” to 77948

SAVE 30% At all 3 Boise Locations* Visit boisefrycompany.com * Excludes Meridian and Nampa locations

SAVING SALMON: IDAHO RIVER TALKS WITH ROCKY BARKER—In 2017, Idaho Statesman reporter Rocky Barker invested more than six months of time and energy to report about Idaho’s endangered salmon and the social, economic and cultural implications of their decline. His package of investigative articles and videos, Saving Salmon, goes beyond normal day-to-day reporting and reveals the scope of this pressing environmental issue. Barker will discuss what he learned and what he views as challenges and opportunities for Idahoans and salmon, and show videos he and his team produced. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-3437481, idahorivers.org/events.

Citizen

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17 Festivals & Events BALLET IDAHO ANNUAL FALL GALA—Enjoy a one-time-only performance with new choreography by Peter Anastos and Daniel Ojeda, along with optional reception and dinner, and many other surprises throughout this elegant

evening. Guests are encouraged to wear white or black cocktail attire. Reserve your seat by phone or online. 6:30 p.m. $100 performance only, $150 dinner and performance, $1,200 table for 10. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise. 208-343-0556, ext. 222, balletidaho.org/events/balletidahos-fall-gala. THE CABIN’S ANNUAL GALA— Meet Reza Aslan, enjoy cocktails and dinner, and support The Cabin’s education programs. You will enjoy dinner on the Morrison Center stage before Aslan gives his Readings and Conversations lecture. 5 p.m. $150, $1,200 table for 8. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110, thecabinidaho.org. SAFEGUARDING IDAHO’S ECONOMY IN A CHANGING CLIMATE—Check out this two-day economic summit focused on market-based solutions and innovations to the realities of how a changing climate is impacting our water, our land, our health and our future. 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $99. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, idahoclimatesummit.com.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

IDAHO HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION MEETING—The Idaho Human Rights Commission will meet to make decisions on the merits of administrative cases filed with the commission. In the second floor conference room. 4 p.m. FREE. Idaho Human Rights Commission, 317 W. Main St., Boise, 208-334-2873, humanrights.idaho.gov. NONPROFIT RESOURCE THURSDAY—There are many free or low-cost resources available to nonprofits, including Resource Thursdays, a program of the Idaho Nonprofit Center. Resource Thursdays offers a panel discussion with a network of experts, followed by a feature presentation. You will also learn about Foundation Directory Online and other library resources. No RSVP necessary. 4-6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208972-8200, idahononprofits.org.

Kids & Teens JUMP TIME BOISE COMMUNITY JUMP—Join Jump Time Boise for its Community Jump event for lowincome and homeless families. Jump Time invites those in need to come to its downtown location for two hours of free jumping, pizza and goodies. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Jump Time Idaho-Boise, 1030 W. River St., Boise, 208-342-JUMP (5867), jumptimeidaho.com.

10 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR On Stage AN EVENING OF INDIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC—Enjoy a beautiful evening of ragas performed in the Hindustani style, with Brandon McIntosh, sarod; Srivani Jade, voice; and Kuntal Roy, tabla. Presented by the Boise Bengali Association and the Boise State University Department of Music. Advance tickets are available at India Foods, 6020 W. Fairview or through Jeanne Belfy at jbelfy@ boisestate.edu. 6:30 p.m. $12$15. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-4261110, morrisoncenter.com. BOISE BARD PLAYERS: SHAKESPEARE’S THE WINTER’S TALE—Grab a drink and settle in to listen to a story that will break your heart, make you laugh and ultimately leave you satisfied. You will be up close and personal with the actors in this immersively staged production. There’s no admission charge, but donations will be gratefully accepted. 7 p.m. By donation. Mad Swede Brewing Company, 2772 S. Cole Road, Ste. 140, Boise, 208-922-6883.

GLITTERATI GALS BURLESQUE: A STEAMPUNK ADVENTURE— Blow off some steam with the help of the Glitterati Gals as they embark on an adventure like no other. Will it be down a yellow brick road, or under the sea? You never know what they might have in store for you. 9 p.m. $13-$15, $20 VIP. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092.

his role as a consulting producer on the acclaimed HBO series The Leftovers, Aslan is also the host and executive producer of two other original television programs: Rough Draft With Reza Aslan on Ovation, and CNN’s Believer. 8 p.m. $22-$32. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org/event/ reza-aslan.

WARREN MILLER FILM FESTIVAL: LINE OF DESCENT—7 p.m. $13-$15. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3450454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Kids & Teens

Literature READINGS AND CONVERSATIONS WITH REZA ASLAN— Reza Aslan is an internationally renowned writer, commentator, professor, producer and scholar of religions. His books, including his No. 1 New York Times bestseller, Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, have been translated into dozens of languages around the world. He is also a recipient of the prestigious James Joyce Award. In addition to

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

DHARMA TALK—Join JDPSN Jason Quinn of the Empty Gate Zen Center in Berkeley, California, for a dharma talk that will address Buddhism from the Kwan Um School of Zen. There will be a questionand-answer period following the talk. Open to all. 7-8 p.m. By donation. Boise Institute for Buddhist Studies, 660 N. Ninth St., Boise, bibscenter.org, 208-661-6277.

Food

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

We provide psychiatric evaluations, therapy, if needed medication management for children, teens, adults and geriatric patients.

Please call 208-319-3513 or book online at www.permamentalhealth.net

Religious/Spiritual

CANYON COUNTY CHRISTMAS SHOW—Enjoy a wonderful holiday experience for the entire family. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$4. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com.

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

We don't just prescribe medication, we listen and meet you where you’re at.

SPLASH ‘N’ DASH—Parents, enjoy a Friday evening with each other while your children are entertained in the pools. For four hours, certified lifeguard and lesson staff will be in the water actively supervising water games and swimming. Preregistration required. For ages 3-12; children must be potty trained. 5:45-9:45 p.m. $13-$18. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Odds & Ends

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS!

TASTE OF FALL RUGBY IDAHO CHARITY FUNDRAISER—Join Rugby Idaho for the third annual Taste of Fall charity fundraiser, featuring dinner, silent auction, guest speaker, cash bar, fun and socializing, with a Scottish rugby theme and awards for best dressed. Proceeds will help underserved and disadvantaged kids stay active by playing rugby. Funds pay for registration fees and health insurance, which is provided to all players who register to enhance social responsibility of the organization and player safety. 5-10 p.m. $60, $50 per plate for table of 8-10. Crane Creek Country Club, 500 W. Curling Drive, Boise, 208-3514-4340. rugbyidaho.com.

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Fiction 101 L

Each entry must contain exactly 101 words (not including the story title). Please confirm your word count using Microsoft Word. We will do the same. No handwritten entries. Entry fee is $10 per story. Submit your Microsoft Word entry to fiction101@boiseweekly.com and enter your credit card payment at boiseweekly.nolatepayments. com. If you prefer to pay by check, please send your entry fee to: Boise Weekly/Fiction 101, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. Your submission will be confirmed via email once entry and payment are received. Both must be received by 3 p.m., Friday Nov. 24. Cash prizes are awarded for winning entries. BW will publish winning stories in the Jan. 3, 2018 edition.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 11


CALENDAR SATURDAY NOVEMBER 18 Festivals & Events BOISE FARMERS MARKET INDOOR WINTER MARKET—The Boise Farmers Market moves to their indoor location at the corner of Eighth and Fulton streets for the winter market through Dec. 23. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market Indoor Winter Market, Eighth and Fulton Streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. BOISE HOLIDAY PARADE—Enjoy “A Storybook Christmas” at the 2017 Boise Holiday Parade, where children’s author Leslie Petricelli will be the grand marshal. The parade kicks off on Jefferson at 10th Street and heads east to Fourth Street, where it turns south to Bannock. Proceeding west, the parade winds up at the 11th Street intersection. 9:45 a.m. FREE. Downtown Boise, Downtown Corridor, Boise, boiseholidayparade.org. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET— Market goers will find booths full of fresh local produce, beautiful flowers, delicious specialty food items and one-of-a-kind locally crafted art. Through Dec. 16. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Grove Plaza, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE—Drop by North End Organic Nursery for their first Holiday Open House. You will find fun and interesting gifts in stock for the holidays, with new items for gardeners and non-gardeners alike. And since it’s the season to give, you can take 10 percent off your total purchase with a donation to Toys for Tots. Plus local beer, wine and cider. 4-7 p.m. FREE. North End Organic Nursery, 3777 E. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-389-4769, northendnursery.com. YOUR HEALTH IDAHO OPEN HOUSE—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-602-9894, boisepubliclibrary.org.

On Stage BOISE BARD PLAYERS: SHAKESPEARE’S THE WINTER’S TALE—7 p.m. By donation. Mad Swede Brewing Company, 2772 S. Cole Road, Ste. 140, Boise, 208922-6883. FRANKLY BURLESQUE: DISCHARGE AFTER DARK—Hosted by DisCharge from Bristol, U.K., aka the “Demon Queen of Nu Queer Sleaze,” DisCharge After Dark explores all that is dark and nasty, from horror and gore to politics and fake news. It’ll be a staged experience of nightmares, dark fantasy, and all that goes bump in the night. Also featuring a bevy of beautiful burlesque and

performance artists. Discount advance tickets available at visualartscollective.com. 8 p.m. $20-$25. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208424-8297, franklyfrankie.org.

a recipe tasting hosted by Caxton Press. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

RECYCLED MINDS ALL-AGES COMEDY SHOW—Just like Whose Line Is It Anyway? on TV, Recycled Minds will perform completely improvised scenes based on your suggestions. Featuring Ashley Tyner’s debut performance. A selection of refreshments will be available for purchase. 8 p.m. $5-$10. The Hub, 1408 State St., Boise, recycledmindscomedy.com.

Sports & Fitness

STAND UP WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT COMEDY SHOW—Laugh it up with comedian Larry Moody and law enforcement supporting comedians from all over the country, including comedian Frank Failla, a retired NYPD sergeant who was present on 9/11. Proceeds benefit the Idaho lodge of the Fraternal Order of Police and the 512 Fund. Although family friendly, the show will be best suited for kids over 13. 7 p.m. $10. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-7790092, playhouseboise.com. WARREN MILLER FILM FESTIVAL: LINE OF DESCENT—4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. $13-$15. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Workshops & Classes WRITING WORKSHOP: CRAFTING CHARACTERS WHO AREN’T LIKE YOU—Writers are often afraid to write characters whose gender, sexual orientation, religion, racial heritage or other aspect of identity differs from their own. But it is possible to do so sensitively and convincingly. Join speculative fiction writer K. Tempest Bradford for this workshop based on teachings from the book Writing the Other, by Nisi Shawl and Cynthia Ward. You will enjoy a mixture of lecture, writing exercises and discussion. Appropriate for all prose writers (fiction and non), playwrights, screen writers and comic writers. 1-4 p.m. $10. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-407-7529.

Literature COURTNEY SMART: RIVER FOOD COOKBOOK SIGNING AND HAPPY HOUR—Join Courtney Smart, author of the River Food cookbook, to get your copy signed, then stick around for a special happy hour. 3-6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow Brewhouse, 2455 N. Harrison Hollow Lane, Boise, 208-343-6820, highlandshollow.com. COURTNEY SMART: RIVER FOOD COOKBOOK SIGNING AND RECIPE TASTING—Join Courtney Smart, author of the River Food cookbook, to get your copy signed, then stick around for

12 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE GREENBIKE’S CRANKSGIVING—Cranksgiving is a fun scavenger hunt/alley cat race for a charitable cause: providing Thanksgiving dinners to families in need. Participants form teams of three or four to ride Boise GreenBikes as they complete a list of tasks that includes gathering all the items necessary to fill a Thanksgiving food box (expect to spend $10-$15), which is then donated to St. Vincent de Paul for distribution to families throughout the Treasure Valley. At the end, you will gather for prizes, drinks and snacks at Clairvoyant Brewing, 2800 W. Idaho St., where the first beer will be free. This is a free event, but registration is required. More details can be found on the Boise GreenBike Facebook page. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. By donation. Boise GreenBike World HQ, 421 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-345-7433, boisegreenbike.com.

Kids & Teens TURKEY SHOOT—Win a turkey for your Thanksgiving dinner. Teams consist of one adult and one child. Each team member will take 10 free throw shots and the team with the highest combined total in each age division takes home the turkey. Advance registration recommended. 1-2:30 p.m. $5-$7 per team. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Religious/Spiritual HALF-DAY MEDITATION RETREAT—Join JDPSN Jason Quinn of the Empty Gate Zen Center in Berkeley, California, for a half-day meditation retreat with chanting, walking and sitting meditation. Open to all; beginners welcome. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. By donation. Boise Institute for Buddhist Studies, 660 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-6616277, bibscenter.org.

Odds & Ends CANYON COUNTY CHRISTMAS SHOW—Enjoy a wonderful holiday experience for the entire family. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE-$4. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com. CAREER PATHWAYS—Refugees, immigrants and new Americans can get valuable career counseling through a new program offered by the Boise Public Library and the International Rescue Committee. Career Pathways is geared toward job seekers with valuable skills

and training who are unable to use them due to a lack of certification, licensing or networking resources. The goal of the program is to help the underemployed reach their career and earning potential, and secure a more fulfilling job. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-972-8320, boisepubliclibrary. org. IDAHO MUSEUM OF MINING AND GEOLOGY OPEN WEEKENDS—The Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology’s building has been upgraded, and now has heat. That means that even though the regular season ended in October, folks can still drop by from 1-4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays in November to see fascinating and engaging exhibits and view the stories they tell. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-368-9876, idahomuseum.org. LATAH AND CASSIA HOLIDAY BAZAAR—Enjoy free entry, free parking, personal service and fun vendors, including ThirtyOne Gifts, Scentsy, SeneGence (LipSense), Jamberry, Java Momma Coffee, Bejazzle Jewelry, Pampered Chef, Origami Owl, Pups Best Munchables, Norwex, Bramble Lane Studio, Kevin and Tiffany’s Home Decor, Metal Moose Creations, LuLaRoe, Treasure Valley Bee Rescue and Teenie Tiny Queens. Proceeds benefit The Alano Club of Boise. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. The Alano Club of Boise, 3820 Cassia St., 208-336-1710, alanoclubofboise.com. MMACHS HOSA HOLIDAY BAZAAR—Enjoy shopping, sweet treats, gift wrapping and festive music to kick off the holiday season. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Meridian Medical Arts Charter High School, 1789 E. Heritage Park Lane, Meridian, 208-855-4075, meridianmedicalartscharter.org.

WINTRY MARKET—Don’t miss this upscale and inventive indie art and craft show, featuring innovative and original items produced using traditional art/craft methods by a diverse crowd of 85 makers and vendors. Kids welcome. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, Pioneer Room, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208639-6610.

Animals & Pets BOWLING FOR RHINOS WITH ZOO BOISE—Join Zoo Boise for the wildlife conservation party of the year at the ninth annual Bowling for Rhinos at Westy’s Garden Lanes. Bowl the evening away with cosmic bowling, raffles, silent auctions, photo-ops, and much more. Registration includes two hours of bowling (6:30-8:30 p.m.), shoe rental, and two raffle tickets for great prizes. All ages welcome. 6-9 p.m. $25, $175 groups of up to 8 bowlers. Westy’s Garden Lanes, 5504 Alworth St., Garden City, 208-376-6555, zooboise.org.

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 19 On Stage BOISE BARD PLAYERS: SHAKESPEARE’S THE WINTER’S TALE—2:30 p.m. By donation. Mad Swede Brewing Company, 2772 S. Cole Road, Ste. 140, Boise, 208922-6883.

Workshops & Classes BEGINNER AMERICAN WALTZ LESSONS—Learn to Ballroom Dance with six weeks of beginner American Waltz lessons, progressing each week. Women learn to follow and men to lead in a casual and non-threatening atmosphere. Sponsored by USA Dance Association and taught by board members. No partner required. 5-6 p.m. $3 per lesson. Idaho Ballroom Dance Center, 943 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208898-9425. usadanceboise.org.

Religious/Spiritual DREAMS, SOUL TRAVEL AND THE WONDER OF YOU SPIRITUAL EXPLORATION CLASS—Learn how to awaken to the eternal, creative, divine being that you are. Explore Soul Travel as an easy way to reach the higher worlds and to improve the quality of your life. 2 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3431871, riversideboise.com.

Odds & Ends CANYON COUNTY CHRISTMAS SHOW—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$4. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-4681000, fordidahocenter.com. IDAHO MUSEUM OF MINING AND GEOLOGY OPEN WEEKENDS—The Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology’s building has been upgraded, and now has heat. That means that even though the

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

PSYCHIC AND HEALING FAIR— Enjoy palm reading, Neuro Astrology, channeling, massage, psychic readings, henna and more. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. $1 per minute. Eyes of the World Imports, 1576 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-1212, eyesoftheworldimportsboise.com. TREASURE VALLEY SINGLES DANCE—7:30-10:30 p.m. $6-$7. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-442-1970, treasurevalleysingles.weebly.com. WATERSHED WEEKEND: MAP MANIA—Trek over to the Boise WaterShed for a day of mapping to celebrate GIS Day. This year’s event will have a safari theme. From 10 a.m.-1 p.m., travel into the wild with your adventure passport and create your own habitat and savannah maps, then monkey over to make jungle cookie maps, take a safari quiz, and play wildlife games for cool prizes. Then at 11:30 a.m., take a water renewal facility tour. Brought to you by the Southwest Idaho GIS Users Group. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-608-7300, bee.cityofboise.org/watershed.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

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CALENDAR regular season ended in October, folks can still drop by on Saturdays and Sundays in November to see fascinating and engaging exhibits and view the stories they tell. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208368-9876, idahomuseum.org.

On Stage

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS—Is food a problem for you? No matter what your problem with food, Overeaters Anonymous has a solution. OA is a fellowship of individuals who are recovering from compulsive overeating through shared experience, strength and hope. They welcome everyone who wants to stop eating compulsively. Visit OA.org for details on the 13 other meetings in the Southwest Idaho region. 6:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Church of Christ, 2000 N. Eldorado St., Boise, 208409-1086, oa.org.

Literature

PSYCHIC AND HEALING FAIR— Enjoy palm reading, Neuro Astrology, channeling, massage, psychic readings, henna and more. Noon6 p.m. $1 per minute. Eyes of the World Imports, 1576 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-1212, eyesoftheworldimportsboise.com. WINTRY MARKET—Don’t miss this upscale and inventive indie art and craft show, featuring innovative and original items produced using traditional art/craft methods by a diverse crowd of 85 makers and vendors. Kids welcome. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, Pioneer Room, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208639-6610.

Food SUNDAY BRUNCH—Join Barbarian Brewing in Garden City for a Sunday morning brunch with Wetos Locos, plus Cutwater Spirits Bloody Marys, red beers, mimosas and more beer. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $TBA. Barbarian Brewing Garden City Taproom/Brewery, 5270 E. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208387-2739.

MONDAY NOVEMBER 20 Festivals & Events TOYS FOR TOTS FAMILY FUN DAY—Help Dave & Busters support Toys for Tots, and ensure every kid gets a toy this year. You will enjoy free unlimited video game play on all simulator games, free soft drinks, face painters, balloon artists, and much more. Take an unopened toy to donate, and receive an additional $5 power card, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. By donation. Dave & Buster’s, 546 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, 208-901-3800, daveandbusters.com. YOUR HEALTH IDAHO OPEN HOUSE—5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-602-9894, boisepubliclibrary.org.

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MAD MONDAY COMEDY OPEN MIC—7-10 p.m. FREE. Mad Swede Brewing Company, 2772 S. Cole Road, Ste. 140, Boise, 208-9226883.

IDAHO BUZZ: IDAHO HISTORY WRITTEN BY IDAHOANS—6-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

Religious/Spiritual 35TH ANNUAL MULTI-FATIH THANKSGIVING SERVICE AND CELEBRATION—Add your voice to the Many Voices Praying at this multi-faith service and celebration of Thanksgiving, followed by a time of refreshment, fellowship and entertainment. The celebration will benefit Our Path Home, an umbrella organization assisting those who are currently experiencing homelessness, through a free will offering, and the Idaho Food Bank with a donation of two non-perishable food items. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-7511, cathedraloftherockies.org.

Odds & Ends

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 21 Literature OUTDOOR CONVERSATIONS SERIES: PAUL J. MITCHELL, MAPMAKER—The Outdoor Conversations Series produced in partnership with the Selway Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation shines a spotlight on authors who connect readers with the wilderness. Paul J. Mitchell is a map maker with big ideas and a lot of talent. He has created maps ranging from the White Cloud Wilderness area and Idaho wine regions, to Idaho geology. Mitchell will reveal his latest work, a largescale map of the Sawtooth Wilderness that’s measured in feet not inches. He’ll also talk about how he creates his maps and answer questions from the audience. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

ART OF THE SLOW DANCE—Join Boise Community Dance Culture for this weekly class and dance night. The first hour is an all-levels class on rotating dance styles (Blues, Zouk, Tango, Fusion, etc.) At 8 p.m., the open fusion dance night begins. You can practice any style of dance while you enjoy a glass of wine in an inclusive and relaxed atmosphere for all levels of dancers (even beginners.) No partner required. For ages 18 and older; valid ID required. 7-10 p.m. $5. Bodovino, 404 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-8466, facebook. com/BoiseCDC.

Kids & Teens

Food

Odds & Ends

KEGS4KAUSE: BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF ADA COUNTY— Head down to Payette Brewing to support a local non-profit organization, with 50 percent of proceeds from the tap room to benefit the Boys and Girls Clubs of Ada County, whose mission is to inspire and empower all young people, especially those who need us most, to realize their full potential as productive, responsible and caring citizens. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-344-0011, adaclubs.org.

CROCHET AND KNIT—Bring your own No. 4 worsted yarn, knitting needles (size 8 or 9 and/or crochet hooks size G or H). Pattern and Instructions provided. Beginners through advanced welcome. For more info, contact Sherrie at priens@cityofnampa.us or 208468-5804. In Multipurpose Room B. For ages 12 and older. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4685804, localendar.com/public/ nampalibrary.

E VENT S

GURU DONUTS TASTY TALES STORYTIME WITH REDISCOVERED BOOKS—Get the kiddos giggling at two storytime sessions with the staff of Rediscovered Books while enjoying the tasty treats at Guru Donuts. The first 20-minute session starts at 10 a.m., with an encore at 10:30 a.m. Go early for $2.50 donut and drink specials. 10-11 a.m. FREE. Guru Donuts, 928 W. Main St,, Ste. 100, Boise, 208-571-7792, gurudonuts.com/tasty-tales.

visit our boiseweekly.com for a more complete list of

calendar events.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 13


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 15 100.3 THE X: OTHERWISE—Listen to 100.3 The X to win free tickets. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory THE COUNTRY CLUB—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s AN EVENING WITH CURTIS STIGERS AND HIS BAND—8 p.m. $25-$55. Egyptian KARAOKE— 7 p.m. FREE. High Note LUCAS LEGER—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

WINTER JAM WEST COAST TOUR—With Lecrae, Mac Powell, Building 429, Andy Mineo, Newsong, Family Force 5, and more. 7 p.m. $15. Taco Bell Arena

ENCORE—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s ERIC MILLETT BAND—7 p.m. FREE. Awakenings

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17

AN EVENING OF INDIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC—With Brandon McIntosh, sarod; Srivani Jade, voice; and Kuntal Roy, tabla. 6:30 p.m. $12-$15. Morrison Center Recital Hall

BEN DE LA COUR—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District

GUILTY PLEASURE—8 p.m. FREE. 127 Club

CHAZ BROWNE—With Gretchen Melita. 7:30 p.m. $15-$25. Sapphire

KAYLEIGH JACK AND BUDDY DEVORE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DAVID MOSS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

KINGS OF SWING—7 p.m. $10, $18 couples. Boise Senior Center

LISTEN HERE

LADY DICE AND ZERO—7 p.m. $10. The Olympic LIKE A ROCKET—With Tycoon Machete. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Neurolux MAGIC SWORD—With Street Fever, and Manatee Commune. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Knitting Factory ROLLED INTO ONE—10 p.m. $5. Reef SOMA—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew

INDIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC, NOV. 17, MORRISON CENTER

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16

The raga has no direct corollary in western classical music. That means for a lot of people who head to the Morrison Center for An Evening of Indian Classical Music, the music rolling off the stage will be almost otherworldly. Put on by the Boise Bengali Association and the Boise State University Department of Music, the event promises an evening of music in the Hindustani (north Indian) style, featuring Brandon McIntosh playing the sarod, a lute-like stringed instrument; Srivani Jade singing and Kuntal Roy playing the tabla, a classical Indian drum. Ragas themselves consist of at least five notes musicians can riff off, and have intense emotional significance and symbolism. Some have strong associations with the seasons, moods and religious holidays. Even for those with a strong background in Indian music, An Evening of Indian Classical Music will be a trip. Advance tickets can be purchased at India Foods (6020 W. Fairview Ave.) or through Jeanne Belfy at jbelfy@ boisestate.edu.

OPEN MIC NIGHT WITH RICHARD SOLIZ—7 p.m. FREE. Deja Brew SIGNAL: CHAPTER FOUR—9 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s

OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 18

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

NEW TRANSIT—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

TIM SWANSON—6 p.m. FREE. Divine Wine

KARAOKE WITH DJ BONZ—9:30 p.m. FREE. Busted Shovel

SINGLE CAR GARAGE BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Awakenings

GABE HESS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

NEW FOUND GLORY—With The Ataris. 8 p.m. $21-$50. Knitting Factory

SCOTT KNICKERBOCKER—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND EMILY TIPTON—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

NEAL AND FRIENDS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ROB HARDING—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE DEVIL MAKES THREE—With Scott H. Biram. 8 p.m. $23-$45. Knitting Factory

BFD— 7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

MATH’S ARCANA—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

MICHAEL W. SMITH AND AMY GRANT: CHRISTMAS—With Jordan Smith. 7:30 p.m. $29-$122. Ford Idaho Center

DAN COSTELLO—7 p.m. FREE. Dwellers

BLAZE AND KELLY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

UKELELE MADNESS—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

ANGELA WILLIAMS AND JOHNNY DOWNING—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

Michael W. Smith and Amy Grant

DALLAS HIGGINS—With Sunset Goat, and Speedy Gray. 7 p.m. FREE. High Note

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 21

TRACTOR BEAM—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

BOSTYX—Featuring David Victor, formerly of the group Boston. 7:30 p.m. $26-$40. Nampa Civic Center

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE— 8 p.m. FREE. Chandler’s

MONDAY NOVEMBER 20

—Harrison Berry 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, morrisoncenter.com.

14 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

ROADKILL GHOST CHOIR—With The Artisanals. 8 p.m. $10-$12. Neurolux SIMPLE RUCKUS—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s SMOOTH AVENUE—7:30 p.m. $15-$25. Sapphire SUNSET GOAT—With No Relation. 8 p.m. FREE. TK Bar TOM TAYLOR— 7 p.m. $5. Helina Marie’s THE WANDERERS—10 p.m. $5. Reef WILL HOGE—With Dan Layus. 7 p.m. $17. The Olympic

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 19 BETHLEHEM STEEL—7 p.m. $5$7. Neurolux CANNIBAL CORPSE—With Power Trip, and Gatecreeper. 8 p.m. $23-$40. Knitting Factory EARTHLING—7 p.m. $6. The Shredder

MAGIC SWORD, NOV. 17, THE KNITTING FACTORY You may remember Magic Sword from that time the cops shut down its dance party outside Neurolux, or the other time one of its epic tracks landed on a trailer for Thor: Ragnarok. Maybe its music has been stuck in your head this whole time, an unruly prisoner rattling its metal cup against the inside of your dome. Even for people unfamiliar with its synth-y, ‘80s movie score sound, it’s time to run, not walk, for tickets to its Friday, Nov. 17, show at The Knitting Factory. Wearing cloaks and face masks, its members will be performing with Bellingham, Washington-based Manatee Commune, a.k.a. Grant Eadie, whose trippy, layered tracks go with Magic Sword like peas and carrots. Tickets are $15-$35. Don’t mess this up. —Harrison Berry With Manatee Commune and Street Fever. 8 p.m., $15$35. The Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOGUS BASIN SKI CLUB WARREN MILLER FILM FESTIVAL PREMIERE PARTY: Thursday November 16th at 5pm ZEE’S ROOFTOP, 5th & Front Street Includes Appetizers, Beverages, Movie Ticket and Free Parking followed by a short stroll to the Egyptian Theatre for the 7pm Premier of Warren Miller’s newest “LINE OF DESCENT” Tickets are $35 per person/Child $10 Presented by the College of Idaho Alumni & Featuring the nationally titled C of I Ski and Snowboard team

Signature Sponsors

EGYPTIAN THEATRE Thurs Nov 16th – 7pm $15 Fri Nov 17th – 7pm $15 Sat Nov 18th – 4:30pm $13 Sat Nov 18th – 7:30 pm $15 (Beer and wine available w/ID)

Purchase Premier Party /Movie Package or Movie Tickets at www.egyptiantheatre.net or at the Egyptian Theatre box office or by calling 208-387-1273 All ticket proceeds go to benefit Recreation Unlimited, Bogus Basin Ski Education Foundation, Bogus Basin Ski Patrol and the College of Idaho Ski Team BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 15


SCREEN

Saoirse Ronan, already nominated twice for an Oscar (Atonement and Brooklyn) is destined for another nod from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for yet another brilliant performance, this time in Lady Bird, opening Friday, Nov. 17.

STARTS FRIDAY, NOV. 17th

LEAVING THE NEST, TAKING FLIGHT

Lady Bird, an exquisite debut from director Greta Gerwig, is Oscar bound GEORGE PRENTICE world of male-dominated blockbusters, Lady Deep into Lady Bird, a terrific new comedy Bird might not be able to stay aloft with such attracting plenty of acclaim (critics’ approval heightened expectations, but when someone on Rotten Tomatoes is 100 percent), an afasks me if it’s as great as the reviews make it fectionate but helplessly judgmental mother out to be, I say, “Yes!” I love, love, love Lady (Laurie Metcalf ) turns to her teenage daughBird, and I’ll bet you will too. ter, Lady Bird (Saoirse Ronan) and says, “I In the film, Lady Bird is the preferred name just want you to be the best version of yourself of 17-year-old Christine McPherson. that you be.” “Lady Bird. Is that your OK, you might think, here’s given name?” asks an impaa line I’ve heard before in any LADY BIRD (R) tient teacher. number of coming-of-age Written/directed by Greta Gerwig “I gave it to myself. It films—Juno, Adventureland, was given to me,” Lady Bird The Perks of Being a WallStarring Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf responds. “To me, by me.” flower—but the daughter, not Lady Bird yearns to fly missing a beat, responds with, Opens Friday, Nov. 17 at The far from her Sacramento Flicks “But what if this is the best hometown. She shares the version?” hard-edged viewpoint of late Lady Bird is so different from other ‘teen angst” films. It’s so smart, hi- author Joan Didion, a quote from whom fills the opening screen: “Anyone who talks about larious and note-perfect, it’s no wonder A.O. California hedonism has never spent a ChristScott of The New York Times called the movie mas in Sacramento.” “big screen perfection” and Peter Travers of Lady Bird is an embodiment of contraRolling Stone called it “simply irresistible.” I’ve been in love with Lady Bird since I saw diction: impulsive yet focused, awkward yet spontaneous, self-centered yet generous. it premiere at the Toronto International Film She dyes her hair red and has an impressive, Festival in September. What some considered to be a modest indie with lovely performances almost obsessive, knowledge of Alanis Morishas evolved into a major break-out hit, garner- sette songs. Her life is filled with the familiar circus of young adulthood: math tests, school ing some of the best reviews of the year. In a 16 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

musical productions, acne, mean girls, cool teachers and embarrassing parents. Lady Bird is embarrassed by her mother Marion, who is doing double shifts as a psych ward nurse and who, like so many adults, can’t seem to say the right thing to her child even though she never seems to stop talking. In one particularly illuminating scene, the mother and daughter are in the car. Lady Bird: “I hate California. I want to go the East Coast. I want to go where there’s culture, someplace like New York. Marion: “How in the world did I raise such a snob?” Lady Bird: “Or at least Connecticut or New Hampshire, where writers live in the woods.” Marion: “You wouldn’t get into those schools anyway.” With that, Lady Bird opens her door and jumps from the fast-moving car. Ultimately, Lady Bird is a must-see film. Gerwig, Metcalf and Ronan are all at the top of their profession, with writer/director Gerwig crafting her first full-length feature behind the camera. All three are destined for sure-bet Oscar nominations, and the timing couldn’t be better to celebrate their exquisite achievement. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


FOOD L E X N E L SON

BOISE FALL FOOD ROUNDUP

Restaurants and breweries open and close, say goodbye to Bleubird and hello to Mad Mac, and McDonald’s now delivers

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

FAVA BEANS AND A NICE CHIANTI There was a time when Chianti evoked a straw-covered squat bottle which held a credible juice, but made for a better candle holder. Although Chianti is a red blend made in the Chianti region of Italy, adding white wine grapes was once required. Over the years, new regulations have vastly improved quality, and although the wine must be at least 75 percent Sangiovese—80 percent for the Classico region—there are now eight sub-regions. Here are the panel’s top three Chianti picks: 2015 BIBBIANO CHIANTI CLASSICO, $21 A Sangiovese-dominant blend (typically with less than five percent of the Colorino grape), dark plum and berry liqueur aromas dominate the nose along with a hint of black licorice. A beautifully balanced wine with a smooth palate, it combines creamy chocolate cherry and berry flavors. The velvety finish lingers on the palate.

LE X NEL SON Boise is still growing, and although more people means more traffic, they also bring something absolutely wonderful to the city of trees: new restaurants, filling spaces where other eateries have been and gone. A prime example is New Garden Chinese, which opened its doors last month in the Collister Shopping Center on State Street, taking over a storefront that used to belong to Nam King. With bottom-shelf prices and 179 menu items—ranging from traditional Cantonese and Chinese-American favorites to true American standbys like burgers and fries—to choose from, there’s a lot to like about New Garden. Continuing the Asian theme, a new Vietnamese restaurant called Pho Tay is slated to open at the corner of Fairview Avenue and Five Mile Road in the space previously occupied by Taj Mahal. Though there isn’t a definite opening date, any restaurant with “pho” in the name is more than welcome to make a winter debut. Plus, some beloved Boise institutions are expanding into new territory, foremost among them the all-pasta food truck Mad Mac, which will open a brick-and-mortar location in early December. Mad Mac, known for its top-notch dishes piled with unconventional mac-andcheese toppings like sweet corn, buffalo chicken and fresh jalapenos, will fill the former Pollo Rey space at the Boise Spectrum (home to Edwards 21 and IMAX). Although it has been open less than eight months, Paddles Up Poke, the build-your-own-poke-bowl place on Ninth Street, is opening a second location at the intersection of Eagle and McMillan roads. Paddles Up owners have yet to announce an opening date. In booze news, Gas Lantern Drinking Company on Fulton Street (between White Dog Brewing and Longdrop Cider), opened at the end of October. The space is beautifully decorated, with a sweeping bar, sleek gray

WINESIPPER

Gas Lantern Drinking Company, now open on Fulton Street, offers Smoke & Thyme bites and boozy pours in an impeccable atmosphere.

upholstery and old-fashioned fixtures, and the bar serves food from Smoke & Thyme, the barbeque food truck parked in the adjoining alley. Then, in brews news, veteran-owned Bear Island Brewing plans to open a taproom next year. Readers may already be familiar with Bear Island, as owners Beth and Steve Bechtel have been operating the brewery out of their family garage since 2014 and sell their beer at more than 80 locations citywide. Beth, the creative force behind Bear Island’s inventive suds, began brewing at home when she and her thenboyfriend Steve were deployed overseas with the U.S. Navy. “...I really had a knack for it, really enjoyed it, and it just became a massive passion of mine,” Beth said. “So I started writing my business plan and just knew, [even though] I still had five years left on my Navy contract, I knew someday that I was going to go home again and start this brewery for Boise.” Bear Island is known for using local ingredients to flavor its creative pours, like lavender sprigs, pumpkins and even Idaho potatoes— read more about Bear Island’s best-selling brew, Idaho Potato Ale, on Page 22—and is currently in the process of moving into the old Fire Station 6 on Fairview. The Bechtels have their fingers crossed for a 2018 opening. In a mix of bad news and good news, the

owners of Bleubird, the beloved Boise sandwich spot and three-time consecutive BW Best of Boise winner for Best Local Sandwich, announced on Facebook that they will be shutting down for good on Friday, Jan. 26. Owners Sarah and David “DK” Kelly will take their culinary excellence elsewhere, opening a new restaurant called Petite 4 on the Boise Bench next spring. Although the new menu has yet to be announced, if it lives up to the Bleubird standard, it will undoubtedly become a destination eatery. Wild West Bakery and Espresso, an Eagle mainstay since 1995, is also closing its doors before the end of the year, joining downtown steakhouse Angell’s Bar and Grill Renato in the restaurant graveyard. It will reopen in early 2018 as Mama Italia’s Trattoria, a traditional, family owned Italian eatery that will have little in common with the brunch spot it is replacing. Diners can expect light, authentic Italian dishes straight from the recipe book of the Italian grandmother who gave the restaurant its name. Lastly, fast food giant McDonald’s has partnered with UberEats to bring its newest venture to Boise: McDelivery. As of Oct. 24, customers can place orders through the UberEats app or website and, for an additional booking fee, fast food from the Fairview Avenue McDonald’s will be delivered directly to their door.

2011 POGGIO GUALTIERI GRIGNANO CHIANTI RUFINA RESERVA, $18.99 After Classico, Rufina is arguably the most prestigious of the Chianti subregions. Red fruit aromas pour from the glass of this Reserva, backed by cedar, vanilla and spice. A dollop of Merlot (10 percent) adds a silky texture to this earthy wine that’s filled with spicy, dark fruit flavors. It finishes with a touch of tart cherry. 2015 VILLA DI GEGGIANO BANDINELLO, $21 Though the Bandinello family’s winery is in the Classico region, this wine can’t be labeled Chianti because it’s a blend with just 60 percent Sangiovese. Still, it’s a delicious, fruit-forward wine with ripe cherry and chocolate aromas and a subtle earthiness. The flavors are fresh and lively, with sweet cherry and berry fruit balanced by a hit of acidity on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 17


CITIZEN HOLLI WOODINGS

Buses, stadiums and having 100 new best friends GEORGE PRENTICE

Holli Woodings didn’t look exhausted after winning a seat on the Boise City Council by an overwhelming margin—she rarely does—even though she had just mounted a successful campaign and had been shuttling between Boise and Bend, Oregon, where her mother was hospitalized following a bad car accident. “She has a broken neck, broken back, broken ribs and broken clavicle,” said Woodings. “She’s not paralyzed, which is a miracle.” Woodings had dropped everything and rushed to Oregon, but her campaign was never put on hold. Due to the good graces of friends and volunteers, the door-knocking continued, which ultimately led Woodings to a win with 52.3 percent of the vote, compared to her challengers Caleb Hansen (28.8 percent), Michelle Doane (10.2 percent) and Nicholas Jones (8.6 percent). How’s your mother doing? They’re going to perform a medical transport to the St. Luke’s Inpatient Rehab, so she’ll be closer to us. They’re going to see if she can heal a bit more before considering surgery. She’ll probably be there for 10 to 12 weeks. I want to read you something you told me once: “The more I thought about the possibility of running for the Boise City Council and the more people asked, the more I thought I should consider it.” That was November 2014. And I kept thinking about it. It just makes sense. I went from serving my neighborhood to serving in the Idaho Legislature. I know city issues and we have so many things going on and there is so much opportunity to make things right. Let’s talk about some of the things that will be before you soon after you’re sworn into office, like a downtown circulator. I love the idea and I like the route they’re considering. I’m a little less convinced that it needs to be a rail system. Some cities are using driverless vehicles in their circulators. We’ve heard that more people would ride a trolley instead of a bus because a trolley has a cool factor, but imagine having a cool driverless bus. 18 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

Mayor Bieter says if we lose the current A-10 mission at Gowen Field, we should support the effort to attract an F-35 mission to Boise, but a fair amount of people in the Vista area get a little nervous about that. One of their questions, which is super valid, is: Will the mission create an uninhabitable zone near the airport? We already have a housing shortage, a pretty significant one. We have to look very hard at how an F-35 mission would affect habitable zones in our city. And we need to operate off the facts, not emotions or assumptions. Can you weigh in on the proposed sports stadium west of downtown? I hear again and again about conversations about this, but they’re outside the public domain, and I think that’s a valid frustration. That said, I think the sports park is a great idea and west of downtown is the right spot for it. It’s an underutilized section of the city. But ultimately the main question is: How is this going to be financed so that Boise taxpayers aren’t left on the hook if it’s not successful? What does the City of Boise need right now that it doesn’t have? We need our buses to run on Sunday[s] and evenings. I heard this time and again from citizens throughout the campaign. I kept hearing that our transportation system isn’t reflective of the size of our city and the needs of our residents. Valley Regional Transit would love to do that but they’re going to turn to Boise City Hall and say, “You’re going to need to pay for that.” I’m anxious to get working on that with my fellow council members. Can I assume you’ve heard from a lot of people since your win? It’s like having another birthday. My inbox is full. The week after you’re elected it’s “Congratulations.” A week later it’s, “We have to meet and talk about my ideas.” I’ve been advised to be prepared to have 100 new and very best friends. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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NYT CROSSWORD | ‘S-Q’S ME!’ BY ED SESSA / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS

1

2

3

4

5

48 Letters of warning on internet sites 52 Radiologist’s tool, for short 53 Cigar City, so-called on account of a former major industry 54 A part of Life? 55 Irritate 56 Suffix with market 57 Mr. Magoo biopic? 62 Actress Thurman 63 N.Y.C. subway letters 65 High school sweethearts 66 “____ said …”

26 Spinny pool shot 27 Direct (toward) 29 Part of many German names 30 “Ready?” response 33 Hog seller? 38 Chefs’ hats 40 Corp. budget item 41 1969 self-titled jazz album 42 Salad alternative 43 Trouble maker 46 Depend (on)

1 Philbin’s onetime morning co-host 8 Equality-promoting org. 12 Those who believe everything has a spirit 20 Off base 21 Small songbird 22 Patronized a restaurant 23 Prodigality? 25 Emmy-winning actor on “The West Wing” 6

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80

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89 93 98

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20 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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92 96

59

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37

66

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45

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58

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112

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40 44

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25 27

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68 Birthplace of Emily Dickinson 71 Sloppy sort 72 Roadblock 73 Canadian coin, informally 74 Like rebate coupons, typically 78 “How cool!” 79 Actor Kilmer 80 Cuckoo or dodo? 83 Locale for a flock 86 Nonreactive 88 Abbr. in a military title

119

120

89 Dark times, informally 90 Trickster 91 Mariner’s org. 92 Small 93 Resembling down 95 General ____ chicken 96 Buccaneer’s quaff 98 Was on a crowded bus, say 100 Soprano Renata 102 Prepares cube steak? 107 Altar sites 108 A/C stat 109 Gay who wrote “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold” 110 “I ____ talking to you!” 112 The “E” of E.D. 114 All-day gripe sessions? 121 Like a rope in tug of war 122 Northern Iraqi 123 Alter ego on “The Simpsons” 124 Tightwads’ opposites 125 Hungers 126 Questionable

DOWN 1 Ones in a mess, informally 2 Question: Abbr. 3 Pot-au-____ (French stew) 4 Basis of the plot of “Gone Girl” 5 Like Corinthian columns 6 Bacilli shapes 7 Habiliments 8 Cobbler’s tool 9 Vineyard designation 10 ____ Cayes (Haitian port) 11 Not related? 12 Gilbert who wrote “Love and Death on Long Island” 13 Rosetta Stone discovery site 14 In a senseless way 15 Deranged, in slang 16 Polish movie named Best Foreign Language Film of 2014 17 Work out 18 Henry VII’s house 19 Lee who co-created the Avengers 24 Not an elective: Abbr.

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boiseclassicmovies.com 28 Flower colored by Aphrodite’s blood, in myth 30 “You know who this is” 31 “A Visit From St. Nicholas” poet 32 Ways out of embarrassing situations? 34 Polished 35 It may have a ring to it 36 Enero a diciembre 37 Civil rights activist Guinier 39 Laker legend with a size 22 sneaker, informally 44 Something absolutely necessary 45 Fast-paced two-player card game 47 Munchies, say 49 Enumerations of things to be sat on? 50 Is plenty angry 51 Song words before “the World” and “the Champions” 53 Like pre-1917 Russia 55 Green shells 58 Animal with a flexible snout 59 Early title for Julius Caesar 60 Brightest star in Orion 61 Apollo 11’s Eagle, for short 64 What Lionel Messi wears 67 Brazil’s ____ Bernardo do Campo 68 Choreographer Ailey 69 2016 film set in Polynesia 70 Et ____ (footnote abbr.) 72 Document certifiers, for short 74 Countenance 75 Sorting category on iTunes 76 Vacuum-tube component

77 Cousin of a spoonbill 81 Alleged psychic exposed by the Amazing Randi 82 Co-authors Margret and H. A. 84 Theatricalize 85 Lhasa ____ (dogs) 87 “Old World Style” pasta sauce brand 92 Glacial deposit 93 Opposition 94 Easy question 95 “I dare you to do better!” 97 Snitched on, with “out” 99 Lucy’s place, in a Beatles song 101 “Impossible!” 102 Leash, e.g. 103 Line (up) 104 Ones on the outsides of brackets L A S T M O W S

S H A H

G I L D A

O C T E T

N O Y O U D I D N T

L A W D

J A F A R

A B A C I

O U T B R E I A M L A

105 “Yuck!” 106 Forgeries 108 Pot growers? 111 Kind of vaccine 113 Cardboard container: Abbr. 115 “____ pasa?” 116 Decorative garden item 117 Source of much of Google’s income 118 Fictional creature made from heat and slime 119 Unspecified degree 120 ____ milk

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

S U C R U P A H N E S W O O E S S S F L H E L P U E R I H S E L F I L L A C K A D T H E R O W A N A T T R H A S R E H E V E I N A A C R N I E S P N D A L E L E G E N Y D O W N

O S E E A D R L D T I S E S D O P M A N E R O S E A D N Y E T P R P Y A T R U N O N O L A S E P D I N

A N S W E R S

N E R F

M A G Y A R S

B E L L A G I O

S L S A O T T U P O B A H W F U E B E S H O A T H D A H E R I

I G T A L D I A B I L A B O A Y A U R A R N A N D D R S K S A P H T I S O O N P W N A K E N H O L S T W C S H E H B E L T U B L O W Z E L A Z E C D E G F I N D E O E S E S S A S

K A S R D A S O G R E S

P E E R

E U L E R

R E T R O

O R E O

T S K S

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF: MALEAH JORDYN KEARY-HEINERT, Minor Child Case No. CV01-17-19553 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petitioner for Change of Name has been filed on behalf of MALEAH JORDYN KEARY-HEINERT, a minor requesting a change of name from MALEAH JORDYN KEARY-HEINERT to JORDYN MALEAH HEINERT. The reason for the change in name is Samson Keary is not the father, the minor’s mother wants her last name to be the same: and the mother wants to switch the minor’s first and middle names to reflect what the minor is known as. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 10:30 o’clock a.m. on December 12, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse, 200 West Front Street, Boise, ID 83702. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date October 20, 2017. CHRISTOPHER D RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB November 8, 15, 22 & 29 LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS CASE #CV0117-19552 (I.C. 15-3-801) IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JANA HOLLENBECK, deceased. NOTICE IS HEARBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Dated: 23rd day of October, 2017. Claims must be presented to the undersigned address indicated: Monica Little, c/o A. Denise Penton, Attorney for Personal Representative, Penton Law Offices, PLLC, 702. W. Idaho Street Suite 100, P.O. Box 6326 Boise, ID 83701, AND and filed with the Clerk of the Court. Pub. November 15, 22, 29 & December 6 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Tenille F. Wheeler, Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1709811 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Tenille Freel Wheller now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Tenille

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Marie Wheeler. The reason for the change in name is: returning to maiden name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on December 14, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date October 27, 2017 CHRISTOPHER D RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEBBIE NAGELE DEPUTY CLERK PUB November 15, 22, 29 & December 6 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DAVID ALLEN DICKINSON CASE NO. CV01-17-17940 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Notice is hereby given that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the clerk of the court. Ashley Dickinson By: Renee Karel ISB # 9050 SUSAN LYNN MIMURA & ASSOCIATES, PLLC Attorneys at Law 3451 E. Copper Point Drive, Suite 106 Meridian, Idaho 83642 Telephone: (208) 286-3140 DATED: November 3, 2017 PUB November 15, 22 & 29

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 21


PAGE BREAK $GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

BEAR ISLAND BREWING IDAHO POTATO ALE

WATTLE I DO? DEAR MINERVA, I am dreading Thanksgiving. My husband’s family is visiting again, which sends our home into turmoil. They are nice enough, and I want them to have a relationship with our children, but their political beliefs are not aligned with the way in which we live our lives and treat others. Now that our teens are showing interest in advocacy and activism and are well on their way to being open-minded, compassionate people, I’m worried that my in-laws’ ignorant and racist comments are going to be a setback. I just want a peaceful holiday. Sincerely, Wattle I Do?

DEAR WATTLE, This is a touchy subject for everyone involved. I prefer to take a gracious stance, and I usually keep a few topics of common, non-political interest in my arsenal. If your kids are doing anything exciting, those can be great topics to bring up when the conversation starts to wander into choppy waters. Keeping the conversation light is part of successful entertaining. It may also help to chat with your kids about how to process and interact with people who don’t agree. If all else fails, talk turkey. Frankly saying, “We need to change the subject” can also move you all on to more pleasant discussions. I am not suggesting you or anyone doesn’t have a right to say their piece. I am suggesting that maybe, just maybe, it will keep until the celebration has ended. Our troubles will always be waiting for us, Thanksgiving or not.

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FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

bearislandbrewing.com $5.56 for a 22-ounce bottle at WinCo Available at roughly 80 locations throughout the Treasure Valley

Beth Bechtel, co-owner of Bear Island Brewing, came up with the idea for the brewery’s best-selling IPA while serving overseas. “When I was in the service I was on deployment in the Middle East, and I ran out of barley—I was brewing out of my room. So I needed a starch solution to make alcohol, and I was working on my IPA recipe...I went into a Middle Eastern market, and the first thing I saw was russet potatoes, and [the] IPA in my brain immediately became Idaho Potato Ale.” According to Bechtel, the idea is more than just a gimmick: The potatoes actually improve the beer. “It’s still a beer, so it still has barley and all those things too, but the addition of potatoes actually enhanced the body and the head retention of the beer. They have a little more protein, and that’s what protein does for beer,” she said. The IPA has a delicate boozy aroma, and each sip teases the palate with floral notes and a quick punch of hops that vanishes on the finish.

Taken by instagram user rasephotography.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10

—Lex Nelson

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

1.

“POSTCARDS FROM MAGDALENA,” JEFF CROSBY

6.

2.

7.

3.

“THE STORIES WE TELL OURSELVES,” NOTHING MORE

8.

4.

9.

5.

10.

“RED BEFORE BLACK,” CANNIBAL CORPSE

“THE DUSK IN US,” CONVERGE

“REDEMPTION AND RUIN,” THE DEVIL MAKES THREE

22 | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | BOISEweekly

“COLORS,” BECK

“TRUE VIEW,” STICK TO YOUR GUNS “CARRY FIRE,” ROBERT PLANT

“DOWN HEARTED BLUES,” EILEN JEWELL “AMERICAN FALL,” ANTI-FLAG

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ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Many people go fishing all their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after,” observed Henry David Thoreau. The spirit of Thoreau’s observation is true about every one of us to some extent. From time to time, we all try to satisfy our desires in the wrong location, with the wrong tools and with the wrong people. But I’m happy to announce that his epigram is less true for you now than it has ever been. In the coming months, you will have an unusually good chance to know exactly what you want, be in the right place at the right time to get it and still want it after you get it—and it all starts now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I predict that during the next 10 months, you will generate personal power and good fortune as you ripen your skills at creating interesting forms of intimacy. Get started. Here are some tips to keep in mind. 1. All relationships have problems. Every single one, no exceptions. So you should cultivate relationships that bring you useful and educational problems. 2. Be very clear about the qualities you do and don’t want at the core of your most important alliances. 3. Were there past events that still obstruct you from weaving the kind of togetherness that’s really good for you? Use your imagination to put those events behind you forever. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You may be entertaining an internal dialog that sounds something like this: “I need a clear yes or a definitive no ... a tender revelation or a radical revolution … a lesson in love or a cleansing sex marathon— but I’m not sure which. Should I descend or ascend? Plunge deeper down, all the way to the bottom? Or zip higher up, in a heedless flight into the wide open spaces? Would I be happier in the poignant embrace of an intense commitment or in the wild frontier where none of the old rules can follow me? I can’t decide. I don’t know which part of my mind I should trust.” If you do hear those thoughts in your brain, Gemini, here’s my advice: There’s no rush to decide. What’s healthiest for your soul is to bask in the uncertainty for a while. CANCER (June 21-July 22): According to storyteller Michael Meade, ancient Celtic culture believed “a person was born through three forces: the coming together of the mother and father, an ancestral spirit’s wish to be reborn and the involvement of a god or goddess.” Even if you don’t think that’s literally true, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to have fun fantasizing it is, because you’re in a phase when contemplating your origins can invigorate your spiritual health and attract good

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BY ROB BREZSNY

fortune into your life. So start with the Celtic theory, and go on from there. Which of your ancestors may have sought to live again through you? Which deity might have had a vested interest in you being born? What did you come to this earth to accomplish? Which of your innate potentials have you yet to fully develop, and what can you do to further develop them? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I predict that starting today and during the next 10 months, you will learn more about treating yourself kindly and making yourself happier than you have in years. You will mostly steer clear of the mindset that regards life as a numbing struggle for mere survival. You will regularly dream up creative ideas about how to have more fun while attending to the mundane tasks in your daily rhythm. Here’s the question I hope you will ask yourself every morning for the next 299 days: “How can I love myself with devotion and ingenuity?” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This may be the most miscellaneous horoscope I’ve ever created for you. That’s apropos, given the fact that you’re a multifaceted quick-change artist these days. Here’s your sweet mess of oracles. 1. If the triumph you seek isn’t humbling, it’s not the right triumph. 2. You may have an odd impulse to reclaim or recoup something that you have not in fact lost. 3. Before transmutation is possible, you must pay a debt. 4. Don’t be held captive by your beliefs. 5. If you’re given a choice between profane and sacred love, choose sacred. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The next 10 months will be an ideal time to revise and revamp your approach to education. To take maximum advantage of the potentials, create a master plan to get the training and knowledge to thrive for years to come. At first, it may be a challenge to acknowledge you have a lot more to learn. The comfortloving part of your nature may be resistant to contemplating the hard work it will require to expand your worldview and enhance your skills. But once you get started, you’ll quickly find the process becoming easier and more pleasurable. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Everything that can be invented has been invented.” -Charles H. Duell, Director of the U.S. Patent Office, 1899. “Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible.” -Lord Kelvin, President, Royal Society, 1895. “All the music that can be written has already been written. We’re just repeating the past.” -19th-century composer Tchaikovsky. “Video won’t be able to hold on to any market it captures after the first six months. People

will soon get tired of staring at a box every night.” -filmmaker Darryl F. Zanuck, commenting on television, 1946. I hope I’ve provided enough evidence to convince you to be faithful to your innovative ideas, Scorpio. Don’t let skeptics or conventional thinkers waylay you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Sagittarians are most likely to buy a lottery ticket that has the winning numbers, but you’re also more likely than everyone else to throw the ticket in a drawer and forget about it, or else leave it in your jeans when you do the laundry, rendering the ticket unreadable. Please don’t be like that in the coming weeks. Make sure you do what’s necessary to fully cash in on the good fortune that life will be making available. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the game of basketball, if a player is fouled by a member of the opposing team, he is given a “free throw.” While standing 15 feet away, he takes a leisurely shot at the basket without having to deal with any defenders. Studies show that a player is most likely to succeed at this task if he shoots the ball underhanded. Yet virtually no professionals ever do this. Why? Because it doesn’t look cool. Everyone opts to shoot free throws overhand, even though it’s not as effective a technique. Weird. Let’s invoke this as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks, Capricorn. In my astrological opinion, you’ll be more likely to accomplish good and useful things if you’re willing to look uncool. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1991, Aquarian rock star Axl Rose recorded the song “November Rain” with his band Guns N’ Roses. It had taken him eight years to compose. Before it was ready for prime time, he had to whittle it down from an 18-minute epic to a succinct 9-minute ballad. I see the coming weeks as a time when you should strive to complete work on your personal equivalent of Axl’s opus.

PRESENTS

Each entry must contain exactly 101 words (not including the story title). Please confirm your word count using Microsoft Word. We will do the same. No handwritten entries. Entry fee is $10 per story. Submit your Microsoft Word entry to fiction101@boiseweekly.com and enter your credit card payment at boiseweekly.nolatepayments. com. If you prefer to pay by check, please send your entry fee to: Boise Weekly/Fiction 101, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. Your submission will be confirmed via email once entry and payment are received. Both must be received by 3 p.m., Friday Nov. 24. Cash prizes are awarded for winning entries. BW will publish winning stories in the Jan. 3, 2018 edition.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Thomas Edison was a prolific inventor whose work led to the creation of electric lights, recorded music, movies and much more. When he was 49 years old, he met Henry Ford, a younger innovator who was at the beginning of his illustrious career. Ford told Edison about his hopes to develop and manufacture low-cost automobiles, and the older man responded with an emphatic endorsement. Ford later said this was the first time anyone had given him any encouragement. Edison’s approval “was worth worlds” to him. I predict, Pisces, that you will receive comparable inspiration from a mentor or guide or teacher in the next nine months. Be on the lookout for that person.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 15–21, 2017 | 23


Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 22  

The fight to remove faith-based exemptions continues

Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 22  

The fight to remove faith-based exemptions continues