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BOISE WEEKLY AU G U S T 3 0 – S E P T E M B E R 5 , 2 0 1 7

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Banding Together

City of Boise holds onto existing partners, seeks more to help fund Allumbaugh House

LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

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Totally BFF

Boise Film Festival scales down locations, increases offerings, plans for the future

VO L U M E 2 6 , I S S U E 1 1

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Comb On Over Living the stronzo life at Barbiere DeVino FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Jared Stewart jared@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Lex Nelson lex@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copyediting: Zach Hagadone Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne Interns: Sophia Angleton, AJ Black, Savannah Cardon Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Bingo Barnes, bingo@boiseweekly.com Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Ryan Johnson, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Andy Hedden-Nicely, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2017 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE THE BIGGER LE BOISE Anyone who says, “There’s nothing to do around here,” isn’t looking hard enough (or just likes to complain). Last weekend was so full of family friendly outing options, the biggest problem was not having enough time to experience everything. Among the festivities, there was the annual Library Comic Con—which expanded to two days this year, adding a live costume contest and dance party—the final weekend of The Western Idaho Fair 2017; the Latino Fest; and on Aug. 26, we held the second (technically third) annual Big Le Boise, Boise Weekly’s own annual street festival (check out the photos on Page 5). We held the first BLB in 2012, closing off the street in front of our building and a parking lot on the corner. A lot has changed since then and by the time we decided to revisit BLB in 2016, there was, among other projects in the works, a new Trader Joe’s across the street and the parking lot we had set up in was the site of a huge new apartment complex under construction. We worked with the City of Boise and CCDC, and were permitted to close off a block of Sixth Street and a portion of Broad Street, which we did again this year. It takes a lot of time and energy to throw a street festival—especially when the street in question is the first new LIV (Lasting, Innovative, Vibrant) district in Boise—and we couldn’t have done it without the help of some really important people and organizations: Big thanks go out to everyone who attended the BLB; our tireless BW staffers and volunteers; the super talented vendors and food purveyors who set up shop; Mayor Dave Bieter for his warm, heartfelt speech (that made Sally Freeman cry); supporting sponsors Air St. Luke’s, Challenger Hospitality Group, Guho Corp., Snake River Brewing and 94.9 The River; and our presenting sponsors AT&T, Crater Lake Spirits, Sykes and The Fowler. Let’s do it again next year! —Amy Atkins

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Amiri Osman TITLE: “Two Musicians” MEDIUM: Batik ARTIST STATEMENT: Born in East D R Congo 80 years ago, have diploma in drawing and perspective with E. African Traditions Cultural, mobilized refugees in southern Africa through art. I arrived in the U.S. at the end of 2016, and my ambition is to have a degree in fabric arts. I was awarded the 2018 Traditional Arts Apprenticeships grant from Idaho Commission on the Arts.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | 3


LIVE COMEDY 6 NIGHTS A WEEK

BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

REMEMBERING CECIL CONDOLENCES FROM ACRO S S THE NATION POURED IN FOLLOWING THE DE ATH OF CECIL ANDRUS, FORMER U.S. INTERIOR SECRE TARY AND FOUR-TERM GOVERNOR OF IDAHO. A N D RU S , 8 5, D I E D AUG . 2 4 — O N E DAY SHY OF HIS 86TH BIRTHDAY— SURROUNDED BY FAMILY AND FRIENDS AT HIS BOISE HOME. RE AD MORE AT NE WS/CIT YDESK.

SEPT. 1-2

SHAWNKY SEPT. 7-10

PELOFS

AT 8 PM & 10:00 PM

TO THE CORE During a course of events in the coming weeks, Meriwether Cider will be inviting Boiseans to pick and crush apples, and then drink in the rewards. Read more at Food/Food News.

VAX FLAP The West Ada School District had to turn away an enrolled kindergartner after his mother failed to provide proof of vaccinations or an exemption form. Read more at News/Citydesk.

FAIR-WELL There was so much to see, do and eat at the 2017 Western Idaho Fair. From ribbon-winning art to heart-stopping rides, check out our slideshow at Arts & Culture/Culture.

BUY TICKETS NOW! LIQUIDLAUGHS.COM | 208-941-2459 | 405 S 8TH ST

OPINION

4 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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THE BIG LE BOISE After months (and months and months) of road work in front of our building, we were so excited for Aug. 26 and our annual street festival, The Big Le Boise. We here at Boise Weekly are so proud to be part of this community, and we see The Big Le Boise as a celebration of not only our commitment, but also of the people, businesses and organizations that are such an integral part of what we do. We had a blast at The Big Le Boise 2017, and we couldn’t have done it without our kick-ass sponsors, vendors, performers, staff, volunteers and attendees. They all made it such a success, we’re already looking forward to next year! —BW Staff

september 2 JOHNNY WEIR

WORLD BRONZE MEDALIST 3X US GOLD MEDALIST sunvalley.com

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208.622.2135

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | 5


CITYDESK

In IDOC prisons, about 50 inmates currently subscribe to the Common Fare meal plan.

HUNGRY JEWISH PRISONERS WIN TRULY KOSHER MEAL PLAN Passover, an eight-day festival celebrated by the Jewish faith in mid-April, traditionally begins and ends with two days of feasting; however, for Jews incarcerated in Idaho prisons, this Passover was marked by near-starvation instead. A disagreement between Jewish prisoners and the Idaho Department of Corrections over whether the IDOC Common Fare meal plan was actually kosher lead four Jewish inmates to file a religious freedom lawsuit against the department this spring. The inmates have submitted unsuccessful complaints to the department since 2009, but were spurred to legal action when two of the inmates subsisted on only fruit and matzo crackers during Passover, choosing to starve rather than violate their faith. ACLU of Idaho and Ferguson Durham PLLC represented the inmates, arguing that IDOC’s refusal to alter its meal plan to meet the prisoners’ religious standards was an infringement of their first amendment rights. Although IDOC continues to insist that Common Fare has always been kosher, the two parties reached a settlement Aug. 11 in favor of the plaintiffs—a revised Common Fare meal plan will be available at all IDOC facilities beginning Nov. 1. “IDOC was offering inmates a diet plan that was kosher and included fresh fruits and fresh vegetables, but we settled this case to avoid a long, expensive legal battle,” said IDOC Public Information Officer Jeffrey Ray. According to Ray, IDOC met kosher standards when it implemented Common Fare last summer. The plan included individually wrapped, kosher-certified meats, fresh produce and prepackaged dairy products prepared for inmates in a separate area of the IDOC kitchens with designated equipment and utensils washed separately in a sanitized environment. Yet for “individuals actually practicing the faith,” as ACLU of Idaho Executive Director Leo Morales put it, these efforts weren’t enough. Morales cited the opinions of the plaintiffs, who span the denominations of Judaism, and experts like Rabbi Mendel Lifshitz of the Chabad Jewish Center of Idaho, who advised IDOC on accommodations for Jewish prisoners in 2005. “[The Common Fare] diet was an effort to provide kosher, and it was perhaps what you might call kosher-style, [but] it did 7 not meet the requirement of kosher law… from a religious perspective, it was never 6 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

RYAN J OH NSON

NEWS LONG AND WINDING ROAD TO RECOVERY

The city of Boise tries to convince other cities served by Allumbaugh House to be funding partners GEORGE PRENTICE From inside Allumbaugh House, which served 864 men and women in 2016, the “outside” world can seem trivial. When confronting life-threatening addiction, something like the current political climate is just a small addition the merry-go-round of melodrama. For patients at the detox and mental health crisis center, managed by Terry Reilly Health Services, it’s all about making it to tomorrow. “I had reached my breaking point,” said one female patient [names are being withheld to protect confidentiality]. “I had always been too afraid to ask for help. Addiction is something I never thought would happen to me.” Another patient had a similar experience. “I felt stupid and embarrassed and just plain down on myself,” she said. “As soon as I walked through the doors, I didn’t feel judged.” Heidi Hart, CEO of Terry Reilly, said she’s still stunned at the overwhelming need despite having served thousands of patients since 2009. “When we were building Allumbaugh House, I’m not sure we knew the magnitude of need that existed within the community,” she said. “It’s a steady pressure of people needing to get in, so we’re constantly balancing a waiting list. I don’t want to say we have exceeded our expectations, because if you think of it, that’s sad, but the demand has [been] greater than I ever anticipated.” Getting the doors open, let alone getting Allumbaugh House built, brought on a decadelong debate among local governments over who should shoulder the cost. In one particularly nasty bit of tension, Ada County even threatened to pull its contribution to Allumbaugh House during a 2010 kerfuffle over the magistrate court services it provides to regional cities. After some hardline negotiating, a so-called Joint Powers Entity was formed, which includes the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Ada County and the cities of Boise, Eagle and Meridian. “I’ve been involved on this project since

2006. Discussions were happening as early as 2003,” said Gina Westcott, Southwest Hub administrative director for IDHW. “There are a lot of things that the Department of Health and Welfare does for behavioral health; but I’m particularly proud that we participate in Allumbaugh House.” IDHW’s annual funding contribution to Allumbaugh House is close to $1 million, approximately 48 percent of the facility’s operating budget. That’s followed by Ada County (14.5 percent), the city of Boise (14 percent) Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center (12 percent), St. Luke’s Health Systems (9 percent) and the city of Meridian (3 percent). Allumbaugh House provides critical services to hundreds of individuals from other communities across the Treasure Valley as well, leading some to question why those cities haven’t contributed to its annual budget. “We just made a presentation to the Eagle City Council Aug. 22. They will definitely be ‘in,’” said Diana Lachiondo, the city of Boise director of Community Partnerships. “We’re also set to present to the Garden City Council, and Kuna. Star is the only community that hasn’t yet been responsive to our request to make a presentation.” Lachiondo added it’s challenging to seek more funding participation while also holding onto commitments from existing JPE members. “This is a little bit like trying to keep a band together,” she said.

Boise Mayor Dave Bieter has heard that tune before. “‘Keeping the band together’ is a perfect analogy,” he said July 18 during a Boise City Council workshop session. The mayor doubled down on the metaphor by quoting from one of pop music’s most famous bands. “A ‘Long and Winding Road,’ that’s what this has been,” Bieter said. “I remember how difficult it was just to get two of three Ada County commissioners to agree to the original partnership. ” Boise City Councilman Ben Quintana said participation in funding Allumbaugh should be a no-brainer. “Am I missing something? I know some people can get emotional about this, but there is [a] direct economic benefit,” he said at the July 18 workshop. “If Allumbaugh House goes away, costs go up. There’s no argument. Why are we even struggling with this?” “I share your frustration,” replied Lachiondo. “I can’t pretend to know what some of the thinking is, other than some fatigue about [what] some people’s preconceptions are about real prevention. We absolutely know that these folks have no place to go.”

WHO GOES TO ALLUMBAUGH HOUSE? Everyone who goes to Allumbaugh does so voluntarily—no one is admitted unless they are referred by a healthcare provider, law enforcement or have undergone an in-person screening. “We get a number of direct phone calls, about BOISE WEEKLY.COM


TAKING IT TO THE STREET Another significant goal is keeping individuals out of the Ada County Jail. “We all are trying to serve the same population. But I must tell you, at first, we had to overcome some misperceptions that Allumbaugh House didn’t have a direct impact to the sheriff’s BOISE WEEKLY.COM

NEWS

LEIL A R AMELL A -R ADER

3,000 calls a year, from families, friends and the individuals themselves. About 45 percent of our patients are self-referred. They call and say, ‘I need help.’ And, yes, sometimes we have to call them back when they’re not as intoxicated,” said Allumbaugh House Program Director Cindy Miller. More often than not, she added, the person in need of services is near or at the bottom of the economic ladder. “We have a number of people who are employed but don’t have insurance that covers substance abuse treatment or even mental health treatment, or their medical deductible is too high,” said Miller. “I can’t tell you how many people are trying to get by with a $10-per-hour job and a $7,000 deductible on their insurance.” An even more common scenario, she added, is the individual doesn’t even have have a roof over their head. “Right now, about 55 to 60 percent of our total population is homeless,” said Miller. “Obviously, being homeless, uninsured and without a support system creates a particular challenge to someone in terms of moving toward recovery.” Many are struggling with alcohol. “Generally speaking, about 60 percent of our patients would be here with alcohol as the primary substance of abuse. That’s followed by opiates and methamphetamine, but what has really made things more complicated is poly-substance abuse—heroin addicts who take meth or people who drink when they’re feeling badly. It’s really rare now to see someone who just abuses alcohol. That has been a significant change since we opened seven years ago.” Meanwhile, the referrals to Allumbaugh House grow each year. “In many of these cases, these are individuals who didn’t end up in an emergency room or a jail,” said Miller. “So, this is really the diversion piece that is so valuable to the whole community.” “Diversion” means keeping someone out of the hospital, which comes at a much higher cost to taxpayers. “The average cost in a hospital for someone who needs help with detox and/or mental health issues is about $1,500 per night—not including any lab work or medication,” said Lachiondo. “Compare that to an average cost at Allumbaugh, which is about $400 per night, and that includes labs and meds. We’re talking about a nearly $1,110 savings per client. Based on the level of admissions and length of stay, we’re estimated that it totals to about a $5.8 million annual savings.”

CITYDESK

Kosher meal plans cost prisons three to four times more than standard meal plans.

sufficient,” Lifschitz confirmed. “As far as I’m concerned as a rabbi, this is a victory for religious freedom.” Meals will now be served with disposable dishes and utensils to prevent cross-contamination during the washing process, an approach in keeping with kosher law. “It’s been an uphill battle, but we’re glad that we will finally be able to follow our religious tenets without having to go hungry anymore,” said the plaintiffs in a joint statement. “An injury to one Jew is an injury to the whole Jewish community.” Morales chalked up IDOC’s reluctance to revise Common Fare to stubbornness about the definition of kosher and concerns over excess cost, a barrier to kosher meal plans nationwide. According to a 2014 New York Times article, the Florida prison system resisted reinstating its kosher meal plan because the $7-per-inmateper-day cost was more than four times its standard rate. A similar disparity plagued prisons in New York and California, and the trend holds true in Idaho: IDOC spends 90 cents per day on prisoners who choose the standard meal plan, while the old Common Fare plan cost $1.75 and the revised plan price will jump to $3.50. Contrary to Morales’ guess, IDOC claims not to be worried about spending extra. This is likely because for the last two fiscal years, vacant positions and unexpectedly low contract costs, among other things, left the department with extra cash in its budget: $3,660,778 in 2016 and $2,598,336 in 2017. That money went back to the state, but next year’s excess may end up in prisoners’ stomachs. Although a revised meal plan is guaranteed to roll out, whether the original Common Fare plan was constitutional has yet to be decided. Ray noted claims the meal plan violated constitutional rights or laws are unconfirmed by the court, but although that’s true, the court didn’t find in favor of IDOC either—instead, the settlement preempted a true ruling. For Morales, there is no question constitutional rights were at stake, and ACLU will continue to pursue monetary compensation for the plaintiffs. “The champions here are the individuals in prison,” he said. “That’s what it takes for all of us in this society to have constitutional rights—to stand up for them when they’re being violated.” —Lex Nelson 6

In 2016, Allumbaugh House provided services to 864 men and women from communities throughout the Treasure Valley. However, not every community currently contributes to its funding.

office and the jail,” said Kate Pape, Health Services administrator at the Ada County Sheriff’s Office. “But what we’re really talking about here is keeping people from getting arrested or coming to jail in the first place.” That’s why, for instance, Pape said there’s an increasing need to identify substance abuse issues before someone risks being locked up. “The average length of stay for someone who has a mental health issue or chronic health care condition, they’re in jail 50 percent longer than those without,” she said. “We see folks who come into the jail and they’re detoxing and we know that’s not the appropriate place for them to be.” That leaves it to cops on the beat to identify a problem before it becomes a felony. “The No. 1 type of call to Boise police is a so-called welfare check,” said Lachiondo. “A neighbor calls about some erratic behavior next door. They’re not sure what’s going on. Maybe the situation doesn’t call for a mental hold at a hospital, so the police officer can make a referral for that individual to get some help sooner than later. So, if it’s voluntary, that’s a great solution.” Walking through the door of Allumbaugh House for the first time is probably the biggest step in an addicted person’s life. “Sometimes, I put myself in the position of somebody who’s coming into Allumbaugh. They’re thinking, ‘Who are these people that I’m being entrusted to? Do I have to be vulnerable and tell all my intimate secrets to 20 people that I’ve never met before? All I really want to do is go throw up or go crawl into a bed,’” said Hart. “I think that’s one of the things that the staff at Allumbaugh works really hard at: Creating a sense

of safety. We know you’re apprehensive. But we want you to trust us and take that risk anyway.” Contrary to popular belief, the greatest concern for most patients is not about coming to Allumbaugh—it’s about leaving. “Quite often, they’re going right back to the environment they came from,” said Miller. “But it’s our job to engage them into recognizing that change is possible and we can help them make those small steps, and then give them lots of reassurance about their after-care plan.” The 16 beds at Allumbaugh House are nearly always full, with most patients leaving the facility after five or six days. The alternative of more people struggling with addiction ending up at the county jail is economically unsustainable. “We’ve been averaging about 1,000 inmates lately, so our goal very much is to keep people who should not be in jail out of jail,” said Pape. “That said, when you’re talking about a criminal offense, community safety is a difficult balance.” “But if we were to say, ‘We’re just going to put these folks in jail and they’ll detox there, then we’re talking about building bigger jails,” responded Lachiondo. “And then we have to ask ourselves if that’s an appropriate use of taxpayer resources.” Which is why Lachiondo will be busy over the coming months, trying to secure new funding partnerships from the cities of Garden City, Eagle, Kuna and Star. Meanwhile, Hart said the success rate at Allumbaugh House is reason enough for duplication. “I’d love to see a facility in the western part of the valley,” said Hart. “Maybe Allumbaugh House West.”

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | 7


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY AUGUST 30 Festivals & Events CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET— 3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com.

BOISE COMMUNITY BAND: SWINGING THROUGH THE SUMMER—Enjoy an evening of swing and big band music from the 1940s with the Boise Community Band, featuring 70 musicians performing good old fashioned summer band concerts in the band shell. 7 p.m. FREE. Gene Harris Band Shell, Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-739-1588, cityofboise.org. COMEDY OPEN MIC—7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

On Stage ALIVE AFTER FIVE: LEEROY STAGGER—Leeroy Stagger is an acclaimed Canadian alternative country singer-songwriter. He released his debut independent EP, Six Tales of Danger, in 2002. Stagger’s 11th studio recording, Love Versus, was just released in the spring. With Low-Fi. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise, leeroystagger.com.

ISF: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—Enjoy an exhilarating night of midsummer madness at this magical comedy brimming with mistaken identity, mismatched lovers and mischief-making fairies. Shakespeare’s comic masterpiece is a joyful celebration of love lost, transformed and restored that casts a powerfully pleasing spell. Suitable for all ages. 8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

WED.-SUN., AUG. 30-SEPT. 3

Art 2017 BIENNIAL BOISE STATE ART DEPARTMENT FACULTY EXHIBITION—Check out recent projects and research by the nationally and internationally recognized artists teaching in the Boise State Art Department, featuring photography, printmaking, painting and drawing, installation and sculpture, ceramics and video. Through Nov. 5. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive; and Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4263994, art.boisestate.edu. CARISSA SINDON: SEEN— Through Sept. 24. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, finearts. boisestate.edu. CYCLING THROUGH: A STORY OF COMMUNITY AND CHANGE— Through Sept. 24. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union

Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242, finearts. boisestate.edu. GERNIKA GOGORATUZ: REMEMBERING GERNIKA—Through Dec. 30. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$5. Basque Museum and Cultural Center, 611 Grove St., Boise, 208343-2671, basquemuseum.com. MAPPING THE PAST: SELECTIONS FROM THE THOMAS J. COONEY COLLECTION—Through Jan. 28. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. NAMPA ARTS COLLECTIVE: HEAT—Through Sept. 25. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com. RICK BARTOW: THINGS YOU KNOW BUT CANNOT EXPLAIN— Through Dec. 17. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, jsma.uoregon.edu/Bartow.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, SEPT. 1-3

Up, up and away!

Ready, set, ride!

STEWART GALLERY GROUP EXHIBITION: SELF TAUGHT—Through Aug. 31. Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208433-0593, stewartgallery.com.

public memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. in the Boise State Student Union’s Jordan Ballroom. In lieu of flowers, the Andrus family suggests memorial gifts to the Andrus Center for Public Policy. Noon, FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., 208-433-9705, capitolcommission.idaho.gov.

Citizen ART IN THE PARK CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS—Boise Art Museum needs your help to fill multiple volunteer opportunities at Art in the Park, set for Sept. 8-10. Positions are available Thursday, Sept. 7, through Monday, Sept. 11, and include assistance with welcome centers, the children’s art tent, booth sitting, recycling, event set-up and take-down, and accounting. Follow the volunteer link on to BAM’s website to register. Through Sept. 6. FREE. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Odds & Ends ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. BOISE SALSA WEDNESDAYS—Beginner Salsa and Bachata lesson followed by social dancing until midnight. 8:30-11:45 p.m. $5. Solid Grill & Bar, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620, facebook.com/ BoiseSalsaWednesdays. BUILD A BETTER GARDEN: FAMILY HELP DAY—Meet at the Hidden Springs community garden to help out. Spent plants will be harvested and taken to feed the animals at the community farm. This fun activity

FORMER GOV. CECIL ANDRUS: LYING IN STATE CEREMONY—Pay your respects to former Gov. Cecil Andrus, who passed away on Thursday, Aug. 24. He will lie in state until noon on Thursday, Aug. 31, when a

FRIDAY-MONDAY, SEPT. 1-4

Don’t be a hermit—go party like one!

SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC

IDAHO STATE BMX CHAMPIONSHIP

HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL

Now in its 26th year, the Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic is become a staple event in the City of Trees. What started as a small launch in 1991 is now a five-day hot air balloon bash at Ann Morrison Park that includes tandem launches of 30-50 balloons, the Nite Glow—when anchored balloons become giant lanterns—and a Kids’ Day (Aug. 30), when little balloon fans are invited into hanging baskets for photos and short flights. The SBBC is contingent on weather, but Boise is blessed with mornings of blue skies and soft breezes more years than not, and families are invited to set up in the park with blankets and chairs, enjoy some concessions and watch the festivities unfold. Visit the web address below for a full schedule and spectator tips. Aug. 30: 7:15 a.m., Aug. 31: 7 a.m., Sept. 1: 7:05 a.m-8:15 p.m., Sept. 2-3: 7:15 a.m., FREE. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 S. Americana Blvd., 208-608-7600, spiritofboise.com.

BMX racing—riding bicycles off-road on a groomed dirt track—has been around since the 1970s, but enjoyed a surge of popularity in recent decades, making its way into the 2008 summer Olympics. The Idaho State BMX Championship promises an action-packed weekend, when expert and novice riders hit the tracks at Eagle Park BMX for an event known to draw a crowd 1,000 strong. Catch a double-points state pre-race on Sept. 11, a triple-points state final race and raffle on Sept. 2 and a double-points Bob Warnicke race on Sept. 3. If you’d like to do more than spectate, it isn’t too late: Riders who want to test their mettle racing others on jumps and runs can register online until 8 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 31. Sept. 1: 6-9 p.m., Sept. 2: 1-4 p.m., Sept. 3: 9 a.m.-noon. FREE to watch, $20-$35 to participate. Eagle Park BMX, 11800 Horseshoe Bend Way, Eagle, 208-869-6858, facebook.com/EagleParkBMX.

The fifth annual Hermit Music Festival will put Americana, blues, bluegrass, country, folk and old-time music center stage with a lineup of local and regional performers including 3HatTrio, Bill Coffey, Fall Creek, Cook and Rose, Curtis/Sutton and the Scavengers and many others. HMF also offers workshops on songwriting, fiddle and banjo playing, flatfoot dancing and more, plus diversions for the kids and vendors hawking the best in local art, food and booze. For the full festival experience, snag one of 50 campsites available near Indian Creek Winery, and take the weekend into Monday night with a guitar workshop at Powderhaus Brewery. As festival founders Ava Honey and Travis Ward say on the HMF website, “Listen to live music. Be alive.” Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 11 a.m., Sunday: 11 a.m., Monday: 5 p.m. (Powderhaus), $25-$50. Indian Creek Winery, 1000 N. McDermott Road, Kuna, hermitmusicfestival.com.

8 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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CALENDAR KEEP YOUR CAR HAPPY! for the entire family is a great way to give back and build a better garden. For ages 9 and older. 6 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Hidden Springs Branch, 5868 W. Hidden Springs Drive, Boise, 208-2292665, adalib.org/hiddensprings.

Food AFTERNOON TEA—Join Chateau des Fleurs for a beautiful afternoon of tea and pastries in the Platinum Ballroom. 1-3 p.m. $39. Chateau des Fleurs, 175 S. Rosebud Lane, Eagle, 208-947-2840, chateaueagle.com/events. BOISE FARMERS MOBILE MARKET—The Boise Farmers Mobile Market delivers farm fresh produce from the Boise Farmers Market to Boise area neighborhoods on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays through Sept. 27. The goal is to improve the nutritional wellness of the community while supporting local agriculture. The BFMM accepts cash, debit and credit cards, EBT and Sprouts Kids Club tokens. Visit

facebook.com/BFMMobileMarket for the schedule. 3-4 p.m., FREE.

COMEDY OPEN MIC/KARAOKE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

SIFTA FOOD TRUCK FEAST—Join the Southern Idaho Food Truck Association to enjoy eats from some of your favorite Boise area food trucks every Wednesday at two locations. 5-8 p.m. FREE. The Journey Boise, 9105 W. Overland Road; and Cathedral of the Rockies Amity Campus, 4464 S. Maple Grove Road, Boise, facebook.com/ IdahoFoodTruckFeast.

HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL KICKOFF PARTY: COOK AND ROSE—Kick off four days of music, dances and workshops at this free, all-ages show. Check online for a complete schedule of events. 6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, hermitmusicfestitival.com.

THURSDAY AUGUST 31 On Stage THE ATHEIST COMEDY EXPERIENCE—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. COMEDY OPEN MIC—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

ISF: HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME—8 p.m. $13-$50. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

All of the work done on your VW or Audi at Jeff’s Import Auto is GUARANTEED! We are your local experts offering great service at competitive prices.

Jeff’s Import Auto 4433 Adams Street Garden City • 376-4686 jeffsimportautowerks.com

PLAYHOUSE: MURDER AMONG THE MATEYS—6:30 p.m. $15. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com. STAGE COACH: THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Calls to Artists

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 4

TRADITIONS OF CHRISTMAS AUDITIONS—Traditions of Christmas Northwest will mark its second annual appearance in the Treasure Valley area in December. The show needs 50 local singers and several singer-dancers ages 8-80. Adult and teen vocalists, children between 8-12 and teens/adults with both singing and dancing ability are invited to audition. For more info or to reserve an audition time, visit the website below. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa. 208-699-4971, traditionsofchristmasnw.com.

Citizen

Visit the Land of the Rising Sun—without even getting on a plane!

FORMER GOV. CECIL ANDRUS: PUBLIC MEMORIAL SERVICE— Celebrate the life and legacy of former Gov. Cecil Andrus, who passed away on Thursday, Aug. 24, at this public memorial service. In lieu of flowers, the Andrus family suggests memorial gifts to the Andrus Center for Public Policy. 2 p.m. FREE, Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-5800, boisestate.edu

JAPAN DAY 2017 From small towns to big cities, nearly every corner of America has been touched by Japanese culture and, for a decade, Boise has set aside a day to celebrate Japanese heritage with Japan Day. This year, the celebration—presented by the Idaho Japanese Association—is on Monday, Sept. 4, at the Basque Center. Enjoy traditional music and dance performances, including the shishi-mai or “lion dance” (to banish demons), martial arts demonstrations including ninjas (yes, ninjas), vendor booths and a flea market. Try your hand at elegant calligraphy, intricate origami or otedama—the art of Japanese juggling—or stop by the food stalls for tastes of Japanese cuisine like mochi cakes and takoyaki. Japan Day: It’s a way to get an up-close look at Japanese culture while staying close to home. Monday, noon-3 p.m., FREE. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., 208-331-5097, idahojapaneseassociation.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Odds & Ends GIRLS NIGHT BLOW DRY BAR— Join Amethyst Boutique Salon and event partners @Boise_Bucketlist and #GirlsNightBoise for expert blow drying, styles, make-up application, drinks, snacks and music. There’ll also be specials on products and a pop-up jewelry boutique hosted by Sydney CopseySechiano of Park Lane Jewelry. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Amethyst Boutique Salon, 220 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208385-0649.

STARTS FRIDAY, SEPT 1st

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CALENDAR THURSDAY TRIVIA—7:30 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3315666, willibs.com.

AWARD WINNING

Pine Fest “The tiniest little music festival in the tiniest little town”

Friday & Saturday, September 8-9 Pine Valley Fairgrounds, Halfway, Oregon Robbie Laws Band Will West & the Friendly Strangers Friday Night All-Stars Polly O’Keary & the Rhythm Method Chaz Browne Guess When Greg Ernst

Admission in advance: $10/Fri & $15/Sat brownpapertickets.com

see pinefest.org for more info

WEST COAST SWING DANCE—Learn this contemporary swing dance style with a beginner lesson, then practice what you learned in open dancing at 9 p.m. No partner or experience needed. 8-11 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

Food TELAYA THIRSTY THURSDAY— Kick back on the patio or take camp chairs or blanket to enjoy live music on the grass. Food truck on-site. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Telaya Wine Co., 240 E. 32nd St., Garden City, 208-557-9463, telayawine.com.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 1 On Stage BLT: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE—All of the wit and romance of Jane Austen’s classic 1813 novel comes to life in this refreshingly fast-paced and engaging new adaptation. 8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

lerini, and Brett Young. 7:30 p.m. $40-$70. Ford Idaho Center Amphitheater, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com. PLAYHOUSE: MURDER AMONG THE MATEYS—6:30 p.m. $15. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-7790092, playhouseboise.com. STAGE COACH: THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Art MIKE BEIRIGER PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW—Don’t miss this rare chance to see the evocative landscape and nature photography of Mike Beiriger. Through Sept. 29. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Eagle City Hall, 660 E. Civic Lane, Eagle, 208-489-8788.

Literature AUTHOR MARK MCGINNIS: THE SHOW-OFF MONKEY— Join local author and illustrator Mark McGinnis for an author

talk and discussion of his latest book, The Show-off Monkey and Other Taoist Tales. Inspired by the ancient philosopher Chang Tzu, the picture book for children ages 5-10 is beautifully illustrated with original artwork. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS VS. HILLSBORO HOPS—7:15 p.m. $2-$16. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com. IDAHO STATE BMX CHAMPIONSHIP— Head over to the Eagle Foothills BMX Park for the 2017 Idaho State BMX Championships. This three-day event featuring 1,000-plus riders and spectators from all over the Northwest kicks off with a double point state final pre-race, then on Saturday, the triple points state final race will determine the Idaho state champions. 6-9 p.m. FREE to watch. Eagle Park BMX, Eagle Sports Complex, 11800 Horseshoe Bend Way, Eagle, 208-918-9180, facebook.com/EAGLEPARKBMX.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

COMEDIAN SHAWN PELOFSKY—With Sophie Hughes and special guest Minerva Jayne. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

At The Cat Doctor, we love and adore cats!

COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy. com. HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL DANCE—Kick off the Hermit Music Festival by kicking up your heels at a Square Dance with Brittany Newell and Friends, and caller Caroline Oakley; followed by a Honky Tonk Dance at 8:30 p.m. with Jack Grelle. 7 p.m. $7 (not included in weekend pass). Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-342-5553, hermitmusicfestival.com.

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The Cat Doctor… Cat Care by Cat People! 9151 Ustick Rd., Boise, ID 83704 www.catdr.com • 208-327-7706 10 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

ISF: HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME—8 p.m. $13-$50. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org. LADY ANTEBELLUM: YOU LOOK GOOD WORLD TOUR—The award-winning country trio is coming to town to support its upcoming seventh studio album, Heart Break. With Kelsea Bal-

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CALENDAR SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 2 Festivals & Events BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove Streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

adaptation. 8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN SHAWN PELOFSKY— With Sophie Hughes and special guest Minerva Jayne. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy. com.

On Stage

HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL—Four days of music, dances and workshops at the Mardi Gras (Sept. 1), Indian Creek Winery (Sept. 2-3) and Powderhaus Brewery (Sept. 4). All ages welcome, kids 13 and younger are free. No dogs. Workshops are included in the cost of the pass. 11 a.m. FREE-$50. Indian Creek Winery, 1000 N. McDermott Road, Kuna, 208-922-4791, hermitmusicfestival.com.

BLT: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE—All of the wit and romance of Jane Austen’s classic 1813 novel comes to life in this refreshingly fast-paced and engaging new

ISF: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle, 208-489-8763, cityofeagle. org/market.

MERIDIAN YOUTH FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-4433. meridiancity.org/youthfarmersmarket. PLAYHOUSE: MURDER AMONG THE MATEYS—6:30 p.m. $15. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-7790092, playhouseboise.com. STAGE COACH: THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Workshops & Classes CPR/AED/FIRST AID CLASS— Learn how to recognize and respond appropriately to cardiac, breathing and first aid emergencies. Upon successful completion, participants are issued a two-year certification through the American Red Cross. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $50-$75. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Literature THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

ILLUSTRATOR JOSEPH COWMAN: K IS FOR KINDERGARTEN—Join Joseph Cowman, illustrator of K is for Kindergarten, for a book signing. Whether your little reader is gearing up for the first day or making his or her way through the school year, this picture book will help guide them with silly rhymes and fun activities. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS VS. HILLSBORO HOPS—7:15 p.m. $2-$16. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com. IDAHO STATE BMX CHAMPIONSHIP—1-4 p.m. FREE to watch. Eagle Park BMX, Eagle Sports Complex, 11800 Horseshoe Bend Way, Eagle, 208-918-9180, facebook.com/EagleParkBMX.

Odds & Ends Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BOISE SWEEPSTAKES CLUB MEETING—Talk about sweepstaking and ways to make winning free online sweepstakes possible. RSVP at meetup.com/ Boise-Sweepstakes-Club-Meetup. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-9728300, meetup.com/Boise-Sweepstakes-Club-Meetup.

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | 11


CALENDAR LINDY HOP SWING DANCE— Drop in for a beginner vintage swing dance lesson every Saturday, then stay from 9-11 p.m. for open dancing and practice. No partner or experience required. 8-11 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

STAGE COACH: THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—2 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

SATURDAY MOVIE: LEGO BATMAN— 1 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800.

BOISE HAWKS VS. HILLSBORO HOPS—7:15 p.m. $2-$16. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

TREASURE VALLEY SINGLES DANCE—Enjoy open social dancing to a live band every week on Saturday. Married couples are welcome, too. 8 p.m.-midnight. $6-$7. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-4421970, treasurevalleysingles. weebly.com. WALKABOUT BOISE WALKING TOUR—Join Preservation Idaho for their weekly Saturday guided walking tour through 150 years of history and architecture. They will introduce you to the built environment that makes downtown Boise like no other place. These walking tours will be held rain or shine, beginning and ending in front of the Basque Museum on Grove Street. Through Nov. 4. 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. $12. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, preservationidaho.org/walkaboutboise-2016.

Food CHICKEN DINNER RED RELEASE PARTY—Celebrate the release of Huston Vineyards’ new 2016 vintage. Il Segreto Wood Fired Pizza will be on hand for food and and local musician Carter Freeman will provide tunes. Tasting fee is refundable with bottle purchase. Noon-5 p.m. $5. Huston Vineyards, 16473 Chicken Dinner Road, Caldwell, 208-455-7975, hustonvineyards.com.

Sports & Fitness

IDAHO STATE BMX CHAMPIONSHIP—A double point race finishes out this exciting weekend of racing. 9 a.m.-noon. FREE to watch. Eagle Park BMX, Eagle Sports Complex, 11800 Horseshoe Bend Way, Eagle, 208-918-9180, facebook.com/EAGLEPARKBMX.

Odds & Ends OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS—Everyone who wants to stop eating compulsively is welcome. 6:307:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Church of Christ, 2000 N. Eldorado St., Boise, 208-409-1086, oa.org.

MONDAYSEPTSEPTEMBER 4 Festivals & Events BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY LIBRARY HOLIDAY CLOSURE— All locations of the Boise Public

Library will be closed on Monday, Sept. 4, in observance of Labor Day. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, boisepubliclibrary.org. JAPAN DAY 2017—Enjoy Japanese culture at the 10th annual Japan Day. You’ll experience amazing performances of classical Japanese dance, including the famous lion dance, shamisen and taiko drums, martial arts, origami and calligraphy, plus a carnival and flea market. Traditional Japanese food will be available for purchase. Noon-3 p.m. FREE. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-5097, idahojapaneseassociation.org.

On Stage HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL DECOMPRESSION PARTY—With Fall Creek, Sean Tracey, Idyltime, Spike Coggins and Hillfolk Noir. 4 p.m. FREE. Powderhaus Brewing Company, 9719 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-376-4026, hermitmusicfestival.com.

Odds & Ends GALAGA TOURNAMENT—Join Grinkers for the five-day Galaga tournament Sept. 4-8. Play as many times as you’d like and place your scores at the front counter. First prize is a T-shirt, $10 gift certificate and magnet; second prize is a $5 gift certificate and magnet; and third prize is a magnet. For

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 3 On Stage THE ATHEIST COMEDY EXPERIENCE—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL—11 a.m. $25-$50. Indian Creek Winery, 1000 N. McDermott Road, Kuna, 208-922-4791, hermitmusicfestival.com. ISF: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—7 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

12 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

CALENDAR all ages. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Grinkers Grand Palace Arcade, 228 E. Plaza Drive, Suite H, Eagle, 208-939-9534, Grinkers.com.

Food SNOW CONE MONDAYS—Every Monday, drop by The Balcony Club for alcoholic and non-alcoholic snow cones. For ages 21 and older. 4-9 p.m. Prices vary. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 5 Festivals & Events ANNE FRANK MEMORIAL TOURS—Enjoy free docent-led tours of the Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial every Tuesday from April to October. Meet at the statue of Anne Frank on the Greenbelt at Eighth Street. Hosted by the Wassmuth Center for Human Rights. 12:15-1 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter.org.

On Stage MUNDEK CLEMENT STEIN’S COMEDY SHOWCASE—8 p.m. $5. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. SPOON—The experimental art rockers hit town in support of their latest release, Hot Thoughts. Stereogum called it “...an international-playboy concept album,” and went on to say that “...it’s absolutely remarkable that, nine albums deep into their career, Spoon are still capable of something like this.” With White Reaper. 8 p.m. $29-$60. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

Art

every October, we gather up the original works that appeared over the previous 12 months and put them up for auction. It’s always a kickass party and for a kickass cause: a portion of proceeds goes to the artists, a portion supports BW’s Cover Auction Art grant program and a piece of the pie is set aside to support BW’s investigative journalistic mission. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

Workshops & Classes THE CABIN FREE DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Budding authors and old pros needing a creative jolt can check out the Cabin’s free and open writing workshop. Alternately hosted by writers Danny Stewart and Heidi Kraay, sessions feature unique prompts designed to inspire a supportive community of local writers. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org/events. JUMP FILM WORKOUT—The Actor Workout and Writer Workout are expanding to include the full process of storytelling collaboration through multimedia outlets. Twice a month, the JUMP Film Workout will take over the Loft and Play Studio to hone and practice the art of storytelling. By bringing writers, producers, actors, editors and folks in other production positions together on the same night to foster collaboration and content development. They hope to encourage the collective nature of storytelling through multimedia platforms to flourish. For ages 16 and older. 6:30-9 p.m. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, jumpboise.org. POWER OF ATTORNEY 101— Learn the basics of Power of Attorney from Idaho Legal Aid Services. This presentation will cover definitions, legal processes, documentation and helpful tips for you and your family. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org/powerattorney-101.

Citizen

INITIAL POINT GALLERY ARTISTS’ RECEPTION—Join the Meridian Arts Commission to welcome and view works by the month’s artists. 4:30-7 p.m. FREE. Initial Point Gallery, Merdian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway St., Meridian, 208-888-4433, meridiancity.org.

TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

Calls to Artists

Kids & Teens

BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Each week since 2001, Boise Weekly has published a piece by a local artist on the front cover—a practice unique among alternative weeklies—and,

GURU DONUTS TASTY TALES STORYTIME WITH REDISCOVERED BOOKS—Get the kiddos giggling at two storytime sessions with the staff of Rediscovered Books while enjoying the tasty

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

treats at Guru Donuts. The first 20-minute session starts at 10 a.m., with an encore at 10:30 a.m. Go early for $2.50 donut and drink specials. 10-11 a.m. FREE. Guru Donuts, 928 W. Main St,, Ste. 100, Boise, 208-571-7792, gurudonuts.com/tasty-tales.

AL VEAFTERF VE

WEDNESDAYS JUNEAUGUST

POWER OF ATTORNEY 101— Learn the basics of Power of Attorney from Idaho Legal Aid Services. This presentation will cover definitions, legal processes, documentation and helpful tips for you and your family. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org.

5 - 8PM

AUGUST 30

Odds & Ends CHOLESTEROL SCREENING AND CARDIAC RISK ASSESSMENT—Everyone age 20 and older should have their cholesterol measured at least once every five years. The higher your LDL level and the more risk factors you have, the greater your chances are of developing heart disease or having a heart attack. The screening includes your HDL/ LDL levels, Cholesterol/HDL ratio, triglycerides, blood pressure check and nutrition and exercise guidelines. Cash or check only. Call for more information. 6:30-9 a.m. $19. Central District Health Department, 707 N. Armstrong Place, Boise, 208-375-5211, cdhd.idaho.gov/hl-cholesterol. php.

@

DOWNTOWNBOISE

PRESENTED BY

the River

FOUNTAIN SPONSOR

Leeroy Stagger Opener: Low-Fi

Visit

downtown boise.org for a full music schedule.

TECH HELP—Drop in any Tuesday to get your technology questions answered in a friendly and informal environment. Take your own device or work on one of their laptops. 6:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-8884451, mld.org. URBAN ADVENTURE BOISE SCAVENGER HUNT—Turn Boise into a giant game board with this fun scavenger hunt that’s guided from any smart phone and available 365 days a year. Start when you want and play at your pace. Sign up online at the website below, and save 20 percent by using promotion code BOISEWEEKLY. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. $39.20. Meridian Public Library, UrbanAdventureQuest.com.

Food GRIMALDI’S PIZZERIA TUESDAY TASTINGS—Celebrate Tuesdays with half-off glasses, carafes and bottles of wine. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Grimaldi’s Pizzeria, The Village at Meridian, 3573 Longwing Lane, Meridian, 208-884-2031, grimaldispizzeria. com.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | 13


DAVID GUENTHER

LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY AUGUST 30 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: LEEROY STAGGER—With Low-Fi. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid BOISE COMMUNITY BAND: SWINGING THROUGH THE SUMMER—7 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park

LEEROY STAGGER, AUG. 2, GROVE PLAZA Canadian alt-country/folk/Americana musician Leeroy Stagger has been performing for almost two decades, releasing 11 studio albums and playing hundreds of tour dates worldwide. In his newest release, Love Versus (2017, True North), Stagger combines catchy beats with smart lyrics about surviving the modern world. “I was going to call the album Love Versus Hate originally, but I shortened it because the Latin meaning of versus is ‘against,’” Stagger writes on his website. “So it made more sense to me to think of the theme as love against everything, essentially. I think the idea with these songs is whether love is enough to conquer the struggle.” Although the subject matter is deep, Stagger’s smooth vocals—layered with the instrumentation of drummer Pete Thomas, guitarist Paul Rigby, keyboardist Geoff Hilhorst and bassist Tyson Maiko—makes for a sweet sonic treat. —Lex Nelson

DOUGLAS CAMERON—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper DUELING PIANOS—8 p.m. FREE. Whiskey Bar

OLD-TIME JAM AND KARAOKE—6 p.m. and 8 p.m., FREE. High Note

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: LOUNGE ON FIRE—6 p.m. FREE$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

RAIN CITY RAMBLERS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL KICKOFF PARTY: COOK AND ROSE—6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange

ROOFTOP ACOUSTIC: EMILY TIPTON—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JEFF ENGELBERT AND FRIENDS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar WILLISON ROOS— 5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THURSDAY AUGUST 31 ADDAM CHIAVARRA—6 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar

OC45 Lady Antebellum

BILLY BRAUN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

OC45—With The Old One Two, and Nude Oil. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic

BOISE SPECTRUM THUNDER THURSDAYS: PILOT ERROR—6 p.m. FREE. Boise Spectrum

OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

Hillfolk Noir

HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL DANCE—With Brittany Newell and Friends, caller Caroline Oakley and Jack Grelle. 7 p.m. $7. Mardi Gras

GHOST BATH—With Beekeeper, and Mariana. 8 p.m. $10. The Shredder GIGGLEBOMB ROOFTOP DANCE PARTY—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

WILSON ROBERTS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 1 GARY TACKETT—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

LADY ANTEBELLUM: YOU LOOK GOOD WORLD TOUR—With Kelsea Ballerini and Brett Young. 7:30 p.m. $40-$70. Ford Idaho Center MICHAEL WORTHINGTON—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District NEAL AND FRIENDS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PATRICIA FOLKNER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

With Low-Fi, 5 p.m., FREE. Grove Plaza, downtownboise.org.

14 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE RADIO MOSCOW AND THE LAST INTERNATIONALE—7 p.m. $10. The Olympic ROZAMOV—With Ditch and the Delta, Throes, Blackcloud, and Black Friar. 7 p.m. $8. The Shredder

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 2 BRET WELTY BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 4

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 5

1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

GREG BRIDGES—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BLUE MONDAY OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid

OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

BLUES DIRECTORS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar DAYS N DAZE—With Juicy Karkass, and Ground Score. 6 p.m. $12-$15. The Shredder HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL DECOMPRESSION PARTY—With Fall Creek, Sean Tracey, Idyltime, Spike Coggins and Hillfolk Noir. 4 p.m. FREE. Powderhaus Brewing

PAMELA DEMARCHE—5 p.m. FREE. Sandbar RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: THE YAWPERS—With Zack Quintana, and Fort Harrison. 7 p.m. $8$10. Neurolux SPOON—With White Reaper. 8 p.m. $29-$60. Knitting Factory THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOEL KASERMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND EMILY TIPTON—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s The Fall of Troy THE FALL OF TROY—With Laika The Dog, and Abaasy. 8 p.m. $15. Neurolux GARY TACKETT—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL—11 a.m. $25-$50. Indian Creek Winery

RICHARD SOLIZ AND THE FABULOUS BLUE RAYZ—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

KIND OF BLUE AND CAPTAIN SNAFU—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar NEAL AND FRIENDS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE PLEWS BROTHERS—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District WILSON ROBERTS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 3 BLUES COLLECTIVE—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar BRET WELTY BAND—11 a.m. FREE. Dive Bar DOUGLAS CAMERON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL—11 a.m. $25-$50. Indian Creek Winery HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar LOS YONICS AND BRYNDIS POR SIEMPRE—7 p.m. $45. Ford Idaho Center NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid STE. CHAPELLE: J.R. AND THE STINGRAYS—1 p.m. $10-$15. Ste. Chapelle WOVENHAND—With King Dude, and Brett Netson. 7 p.m. $12. The Olympic

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

RADIO MOSCOW, SEPT. 1, THE OLYMPIC Radio Moscow serves as a reminder that not all things relating to Russia need be politically contentious—sometimes they can be straight up rock ’n’ roll. Yet it must be said that despite its name, Radio Moscow isn’t Russian at all: The trio, which includes drummer Paul Marrone, bassist Anthony Meier and guitarist/vocalist Parker Griggs, actually hails from Iowa, where they started jamming together in 2003. Since its self-titled debut album hit the shelves in 2007, Radio Moscow has been pedaling self-styled “powerful, crunching Sabbath-style chords and fiery solos” that set it apart from the crowd. The group’s much anticipated fifth album, New Beginnings (Century Media Records), will drop this fall. Ahead of the release, the band will make a pit stop in Boise Friday, Sept. 1, to rock The Olympic with its signature raw blues riffs—building anticipation for its new album to a fever pitch in the City of Trees. —Lex Nelson With The Last Internationale, 8 p.m., $10. The Olympic, 1009 W. Main St., 208-342-0176, theolympicboise.com. BOISEweekly | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | 15


IFC FILMS

SCREEN THE ROAD BEST TRAVELED

Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan deliver once again in their new film, The Trip to Spain GEORGE PRENTICE Rob Brydon (left) and Steve Coogan (right) take the “buddy comedy” to new places.

STARTS FRIDAY, SEPT 1st 50% OFF SALE

Going on now!

Your enjoyment of The Trip to Spain, the gentlest yet funniest installment in a trilogy of light comedies, will depend on your admiration affection for one another yet are at their wit’s end when they’re together. The purpose behind for stars Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan, their Brydon and Coogan’s previous road trips—to bottomless well of impressions, the gorgeous Northern England in 2010 and to vistas of Spain and Italy in 2014—were rather incidenwatching a moveable THE TRIP TO SPAIN (PG-13) tal. This time around, Coogan is feast trek across the Directed by Michael Winterbottom supposed to be writing a book and Iberian landscape. Starring Rob Brydon and Steve Bryden is supposed to be scratching For me, that’s check, Coogan out restaurant reviews for The New check, check and Opens Friday, Sept. 8 at York Times. What really defines their check. The Flicks trip is non-stop improvised banter Coogan and between two of the funniest men in Brydon, who are film. And their dueling impressions? Don’t get again playing barely fictionalized versions of them started—on second, thought, please do. themselves, are the British version of The Odd There’s Woody Allen, Marlon Brando, David Couple: They have a deep, albeit unspoken,

Bowie, Robert DeNiro, Anthony Hopkins, Roger Moore, Michael Caine, Mick Jagger and Mick Jagger doing Michael Caine. Sprinkle in a little Spanish Inquisition humor and a bonus scene where the two men dress up as Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, and you’ll be laughing until the waiter brings dessert. Then, there is Spain itself. There couldn’t be a better time for a “carta de amor” to the beautiful nation. Following the summer of tragedy and sorrow in Spain, this film is a reminder of why it is such a magical and important place, and it gave me more genuine laughter than any other movie this summer. I can’t wait to see where Brydon and Coogan take us next.

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500 Vista • Boise Tu–Fri 11–6:30|Sat 11-6 • 389-4623 Corner of Vista and Rosehill 16 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE FILM FESTIVAL 2017: BIGGER AND BETTER (AND STILL GROWING) Watch most film festival organizers—people who take multitasking to a ridiculous new level— at work and you’ll see they’re nearly always scheduling, scheming or schmoozing. More often than not, they’re also waist-deep in the minutia of their most recent event and while also organizing the next iteration. But ask Boise Film Festival Executive Director Melinda Quick about her priorities, and she’s likely to tell you about plans beyond this year—or even next. “What am I looking at? The 2019 festival,” said Quick, whose name is a perfect moniker for her never-sitstill work ethic. “Yes, of course, we’re working like crazy [on] next month’s festival [Thursday, Sept. 21-Sunday,

Sept. 24], and the plans for 2018 have been well underway for a long time. Honestly, I’m thinking more and more about 2019.” That’s a lot of confidence for a festival still in its infancy and that has had its share of detractors, who complained about a hodgepodge of odd screening venues and the lack of a cohesive theme connecting the films. “For the most part, I heard, ‘It’s not worth it’ or ‘Have fun, but we don’t understand why you would put any effort into this,’” Quick said. She didn’t let it get her down, though. “After all, I thrive on putting big things together,” she said. Those things include crafting a series of events happening throughout the year in order to strengthen the BFF brand, generate ticket sales and keep the conversation about the film festival going. Some of the

More than 40 films will be events included a showcase for screened during the four-day festival, Boise artists who had reinterpreted none of which conflict on the schedfamous movie posters and screenule, a problem Quick said plagues ings of films at like-minded venues, too many film festivals. Additionally, such as the 1983 cult classic there will be film workshops in the Strange Brew at Boise Brewing or state-of-the-art JUMP studios, as The Neverending Story at Rediscovwell as a series of panel events, ered Books. including the status of filmmak“ I think the biggest step foring in Idaho, the ward for us is that burgeoning virtual we have a single BOISE FILM FESTIVAL 2017 reality industry and venue for this Thursday, Sept. 21-Sunday, Sept. the roles of youth year’s festival, 22; four-day pass $50-$150 and women in film. playing host to all JUMP, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Each evening will our films, panels boisefilmfestival.org. be capped off by and workshops. A parties at Amstervery big venue,” dam Lounge, Boise Brewing or the said Quick. “We talked to the folks Owyhee Rooftop Lounge. at JUMP about this possibility for Quick also agreed to let Boise months and months, and we came Weekly readers be among the first to to an agreement in late July. Did I check out the full BFF 2017 schedhave a Plan B, Plan C and Plan D? ule—find it at boiseweekly.com. You bet I did, but this couldn’t be —George Prentice better.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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September 3 Post-Game Fireworks!

Posters and pop culture memorabilia cover the walls at Boise barber shop Barbiere DeVino in the Belgravia Building (441 W. Main St., barbieredevino.com). Punk, rap and ska pump through the speakers, and the retro barber chairs are usually full thanks to a steady stream of customers, who emerge from the subterranean shop with sharp ’dos, clean shaves and immaculately edged beards courtesy of stylists who can talk a customer’s ear off without nicking it. At the center of it all is the eponymous shop owner Chris DeVino. A longtime punk musician, DeVino was often the one wielding the clippers when his bandmates needed trims. While touching up a summer haircut, he talked about why he went into barbery, the decor of his shop and the meaning of the Barbiere DeVino tagline: “Gentlemen First, Stronzo Forever.” What’s your story? I have a 6-year-old son, and his mom bailed. I had to step up a lot. I was working in a kitchen, and in that industry you don’t have freedom of your schedule. You’re stuck making a minimum, shitty wage, and I didn’t want to do that. I wanted to be able to go to kindergarten functions and be there for my son. What made you think you’d be good at this? I’ve been in punk bands since I was about 12, and somebody had to do haircuts. My parents had these clippers under their bathroom sink, so I was the dude giving mohawks and shaving heads. Just being a shithead kid, really. I remembered doing that stuff, and it fit my personality. You turned cutting hair into something you do for a living. What’s the biggest change? I’m no longer a slave. I didn’t do it for anybody but myself. This shop was opened for me to hang out with my friends and listen to the music we want to listen to and do shit the way we want to. We’re giving you honest bullshit instead of just bullshit. What do you do that’s special, and what is ‘stronzo’? “Stronzo” means “asshole” or “bastard” in Italian. I think that’s what’s different: We do it for

18 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

us, and we’re not afraid to tell you we do it for us. We take our time, we talk to people. We care about our craft and how you look when you leave here, and we’re not going to rush you out in 20 minutes. We grew up as punk rock kids. You can take the kid out of punk rock, but you can’t take the punk rock out of the kid. This place has a distinct look. How long did it take to make the space your own? We immediately changed the vibe down here [from the more traditional barber shop previously in the space] the minute we stepped into it. It’s different. It’s cluttered. It feels like what I think a barber shop should look like. What’s your favorite piece? Probably the “wall nuts.” It’s a Polaroid picture of someone’s nuts. I really like the Elvis bust—it used to be an old whiskey decanter. There was a barber shop here before you moved in. Did that mean you had a built-in customer base? [Customers of the former shop] were hesitant at first. They had a quiet woman who cut their hair who didn’t really talk to them very much. They came down here and were, like, “What the fuck?” But the haircuts were good. Some of them waited until I was open for a year. We had someone tell us we should not advertise that we do kids’ haircuts. We didn’t advertise that, but we do have people who love coming here and love bringing their kids here. You say people come from as far away as the Idaho panhandle to get haircuts here. Why? I’ve got a guy that lives past Coeur d’Alene, and he comes down once a month. He was in town getting tattooed, and he came by because it was convenient. He got another haircut where he was from and they fucked his hair up. I have a customer who does business in Utah, and he waits to get his hair cut until he knows he has some business here. When people find the barber they like or the shop where they’re comfortable, they’ll do anything they can to come back. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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PAYMENT KITTY: 1½-year-old, female longhair. Loves to be brushed, sweet, shy. Came from home with abusive children, so adults only. (PetSmart Center–#36069786)

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25 Device with a Retina display 26 The opposition 27 “Madame X” painter John Singer ____ 29 23-Across, literally? 33 Cozy 35 Actor ____ Buchholz of “The Magnificent Seven” 36 Epitome of simplicity 37 Sour 39 Spicy fare? 41 “Where America’s Day Begins”

1 Way around London, with “the” 5 E.R. V.I.P.s 8 Haunted house sound 13 Backflow preventer in a drain 18 Brief, as a visit 20 Sub 21 Oscar role for Vivien Leigh 22 Astonishing March Madness success, e.g. 24 He denied Christ three times 1

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BY JEFF CHEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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1 Sign of nervousness 2 Sea urchin, at a sushi bar 3 Declare verboten 4 Break off a romance 5 Takeaway, of a sort 6 When a baby is expected 7 1904 world’s fair city: Abbr. 8 Utilities, insurance, advertising, etc. 9 Loosely woven fabric with a rough texture 10 Try to find oneself? 11 ____ quotes 12 What a designated driver takes 13 Candy that fizzes in the mouth 14 New Hampshire 15 Gives stars to

16 Have no existence 17 Line usually on the left or right side 19 Tonto player of 2013 20 ____ characters (Chinese writing) 23 Murderer of Hamlet 28 Tuna, at a sushi bar 29 Doesn’t keep up 30 Go up against 31 Facial feature of the Bond villain Ernst Blofeld 32 Jargon 34 Runs for a long pass, say 38 One component of a data plan 40 What the prefix “tera-” means 42 Contributed to the world 43 56-Down, literally? 44 “Don’t you ____!” 47 Line judge? 48 Home to the National Border Patrol Museum 49 Teacher’s unit 51 Funny Tina 53 Bubkes 55 60-Down, literally? 57 Stay 59 Setting eschewed by Hawaii: Abbr. 61 Capturer of some embarrassing gaffes 62 “The Iceman Cometh” playwright 63 Hospital sticker 64 Handling well 69 Winner of four 1990s-2000s golf majors 70 1953 Leslie Caron film 75 Other: Abbr. 77 Networking assets 80 “Ta-ta!” 81 Former world capital called “City of Lights”

84 Shift+8 86 “Everybody’s a comedian” 88 Certain cheap car, informally 89 Mathematician Turing 90 Apt rhyme for “fire” 93 Asked for a desk, say 95 That the sum of the numbers on a roulette wheel is 666, e.g. 98 Uganda’s Amin 99 Marsh birds 102 Showing politesse 103 Lower 105 International package deliverer 107 Desi of Desilu Productions 108 Show a bias 109 Nintendo game princess 110 Lens caps?

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111 Where fighter jets are found: Abbr. 113 “Gangnam Style” hitmaker 117 ____ pro nobis (pray for us) 118 Sch. in Fort Collins 119 The dark side 120 Symbol on the flag of Argentina or Uruguay 121 “Eww, stop!”

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

E S S L U T F O R E R R E R E A T E X E T Z V E R S R A I O A P S O N T I M Y A G E G M O R I C E A S T F O R I L U M A C H T K O E S T

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BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | 21


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MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

KKSTAR PORTABLE BLENDER

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Here at Boise Weekly, we love our gizmos and have added yet another one to our collection. At at glance, it looks like any of a hundred beverage containers, but the KKStar Portable Blender from Japan is special. KKSstar Portable Though Blender the small $20-$33 blades in Available at amazon. the KKStar com, walmart.com and can’t other online retailers. compete with those in stronger blenders like the Nutribullet, it’s perfect for fruit and a bit of yogurt and milk. Plus, it charges via USB, so you can “blend” work and healthy snacking without ever leaving your desk. —George Prentice

BI-FURIOUS

DEAR MINERVA, I’m bisexual, currently seeing a man. I don’t hide being bi, but I’m most often treated as I appear: a straight, white woman. I was recently involved in a confrontation with a man who aggressively “spoke the truth about his hate” regarding POC and LGBTQ. I spoke up, politely at first, but then my own anger came out, and I wasn’t polite or civil. His reaction was one of disgust. He asked me if I wanted my children to grow up in a world where “the gays, the blacks and the trannies” were taking over. I told him I didn’t, but not for the reasons he listed. He asked me why I cared so much about his tirade. I should have told him I’m bi, but I was afraid of him. I’m ashamed that I was afraid. Do you think I should’ve told him? Sincerely, Bi-Furious

Taken by instagram user soule_photography.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS DEAR BI-FURIOUS,

1. 2.  3.  4.  5. 

“PAINTED RUINS,” GRIZZLY BEAR

Whether or not you came out to him is less important than the fact that you stood up and said something. However, it does bring up passing privilege. Because you pass as a straight, white woman, you reap the benefit of being automatically accepted. The problem with this is twofold: You feel guilt for hiding your truth while still being able to mask your truth when you feel afraid. That is not something many POC or LGBTQ people have the luxury of doing. You are free to be as out as you want to be, but don’t ever stop standing up for what is right.

“TO THE BONE,” STEVEN WILSON “WOODSTOCK,” PORTUGAL. THE MAN “EVERYTHING NOW,” ARCADE FIRE “SOMETHING TO TELL YOU,” HAIM

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

6. 7.  8.  9.  10.

“GOOD KID M.A.A.D. CITY,” KENDRICK LAMAR

“AUDIOSLAVE,” AUDIOSLAVE “WEEZER,” WEEZER

“DEAR DESOLATION,” THY ART IS MURDER “LOVEJOYS,” PICKWICK

6,000

1,800

$20

1805

$29,900

50+

1893

$.05-$.10

The number of years since barbering began— blades and paintings of barbers at work can be traced to ancient Egypt (crewners.com)

The hours of study required to get an Idaho barber’s license; students must also pass written/practical exams (beautyschoolsdirectory. com)

In 1880, the average cost of equipping a 10-foot by 12-foot barbershop (nationalbarbermuseum.org)

The year Truefitt & Hill opened its doors—the London-based barbershop is the longest running in the world (truefittandhill.co.uk)

In 2016, the average annual salary for a barber in the U.S. (bls.gov)

Since 1995, the percent of African-American barbering students in the U.S. (nationalbarbermuseum.org)

The year the world’s first barber school opened— it is located in Chicago (nationalbarbermuseum.org)

The average cost of a haircut circa 1800—a shave was only $.03! (crewners.com)

22 | AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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B OISE W E E KLY

TED RALL

JEN SORENSEN

HOBO JARGON

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “We are continually faced by great opportunities brilliantly disguised as insoluble problems,” said businessman Lee Iacocca. You are wrestling with an example of this phenomenon, Aries. The camouflage is well rendered. To expose the opportunity hidden beneath the apparent dilemma, you may have to be more strategic and less straightforward than usual—cagier and not as blunt. Can you manage that? I think so. Once you crack the riddle, taking advantage of the opportunity should be interesting. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Close your eyes and imagine this: You and a beloved ally get lost in an enchanted forest, discover a mysterious treasure, and find your way back to civilization just before dark. Now visualize this: You give a dear companion a photo of your face taken on every one of your birthdays, and the two of you spend hours talking about your evolution. Picture this: You and an exciting accomplice luxuriate in a sun-lit sanctuary surrounded by gourmet snacks as you listen to ecstatic music and bestow compliments on each other. These are examples of the kinds of experiments I invite you to try in the coming weeks. Dream up some more! Here’s a keynote to inspire you: sacred fun.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On its album Jefferson’s Tree of Liberty, Jefferson Starship plays a song I co-wrote, “In a Crisis.” On its album Deeper Space/Virgin Sky, the band covers another tune I co-wrote, “Dark Ages.” Have I received a share of the sales? Not a penny. Am I upset? Not at all. I’m glad the songs are being heard and enjoyed. I’m gratified a worldfamous, multi-platinum band chose to record them. I’m pleased my musical creations are appreciated. Now, here’s my question for you, Gemini: Has some good thing of yours been “borrowed”? Have you wielded a benevolent influence that hasn’t been fully acknowledged? I suggest you consider adopting an approach like mine. It’s prime time to adjust your thinking about how your gifts and talents have been used, applied or translated.

line carburetor.” Be on the lookout, Cancerian, for inventive substitutions and ingenious replacements.

mindful of how you shape the basic features. The details you include in the beginning may endure.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): When famous socialite Nan Kempner was young, her mother took her shopping at Yves Saint Laurent’s salon. Nan got fixated on a certain white satin suit, but her mean old mother refused to buy it for her. “You’ve already spent too much of your monthly allowance,” mom said. But the resourceful girl came up with a successful gambit. She broke into sobs and continued to cry nonstop until the store’s clerks lowered the price to an amount she could afford. You know me, Leo: I don’t usually recommend resorting to such extreme measures to get what you want. But now is one time when I am giving you a go-ahead to do just that.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The sadness you feel might be the most fertile sadness you have felt in a long time. At least potentially, it has tremendous motivating power. You could respond to it by mobilizing changes that would dramatically diminish the sadness you feel in the coming years, and also make it less likely that sadness-provoking events will come your way. So I invite you to express gratitude for your current sadness. That’s the crucial first step if you want to harness it to work wonders.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Author Roger von Oech tells us that creativity often involves “the ability to take something out of one context and put it into another so that it takes on new meanings.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, this strategy could and should be your specialty in the coming weeks. “The first person to look at an oyster and think food had this ability,” says von Oech. “So did the first person to look at sheep intestines and think guitar strings. And so did the first person to look at a perfume vaporizer and think gaso-

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Computer scientist Tim BernersLee invented the miraculous communication system we know as the World Wide Web. When asked if he had any regrets about his pioneering work, he named just one. There was no need for him to have inserted the double slash—”//”— after the “http:” in web addresses. He’s sorry internet users have had to type those irrelevant extra characters so many billions of times. Let this serve as a teaching story for you, Virgo. As you create innovations in the coming weeks, be

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Don’t hoot with the howls at night if you want to crow with the rooster in the morning,” advised Miss Georgia during the Miss Teen USA Pageant. Although that’s usually good counsel, it may not apply to you in the coming weeks. Why? Because your capacity for revelry will be at an all-time high, as will your ability to be energized rather than drained by your revelry. It seems you have a special temporary superpower that enables you both to have maximum fun and get a lot of work done. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): During this phase of your astrological cycle, it makes sense to express more leadership. If you’re already

a pretty good guide or role model, you will have the power to boost your benevolent influence to an even higher level. For inspiration, listen to educator Peter Drucker: “Leadership is not magnetic personality. That can just as well be a glib tongue. It is not ‘making friends and influencing people.’ That is flattery. Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to higher sights, raising a person’s performance to a higher standard, building a personality beyond its normal limitations.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “One should always be a little improbable,” said Oscar Wilde. That’s advice I wouldn’t normally give a Capricorn. You thrive on being grounded and straightforward, but I’m making an exception now. The astrological omens compel me. So, what does it mean, exactly? How might you be “improbable”? Here are suggestions to get you started: 1. Be on the lookout for inspiring ways to surprise yourself; 2. Elude any warped expectations that people have of you; 3. Be willing to change your mind. Open yourself up to evidence that contradicts your theories and beliefs; 4. Use telepathy to contact Oscar Wilde in your dreams, and ask him to help you stir up some benevolent mischief or compassionate trouble. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A modern Israeli woman named

Shoshana Hadad got into trouble because of an event that occurred long before she was born. In 580 B.C., one of her male ancestors married a divorced woman, which at that time was regarded as a sin. Religious authorities decreed that as punishment, none of his descendants could ever wed a member of the Cohen tribe, but Hadad did just that, which prompted rabbis to declare her union with Masoud Cohen illegal. I bring this tale to your attention as a way to illustrate the possibility that you, too, may soon have to deal with the consequences of past events. But now that I have forewarned you, I expect you will act wisely, not rashly. You will pass a tricky test and resolve the old matter for good. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Want to live to be 100? Then be as boring as possible. That’s the conclusion of longevity researchers, as reported by the Weekly World News. To ensure a maximum life span, you should do nothing that excites you. You should cultivate a neutral, blah personality and never travel far from home. Just kidding! I lied. The *Weekly World News* is, in fact, a famous purveyor of fake news. The truth, according to my analysis of the astrological omens, is that you should be less boring in the next seven weeks than you have ever been in your life. To do so will be superb for your health, your wealth and your future.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 11  

City of Boise holds onto exiting partners, seeks more to help fund Allumbaugh House

Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 11  

City of Boise holds onto exiting partners, seeks more to help fund Allumbaugh House