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BOISE WEEKLY AU G U S T 9 – 1 5 , 2 0 1 7

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No Beating the Heat

Homeless people in Boise have few options to escape triple digit temperatures and unhealthy air conditions.

LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

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The View From Here Global online observatory Slooh.com sets up in Stanley for total solar eclipse.

VO L U M E 2 6 , I S S U E 0 8

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Boise Bites See what’s cooking at five downtown eateries. FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Jared Stewart jared@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Senior Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Lex Nelson lex@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copyediting: Zach Hagadone Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, Andrew Mentzer Interns: Sophia Angleton, AJ Black, Savannah Cardon Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Bingo Barnes, bingo@boiseweekly.com Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Andy Hedden-Nicely, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2017 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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EDITOR’S NOTE WOOLY BULLY According to an Aug. 7 article in The New York Times, a draft of a report on climate change was leaked to the Times and the Washington Post. The report, which was created by “scientists from 13 federal agencies” and has been signed off by the National Academy of Sciences, shows “evidence for a changing climate abounds, from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans.” The numbers in the report are startling (you can read the draft online at nytimes.com), but even more astonishing is the reason why the article was leaked: to prevent President Donald Trump from suppressing it. Sigh. We’re only 200 days into Trump’s presidency, and it’s already tough to gin up the outrage this situation merits. I feel like my sense of injustice is lying quietly under a heavy shroud of apprehension and shameful apathy. It reminds me of when I was young and would spend the rare night with my grandmother. She lived alone and didn’t often have overnight guests, so the accommodations were more for appearances than comfort. In the guest bedroom there was a little wooden chair, a dresser my grandmother used for extra clothes and a small bed made up with a beautiful but lightweight bedspread over scratchy, unyielding wool blankets. When I stayed over, I would spend a fitful night alternating between holding still to avoid the itchiness of the wool and shivering under the thin bedspread when I pushed the blankets aside. I was a shy, anxious (and sensitive) kid who rarely spoke above a whisper and didn’t like to make a fuss. It never occurred to me to ask for different covers. Now, as an adult, I’ve found my voice. I don’t mind using it, and I don’t mind being part of a little (or much) ado if it’s to defend my convictions or on behalf of a worthy cause. But, c’mon. When, in spite of scientific evidence, President Trump continues to believe/claim climate change is a myth, and the scientists tasked with gathering said evidence are so worried about what he’ll do with it they leak the information like they’re part of some covert operation, I want to crawl back into bed and wish the madness away. I’d trade the softest linens in the world for my grandmother’s wool blankets if, just once, President Trump would say, “The environment is in trouble. We should do something about it.” —Amy Atkins

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Frederick Choate TITLE: “Summer in Idaho (The Pioneer Fire)” MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: I’ve lived in southern Idaho all my life… and every summer the smoke seems to get worse. My passion as an artist is portraying Idaho in all its facets, be it mountains, desert, canyon lands or farmland. When I’m not painting, I can be found teaching classes at Quality Art in Garden City. My permanent exhibition space is at Dawson’s coffee House at 219 N. Eighth St. fredchoate.com

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

SEEING RED A STE ADY STRE AM OF ORANGE AND RED AIR QUALIT Y ALERTS HAVE BEEN ISSUED BY THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALIT Y WITH TRE ASURE VALLE Y CONDITIONS REMAINING IN THE “UNHE ALTHY” CATEGORIES. UNFORTUNATELY, THE TIMING COULDN’T BE WORSE FOR ATHLETES : TE AM PRACTICES HAVE JUST BEGUN FOR THE COMING SCHOOL YE AR. RE AD MORE AT NEWS/CIT YDESK.

2017

Saturday, August 12 10am-6pm Sunday, August 13 10am-4pm artisans, concessions, entertainment, free kids’ activities & more!

SWINGING THE HAMMER Music from Boisebased band Magic Sword is in the newest trailer for Thor: Ragnarok, opening Friday, Nov. 3. Read more at Music/ Music.

TWO FOR THE ROAD Portland-based Gabe and Myra Gleason, aka Stereo RV, made Boise the second stop on a national tour. Read our review at Music/Music.

BRAIN FOOD More than 100 Idaho public schools, including 15 in Boise, are the beneficiaries of $2.1 million in grants as part of the USDA Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program. Read more at Food/Food News.

FOR MORE INFO, VISIT NAMPAPARKS.ORG OR CALL 468-5858

OPINION

4 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION THE SUMMER OF ‘97

Conservation isn’t enough to save the trails— communication is key ANDREW MENTZER conflicts have risen in recent years as everyone According to the Outdoor Industry Associahas seemingly adopted their own rules of tion, most Idahoans engage in an outdoor etiquette. On every mountain bike ride or recreational activity every year. Also, around trail run I do these days, there are at least a 30,000 new people move to, are born in or half dozen interactions with other people. otherwise end up in Idaho every year, where Last summer, I was involved in a head-on colmountain biking, trail running and hiking are lision with an older gentleman on a mountain not fads—they are reasons for living here. As bike who refused to yield to uphill traffic. an Idaho native, this is where I might launch He screamed at me as he tumbled ignorantly into a frustrated diatribe about non-natives cramping my style, but we all know that rheto- down the hill. For the record, there is a list of ric is neither constructive nor beneficial. I also easy-to-follow rules available at ridgetorivers. org/etiquette. If every trail user made an efknow better: I have transplants in my family fort to follow these guidelines, we could spare now, and they are responsible trail users. What does all of this mean for Idaho trails ourselves—at least temporarily—the lameness that has befallen so many other cities in the and open spaces? Let’s go back in time … region. In the summer of 1997, I rode the Lower If we do nothing, we’ll likely start to see Hulls Gulch Trail 17 days in a row. I didn’t one-way trail systems, exclusions for certain come across a single person during any of groups and more of an ants-marching look those 17 rides. It was my own little paradise. and feel on Idaho trails. This has been the case I let my inner recluse run free as I banked in Marin County, California, Salt Lake City through curves with reckless abandon, never and other areas around the West. It’s a reacfearing what may lie around the corner. In tive mitigation plan rather than a proactive 1997, most of the Lower Hulls trail was less approach to curbing bottlenecks. than a foot wide, and the rock sections were As with most solvable things in this world, steeply pitched, with a natural facade intact. the solution gets back to communication. Those are days I will never forget. I applaud the City of Boise for its effort to Today, Lower Hulls is an ever-widening expand and extend the 2001 open space levy, single track, and human-caused erosion has which has given us the opportunity to have a changed the aesthetic of the trail and its adjaworld-class trail system. I appreciate the effort cent features. A downhill trip on a weeknight will result in five to 30 yields—sometimes one to expand trail miles in and around Bogus every 100 yards. Those rocks are now troughed Basin, Hidden Springs, Eagle and Harris Ranch. I commend the efforts to manage— out, a byproduct of decades of high use. If I head to Camel’s Back Park on a Satur- or avoid—on-site conflicts with increased signage and public outreach. The efforts have day, I may not only encounter hundreds (ocbeen robust. The question is: How do we get casionally thousands) of people catching sun and gearing up to hit the lower Ridge to Riv- the word out to everyone? I don’t have the answer, but I do know this: Until all trail users trail system, I may also end up parking in front of a North End resident’s house—which ers follow the same set of rules, we’ll continue down a path toward restrictions for many sucks for the folks who live around there and groups, continued erosion, and environmental leads to additional confrontations. The City of Boise has gone to great lengths and trail-widening issues. Whatever happens, to manage the massive influx of users, includ- you’ll still see me on the trails—frustrated and ing increased signage, more dog waste pick-up longing for 1997. stations, public surveys and rebuilt sections of trail to S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence better handle new levels of and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, traffic. This is all beside the in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., point, however. The greatBoise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions est challenge facing our trail may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, systems is not how many whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or users there are, but how they left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. use the trails. User-on-user BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | 5


CITYDESK

GEORGE PRENTICE

A .J. BL AC K

NEWS

King-size bedsheets became protest signs in one West Boise neighborhood.

HOMEGROWN PROTEST RESULTS IN HOMEGROWN COMPROMISE IN WEST BOISE NEIGHBORHOOD A cluster of homemade signs cropped up on 36th Street in late June. Some of them, made from king-size bedsheets, had the words “NO TO 3 LOTS” spray-painted across the linen. One of the larger sheets hung from the boughs of a large tree towering over the backyard of Adrianne Burlile’s northwest Boise home, where she has lived with her husband and two children for eight years. “This all started when we got letters in the mail with layouts of what was going to be done with the newly bought property next to us,” said Burlile. “First, the property was going to be split into three lots, then two lots and then back to three lots—the one bordering us being a ‘flag’ lot.” Named for its shape, the flag lot would have included a long driveway next to a fence bordering the Burliles’ property. The plans also indicated one of three new homes would face directly into their backyard. Burlile said her chief concerns centered around maintaining a safe and private environment for her family, which is why she made the first “NO TO 3 LOTS” signs. The Burliles then rallied about a dozen of their neighbors to join the protest. “Safety is a concern for everyone on our street,” said Burlile. “There are several families with young children who play and ride bikes in front of the houses, and we already have a problem with traffic in the neighborhood.” Burlile said her neighbors’ apprehension was due to how the newly-divided lots that developers had proposed might affect the integrity of the area. She described the neighborhood as family friendly, where residents gather to barbecue, and children and dogs play freely. Most of the original properties are located on about a quarter acre of land. Burlile said many worry that skinnier lots and smaller homes might attract renters or homeowners who may not 7 value or maintain properties. “Most of us on the street are 6 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

Before noon, it’s 95 degrees outside and climbing. Even in the shade of the Boise Connector on Americana Boulevard, there is little escape from the heat.

CRUEL SUMMER

Hot weather is as much a reminder as the cold that solutions to homelessness in Boise need to be long-term SOPHIA ANGLE TON It was already sweltering outside on a midsummer morning when a dozen people began walking toward a small strip of shaded sidewalk under the Boise Connector. All across the city, air conditioners were running full-tilt, public swimming pools were filling up and the streets were emptying as people headed indoors to escape the sun. That wasn’t an option for 66-year-old Craig [Editor’s note: Boise Weekly agreed not to use the last names of the homeless people we spoke to]. Craig was sitting in the back of an old station wagon parked on Americana Boulevard. He was shirtless and covered in sweat as the temperature continued climbing to what

would be triple digits that day. “It hasn’t killed me yet,” he said. A few feet away, Jeff and Doug, also in their 60s, sat on the sidewalk. Every day they try to stake out a shaded spot and do their best not to get in the way of pedestrians and cyclists. Jeff has been homeless for seven years, about the same amount of time he has been in recovery from methamphetamine addiction. To fight the heat, he had a couple of cans of Mountain Dew, his favorite beverage, within reach. “I’m always drinking,” he said. Doug smiled. He admitted he doesn’t hy-

drate enough and said he isn’t sure how long he has been homeless. Also, Doug has cancer. “I get some help over there,” he said, pointing around the corner to a Terry Reilly Health Services clinic. “But this heat? Well, it doesn’t really help my health.” For people like Craig, Doug and Jeff, summer in Boise can be crueler than winter. “This year, we were really surprised at how quickly some of our people got badly sunburned. It started early this summer and continues,” said Morgan Smith, a social worker at the Interfaith Sanctuary shelter on River Street. “Everyone is really worn out when they come in at the end of the day. They’re BOISE WEEKLY.COM


day. Imagine that. He got a connection, after being disconnected for so many years.” According to Richards, another takeaway from Cooper Court is the need to put a greater emphasis on housing-first initiatives. “The shelter system is not the answer,” she said. “There is a huge difference between a shelter and home.” City of Boise officials have looked at examples of initiatives in other regional communities like Salt Lake City and “ WE ARE STILL WORKING,” SAID Seattle. Boise, in partnership with the Idaho Housing and Finance AssociaRICHARDS. “BELIE VE ME, WE HAVE tion, Ada County, and Saint Alphonsus NOT FORGOT TEN.” and St. Luke’s hospitals, has plans to break ground on a 40-unit housing-first initiative later this year. The facility will Sanctuary. Known as Cooper Court (the name be called New Path Community Housing, and support services will be available on site. Most of the road) the tent city grew exponentially advocates agree New Path is a good first step, until December 2015, when police came in particularly for people who are chronically and cleared everyone out. Boise Police Chief Bill Bones says the struggle with homelessness homeless—The U.S. Department of Housing and how his department can respond stretches and Urban Development defines chronically homeless people as those with a disabling back much further than Cooper Court, condition who have had at least four episodes though. of homelessness in the past four years. “Honestly, I think we could go back at “If you can get those people into constant least 20 years and say that there were a lot of things we care and support, it takes the pressure off the system to be able to look at ways to improve POINT-IN-TIME COUNT, BOISE, JANUARY 25, 2017* would do differently,” said and better serve others,” said Peterson. Bones. Peterson said the 120 or so chronically The tent city became TOTAL NUMBER OF PERSONS EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS 669 homeless men and women in Boise take up a flashpoint for how—or HOMELESS ADULTS WITH A SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS 151 the most time, energy and resources. Providif—Boise would reevaluate HOMELESS ADULTS WITH A SUBSTANCE ABUSE DISORDER 205 ing them with a long-term supported living the best way to serve the HOMELESS ADULTS, VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 112 situation frees resources for other areas like case homeless population. management services. While city officials are “Cooper Court put *DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DE VELOPMENT ONE NIGHT PIT COUNT 2017 optimistic about the benefits New Path will homelessness on the front page,” said Richards. “More provide, homeless advocates know there is still and more people realized the system we had in a lot to be learned from Cooper Court. The City of Boise opened a temporary place was not working.” cooling station at the Pioneer Community At Interfaith Sanctuary, Peterson said Center on Ash Street. It’s open on days when Cooper Court revealed a greater need to temperatures hit 95 degrees or higher, but provide services beyond just a place to stay. only to families with children, which means She said it became clear providers needed to Craig, Doug and Jeff have to go elsewhere to CORPUS CHRISTI DAY SHELTER start addressing the causes of homelessness, get out of the sun. Sometimes it’s under the Open Monday-Saturday, 7 a.m.including addiction and mental and physical bridge on Americana Boulevard, and some11:45 am and 12:45-4:30 p.m., 525 Americana Blvd., 208-426-0039, health issues. times it’s Ann Morrison Park, the downtown corpuschristiboise.org “We learned we could make a lot of branch of the Boise Public Library or the changes from inside our shelter,” she said. Corpus Christi Day Shelter on Americana “For example, we went from two social workBoulevard. PIONEER COMMUNITY CENTER “Do you know what might surprise a lot of ers to 10 case managers.” COOLING STATION Open 1 p.m.-5 p.m. daily, if temperaPeterson said one of the best ways to help people in Boise? There are a number of people tures hit 95 degrees or higher. some homeless people get back on track is to here who have jobs—some part-time, some 500 S. Ash St., 208-608-7688, help them acquire something most of us take full-time. I’ve been seeing more of that this parks.cityofboise.org. for granted. summer,” said Rick Bollman, Corpus Christi “I worked with a man who had been operations coordinator. “So wrap your head homeless and out on the streets for 16 years, around that for a moment: These are people INTERFAITH SANCTUARY who are employed, but they still can’t afford a because he had no identification,” she said. SHELTER It can be a long process—it took nearly five place to live.” Open 6 p.m.-7 a.m. daily, 1620 W. River St., 208-343-2630, interfaithmonths for the man to secure a state-issued Peg Richards, president of the Boise/Ada sanctuary.org. County Homeless Coalition, said the so-called photo ID—but it can make a big difference. “And you know what?” Peterson said. He working poor are indicative of the lack of literally got a job the very next day. The next options. exhausted from being in the sun all day.” Plus, the consequences homeless people face can be far greater than sunburn and dehydration. “There are so many risks in summer,” said Interfaith Sanctuary Director Jodi Peterson. “There is going to be dehydration, but there is also going to be heat stroke and even [skin] cancer.” As temperatures continue to rise, so does the number of homeless men, women and children in Boise. “Yes, there are indications that we’re seeing more homeless this year than last year,” said Peterson. “Here at Interfaith Sanctuary, we have been at capacity most nights for several months now.” Not during the day, however. Shortly after dawn each morning, Interfaith closes its doors, sending hundreds of residents outside. Their options for escaping the heat remain few. “There are so many risks in the summer, and there are not a lot of places offered as safe havens during the day for our homeless population,” Peterson added.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

“We are behind the times in the way we address homelessness,” said Richards. In summer 2014, Boise Police Department officers began citing a number of homeless people for “camping” under and around the connector bridge. Many of those cited set up campers and tents along a small service street behind Corpus Christi and Interfaith

Neighbors took down their makeshift protest signs when a compromise was struck.

friends—we hang out and take good care of our homes,” she said. “We 6 want the neighborhood to stay this way.” Rather than resulting in a lawsuit at the Ada County Courthouse or a squabble at Boise City Hall, the protest prompted the new developers to contact the residents, and those in-person communications led to a different layout for the land everyone can agree on. For example, the flag lot will be reworked as a square lot, which will give the Burliles their space and privacy. Meanwhile, officials at City Hall said the division of large lots to accommodate higherdensity neighborhoods has become a trend. “I will say this: The cause of much of this is that Boise is really a mature city. Most neighborhoods are mature, and there really isn’t a whole lot of room for new subdivisions in neighborhoods in some parts of the city,” said Mike Journee, spokesperson for the city of Boise. “In some of these older neighborhoods, it has been a focus of the Boise City Council to allow for more density and to do that thoughtfully.” According to Journee, as long as developers go through the proper channels with zoning, design review and permitting—providing the construction doesn’t deviate from building codes— there isn’t really a process of recourse for neighbors who otherwise disagree with new development. Burlile said her neighborhood protest, which forced direct dialogue between residents and the developer, resulted in a compromise and kept the matter out of the courthouse and out of Boise City Hall. That’s good news for city officials. “The idea is to develop neighborhoods with the goal of protecting the neighborhood and keeping its character, while at the same time creating a density for positive reasons, making neighborhoods more walkable, provide more housing and other things like that,” said Journee. —A.J. Black BOISEweekly | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | 7

A .J. BL AC K

NEWS

CITYDESK


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY AUGUST 9

ISF: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Festivals & Events CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com.

On Stage ALIVE AFTER FIVE: SCARS ON 45—The English indie-rock band gained notoriety when their song “Beauty’s Running Wild” was featured in an episode of CSI New York. The band’s single “Heart on Fire” was selected as the lead song for the eighth season of ABC hospital drama Grey’s Anatomy. With Know Reaction. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise, scarson45.com.

Art EDIE MARTIN: ‘TIMELINES’ FUSED GLASS—Through Aug. 24. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery. com. GERNIKA GOGORATUZ: REMEMBERING GERNIKA—Through Dec. 30. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$5. Basque Museum and Cultural Center, 611 Grove St., Boise, 208343-2671, basquemuseum.com. AN INTENTIONAL EYE: SELECT GIFTS FROM WILFRED DAVIS FLETCHER—Through April 14. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY, AUG. 10-12

Beauty, brains and Braun.

THE LETTER BOX PROJECT— Through Aug. 31. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, boisepubliclibrary.org. MAPPING THE PAST: SELECTIONS FROM THE THOMAS J. COONEY COLLECTION—Through Jan. 28. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. NAMPA ARTS COLLECTIVE: HEAT—Through Sept. 25. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. SEAN KENNEY: BRICKS + STONES—Through Feb. 11. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. STEWART GALLERY GROUP EXHIBITION: SELF TAUGHT— Through Aug. 31. Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com.

TVAA: THE DRAWING ROOM— Through Aug. 25. 5:30-8 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

and older. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610.

THURSDAY AUGUST 10

Sports & Fitness

On Stage

WHEN MODERN WAS CONTEMPORARY: SELECTIONS FROM THE ROY R. NEUBERGER COLLECTION—Through Aug. 27. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

BOISE HAWKS VS EUGENE EMERALDS—7:15 p.m. $2-$16. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-3225000, boisehawks.com.

BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: THE WIZARD OF OZ—Head somewhere over the rainbow with Dorothy and crew at this all-ages show. 7 p.m. $9 online, $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre. net.

Talks & Lectures

SIFTA FOOD TRUCK FEAST—Join the Southern Idaho Food Truck Association to enjoy eats from some of your favorite Boise area food trucks every Wednesday from 5-8 p.m. at two locations. 5-8 p.m. FREE. The Journey Boise, 9105 W. Overland Road, 208-376-3748; and Cathedral of the Rockies Amity Campus, 4464 S. Maple Grove Road, Boise, 208-362-2168, facebook.com/IdahoFoodTruckFeast.

GIVING LEADS TO GAINING—In a world where individualism and protectionism have become hot topics, participants are taken in the opposite way to explore the benefits of giving, as well as set a model to integrate giving into your organizations. This interactive workshop builds off Adam Grant’s Give and Take, a revolutionary approach to success. For ages 18

FRIDAY, AUG. 11

Food

BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION— Head to the hills for this annual Americana music festival featuring Reckless Kelly, Micky and the Motorcars, The Turnpike Troubadours, and a host of other bands. Also on Friday at 4 p.m. and Saturday at 1 p.m. 4 p.m. $87-$125. Challis, U.S Hwy. 93, Central Idaho, braunbrothersreunion.com. COMEDIAN EMMA ARNOLD—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

MONDAY, AUG. 14

Feast your eyes.

Get your marshmallows ready.

THE BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION FESTIVAL

BAM SUMMER EXHIBITIONS OPENING PARTY

CAMPFIRE STORIES

The population of small central-Idaho town Challis nearly triples one weekend each year, thanks to the Braun Brothers Reunion Festival. The festival, which promises “the best in Americana, Texas country, red dirt and bluegrass music,” brings in fans and fanmakers from around the country for three days of music in the mountains. This year, the Braun family will host more than a dozen top acts, including Old 97’s, The Dirty River Boys, Lee Ann Womack, Reckless Kelly and Jeff Crosby. A local sorority will be serving up camp food from the grill, and TEC Distributing and Proletariat Wines will be pouring drinks. Whether you plan to camp, drive your RV or snag a hotel room, you’d better hope to it—tickets and spaces are going fast. Thursday-Friday, 3 p.m.; Saturday: noon; FREE-$125. Challis, braunbrothersreunion.com.

Boise Art Museum is hosting a summer soiree to celebrate its new exhibitions. Attendees can enjoy drinks and hors d’oeuvres while they take a look at An Intentional Eye: Select Gifts from Wilfred Davis Fletcher, a collection of almost 600 pieces spanning many media and styles; Mapping the Past: Selections from the Thomas J. Cooney Collection, featuring stunning 16th and 17th century maps; and Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain, which includes more than 100 works by internationally acclaimed Northwest artist Rick Bartow, a Wiyot tribe member. An Intentional Eye and Mapping the Past debuted May 6 and Aug. 5, respectively, but Rick Bartow is brand new—and well worth putting on your p(art)y hat for. 5:30-8 p.m., FREE-$10. BAM, 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Every second Monday of the month from June to September, The Modern invites storytellers of all stripes to sit on its patio and regale listeners with tales of their experiences and adventures. This week, radio journalists and podcasters Frankie Barnhill and Adam Cotterell will open the night with a discussion of their creative process and stories specific to the Gem State; University of Idaho professor, poet and author Alexandra Teague will also be sharing her wisdom. The event is free, but The Modern offers an optional threecourse dinner for those who want to enjoy a meal and snag prime seats. The dishes this month include heirloom tomato salad, braised chicken, and a peach and polenta cookie dessert. Good food for thought and plain good food. What’s not to love? Dinner: 7:30 p.m., talks: 8 p.m.-10 p.m.; FREE-$30. Modern Hotel, 1314 W. Grove St., 208-424-8244, themodernhotel.com.

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CALENDAR ISF: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. LIKE A ROCKET ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—Three years in the making, High John the Conquerer is the fourth album from Like a Rocket’s Speedy Gray, Max Klymenko and Andy Cenarrusa. The combination of their talents and influences gives Like A Rocket their unique mix of alt-country and dark psychedelic atmospheres. The album will be available for purchase at the party. 6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010. OPERA IDAHO OPERATINI: BOOTS AND BOOZE—In the spirit of Oklahoma!, Opera Idaho is hosting a very special Operatini at Gov. and First Lady Otter’s ranch. Ticket price includes great food and being serenaded by the cast of the upcoming production of Oklahoma! in Concert, who will sing some of their favorite selections from the canons of opera and mu-

sical theater. Plus a no-host bar, where you can purchase anything from a soda to a martini specially designed by Joe’s Traveling Bar for this Operatini. 6 p.m. $22-$30. Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s Ranch, 1009 S. Star Road, Star. 208-3453531, operaidaho.org.

Talks & Lectures ICL PORCH TALK: ECLIPSE AND DARK SKIES 101—Join the Idaho Conservation League on the porch to hear tips and tricks for viewing the eclipse. You will take a close look at eclipses, the marks they leave on history, and safety issues. You will also talk about how you can be best prepared to see this once-in-ageneration event, and learn more about what a dark sky reserve is and why ICL is involved in creating one. Certified eclipse glasses will be available for purchase while supplies last. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. Idaho Conservation League, 710 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-6933, idahoconservation.org.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 16

Food UNITED WAY OF TREASURE VALLEY FLAPJACK FEED—Join United Way of Treasure Valley for the 10th annual Flapjack Feed in downtown Boise. It’s a great event to bring the family or the office together for a good cause. Proceeds help United Way fund programs and charities all across the valley. 7:30-10 a.m. $7 suggested donation. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, unitedwaytv. org/10th-annual-flapjack-feedaug-10.

FRIDAY AUGUST 11 On Stage COMEDIAN EMMA ARNOLD—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION— 4 p.m. $87-$125. Challis, U.S Hwy. 93, Central Idaho, braunbrothersreunion.com.

ERSTAD ARCHITECTS

ERIN AND HER CELLO— Boise-born and New York City-based Erin and Her Cello’s genre-crossing music (surf rock, funk, French pop) will have you tapping your toes, singing along and laughing out loud. With the Lars Jacobsen Trio. 7 p.m. $20 adv., $25 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. FUSE DANCE COLLABORATION: FOSTERING A UNIFIED, SOULFUL ENERGY—Join F.U.S.E. Dance Collaboration for a show packed with all your favorite pieces from over the years, along with a few new surprises. Featuring choreography by Tori Campbell, Taylorann Evans, Andrea Markham, Holly Slyter, Dejanee Douglas, Ashley Byington and Abby Lopac. 8 p.m. $15. Alano Club, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-1710, fusedancecollaboration.com. ‘People are really good at heart.’

15TH ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL ANNIVERSARY AND GROUNDBREAKING The Wassmuth Center for Human Rights is inviting everyone to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the Anne Frank Memorial on Eighth Street. The event will include a speech from former Idaho Gov. Phil Batt; memorial tours; food from Bombay Grill, Kanak Attack and Rhapsody Andy’s Shaved Ice; music; and dancing. At 1 p.m., the center will break ground for the Marilyn Shuler Classroom for Human Rights, which will serve as a media-rich information center for guests, a meeting place for community events and tours, and an homage to late-Idaho Human Rights Commission Director Marilyn Shuler, whose legacy as an advocate and volunteer will go down as an important part of Boise history. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

ISF: HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME—8 p.m. $13-$50. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. LIPSINC: TWISTED SISTERS—Join Victoria, Christina Champagne, Roxy V and Martini to get your panties twisted at Idaho’s first professional female impersonation troupe’s new show. And in a twist on the LipsInc formula, the show will feature the troupe’s first ciswoman grand guest entertainer, Mimi Mashuga, an award-winning burlesque artist. Another ciswoman entertainer, Frankee, will be featured in the “wacko” finale. 8:30 p.m. $20. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3680405, lipsinc.net.

august 12

JASON BROWN

august 26

GRACIE GOLD

september 2 JOHNNY WEIR

sunvalley.com

208.622.2135

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | 9


CALENDAR 4th Annual ARTHRITIS AWARENESS

E IT MOV R O T I LOSEK 5

5K/1K RUN AND/OR WALK - August, 26th, 2017

ARTHRITIS AWARENESS

Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park 1900 North Records Avenue Meridian, Idaho

Donation/Registration Fee which includes shirt for each participant $10 per person (while supplies last) Registration time is 8 to 9 am Starts at 9:30 am

Donate/Pre-register at www. idahoarthritiswalk.com

Supported by local Rheumatologists

Art

streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

49TH ANNUAL SUN VALLEY CENTER ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL—This three-day outdoor exhibition of 130 artists from around the country features a wide range of unique handmade fine arts and crafts, including painting, photography fiber, ceramic, metal, jewelry and woodwork. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Atkinson Park, 900 Third Ave. N., Ketchum, sunvalleycenter.org/ arts-crafts-festival.

CELEBRATION OF VERA’S LIFE— Stage Coach Theatre recently lost one of its founders and great supporters: Vera Cederstrom. Family and friends are invited to a celebration of Vera’s life. In the McCleary Auditorium. 2 p.m. FREE. Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center, 1055 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-367-2121, saintalphonsus.org.

BOISE ART MUSEUM SUMMER EXHIBITIONS OPENING CELEBRATION—Celebrate BAM’s summer exhibitions, including Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain, Mapping the Past: Selections from the Thomas J. Cooney Collection, and An Intentional Eye: Select Gifts from Wilfred Davis Fletcher. In addition to all the great art, you will enjoy complimentary hors d’oeuvres and a no-host bar. 5:30-8 p.m. FREE$10. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, ext. 14, boiseartmuseum.org.

Literature AUTHOR JEFF METCALF—Meet and greet author Jeff Metcalf, who will be reading from the beginning of his novel Wacko’s City of Fun Carnival and Other Such Madness. The novel is based (partly) on his experience running away from home at 15 and joining a carnival. With wine, beer and cider available for purchase; food truck on-site. Proceeds benefit Surel’s Place. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$5 donation. Cinder Winery and Tasting Room, 107 E. 44th St., Garden City, 208376-4023, cinderwines.com.

EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle, 208-489-8763, cityofeagle. org/market. FAT TIRE TOUR DE FAT— The annual celebration of all things two-wheeled kicks off at 10 a.m. with the Bicycle Parade, which winds its way from Ann Morrison Park through downtown to the Capitol for the city’s first-ever Bicycle Rally. As always, you can expect eye-popping costumes, decorated bicycles, custom bikes and general silliness. Festivities crank back up again at the Idaho Botanical Garden starting at 4 p.m., where the evening of entertainment is headlined by Blackberry Smoke. You will also enjoy a mix of musicians, circus performers, vaudeville acts, magicians, comedians, and mind-blowing provocateurs. Tour

de Fat’s Boise stop benefits Boise Bicycle Project, Southwest Idaho Mountain Biking Association, and Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance. 4-9 p.m. $25. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, newbelgium.com. MERIDIAN YOUTH FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-4433, meridiancity.org/youthfarmersmarket. NAMPA FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Lakeview Park, Garrity Boulevard at 16th Avenue North, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparks.org.

On Stage BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION— 1 p.m. $87-$125. Challis, U.S Hwy. 93, Central Idaho, braunbrothersreunion.com. COMEDIAN EMMA ARNOLD—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDIAN RAYMOND ORTA—8 p.m. $15-$35. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter. com.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

SATURDAY AUGUST 12 Festivals & Events

hats for sale at the Boise Weekly Office. $12 + TAX benefiting the WCA.

BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove Streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. CALDWELL MODEL RAILROAD CLUB GRAND REOPENING OPEN HOUSE—Check out the progress made at the clubhouse since last year at the Caldwell Model Railroad Club’s Grand Reopening Open House. You will enjoy their model train layouts with hundreds of feet of track, featuring Thomas and other special trains for the kids on display and running. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. By donation. Caldwell Model Railroad Clubhouse, 809 Dearborn St., Caldwell, cmrchs.org. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State

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CALENDAR FUSE DANCE COLLABORATION: FOSTERING A UNIFIED, SOULFUL ENERGY—8 p.m. $15. The Alano Club of Boise, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-1710, fusedancecollaboration.com. ISF: HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME—8 p.m. $13-$50. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. LIPSINC: TWISTED SISTERS—8:30 p.m. $20. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-368-0405, lipsinc.net.

Literature AUTHOR CHRISTOPHER FARNSWORTH: FLASHMOB—Critically acclaimed author Christopher Farnsworth seamlessly combines history, biotechnology and modern-day action in his latest novel, Flashmob. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229. rdbooks.org. AUTHOR DRAKE SHANNON: ZOINK!—Meet local author Drake Shannon and find out about the Space Squires and their musical adventures on Mars in this creative picture book. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED 368-0405

through dialogue. This event gives readers a framework to ask difficult questions about stereotypes and prejudices experienced by a diverse array of “books” for a 20-30 minute loan. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Generations Plaza, corner of Main Street and Idaho Avenue, Meridian, mld.org. IDAHO FOODBANK BENEFIT SCREENING: GOONIES AND RAIDERS—Enjoy two great movies from the ‘80s at the Country Club Plaza’s 25th Anniversary Celebration. Enjoy The Goonies and/or Raiders of the Lost Ark with cash or non-perishable food donations to the Idaho Foodbank. There will be fun for the entire family, with free treasure hunt, prizes and food and ice cream trucks. 11 a.m. By donation. Country Club Reel Theatre, 4550 Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com.

SUNDAY AUGUST 13 Festivals & Events NAMPA FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Lakeview Park, Garrity Boulevard at 16th Avenue North, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparks.org.

FUSE DANCE COLLABORATION: FOSTERING A UNIFIED, SOULFUL ENERGY—2 p.m. $15. The Alano Club of Boise, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-1710, fusedancecollaboration.com. ISF: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—7 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. RANCID AND DROPKICK MURPHYS: FROM BOSTON TO BERKELEY SUMMER TOUR 2017—Don’t miss your chance to bang heads with punk rockers Rancid and Dropkick Murphys, who join forces for this co-headlining North American tour. With special guests The Selecter and Kevin Seconds. 5:30 p.m. $40. Ford Idaho Center Amphitheater, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com.

Talks & Lectures A HISTORY OF HATS IN AMERICA—Join Janet Worthington for a lively presentation on the history of hats in America. Light refreshments will be served; wine available for purchase. 2-4 p.m. $20. Bishops’ House, 2420 E. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-342-3279, thebishopshouse.com.

On Stage

www.porterhousemarket.com

Sports & Fitness LEIA’S WARRIORS FUN RUN AND WALK—Leia’s Warriors Fun Run and Walk is a benefit for a local 14-year-old girl fighting Hodgkin’s Lymphoma for the second time. There are options for one, three and five miles to accommodate everyone. All proceeds will go directly to Leia’s family for costs related to her care and treatment. Pricing available at registration website. 8 a.m.-noon. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, bluecirclesports.com.

2-Day 2-Day Fresh Freshseafood seafoodsale sale Whole Sockeye salmon $10.79 lb Sockeye fillets $13.99 lb Smoked Sockeye $14.99 lb Dungeness crabs $8.99 lb Halibut fillets $19.99 lb Halibut chowder and seafood cioppino $8.50 Quart

FRI | AUGS1A1TTH| A&UG 12TH 208-938-1441 12 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

Fish for more info at www.porterhousemarket.com

COMEDIAN EMMA ARNOLD— 8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

TOUR DE FAT PARADE AND RALLY—Join thousands of people on bikes to cruise from Ann Morrison Park to the State Capitol for Boise’s first Bicycle Rally. All types of bicycles, riders and costumes are welcome. You will celebrate the pure joy of riding a bicycle as you make your voice heard for stronger, safer and more vibrant bicycle communities throughout the state. 10 a.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 N. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

Citizen HUMAN LIBRARY—Join your Treasure Valley Public Libraries for a unique experience where real people are on loan to readers. The Human Library is an organization committed to designing a space for community members to challenge discrimination Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR Odds & Ends

men felled by police bullets in city streets today. 8 p.m. $30-$35. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS—Is food a problem for you? No matter what your problem is with food—compulsive overeating, under-eating, food addiction, anorexia, bulimia, binge eating or overexercising—Overeaters Anonymous has a solution. 6:307:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Church of Christ, 2000 N. Eldorado St., Boise, 208-409-1086, oa.org.

KEGS 4 CAUSE: JESSE TREE—Half of all beer sale proceeds from 5-10 p.m. benefiting Jesse Tree’s efforts to prevent homelessness. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-383-9486, jessetreeidaho.org.

MONDAY AUGUST 14

TUESDAY AUGUST 15

On Stage

Festivals & Events

RHIANNON GIDDENS: THE FREEDOM HIGHWAY TOUR—The master folklorist, banjo virtuoso and vocal powerhouse hits the Egyptian stage in support of her second solo album. In this new work, Giddens speaks for the truly silenced: slaves, people murdered during the 1960s struggle for civil rights, and young

ANNE FRANK MEMORIAL TOURS—12:15 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise. 208345-0304, wassmuthcenter.org. JANAMASHTAMI: LORD KRISHNA’S BIRTHDAY—This family-friendly festival features the House of 10,000 Flowers, traditional

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

dance and music, free authentic Indian vegetarian food, and kids’ activities. 6:45-10 p.m. FREE. Boise Hare Krishna Temple, 2470 W. Boise Ave., 208-344-4274, boisetemple.org.

On Stage ISF: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org. MARBIN—The Chicagobased prog jam fusion band started touring in 2011 and has played over a thousand shows since. Marbin has released five albums with Moonjune Records: Marbin (2009), Breaking the Cycle (2011), Last Chapter of Dreaming (2013), The Third Set (2014), and Aggressive Hippies (2015). 9 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9200, marbinmusic.com. MUNDEK CLEMENT STEIN’S COMEDY SHOWCASE—8 p.m. $5. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Sports & Fitness CALDWELL NIGHT RODEO—Check out one of the Top 30 professional rodeos in the U.S., where the cowboys are the stars. Visit the website for a complete schedule of events. Daily through Aug. 19. 6:30 p.m. $8-$22. Caldwell Night Rodeo Grounds, 2301 Blaine St., Caldwell, 208-459-2060, caldwellnightrodeo.com.

Odds & Ends

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

GR8TER MEETS—Anyone with mental or emotional struggles (and also those who provide support to those with struggles, whether personally or professionally) are invited to this monthly meeting. The focus will be on education, empowerment and fun, with activities, prizes and a guest speaker with topics relevant to the mission of removing the stigmas surrounding mental and emotional problems. Gr8ter is a support community for people who are rising above life’s struggles. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. MaxGiving HQ, 7253 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 855-245-7500, gr8ter.org.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY AUGUST 10

THURSDAY AUGUST 10

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: SCARS ON 45—With Know Reaction. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

BEN BURDICK TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

DUELING PIANOS—8 p.m. FREE. Whiskey Bar

BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION— Featuring Reckless Kelly, Micky and the Motorcars, The Turnpike Troubadours and a host of other bands. 4 p.m. $87-$125. Challis, U.S Hwy. 93, Central Idaho

GARY TACKETT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BREAD AND CIRCUS—6 p.m. FREE-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SCARS ON 45, AUG. 9, GROVE PLAZA Scars on 45 celebrates its 10th birthday this year, although the UK-based alt-rock band still feels like a fairly new voice. Before its popular single “Give Me Something,” which debuted in 2011, Scars on 45 was known mostly as a local band in its English hometown of Bradford, Yorkshire. Its songs, however, occasionally jumped the pond to play on American TV shows like CSI: New York and Grey’s Anatomy, broadening its audience. Now, buoyed by its successful second album Safety in Numbers (2014, Nettwerk), Scars on 45 is house-hopping across America, including an Aug. 9 visit to Boise for Alive After Five. If you’re into acoustic melodies and Fleetwood Mac-esque country flair, don’t miss these soccer players-turned-musicians at the Grove on Wednesday night. —Lex Nelson With Know Reaction. 5 p.m., FREE. Grove Plaza, downtownboise.org.

BIG WOW BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Boise Spectrum

LOCUST GROVE—With Peace Be Steel, and Prey for Peril. 8 p.m. $5. The Shredder

COLD WAR KIDS—With Julien Baker, and Joywave. 8 p.m. $27$65. Knitting Factory

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE DERAILERS—With Andrew Sheppard. 7 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. Neurolux

LIKE A ROCKET ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange OPERA IDAHO OPERATINI: BOOTS AND BOOZE—6 p.m. $22-$30. Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s Ranch, 1009 S. Star Road RODRIGO Y GABRIELA—8 p.m. $35-$65. Revolution RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

VANPAEPEGHEM DUO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE HEAD AND THE HEART—With Blind Pilot and Gregory Alan Isakov. 7 p.m. $36-$46. Ford Idaho Center

FRIDAY AUGUST 11 ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s BIG WOW BAND—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

EMILY TIPTON—6 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar

SPEEDY GRAY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

FOLK HOGAN—With Space Car, and A Mighty Band of Microbes. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic

BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION— 4 p.m. $87-$125. Challis, U.S Hwy. 93, Central Idaho

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CLAY MOORE TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SOUL SERENE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

DARSOMBRA—With Brett Netson, and Desert Graves. 8 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder ERIN AND HER CELLO—With the Lars Jacobsen Trio. 7 p.m. $20 adv., $25 door. Visual Arts Collective

BOISE ALL-AGES MOVEMENT PROJECT: TYTO ALBA—With Tag Along Friend, and Good Dining. 7 p.m. By donation. Pollo Rey

SNOW ROLLER—With Dasher and Cmmnwlth. 7 p.m. $7. Neurolux

DAN COSTELLO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JOE HOLT—7 p.m. FREE. High Note LOCALS NIGHT—With Jared Nilo, Maddie Zahm, and Abby Nicole. 7:30 p.m. FREE. The District MIKE CRAMER—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar NEW TRANSIT—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar OUTSIDE THE FRAME—10 p.m. $5. Reef RYAN WISSINGER—8 p.m. FREE. Piper TRACTOR BEAM—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

2nd Annual

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th 10 AM - 5 PM BOISE SPECTRUM

16 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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MUSIC GUIDE SATURDAY AUGUST 12

RANCID AND DROPKICK MURPHYS—With The Selecter and Kevin Seconds. 5:30 p.m. $40. Ford Idaho Center

TUESDAY AUGUST 15

ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SONGWRITERS IN THE PARK SIS FEST: KATE MACLEOD—With The Analog Sisters and Lindsey Hunt. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Sandy Point

ADDAM CHAVARRIA—6 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar

MONDAY AUGUST 14

MARBIN—9 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Reef

AVENGED SEVENFOLD—With A Day To Remember, and Ho99o9. 6:30 p.m. $45-$50. Ford Idaho Center BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION— 1 p.m. $86-$124. Challis, braunbrothersreunion.com. THE BUTTERTONES—With Jac Sound, Spiritual Warfare, and Greasy Shadows. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux CAMDEN HUGHES TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CARMEL AND THE CLOSERS—10 a.m. FREE. Lakeview Park CONCERTS ON BROADWAY: ERIN AND HER CELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian City Hall ENCORE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar FAT TIRE TOUR DE FAT: BLACKBERRY SMOKE—Featuring a mix of musicians, circus performers, vaudeville acts, magicians, comedians and mind-blowing provocateurs, with the opening band at 5:30 p.m. and headliners at 7:30 p.m. 4-9 p.m. $25. Idaho Botanical Garden FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

311: UNITY TOUR—With New Politics. 8 p.m. $20-$140. Revolution THE LUCKY EEJITS—With Lightspeedgo, and Flag on Fire. 8 p.m. $6. The Shredder MOSS AND RICHE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 RHIANNON GIDDENS: THE FREEDOM HIGHWAY TOUR—8 p.m. $30-$35. Egyptian

DAVE MANION—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

MOJO BOOGIE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: THE SHIVAS—With The Band Ice Cream, and The Love Bunch. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux THE SIDEMEN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s TAI SHAN—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

SCOTT KNICKERBOCKER AND TRAVIS WARD—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

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MICHAELA FRENCH—8 p.m. FREE. Piper NOAH KADRE EXPERIENCE EP RELEASE PARTY—Free EP for the first 50 people. 10 p.m. $5. Reef

THE RECORD EXCHANGE AND BOISE WEEKLY PRESENT

THE OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND MOSQUITOS—7 p.m. FREE. High Note RUSSIAN DRAMA—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District SHON SANDERS AND THE FOUR PENNY PEEP SHOW—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s SHOT GLASS—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar SWEET BRIAR—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s TRAVIS WARD—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar ZACH FORSMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SUNDAY AUGUST 13 BIG WOW BAND—1 p.m. $10-$12 adv., $10-$15 door. Ste. Chapelle THE DAVID GLUCK BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar KAYLEIGH JACK—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar KHAOTIKA—With Ruines Ov Abbadon, Wormreich, and Krystos. 7 p.m. $8. The Shredder MOODY JEWS—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

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AVENGED SEVENFOLD, AUG. 12, FORD IDAHO CENTER It’s rare that bands formed in high school stick around, much less make it to the bigtime, but hardcore metal group Avenged Sevenfold has been an exception to the rule. Formed in 1999, the band was catapulted to stardom with the release of its third album, City of Evil (2005, Warner Brothers), which broke into the Billboard Top 200—a feat repeated in 2007 with a self-titled release that also scored chart-topping hits in Europe. Firmly established as an international name, the five-piece California-based band is known for intense guitar riffs, high-energy sound and stadium-rocking live performances. Now on tour to promote The Stage (2016, Capitol Records), Avenged Sevenfold will make a stop in Nampa for an outdoor concert that will bring all of its fans (who call themselves the Deathbat Nation) out of the Treasure Valley woodwork. —Lex Nelson With A Day To Remember and H09909. 6:30 p.m., $45-$50. Ford Idaho Center Outdoor Amphitheater, 16200 N. Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com.

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THURSDAY

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REC NEWS

TOUR DE FAT 2017 BRINGS BIKES, BEERS AND BANDS TO NEW LOCATION AT OUTLAW FIELD Tour De Fat, the annual bacchanal of beer, bikes and bands, is returning to Boise Saturday, Aug. 12. Put on by New Belgium Brewing Company, the festivus has in years past brought tens of thousands of costumed bike-riders out to occupy Ann Morrison Park like a lowemission Thunderdome. This year, revelers will gather in Outlaw Field at the Idaho Botanical Gardens—and it will cost $25 to get in. Despite the change of venue and introduction of ticket sales, organizers said Tour De Fat 2017 will remain similar to previous years. There will be bands: The headliner this year is Atlanta, Georgia-based country rock band Blackberry Smoke, making Boise the last stop on its western tour before heading east. There will be beer: New Belgium classics like Fat Tire and Euro-style brews like the 1554 Black Lager and currently super-popular sours. There will be beneficiaries: Southwest Idaho Mountain Bike Association, Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance and pedal-powerhouse Boise Bicycle Project all stand to gain. Proceeds from Tour De Fat 2016 totaled $63,365. “There are a lot of similarities [between the 2016 and 2017 events]. We still have the same touring ensemble,” said New Belgium Public Relations Director Brian Simpson. That said, Tour De Fat took place in 12 U.S. cities in 2016. This year, 33 cities will host the event as part of a “new vision” designed to expand the reach of the tour, Simpson said. As in Boise, all of those events will be ticketed. The action begins at 4 p.m., so attendees can, in Simpson’s words, “catch that magic hour at sunset” and enjoy a music festival-esque atmosphere. Get tickets at newbelgium.com. Unfazed by the changes, the annual Tour De Fat Bicycle Parade and Rally, which is put on by BBP and TVCA and drew a small army of Boiseans and their freak flags last year, will go on as scheduled, beginning at Ann Morrison Park at 10 a.m. and culminating at the Idaho Statehouse for a demonstration. Suggested slogans on the event Facebook page include: “We value access to our public lands where we ride recreationally,” and, “We want safer streets for Idaho families!” Register for the rally online at boisebicycleproject.org. —Harrison Berry 18 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

COURTESY SLOOH

Folks freewheelin’ at the 2016 Tour de Fat bicycle parade and rally.

123RF

PATRICK SWEENE Y

RECREATION

Powerful Slooh.com telescopes will be set up in Stanley to view the Monday, Aug. 21 total solar eclipse.

FROM THE SUN TO STANLEY

Online observatory will stream the solar eclipse from Idaho to all corners of the earth SOPHIA ANGLE TON A welcome sign on the outskirts of Stanley states the official population of the Custer County community is 63. That number will temporarily swell in the coming days from the expected rush of visitors hoping to see the total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21. For millions of people who aren’t along the “path of totality” but still want to see it, one visitor will make that possible. Slooh, a Connecticut-based online observatory company, will set up its base of operations in Stanley, training its powerful telescopes on the sun. Slooh will then beam the images across the globe, in part by sharing them through Reddit, The Weather Channel and the ABC, BBC and CNN networks. “This eclipse is going to be one of those events when people all across the world are going to be watching whether they are able to be there live, watching it in person or watching it on a screen,” said Michelle Meskill, a Slooh spokeswoman. Slooh.com was founded in 2004 with a mission of “connecting humanity through communal exploration of the universe.” Today, the site has more than 80,000 international members. Memberships range from $5 to $25 per month and allow users to book sessions in which they can control state-of-the-art Slooh telescopes located in Chile and the Canary Islands. Additionally, Slooh has a giant mobile observatory that travels around the world for major celestial events. To date, Slooh has streamed previous solar eclipses from its mobile observatory in Indonesia, Kenya and the

Faroe Islands. The Aug. 21 eclipse will be the first time Slooh has set up shop in Idaho. “Stanley is right on the path of totality; it’s going to have a good two minutes of total darkness,” said Meskill. “The weather is also supposed to be really good there. Clear skies [are] important.” On its journey from Connecticut to Idaho, the Slooh mobile observatory will visit planetariums and science centers. On Friday, Aug. 18, Slooh astronomer Paul Cox will deliver a free lecture at the Stanley Museum and will be one of a number of astronomers commenting when Slooh livestreams the eclipse. During the broadcast, which is scheduled to begin when the moon first starts passing across the sun, Slooh will also share live footage from the Idaho Rocky Mountain Ranch in Stanley and the Elk Creek Campground in the Sawtooth National Forest. The Elk Creek Campground is hosting its own eclipse festival Friday, Aug. 18 through Tuesday, Aug. 22. The event will be free to Slooh members. “We’re going to have yoga and meditation every day, and we’ll have some live music from a reggae blues band on Saturday and Sunday,” said Meskill. “There will be people teaching landscape photography and putting on workshops for photographing the eclipse. It’s going to be a lot of fun.” Slooh is expected to host more than 200 guests at the campground, with visitors coming from as far away as Australia, Thailand and the United Kingdom.

Bob Berman, a veteran astronomer for the Old Farmer’s Almanac and one of the experts who will participate in the Slooh broadcast, said he isn’t at all surprised to hear people are coming from far and wide to Stanley. “A total solar eclipse is so rare. There is nothing else on this earth that compares,” said Berman. “It is sacred. A total solar eclipse is … beyond anything we experience on this earth.” That rare experience is why officials at the Stanley Chamber of Commerce are preparing for an unprecedented number of visitors. “Honestly, we have no idea how many people are coming up to Stanley. It could be 2,000 or it could well be 25,000,” said Ellen Libertine at the Stanley Chamber. Either way, preparations have been underway for months. “We’re trying to think about problems before they come,” said Libertine. “We know we are going to have problems on the roads. We know we are going to have problems with the telephone cell service.” Despite some nervousness about the unknown, Libertine said Stanley citizens are pretty upbeat about the event. “We’re particularly excited Slooh chose to be in Stanley,” she said. “It is an amazing thing that they do, and we never knew anything about them before Slooh contacted us. It made us say, ‘Wow, people all over the world will be watching from here.’” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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Change Your World Celebration “Standing Up To Hate and Extremism Together” Friday, September 15, 2017 6:00 -9:30 p.m. Boise Centre EAST, Rm 400 850 West Front, Boise No-host reception, music, silent auction, live auction, dinner, award recognition, program with keynote presentation.

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Lecia Brooks Keynote Speaker Outreach Director Southern Poverty Law Center BOISEweekly | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | 19


IMPUL S PICTURES

SCREEN JAGGED BEAUTY

The Glass Castle, which is based on the memoir of gossip columnist Jeannette Walls, speaks to the walls we build—and the secrets we hide behind them GEORGE PRENTICE

STARTS FRIDAY, AUG 11th

20 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

Glass can be used to make a stunning mosaic or can be dangerous, leaving permanent scars. Jeannette Walls’ life was full of both. In her bestselling 2005 memoir, The Glass Castle, which spent a stunning 261 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list, Walls chronicled her up-until-then hidden past of abuse, poverty and shame and her unlikely climb to become one of the most celebrated gossip columnists in New York City—she wrote for New York Oscar-winner Brie Larson reteams with director Destin Daniel Cretton (Short Term 12) to adapt bestseller The Glass magazine and USA Today in the late 1980s Castle for the big screen. Larson plays Jeannette Walls, author of the book. and early ’90s. Earlier this month, Walls told the The Los Angeles Times she had been body. But the fire causes only some a few of One night, when the taxi she’s in is stopped warned a movie adaptation of her memoir the innumerable scars, many of them hidden, might “Hollywoodize it” by smoothing out its at a red light, Walls sees a woman picking inflicted upon Jeannette and her three siblings edges. She quickly added that she was flattered through garbage. Walls’ face goes blank when at the hands of Rose Mary and their father she recognizes the woman: It’s her mother. anyone would even want to turn her story Rex, portrayed by Woody Harrelson, who Walls slumps down into the seat and we flash into a film. balances the charismatic energy of a cockeyed back to a past she tried to bury—flashbacks “It was, I had thought, a shameful story,” optimist with the raging soul of a domestic to Walls’ childhood happen often in the film, Walls told the Times. “I didn’t think people but not so often that we lose the thread of the terrorist, fueled by alcoholism. The role is a would understand. I was so wrong.” heady one only an actor like Harrelson could present. In one early scene, we see a threeFor director/screenwriter Destin Daniel have pulled off so perfectly year-old Walls begging her Cretton, this is only his Rex rails against capitalism, hypocrisy and mother Rose Mary (Naomi second feature film—his whatever else angers him, and he’s usually Watts) for something to directorial debut was the hatching what he calls an “escape plan” for THE GLASS CASTLE (PG-13) eat, but Rose Mary, who is fabulous 2009 independent Directed by Destin Daniel Cretton his family which usually has law enforcement, almost always painting, is Short Term 12—and he has child protection or creditors hot on their heels. more interested in her art done a masterful job adaptStarring Brie Larson, Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts “All this running around is only tempothan her family’s needs, ining The Glass Castle, jagged cluding one of her children’s rary,” Rex promises. “Soon, we’ll get to work edges and all. Brie Larson, Opens Friday, Aug. 11 at The Flicks and build our castle.” He fills the children’s hunger pangs. who portrays Wells, starred heads with the dream of building a fantastical “Would you rather me in Short Term 12, giving a make some food that will be home, made primarily of glass. The dream of breakthrough performance gone in an hour, or finish this painting which their glass castle shattered as easily real glass that, in large part, set the stage for her 2015 and the metaphorical shards left actual longOscar-winning performance in Room. Cretton will last forever?” Rose Mary asks three-yearlasting scars. old Jeanette. When the tiny girl reaches for and Larson are reunited in The Glass Castle, “It’s just my family’s story,” Walls told the a stool and grabs a lighter to ignite the gas in which Larson delivers proof of why she’s Times. “It’s my hope that by making such an among the most sought-after actresses in Hol- burner on the stove, the impending danger is effort to get at the truth, this film will help almost palpable. As the child matter-of-factly lywood. people understand all the other families out drops a few hot dogs into a pot of boiling In the opening moments of The Glass there like mine.” water, flames from the stove catch her dress Castle, we meet a 20-something Walls in For that reason alone, The Glass Castle is a 1980, when she was penning must-read gossip and turn it into a ball of fire, which results must-see. and rubbing elbows with the Manhattan elite. in a blanket of scars across half of Jeannette’s BOISE WEEKLY.COM


FOOD L E X N E L SO N & A M Y ATKI N S

CHOW DOWN(TOWN) What’s new—and newly updated—in the downtown Boise food scene LE X NEL SON

FORT STREET STATION—808 W. FORT ST. With Richard’s Cafe Vicino now comfortably established in the Inn at 500 Capitol, its vacated space across from the Boise Co-op was ripe for a cool new eatery—Fort Street Station fits the bill admirably. Thickly varnished wooden tables, booths upholstered in rich patterned fabrics and black-and-white historical photographs lining the walls give the space an elegant-yet-casual atmosphere and evoke an old-style public house. The menu also has a traditional pub vibe, though with some well-chosen twists. The fish ’n’ chips plate ($11) featured large beer-battered chunks of flaky cod, but the accompanying sweet potato fries were the real standout: light and crispy, they kept their crunch even after a squeeze of lemon and dunk in tartar sauce. In the shrimp and artichoke salad ($14), the bright acidity of banana peppers was a pleasant contrast to the earthier artichokes, pine nuts and Parmesan cheese. With its selection of beer, wine and cocktails, and great quality at a reasonable price, Fort Street Station should be on your shortlist of stops when it’s time to hop off the hungry train.

FRESH HEALTHY CAFE—860 W. BROAD ST. For this healthy haven that opened June 1 in the middle of the downtown restaurant scene, it’s all in the name. Fresh Healthy Cafe serves wraps, paninis, salads, quinoa protein bowls, granola-topped power bowls, smoothies and juices all day from its whimsical BoDo space, which is filled with colorful food-themed artwork and dividing walls made of river rock topped with grass sprouts. The turkey pesto panini ($8.29) featured thin, chewy bread that retained its toasty, crunchy crust despite the gooey mozzarella, tomatoes and fragrant pesto packed inside. The Jolly Green smoothie ($5.79) was a tropical treat, with only a slight vegetal note hinting at the wheatgrass and spinach hidden among its ingredients. Fresh’s menu has options for a myriad of dietary needs, and blenders were constantly whirring, whipping up the franchise’s signature smoothies. Although the turkey panini is worth BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Prime rib French dip (left), and mac-and-cheese with Kurobuta pork (right) at Capitol Cellars; and the Jolly Green smoothie (center) from Fresh Healthy Cafe. Is it lunchtime yet?

returning for, a Fresh smoothie is filling enough on its own; get the best bang for your healthconscious buck by drinking your lunch.

THE STIL–786 W. BROAD ST. As of this writing, The STIL—a.k.a. The Sweetest Things in Life—has more than 90 reviews on Facebook, and all of them give the indoor-outdoor ice creamery five stars. With locally made ice cream; Idaho-inspired flavor combinations; and a selection of boozy adult scoops, beer and wine, The STIL seems to have gathered many of Boise’s favorites in one place. The Bee Happy, a marriage of honey and lavender, is a life-changing ice cream if ever there was one. Its sweet burst of honey notes with lavender lingering on the finish make it an ice cream deserving of the type of discussions usually reserved for wine. On the other end of the spectrum, the brownie batter flavor, Licking the Spoon, takes chocolate to another level. Rich and intense, this cocoa powder-heavy concoction is nirvana for chocoholics (although it might be too strong for milk chocolate lovers). The STIL even offers indulgences for the 21 and older crowd, with its rotating flavors like Purple Rain (raspberry wine sorbet) and options like beer floats and affogatos—an ice cream treat drenched in espresso and, sometimes, liqueur. At $5.75 for a double scoop of ice cream, The STIL isn’t the place to go if you’re penny pinching, but if you’re looking to splurge a little, it sure does hit the sweet spot.

CAPITOL CELLARS–110 S. FIFTH ST. Capitol Cellars has been an almost literal hidden gem since 2015, when it opened in the Belgravia Building space previously occupied by District Coffee House—but this summer, the

restaurant stepped out of its subterranean zone a bit to provide al fresco dining, too. Capitol Cellars now has a patio, which wraps around the corner of the historic building (on Main and Fifth streets) and the elegant indoor decor has been extended outside with wrought iron tables and seating at a gray granite bar facing Fifth Street—perfect for people watching. For lunch, we tried half a prime rib French dip paired with beet salad ($15.43) and the “Ways & Means” ($15), a subtly flavored yet satisfying pasta dish featuring a gouda fondue sauce, garden fresh peas and a crisped pork belly garnish. The prime rib—a Capitol Cellars specialty served six nights a week—was peppery and packed with flavor. The salad was well balanced with meaty beets, a tart vinaigrette and candied walnuts providing a sweet punch. With lunch options ranging in price from $5.43 to $16 and plenty of wine on the menu, Capitol Cellars has you covered for a lavish lunch date or a quick mid-day bite.

BACON—121 N. NINTH ST. Boise’s beloved ode to all things pork, John Berryhill’s brunch-centric restaurant Bacon, will oust upscale eatery Berryhill on Sunday, Aug. 13 to take up permanent residence at 121 N. Ninth Street. Since 2016, the two restaurants have shared the same address, with staff performing a Clark Kent style quick-change every evening to transform Bacon into Berryhill. According to Berryhill himself, Bacon’s casual southern fare has finally won out. After a brief transition, Bacon will serve brunch—including its signature Bacon Shots ($10), a sampler of all five types of bacon on offer—all day long. The new hours will be 7 a.m.-7 p.m. TuesdaySaturday and 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. BOISEweekly | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | 21


CITIZEN JILLIAN KATES AND DAVID ANTHONY SMITH DAVID B. BOGIE

Midsummer Night’s dreamers GEORGE PRENTICE

Mistaken identities, a randy romp in the forest, donkey devotion and a whole lot of fairy dust: It must be A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the fourth production to brighten the amphitheater of the Idaho Shakespeare Festival this season. Midsummer is perhaps the Bard’s most popular comedy, but what sets this ISF production apart is the decision by director Joseph Hanreddy to cast some of the company’s veteran dramatic performers alongside others who Boise audiences are more accustomed to seeing in ISF musicals. A Midsummer Night’s Dream runs Friday, Aug. 4 through Sunday, Sept. 3. Prior to opening night, Boise Weekly caught up with Jillian Kates (who portrays Fairy Queen Titania) and 17-year ISF veteran David Anthony Smith (who plays Nick Bottom, a lowly weaver who is turned into a donkey but nonetheless captures Titania’s heart). Love may be blind, but that has never been truer than with Nick Bottom, who becomes, pardon my English, an ass. Smith: An ass’s head and an ass’s tail and he even takes a peek, let’s say below his belt, to see if the transformation has occurred there, too.

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Despite Bottom becoming an ass, a little bit of fairy dust goes a long way for Titania. Kates: Be careful with your dosage. In my case, it goes too far. But what can I say? We’re having a blast. Talk to me a bit about how you conjure up on-stage chemistry. Kates: We were just working on a scene, a post-coital scene between Bottom and Titania. To help create those sexy moments, we actually need help from an intimacy choreographer. Excuse me? Is ‘intimacy choreographer’ an actual line item on a resume? Kates: It is. Smith: It’s a position, so to speak. Kates: We have to go through the movements. It’s like a dance you need to work on with some outside help. It must also help that you’ve worked together before. Smith: I love Jillian’s work. It helps to have mutual respect and admiration. Kates: Oh, stop.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream ranks high in audience familiarity with the script. What distinguishes your production? Kates: For one, you’re going to see some musical theater actors taking on Shakespeare. Audiences may remember you as Eliza in My Fair Lady last summer, and you performed in the 2015 musical, The Secret Garden. Kates: It’s something fun and magical for we singers to bring a musical approach to Shakespeare. A Midsummer Night’s Dream already lends itself to an obvious rhythm, but we’ll also be bringing you a melody that is something new and fresh and pretty wonderful. Speaking of keeping things fresh, how are you holding up in the heat? Smith: Hydration is key. As soon as we’re offstage, we’re heading to the water and cold towels. Kates: We’re like zebras to the pond, soaking it up. I’ve heard nothing but raves from audiences about this season’s productions. Kates: Boise audiences are the best you could ask for. So generous.

Smith: When we compare audiences to our same productions at the Great Lakes Theater in Cleveland, we always say, “In Boise, you’re innocent until you’re proven guilty. In Cleveland, you’re guilty until proven innocent.” The thing for me in Boise is that audiences here are so astute. When they see a classical production, they know their Latin references, their legal references, their biblical references. Speaking of references, I’m impressed that you have a script of A Midsummer Night’s Dream is sitting here next to you. Smith: For instance, right here, they’re talking about Bottom’s relationship with Titania. “Their kinds of understanding are totally different and each one comically dislocates the other. She offers him fairy food, but with the tastes of the ass, he would much rather have hay.” Kate: Hilarious. I love that. The species are trying to connect and intertwine, but... Smith: The audience wants them to stay together, but they’re not really on the same page. She tries her fairy stuff on him and says, “Well, I’ll get you these beautiful nuts.” Kates: But he says, “No, I’d rather have hay.”

Join us for an afternoon of scenic walks through the vineyard and an up-close tour with our winemaking team including wine tasting and a gourmet boxed lunch under the shade of our trees. Ages 21 and over, please. Dogs are welcome. Questions? Contact Kelli at kellig@sawtoothwinery.com or (208) 467-1200 Sawtooth Winery 13750 Surrey Ln. Nampa, ID 83686

Tickets available at www.universe.com/ sawtoothvineyardhike17 22 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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NYT CROSSWORD | ANCHORS AWAY! ACROSS

24 Sailing vessels that Cap’n Crunch might commandeer? 27 Cuzco builders 29 Tetris piece 30 Testing times 31 Heavily armored vessels getting married? 35 Smelter input 36 Whiskey distiller’s supply 37 “The plot thickens!” 38 Candy in collectible containers 39 Mideast monarchy

1 “Cease!” on the seas 6 “What nonsense!” 9 Walk on the edge? 13 Luminary 17 Clubs with strobes 19 Hieroglyphic bird 21 ____ O’s (chocolaty cereal brand) 22 Asian territory in the game Risk 23 Roll out

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76 Recreational vessel that’s never left the harbor? 84 1997 action film set on a plane 85 X amount 86 Isaac Newton, e.g. 87 Brings up 89 Bad at one’s job 90 P, to Pythagoras 91 Revolver, in Roaring Twenties slang 94 Use scissors on 95 Governess at Thornfield 96 Berkeley institution, briefly 97 In place of 98 It brings people together 99 No. of interest to some recruiters 100 Luxury vessel with a pair of decks, both of which need swabbing? 106 Malodorous mammal 109 A&M athlete 110 Matisse who painted “La Danse” 111 Cargo vessel full of iPads? 114 Mown strips 117 “Game of Thrones,” e.g. 118 Blackens 119 Staple of Shinto rituals 120 Second story? 121 Rub out 122 Not needing a cane, maybe 123 Deadhead’s hits? 124 Foolish

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60 Flood survivor 61 ____ Gold, chief of staff on “The Good Wife” 62 Often-quoted chairman 63 A large amount 66 Fishing vessel that can pull only half a net behind it? 70 Bruce of “The Hateful Eight” 71 Messenger ____ 72 Rare craps roll 73 Incapacitate, in a way 74 Growth ring?

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43 Numbers on right-hand pages 45 Resells ruthlessly 47 Speaker on a car’s dash 48 Polished 49 Fruit mentioned in the “Odyssey” 51 Equal 52 Actor Stephen 53 Split, e.g. 54 Kids’ game in which small vessels attack each other? 59 Rio maker

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BY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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1 Kick in 2 Struggle 3 Ambitiously sought 4 Noninvasive medical procedures 5 Flashlight : U.S. :: ____ : U.K. 6 Consequential 7 Addis ____ 8 Lookout point 9 “You Send Me” singer, 1957 10 Coffee holder 11 Works on as a cobbler might

AUG 10 & THURSDAY, JULY1727-7PM 21+

The Wizard of Oz 12 Libertarian pundit Neal 13 Head honcho 14 It may end on a high note 15 D.C.’s National ____ 16 Chicago-based fraternal order 18 Mezzanine access 20 They hang around the rain forest 25 Return from a trip to the Alps? 26 Pharma watchdog 28 Surveillance aid 31 Coat in a cote 32 Fire 33 Longtime retailer hurt by Amazon 34 Coverage provider? 40 Femme’s title 41 Choice for an online gamer 42 Star of “Kinsey,” 2004 44 Is downright terrible 46 Actress Téa 47 Beauty 48 Under goer? 50 Biathletes do it 52 Uncreative creation 53 Forming spiral patterns 55 Holy Week follower 56 ____ State (Alabama’s nickname) 57 Measure of purity 58 Cheer with an accent 63 “____: A Love Story” (1998 George Burns book) 64 Like soubise sauce 65 Coat of arms element 67 Flock female 68 Vogue or Elle 69 Ehrich ____ a.k.a. Houdini 70 Chops up 75 Elephant ____ (pastry)

BUY BUYYOUR YOURTICKET TICKETTODAY TODAY

bbooi isseeccl laassssi iccmmoovvi ieess. c. coomm 106 Entry ticket 107 Iridescent stone 108 Women’s Open org. 112 Go astray 113 Roulette bet 115 Cool, in the ’40s 116 Roguish

77 It may help remove a curse 78 Hold an assembly 79 Revival movement prefix 80 Not mainstream 81 Bellyacher 82 Quits, informally 83 Nonsensical talk 88 Prep for a match 90 Dilapidated dwelling 91 Manhandles, with “up” 92 Like the Gemini flights 93 Way out 96 Wares at fairs 97 “Around the World in 80 Days” protagonist 101 Nonpermanent sculpture medium 102 Flower with rays 103 Vichyssoise vegetables 104 Single 105 Dialect of Arabic L A S T J A M E S I V

O N A D A R E

C H E W S U P

R A T I O N S

T A X I T O T H E R U N W A Y

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Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

T I M I O P I N W O R K T S S E O N P N L I O S E A T I H O D O F I E M A C D E J E E R I C C U T A L A P C H E S O A R C O T S F R L R E E U P A C R S E H S E D E

D E T A I N S

S H H E U D N S S B S I T T O R E E P N O T S O G O O D

D R E A M

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I H E A S O P H T S H I E L E E D L V A R A R A G D O E D E D E S C H O R O V E N E P E E R E S T R T H P L E K Y L O N I I E N D E E

R I F L E

D A T E S

O R D E R E R

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BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Lauren Adler Legal Names Case No. CV 01 1710260 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Lauren Michelle Adler now residing in the City of Eagle, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Laurie Manahata Reynolds. The reason for the change in name is: I have always gone by Laurie,and I do not want to carry my family name,

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DEPUTY CLERK PUB Aug. 2, 9, 16 & 23 LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS: CASE NO. CV-01 17 12327 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA MAGISTRATE DIVISION In the Matter of the Estate of: Richard Cary Olson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Tamie Baker has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against said deceased or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to Tamie Baker, 2013 S. Eagleson Rd., Boise, ID 83705 AND filed with the Clerk of the Court. Pub. Aug. 2, 9 & 16, 2017.

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | 25


PAGE BREAK $GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH QUEERLY DEPRESSED DEAR MINERVA, I’m worried. It feels like this country is going backwards in LGBTQIA rights. There is so much going on, even in Chechnya with the slaughter of gay men. It makes one wonder what one can do, especially as just one person. Any advice for this disempowered citizen? Sincerely, Queerly Depressed

DEAR QD, Many people share your feelings of anxiety and helplessness in the world right now. The situation in Chechnya is one that is both frightening and almost unimaginable in 2017. The waters of acceptance and tolerance in our own country and here in Idaho have been choppy as well. I personally have encountered more people willing to flagrantly harass me. I truly believe that while it feels like we’re backsliding, what we are really experiencing is people finally throwing their “privilege tantrums.” The world is like a big grocery store and these haters aren’t getting the the toy they want, so they throw a fit. The hatred is not new. What feels new is this sort of “renaissance of hatred.” I would encourage you to remember there is great power in continuing to be yourself. Your everyday activism— showing up and being involved unapologetically—does so much. I think we are on the verge of a real breakthrough, and all those people stuck in the Dark Ages will fade away. Hatred is a disease and it dooms people to fates worse than death. They will fade into mediocrity while their ignorance will vouchsafe their irrelevance. Love will prevail.

FIRESIDE MALLOW CO. Whether you’re toasting them solo or building mile-high s’mores, marshmallows are to summertime camping as bears are to the forest. Yet as food trends move toward local, handcrafted, organic fare the marshmallow will likely be left behind... unless Caldwell-based Fireside Mallow Co. has anything to say about it. According to Fireside, there’s a better way to do marshmallows: gourmet, local, handmade, hand cut and small batch. “After a year or so of $8.99 per 12-piece bag trial, error, and experimentAvailable at the Capitol City Public ing with batch after batch Market, Mo’s Frozen Yogurt, H&M of marshmallows we came Meats and Catering, Mailroom N’ up with a recipe we knew More and Bayberries Flowers & Gifts, or order online at firesidemallow.com. was different,” reads the website. That difference is obvious after browsing the online store, where Fireside offers “mallows” in mint chocolate chip, peanut butter-banana, mocha and birthday cake flavors, among others. The meltingly sweet mallow might be here to stay. —Lex Nelson Taken by instagram user travelbug1988.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2.  3.  4.  5. 

“LA DIVINE,” COLD WAR KIDS

“EVERYTHING NOW,” ARCADE FIRE “HEARTLESS,” PALLBEARER “FLOWER BOY,” TYLER, THE CREATOR “PARANORMAL,” ALICE COOPER

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

50+ The percent of all marshmallows sold during the summer in the U.S. that are eventually roasted over a campfire (candyusa.com)

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FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

6. 7.  8.  9.  10.

“LUST FOR LIFE,” LANA DEL REY

“OK COMPUTER: OKNOTOK 1997 2017,” RADIOHEAD “A BLACK MILE TO THE SURFACE,” MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA

“THE NASHVILLE SOUND,” JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT “VOLUME 1,” MAGIC SWORD

26

267

2000 B.C.

19TH

140,280

1927

90 MILLION

The number of years Ligonier, Indiana—the “marshmallow capital of the world”—has hosted an annual Marshmallow Festival (candyusa.com)

Weight in pounds of the world’s largest s’more, created in Gardners, Pennsylvania, in 2014 (guinnessworldrecords. com)

The year ancient Egyptians began making proto-marshmallows with sap from the mallow plant (candyusa.com)

Century during which the marshmallow spread to Europe and found a foothold with French candy makers (candyusa.com)

The number of marshmallows tossed by students in Taylorsville, Utah, during the world’s biggest ‘mallow fight (alternativerecords. co.uk)

The year the first s’mores recipe was published—fittingly, in The Girl Scout Handbook (candyusa.com)

The number of pounds of marshmallows Americans buy every year (candyusa.com)

26 | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): I hope you’re making wise use of the surging fertility that has been coursing through you. Maybe you’ve been reinventing a longterm relationship that needed creative tinkering. Perhaps you have been hammering together an innovative business deal or generating new material for your artistic practice. It’s possible you have discovered how to express feelings and ideas that have been half-mute or inaccessible for a long time. If for some weird reason you are not yet having experiences like these, get to work. There’s still time to tap into that fecundity. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano defines “idiot memory” as the kind of remembrances that keep us attached to our old self-images, and trapped by them. “Lively memory,” on the other hand, is a feisty approach to our old stories. It impels us to graduate from who we used to be. “We are the sum of our efforts to change who we are,” writes Galeano. “Identity is no museum piece sitting stock-still in a display case.” Here’s another clue to your current assignment, Taurus, from psychotherapist Dick Olney: “The goal of a good therapist is to help someone wake up from the dream that they are their self-image.”

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Sometimes, Gemini, loving you is a sacred honor for me—equivalent to getting a poem on my birthday from the Dalai Lama. On other occasions, loving you is more like trying to lap up a delicious milkshake that has spilled on the sidewalk, or slow-dancing with a giant robot teddy bear that accidentally knocks me down when it suffers a glitch. I don’t take it personally when I encounter the more challenging sides of you, since you are always an interesting place to visit. But could you maybe show more mercy to the people in your life who are not just visitors? Remind your dear allies of the obvious secret—that you’re composed of several different selves, each of whom craves different thrills. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Liz, my girlfriend when I was young, went to extreme lengths to cultivate her physical attractiveness. “Beauty must suffer,” her mother had told her while growing up, and Liz heeded that advice. To make her long blonde hair as wavy as possible, for example, she wrapped strands of it around six empty metal cans before bed, applied a noxious spray, and then slept all night with a stinky, clanking mass of metal affixed to her head. While you may not do anything so literal, Cancerian, you do sometimes act as if suffering helps keep you strong and attractive—as if feeling hurt is a viable

way to energize your quest for what you want. But if you’d like to transform that approach, the coming weeks will be a good time. Step One: Have a long, compassionate talk with your inner saboteur. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Each of us comes to know the truth in our own way, says astrologer Antero Alli. “For some it is wild and unfettered,” he writes. “For others it is like a cozy domesticated cat, while others find truth through their senses alone.” Whatever your usual style of knowing the truth might be, Leo, I suspect you’ll benefit from trying out a different method in the next two weeks. Here are some possibilities: trusting your most positive feelings; tuning in to the clues and cues your body provides; performing ceremonies in which you request the help of ancestral spirits; slipping into an altered state by laughing nonstop for five minutes. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Would you scoff if I said that you’ll soon be blessed with supernatural assistance? Would you smirk and roll your eyes if I advised you to find clues to your next big move by analyzing your irrational fantasies? Would you tell me to stop spouting nonsense if I hinted that a guardian angel is conspiring to blast a tunnel through the mountain you created out of a molehill? It’s OK if you ignore my predictions, Virgo.

They’ll come true even if you’re a staunch realist who doesn’t believe in woo-woo, juju or mojo.

irritants? Can you call on helpful spirits to ensure your life continues to thrive?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): This is the season of enlightenment for you. That doesn’t necessarily mean you will achieve an ultimate state of divine grace. It’s not a guarantee you’ll be freestyling in satori, samadhi or nirvana, but one thing is certain: Life will conspire to bring you the excited joy that comes with deep insight into the nature of reality. If you decide to take advantage of the opportunity, please keep in mind these thoughts from designer Elissa Giles: “Enlightenment is not an asexual, dispassionate, head-inthe-clouds, nails-in-the-palms disappearance from the game of life. It’s a volcanic, kick-ass, erotic commitment to love in action, coupled with hard-headed practical grist.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The fates have conspired to make it right and proper for you to be influenced by Sagittarian author Mark Twain. There are five specific bits of his wisdom that will serve as benevolent tweaks to your attitude. I hope you will also aspire to express some of his expansive snappiness. Here’s Twain: 1. “You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.” 2. “Education consists mainly in what we have unlearned.” 3. “It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.” 4. “When in doubt, tell the truth.” 5. “Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Some zoos sell the urine of lions and tigers to gardeners who sprinkle it in their gardens. Apparently the stuff scares off wandering house cats that might be tempted to relieve themselves in vegetable patches. I nominate this scenario to be a provocative metaphor for you in the coming weeks. Might you tap into the power of your inner wild animal so as to protect your inner crops? Could you build up your warrior energy so as to prevent run-ins with pesky

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “My grandfather used to tell me that if you stir muddy water it will only get darker,” wrote I. G. Edmonds in his book Trickster Tales. “But if you let the muddy water stand still, the mud will settle and the water will become clearer,” he concluded. I hope this message reaches you in time, Capricorn. I hope you will then resist any temptation you might have to agitate, churn, spill wine into, wash your face in, drink, or splash around in the muddy water.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1985, Maurizio Cattelan quit his gig at a mortuary in Padua, Italy, and resolved to make a living as an artist. He started creating furniture, ultimately evolving into a sculptor who specialized in satirical work. In 1999, he produced a piece depicting the Pope being struck by a meteorite, which sold for $886,000 in 2001. If there was ever going to be a time when you could launch your personal version of his story, Aquarius, it would be in the next 10 months. That doesn’t mean you should go barreling ahead with such a radical act of faith, however. Following your bliss rarely leads to instant success. It may take years (16 in Cattelan’s case). Are you willing to accept that? PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Tally up your physical aches, psychic bruises and chronic worries. Take inventory of your troubling memories, half-repressed disappointments and existential nausea. Do it, Pisces. Be strong. If you bravely examine and deeply feel the difficult feelings, then the cures for those feelings will magically begin streaming in your direction. You’ll see what you need to do to escape at least some of your suffering. So name your griefs and losses, my dear. Remember your near-misses and total fiascos. As your reward, you’ll be soothed and relieved and forgiven. A great healing will come.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 9–15, 2017 | 27


FEATURED STORYTELLERS 6/12, 8-10 PM H.L. HIX POETRY

THE MODERN HOTEL PRESENTS

CAMPFIRE STORIES SEASON 4 Season 4, will feature poets, ямБction writers, journalists, and storytellers sharing their original work on the Modern's beautiful outdoor patio. Beginning in June and continuing through September our storytellers will take the stage every second Monday of the month, 8-10pm.

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7/10, 8-10 PM ELENA TOMOROWITZ POETRY

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Special seasonal menu for the event by reservation. For details go to facebook.com/ModernHotelandBar or themodernhotel.com

BETHANY SCHULTZ HURST POETRY

Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 08  

Homeless people in Boise have few options to escape triple digit temperatures and unhealthy air conditions

Boise Weekly Vol. 26 Issue 08  

Homeless people in Boise have few options to escape triple digit temperatures and unhealthy air conditions