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BOISE WEEKLY JUNE 7–13, 2017

LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

VO L U M E 2 5 , I S S U E 5 1

“What the hell? We’re finally at the Oregon coast for this relaxing vacation, and we got this group of scumbags.”

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Transformative Half the World explores how refugees change—and are changed by—Boise

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Rad World

Get wise to the third annual World Village Fest

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NOISE 21

Behind theDerrick Mask Davis is The Phantom of the Opera FREE TAKE ONE!


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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Jared Stewart jared@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, Lex Nelson, Ben Schultz Interns: Sophia Angleton, AJ Black, Savannah Cardon, Elizabeth Findley Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Patrick McShea, patrick@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Bingo Barnes, bingo@boiseweekly.com Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Andy Hedden-Nicely, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance.

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2017 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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IN WITH THE OLD NEW In September 2003, I came to work for Boise Weekly as the part-time receptionist. At the time, I worked two other jobs and, though it would be a struggle to fit in a third, I was an avid BW reader and loved the idea of being part of an organization whose views so closely aligned with my own. Also, it wouldn’t be the first time. My parents worked hard, but still had to make decisions like whether to buy groceries or turn the heater on because, sometimes, they couldn’t afford both. I could spell the word “wealth” but had no intimate knowledge of it. “Work” and I, however, were tight (we’d known each other for years). A third job was no big deal, and I was thrilled at the idea of working with people who wrote for a living. In my family, writing wasn’t a job, it was a hobby. I never considered it as a career, even though I started writing in grade school (I wrote my first play at age 7). At BW, however, I discovered my work ethic and love of writing didn’t have to be mutually exclusive. I eventually quit my other jobs and, for the past 14 years—minus about 18 months when I took a sabbatical and another job before coming back to BW full-time—I have worked harder and with more satisfaction than I ever thought possible. (I will forever be grateful to then-Editorin-Chief Cynthia Sewell and still-owner Sally Freeman for the opportunity of a lifetime.) In my time at Boise Weekly, I have had almost as many titles as Friday the 13th has sequels: Receptionist, Calendar Manager, Music Editor, Arts and Entertainment Editor, Arts and Entertainment Editor Emeritus, Advertising Director, Associate Editor, Associate Publisher and, now, Editor-in-Chief. It is with conflicted feelings I say goodbye to Zach Hagadone, my coworker/teacher/sounding board/kindred spirit/heart. For him, I am overjoyed. He is on his way to achieving a longtime goal of attending graduate school, and I couldn’t be more proud. For me, I am saddened by the thought of turning the corner into the newsroom and seeing an empty (albeit much cleaner and better organized) space where my friend once sat. I have worked for almost as many editors as Amityville Horror has sequels, and their legacy is now in my hands. I will do my damndest to honor it, no matter how hard I have to work. —Amy Atkins

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Rachel Teannalach TITLE: “Kailua” MEDIUM: oil and wax on linen

MARK DY RUD

Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com

EDITOR’S NOTE

ARTIST STATEMENT: “Kailua” oil and wax on linen. Original illustrations from Rachel Teannalach’s children’s book, Paintings for Mairead, are on exhibit and available for purchase this month at Evermore Prints (780 W. Main St.). Limited edition books also available for purchase. More at teannalach.com.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

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The Idaho Foodbank kicked off its 19th year of Picnic in the Park, delivering meals to kids at parks and neighborhoods across Boise through the summer. Read more at News/Citydesk.

X MARKS THE SPOT Streets around Rhodes Skate Park in Boise will begin shutting down Wednesday, June 7 in preparation for the X Games qualifier. Get more at News/Citydesk.

PUSH AND PILL Planned Parenthood in Idaho is pushing back against a proposal from President Donald Trump that could threaten access to birth control coverage. Find out more at News/Citydesk.

#sawtoothwinery

OPINION

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OPINION THE NASTY GOD

An armageddon of empty arrogance BILL COPE If you don’t remember Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker, I understand. It’s been awhile. Yet, once upon a time, they were the cutest couple in televangelism—if we define “cute” as “cheesy.” As preachers-in-residence on the PTL (Praise the Lord) Club, they looked like a pair of Cabbage Patch dolls, with some pre-teen Basquiat applying Tammy Faye’s makeup with spray paint. We mustn’t be too hard on Tammy Faye. Cancer got her in 2007. But for more than a decade, she and Jim were superstars ministering to the camera. In 1987, the many mansions of Jim and Tammy came tumbling down. Jim was convicted of defrauding PTL out of a big hunk of money, much of it going to encourage a woman to keep her mouth shut about his having drugged and raped her. He went to prison, Tammy divorced him and the PTL Club went bankrupt. As far as this casual observer was concerned, that was the end of the story—at least, until a couple of weeks ago, when I learned Jim Bakker is once again, as the kids say, a “thing.” Yes, squishy Jimmy is back to televangelizing, alarming the gullible into buying survival rations ahead of the End Times. It’s no shock a convicted criminal would return to his old flimflamming grounds. What else would such a man do for a living, having learned early in life he had a special talent for separating rubes from their money? I learned of Bakker’s re-emergence as an evangelical presence after he remarked (about a month ago) that the resistance to Trump is kickstarting the Apocalypse. “It seems like there is a hatred among people and this is satanic,” Bakker warned. “These people mocking the president... That’s the spirit of Antichrist.” Bakker isn’t the only highly visible evangelical warning of divine wrath if Americans don’t get straight with The Donald. Pat Robertson (the troll under The 700 Club bridge) said in February, “I think ... these people are not only revolting against Trump, they’re revolting against what God’s plan is for America.” Franklin Graham showed his theological depth with this: “He [Trump] did everything wrong, politically. He offended gays. He offended women. He offended the military. He offended black people. He offended the Hispanic people. He offended everybody! And he became president of the United States. Only God could do that.” While support for Trump is not universal among evangelical leaders—the sticky web of the Southern Baptist Convention is being torn ragged by the rift between those officials who have denounced Trump and those who will abide with no criticism of him—Robertson, Bakker and Graham are decidedly with the majority BOISE WEEKLY.COM

of white evangelical voters. Trump carried their numbers with an astounding 80 percent. Since the election, analysts have been straining their brains to explain how the self-professed most righteous Americans could fall so obediently in line behind such an obscene specimen as Donald Trump. Most commonly offered excuses are their economic distress and/or innate racism. There is truth to these rationales. As one of the least educated, most intellectually challenged demographics in our nation, it is no surprise they have suffered more economic distress than the average American. Iif you can’t tolerate the idea that a great many among this population are innately racist, then I’ll leave it to you to explain why there are so few mainline Catholic, Lutheran or Unitarian neo-Nazis or Klansmen. I am convinced it goes much further. From the beginning of Trump’s campaign, it became clear the reason the evangelical horde responds so sympathetically to this travesty of a man is that they recognize in him the rot and depravity in their own depths. It’s simple: They are as awful at being humans as he is. Why are they so attracted to the most strident, uncompromising churches to begin with? Might it be they avoid the more forgiving, liberal denominations because they understand, at some instinctual level, that far from being morally superior, they are, in truth, morally inferior? Might it be that evangelicals voted for a profane bastard for president for the same reason they were drawn into the evangelical mosh pit in the first place? That they, like him, possess no inherent sense of spirituality, of what is good and what is not good? And that without some malignant authoritarian figure—be it a vindictive preacher or a vindictive president—telling them how to behave... what to think... where to put their faith... who to blame... they would be lost in the incoherent muddle and muck of their own resentments, jealousies and violent natures? Might it be so easy to sell such ethically empty vessels the lies about Obama and Hillary because they simply don’t want to believe there are people more remarkable than themselves? That the only way they can respond to the reality that others are so much smarter, so much more accomplished, so much more loving... so much more in the likeness of the God they try to claim as theirs alone... is to dim those more radiant souls down to a darkness they can comprehend? I would suspect Jim Bakker knows exactly what I’m getting at, as does Robertson and Graham. But don’t count on any of them to ever say it, as dependent as they are on that never-ending rube money. BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 5


KE L S E Y HAWES

KE L S E Y HAWES

An average 1,450 people become U.S. citizens each year at naturalization ceremonies in Boise.

World Refugee Day will be celebrated Saturday, June 17 in Boise with a naturalization ceremony in the Grove Plaza.

ALLEN R. ANSELL

HEARTACHE, SHRAPNEL AND A CHILD NAMED REMEMBER Half the World explores how Boise transforms and is transformed by refugees GEORGE PRENTICE

Shrapnel ripped through the hands, arms, chest and mouth of Refik Sadikovic in 1995.

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Some newcomers to Idaho bring heirlooms, tapestries or recipes from their homelands. Refik Sadikovic brought shrapnel. “The shrapnel reminds me of the purpose of life,” he said. “During the war, I was helping people. I didn’t want to kill anybody. Somehow I was chosen to survive.” The war was in Sadikovic’s birthplace of Vrnograc, Bosnia, among the Bosnians, Serbs and Croats. In 1992, Sadikovic was forced to join the Bosnian army but, in 1994, when he said all hope for the Bosnians was lost, Sadikovic and nearly 40,000 other refugees escaped into what he called “a no-man’s land” between the Serbian and Croatian forces. Sadikovic crossed rivers and countless minefields, was held at gunpoint by Slovenian police and sent to a refugee camp. In 1995, the shrapnel from a hand grenade ripped into his body, wounding his hands, arms, chest and mouth. Sadikovic’s tale of survival would last another five years and several more dramatic chapters before he arrived in Boise in 2000. Here, he swept streets and learned English by listening to the radio. By 2009, he was working at Micron and had received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Boise State University. Sadikovic is now pursuing a doctorate in education, curriculum and instruction. His miraculous story is only one of 10

chapters in a new book, Half the World, which chronicles some of the refugees who are now an integral part of the Boise community. The book, published by Rediscovered Books, is the eighth in the Boise State University Investigate Boise Community Research series, which has examined Treasure Valley sprawl, the recession, the local sustainable food community and the Boise connection to all things Basque. What sets Half the World apart from the previous efforts is urgency, echoing headlines from around the world concerning political and cultural debates over refugees. In “Improbable Sanctuary,” the first chapter of the book, historian/author/soon-to-retire Boise State professor Dr. Todd Shallat mentioned the Idaho town of Filer, where a pastor preached against a “Muslim refugee agenda,” calling Boise “a refugee dump” in 2015. Shallat also referred to a 2015 Twin Falls debate over a refugee resettlement center at the College of Southern Idaho and the April 2017 guilty pleas from three young male refugees in connection with an assault of a 5-year-old girl at a Twin Falls apartment complex. “And then there was this… what’s the word? Asinine. This asinine attempt by [Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter] to align himself with national hysteria over refugees,” said Shallat. He was talking about November 2015, when Otter and two dozen other governors sent a letter BOISE WEEKLY.COM


L AUR A WINS LOW

Functional & Integrative Medicine of Idaho Gail Eberharter, MD, DABMA

Certified by the Institute Functional Medicine since 2013

Karen Callagy, PA-C Amber Warren, PA-C

Emelda Nzobhampari, a native of Rwanda, is now a chocolatier at Happy Day Chocolates in Boise.

to then-President Barack Obama, demanding a halt to “rubber-stamped” immigration/refugee programs. “Do you remember that? Totally misinformed,” Shallat said. A little more than a block from the Idaho Statehouse, Boise Mayor Dave Bieter was in his City Hall office crafting a different message. “Bieter was shouting-distance away, but political light-years away, from Otter,” said Shallat. “Bieter ignited his own headlines by drafting a defiant response regarding refugees.” In a December 2016 letter to other U.S. mayors, Bieter wrote: “We don’t debate about who is more worthy or where they’re from. We are a welcoming city. We all have work to do. When it comes to immigration and refugees, presidents and Congress get to ‘say’ but mayors have to ‘do.’” In “Improbable Sanctuary,” Shallat examined the complex relationship Boise has had and still has with refugees, writing, “Both an immigrant city and an anti-immigrant city, Boise, historically had shunned prejudice but also endorsed it depending on what was at stake.” Today, Neighbors United, a Boise-based clearinghouse for refugee support services, links 30 nonprofits and 16 government agencies, and the Agency for New Americans provides case workers in 12 languages. The International Rescue Committee helps refugees become self-sustaining and the Boise Independent School District coordinates translation services in 84 languages. Shallat also helped bust three common myths regarding refugees: No. 1, that U.S. Homeland Security confirms “there is no harder way to

enter the country than as a refugee, subject to “the highest level of security check.” No. 2, “it is a fiction that refugees bleed the coffers of public assistance.” No. 3, Shallat pointed to studies that insist refugees have not displaced native workers. Rather, refugees in agricultural regions can reduce dependence on guest or undocumented workers. “The city of Boise defies red state stereotypes,” Shallat concluded, and the city’s embrace of refugees “is proof that right and left, secular and religious, we share common goals, even for different political reasons.”

TELLING EMELDA’S STORY Recent Boise State graduate Laura Winslow is a citizen of the world. Born in Copenhagen, she holds dual citizenship in Denmark and the U.S. and was anxious to study in America. She earned degrees in marketing and sociology but takes particular pride in her contribution to Half the World. “She’s a beautiful writer,” said Shallat, eliciting a smile from Winslow, who was within earshot. Winslow said interviewing the main subject for her essay, “Leave One to Remember,” was particularly daunting—requiring as many as three people to interpret Swahili into French, into English and back again. “When I first started working on this chapter, it gave me the opportunity to do some real sociological work,” said Winslow. “I love the idea of humanity. I met Emelda, and she is quintessentially innocent. Her story begins when she was a child.” Emelda Nzobhampari, 27, works as a 8 chocolatier at Happy Day Chocolates—

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 7


part of a job readiness program from Boise-based Full Circle Exchange. She has come a long way since 1994. Nzobhampari hasn’t seen her parents since then, when they left her with grandparents in a Rwandan village. Those grandparents were killed soon after by rebels in a war that, by May 1994, The New York Times reported, prompted a slow march of Rwandan refugees into Tanzania more than 10 miles long. Nzobhampari, then 5-yearsold, wandered her war-torn corner of the world, alone, for years—until 2005, when the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees began a file to help determine her fate. At first, Nzobhampari thought she might be resettled to Australia but, in 2006, the Tanzanian government began pushing Rwandan refugees back to Rwanda. “We were told to go back to where we came from, that we were no longer welcome,” she said. In her essay chronicling Nzobhampari’s journey, Winslow wrote: “Everyone she [knew]—her friends, her family, all of the people she used to see around her—was dead.” While in still another refugee camp, Nzobhampari met Emmanuel. They attended worship services together, became friends and fell in love. One day, United Nations officials posted a list at the camp naming those selected to be resettled. Nzobhampari’s name was on the list. Emmanuel’s name wasn’t. By then, Nzobhampari was expecting the couple’s child. “We wanted to get married,” she told Winslow. “We didn’t have time.” The baby boy, named Remember, was born in July 2014. One year later, Nzobhampari and Remember arrived in Boise. “Emmanuel, who has since been resettled to Canada, calls Emelda every day,” Winslow wrote. “The two hope to find a way to be together.” 7

TEFF LOVE Emily Fritchman is a Boise native. In the fall, she’ll begin her senior year at Boise State with a double major in history and English. At 21, she’s the youngest contributor to Half the World. Nonetheless, she’s already a published author. Fritchman’s work appeared in Forgotten Stories of the Boise Valley, published in 2016, in which she wrote about visiting a gold mine in the nowabandoned town of Pearl, Idaho. “But the story I worked on this past year is about something called teff, described as a tiny golden-brown grain that can give an Ethiopian injera flatbread a tangy sourdough-like taste,” Fritchman said. “It’s a native species of grass in Ethiopia.” Yordano Refu, an Ethiopian refugee who was resettled with her family to Boise, is what Fritchman called “a teff connoisseur.” Today, she works for one of the largest teff exporters in the U.S.—a farmer and biologist from the Boise Valley. Wayne Carlson was a Red Cross volunteer in Ethiopia during the 1970s. His experiences inspired him and his wife Elizabeth to relocate to the Boise Valley where they studied the climate, worked in the seed industry and bought a fiveacre farm. Soon, they were growing teff. That led Fritchman to Kibram Milash, another refugee from Ethiopia. Escaping extreme poverty and violence in his home country, Milash resettled to Boise in 2013, working as a janitor, taxi driver and barista before he secured a business loan. Milash opened a kiosk in the Boise International Market, but his entrepreneurial dream went up in smoke—literally—when a fire gutted the market in September 2015. Starting over, Milash opened Kibrom’s Ethiopian and Eritrean Restaurant on State Street in Boise. Teff grown at Carlson’s Canyon County farm regularly fills the pantry of Milash’s restaurant.

HALF THE WORLD: EXCERPTS FROM A NEW BOOK ABOUT REFUGEES IN BOISE “‘My shrapnel reminded me of the purpose of life. I believe that if you do good things in life, you will be protected. Because during the war I was helping people: I didn’t want to kill anybody, because I felt like if you kill anybody, even if that person is your enemy, it will come back somehow to bite you. Somehow, I was chosen to survive and I am here to share my story. My body was full of shrapnel, 15 wounds, and miraculously I survived. “‘I always think about that shrapnel, and so many foreign bodies that are inside, and at peace with me. And people ask if I feel anything. No, I don’t! I never felt anything, and even though some of the shrapnel pieces broke my bones, they don’t bother me. “‘This is why whenever I talk with refugee students in high schools, I encourage them. I say “Look, I came to America and I didn’t go to an American high school. I was able to finish college 8 | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | BOISEweekly

“I do not feel ashamed to ask for anything,” he said. “In America, everything has a solution.” Fritchman also spent some time in the Northwest home of the Refu family where, she wrote, “food is ceremony, a cultural bond.” “If you know an Ethiopian, you have eaten teff injera,” Refu said. “I think of teff and injera as doors that lead to questions and discussions, bringing cultures together.”

BOISE PUSHES BACK AGAINST STATEHOUSE HYSTERIA Half the World concludes with a chapter written by Dr. Errol Jones, professor emeritus at Boise State and winner of the city of Boise biennial award for excellence in civic contribution to history and the arts. Jones wrote of what

and now I’m getting my doctorate. I had to work much harder, because writing was much harder for me than for somebody who attended an American high school. “‘The only English I knew was from TV, and from listening to the NPR radio in my truck during my work. As somebody who is from a different country, I felt like if I didn’t know something, people will judge me and laugh at me. If an American doesn’t know how to spell, that’s fine; but if a foreigner doesn’t know how to spell, it’s embarrassing. I felt that I had to prove my worthiness to others. But you should believe in yourself and not give up. Don’t let fear or insecurity or anything or anyone else discourage you. That is my advice.’” —Excerpted from “Chosen to Survive,” Chapter 3, Half the World “‘I told him I had no family to go to. I didn’t know anyone in Rwanda, and I can never go back there. After everything that happened in Rwanda, I’ll never go there again.’

he called external “hysteria that challenges the City of Boise’s commitment to human rights.” He pointed to a 2015 Idaho Statehouse rally of self-named “militiamen” demonstrating against refugees, and a 2016 bill in the Idaho House of Representatives that would have prohibited state courts from acquiescing to Islamic or Sharia law (the bill was ultimately blocked in the Idaho Senate). More recently, Jones referred to President Donald Trump’s repeated efforts to ban refugees from majority-Muslim nations. All of this came, Jones pointed out, as the city of Boise continues to open its arms to refugees. “Boise institutions had rejected the politics of exclusion,” Jones wrote. “Whether other Idahoans would overcome the cycle of xenophobia remained to be seen.”

“When Emelda was 16, the harassment twisted into threats of murder. The man that Emelda had once thought could be a father to her was roaring at her that he had taken her in and cared for her. Now, as he was leaving to go back to Rwanda, she had to follow him there, or he would kill her before he left.” —Excerpted from “Leave One to Remember,” Chapter 4, Half the World “For Ethiopians, Yordanos explains, food is ceremony, a cultural bond. ‘If you know an Ethiopian, you have eaten teff injera. It is a staple in most every household. In America, I think of teff and injera as doors that lead to questions and discussion, bringing cultures together.’ Food nurtures the wealth of multicultural understanding. Ethiopian seeds, transplanted to the Boise Valley, cultivate a dynamic that benefits both.” —Excerpted from “Food of the Pharaohs,” Chapter 5, Half the World

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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JUNE 7 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE GROVE PLAZA GRAND RE-OPENING—Kick off the 2017 Alive After Five season at the grand re-opening of the Grove Plaza. The party starts at 4:15 p.m. with Ned Evett, Boise’s “master of the glass-necked guitar.” Then Steve Fulton opens for headliners The Shook Twins. 4 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise, downtownboise.org. CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com. MERIDIAN PUBLIC WORKS WEEK—9 a.m.-5 p.m. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-4433, meridiancity.org/ pww.

On Stage

Calls to Artists

BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: PRINCESS BRIDE— Inigo and Westley are back this summer for an encore of Rob Reiner’s comedic fantasy. Enjoy beer and wine at this 21-plus show, or take the whole family to the June 8 screening. 7 p.m. $9 online, $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, boiseclassicmovies.com/deals.

BOISE HAWKS NATIONAL ANTHEM AUDITIONS—The Boise Hawks are looking for talented singers to belt out the national anthem before home games. All interested performers should register on the Memorial Stadium concourse at 4:30 p.m. 5-7 p.m. FREE. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

ISF: HAMLET—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Art EAGLE PLEIN AIR FESTIVAL—The week-long outdoor art festival and competition brings 50-plus painters to paint and compete in a variety of events. Through June 11. 9 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-888-9898, eaglepleinairfestival.com.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JUNE 9-10

Talks & Lectures FLOATING THE BOISE RIVER WATER TRAIL—Join Tom “Chel” Chelstrom, author of the Boise River Water Trail Guide, and master of Google Earth Gary Grimm to take a virtual trip down the Boise River. 7 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, boiseriverenhancement.org.

Animals & Pets

ERIC L ARS BAKKE- ESPN IMAG ES

WILD CARD WEDNESDAYS: IDAHO HUMANE SOCIETY—Join the Idaho Humane Society’s Nicole Post and Hank the Rescue Dog to learn about pet responsibility and dog safety, as well as information on IHS volunteer opportunities and how you and your family can get involved. 4-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Bown Crossing, 2153 E. Riverwalk Drive, Boise, 208-9728200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Food BOISE FARMERS MOBILE MARKET-WEDNESDAYS—Find the Mobile Market at U of I Extension Office (5880 N. Glenwood) 10:30-11:30 a.m., HP, Inc. (11311 W. Chinden Blvd.) noon-1 p.m., Winstead Park 1:30-2:30 p.m. and Affinity at Boise (13626 W. Baldcypress St.) 3-4 p.m. FREE. facebook. com/BFMMobileMarket.

X marks the spot.

X GAMES QUALIFIER Boise Mayor Dave Bieter had an iconic moment last summer when he stood in the middle of the newly revamped Rhodes Skate Park and told hundreds of skateboarders what it would mean to have a world-class park in their hometown. At the time, he couldn’t have known the new park would host a qualifying event for the 2017 X Games. Join some of the top skateboarders in the U.S. as they compete June 9-10 for a shot at the X Games in Minneapolis July 13-16. Roll down to Rhodes Friday for women’s and men’s elimination and BMX park elimination events. On Saturday, scope the women’s, men’s and BMX park finals. Admission is free, but special bleacher seating will be available for $20 and food trucks will be on hand. ABC will broadcast the action Saturday, June 17. Friday, 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$20. Rhodes Skate Park, 1555 W. Front St., 208-608-7600, xgames. cityofboise.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

THURSDAY JUNE 8 Festivals & Events BOISE DEPOT OPEN HOUSE—Enjoy music by the Silver Brass starting at 5:45 p.m., with free guided tour at 6:30 p.m. RSVP at eventbrite. com. There will be exhibits from the Caldwell Model Railroad Club and Historical Society; Hardwoods, Hardware and Hobbies; and the Idaho Lego User Group. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 9


CALENDAR On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: PRINCESS BRIDE—For all ages. 7 p.m. $9 online, $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, boiseclassicmovies.com/deals. COMEDIAN KERMET APIO—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ISF: WAIT UNTIL DARK—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Art ART IN THE VINES—Enjoy wine tasting in the vines while surrounded by dozens of artists painting as part of the Eagle Plein Air Festival. With music by the Van Paepeghem Sextet. A portion of art and wine sales will benefit the Idaho Jazz Society. 6-9 p.m. $25. 3

Horse Ranch Vineyards, 5900 Pearl Road, Eagle, eaglepleinairfestival. com/art-in-the-vines.

Literature AUTHOR TODD SHALLAT BOOK RELEASE—Join Boise State professor and author Todd Shallat to celebrate the release of his latest book, Half the World: Refugees Transform the City of Trees. Nearly one out of every 100 people worldwide is a displaced person seeking asylum, imperiled by famine and war. Half the World takes measure of that staggering crisis in stories from a city transformed. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks. org.

FRIDAY JUNE 9 Festivals & Events

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 9-11

FAR WEST SKI ASSOCIATION CONVENTION COMMUNITY FOUNTAIN PARTY—Drop by the renovated Grove Plaza for the Bogus Basin 75th Anniversary Celebration. Boise School of Rock and Onikari Basque Dancers will perform, with food, beer and wine available. 4-6:30 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise, fwsa.org. GINGERFEST IV—Enjoy family friendly games and contests, plus food truck grub, red beverages, beer and wine. 6-10 p.m. $3-$6. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208334-2844. WARHAWK AIR MUSEUM DRONE DAYS— Learn all about drones, how they are being used in our community and their STEM education potential. Kids 15 and younger admitted for free with paying adult. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$12. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-4656446, warhawkairmuseum.org.

WORLD VILLAGE FEST— Feel like a globetrotter without leaving town. You’ll enjoy dance, music, storytelling, poetry, film, art and food featuring multinational performing groups showcasing the full range of Idaho’s diverse communities. 4-10 p.m. FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise, worldvillagefestival.com.

On Stage COMEDIAN KERMET APIO—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. FULL DRAW FILM TOUR—Enjoy films that will truly inspire all who share the passion and pursuit of bowhunting and the outdoors. 7 p.m. $8-$48. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, fulldrawfilmtour.com. ISF: WAIT UNTIL DARK—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 10-11

Around the world in three days.

LIPSINC: ICONS, TWO DECADES OF FABULOUS—Join Idaho’s first professional female impersonation troupe for hysterical shows featuring your favorite numbers from the past 20 years and a special guest entertainer from San Francisco, the wild and wacky Cocketelia. Call for reservations; $1 from each ticket will be donated to Boise Pridefest. 8:30 p.m. $20. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-368-0405, lipsinc.net. MAHAVIA FLAMENCO AND OFF CENTER DANCE: SUMMER FLAMENCO FIESTA—8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208424-8297, mahavia.com/events. STARLIGHT: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—8 p.m. $10$25. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Art ADVOCATES FOR ART—Join Family Advocates and Artbent Productions for this dramatic immersive event. Local artists Shawn Edrington, Kris Hargis, Kristen Hill, Erika Reed and Veiko Valencia have transformed rooms in the Family Advocates building into works of art so viewers can learn more about Family Advocates and the great work they are doing in our community. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Family Advocates, 3010 W. State St., Ste. 104, Boise, 208-3453344, strongandsafe.org.

Literature BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY CLEARANCE SALE—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

STUDIO C: A PRETTY DECENT COMEDY SHOW—7 p.m. and 9 p.m. $18-$45. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com.

SUNDAY, JUNE 11

Small movies, big results.

Tour of beauty.

WORLD VILLAGE FEST

I48 FILM COMPETITION

IBG PRIVATE GARDENS TOUR

Among the definitions of “global,” the Oxford Dictionary lists “relating to or embracing a group of items, etc.; total.” It’s an apt description of World Village Fest, which is about as “global” as it gets with dozens of dance, music, storytelling, poetry, film, art and food events, all of which take place over three days at Capitol Park in downtown Boise. Presented by Global Lounge, World Village Fest will be a small world after all with dozens of multinational performing groups showcasing the full range of Idaho’s diverse communities. From Afro-pop, Americana and Basque folk; to East Indian dance, flamenco and klezmer; to Native American drum and singing, Turkish and Iranian music, and the Zack Quintana Band’s blues rock, it’s the dictionary definition of diversity—from A to Z. June 9, 4-10 p.m.; June 10, 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; June 11, 9 a.m.5:30 p.m.; FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, worldvillagefestival.com.

The idea of a 48-hour film competition wasn’t new when, 14 years ago, organizers decided Boise should give it a try and launched i48. Each June, teams write, cast, shoot, score and edit original short comedies, dramas and sci-fi short subjects in a 48-hour frenzy. Prizes and trophies are offered, but the real thrill is sharing films with friends and family on the big screen at The Flicks and The Egyptian. I48 has become so successful over the years that it spawned h-48, a horror-themed competition each October, and the i48 February challenge, which made its debut earlier this year. Soon, maybe the 48 won’t only stand for how many hours filmmakers have, but also how many related events there are. All films: June 10, 12:45 p.m. and 2:45 p.m., $5. The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton Street. Best of i48 screening and awards ceremony: Sunday, June 11, 5 p.m., $7. The Egyptian, 700 W. Main Street, 208794-1157, idaho48.org.

For 31 years, the Idaho Botanical Garden has been guiding the greenthumbed and horticulturally curious alike on walkabouts to showcase some of the premier home gardens in the Boise area. This year, the Private Gardens Tour focuses on homes built on the Boise Bench in the early 1900s, featuring old growth trees alongside modern, updated landscapes. The tour is a fundraiser for the Idaho Botanical Garden, its plants and programs, and the Lunaria Grant Program, which was established to “encourage and cultivate horticulture and related educational projects” throughout the state. With summer temperatures on the rise, it’s time to make your yard an oasis. Take the tour and be inspired. Find a map of the homes along the route at the IBG website. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; $20-$25 adv., $30-$35 door. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

10 | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR St., Boise, 208-342-5601, stmichaelscathedral.org.

Sports & Fitness ELEMENT SKATEBOARDS 25TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION DEMOS—Along with the Road To X Games regional qualifying event at Rhodes Skatepark June 9-10, Element will bring star skateboarders Nyjah Huston, Evan Smith, Julian Davidson, Mark Appleyard and Mason Silva to town for demonstrations and autograph signing. 7 p.m. FREE. Rhodes Skatepark, 1555 W. Front St., under the connector, Boise, 208-608-7600, elementbrand.com. ROAD TO X GAMES SKATEBOARD/BMX PARK QUALIFIER—11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. FREE. Rhodes Skatepark, 1555 W. Front St., under the connector, Boise, 208608-7600, xgames.cityofboise. org.

Odds & Ends ST. MICHAEL’S CATHEDRAL JUMBLE (RUMMAGE) SALE—8 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. St. Michael’s Episcopal Cathedral, 518 N. Eighth

SATURDAY JUNE 10 Festivals & Events BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove Streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. CONSERVATION IN THE CITY—Stroll through one of Boise’s premier parks and explore how conservation is happening in your community with Boise Parks and Recreation, Golden Eagle Audubon Society, MK Nature Center and others. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Kathyrn Albertson Park, 1001 Americana Blvd., Boise, bit. ly/BPRConservationIntheCity.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle, 208-4898763, cityofeagle.org/market. GENE KLEINER DAY— Help pay tribute to the extraordinary generosity of Gene Kleiner, who donated Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park to the city of Meridian and its residents. The Meridian Symphony Orchestra will perform a summer showcase of popular favorites. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, 1900 N. Records Ave., near Fairview Avenue and Eagle Road, Meridian, meridiancity.org/events. KIDS’ FISHING DAY—Families can fish without a license, make fishy crafts and learn about fish, water safety and more. Poles and tackle will be available for children, or take your own gear. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor’s Center, 13751 Upper Embankment Road, Nampa, 208-467-9278, fws.gov/nwrs. NEIGHBORHOOD BLOCK PARTY—6-9 p.m. FREE. St. John’s Cathedral, 775 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-3511, boisecathedral.org. WARHAWK AIR MUSEUM DRONE DAYS—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE-$12. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-465-6446, warhawkairmuseum.org/event/drone-days. WORLD VILLAGE FEST—10 a.m.10 p.m. FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise, worldvillagefestival.com.

LIVE COMEDY

On Stage

6 NIGHTS A WEEK

COMEDIAN KERMET APIO—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ISF: HAMLET—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. LIPSINC: ICONS, TWO DECADES OF FABULOUS—Call for reservations. 8:30 p.m. $20. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3680405, lipsinc.net.

1 1 8 E N U J

STARLIGHT: BEAUTY AND THE BEAST—8 p.m. $10-$25. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com. STUDIO C: A PRETTY DECENT COMEDY SHOW—7 p.m. and 9 p.m. $18-$45. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Art ADVOCATES FOR ART—6-8 p.m. FREE. Family Advocates, 3010 W. State St., Ste. 104, Boise, 208-3453344, strongandsafe.org. NAMPA ART COLLECTIVE: AMOR ETERNO—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Nampa’s Wall Street, alley from Front to 2nd St. S., between 12th and 13th Aves., Nampa, nampaartcollective.org.

KERMIT JUNE 21-24 PIO

A

$10 THURSDAY-SUNDAY AT 8 PM & 10:00 PM$12 FRIDAY & SATURDAY

BUY TICKETS NOW! LIQUIDLAUGHS.COM | 208-941-2459 | 405 S 8TH ST BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 11


CALENDAR WHEN MODERN WAS CONTEMPORARY: SELECTIONS FROM THE ROY R. NEUBERGER COLLECTION—The exhibition illuminates the artistic transformations that took place in the U.S. during the first half of the 20th century through a selection of masterworks by 52 of the most influential artists of the time. Through Aug. 27. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Literature THE BEAUTY OF IDAHO: BOOK RELEASE AND FASHION SHOW—Join Virginia Treat of Treats Photography to get a first look at her photo book, calendars, prints and more produced as part of the Idaho Nature Conservation Initiative. 7 p.m. $10-$20. Studio Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Ste 106, Boise, 208-917-7427, studioboise.org. BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY CLEARANCE SALE—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org. FRIENDS OF THE HIDDEN SPRINGS LIBRARY BOOK SALE—7 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Hidden Springs Village Green, 208-2292665, adalib.org/hiddensprings.

Sports & Fitness ROAD TO X GAMES SKATEBOARD/BMX PARK QUALIFIER—11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Rhodes Skatepark, 1555 W. Front St., under the connector, Boise, 208-608-7600, xgames.cityofboise.org.

Kids & Teens

FREE. Bark n’ Purr, 1036 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 503-577-6079, facebook.com/idahosaintbernardrescue.

SUNDAY JUNE 11 Festivals & Events IBG PRIVATE GARDENS TOUR 2017—The 31st edition of the Private Gardens Tour showcases Boise Bench homes built in the early 1900s that are filled with old growth trees but feature modern updated landscapes that will inspire you to reinvent your own yard. Map available online. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $20-$25 adv., $30-$35 door. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org/ events/garden-tour-2017. WORLD VILLAGE FEST—9 a.m.5:30 p.m. FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise, worldvillagefestival.com.

On Stage COMEDIAN KERMET APIO—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ISF: HAMLET—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

OPERA IDAHO ART SONG RECITAL—Join Opera Idaho’s Resident Company singers for a recital of under-produced art songs. These non-staged songs often incorporate well-known poems, seasonal themes, complex music and piano. 2:30 p.m. FREE. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-3531, 1617.operaidaho.org/wordpress.

Talks & Lectures TROY LAMBERT: MINE SITE REMEDIATION AND RESTORATION—1 p.m. FREE-$5. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-368-9876, idahomuseum.org.

Animals & Pets IDAHO’S 22 ANNUAL RATTLESNAKE AVOIDANCE TRAINING FOR DOGS—Visit the website for more info and to reserve your spot. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $50-$60. Veterans Memorial Park, 930 N. Veterans Memorial Parkway, Boise, 208-4632304, snakeavoidance.org.

MONDAY JUNE 12 On Stage STARLIGHT: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—8 p.m. $10$25. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

SAVOR IDAHO—Idaho’s premier wine and food event features delicious food served from local restaurants and wine tastings from Idaho grapes. 2-5 p.m. SOLD OUT. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

EYESPY

Odds & Ends

AUTHOR TALK WITH V.E. SCHWAB AND MADELEINE ROUX—Don’t miss this incredible opportunity to meet two of the most popular Young Adult authors around. Victoria Schwab and Madeleine Roux will discuss their new books and their creative processes. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

STARLAB PLANETARIUM—Gaze at the night sky in the middle of the afternoon inside this mobile planetarium while Amy Truska from the Whittenberger Planetarium enlightens you with fascinating facts and stories from outer space. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org/lakehazel.

Food BOISE FARMERS’ MOBILE MARKET-MONDAYS—Find the Mobile Market at Veterans Memorial Park 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Franklin Grove Apartments (4929 Franklin Road) 1:30-2:30 p.m., Heatherwood Senior Living (5277 W. Kootenai St.) 3-4 p.m. and Hidden Springs Library 5-6:30 p.m. FREE. facebook.com/BFMMobileMarket.

TUESDAY JUNE 13 Festivals & Events

Food

Literature

ANNE FRANK MEMORIAL TOURS—12:15 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3450304, wassmuthcenter.org.

On Stage

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

Kids & Teens

Food BOISE FARMERS’ MOBILE MARKET-TUESDAYS—Find the Mobile Market at Ivywild Park noon-1 p.m., Shoreline Plaza (675 S. 13th St.) 1:30-2:30 p.m., Brookdale Senior Living (739 E. Parkcenter Blvd.) 3:30-4:30 p.m. and Harris Ranch (Ranch Market, 4991 E. Warm Springs Ave.) 5-6:30 p.m. FREE. facebook.com/BFMMobileMarket.

GURU DONUTS TASTY TALES STORYTIME WITH REDISCOVERED BOOKS—10-11 a.m. FREE. Guru Donuts, 928 W. Main St,, Ste. 100, Boise, 208-571-7792, gurudonuts.com/tasty-tales.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

ISF: WAIT UNTIL DARK—8 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Workshops & Classes

AUTHOR BUCK BUCHANAN BOOK SIGNING—11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

SOLARIZE THE VALLEY WORKSHOP—Learn about installing rooftop solar on your home or business, net metering, powering your electric vehicle and Solarize the Valley’s pricing and process. Meet the local installers and get your questions answered. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Riverstone International School, 5521 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-344-9161, solarizethevalley.org.

Odds & Ends ST. MICHAEL’S CATHEDRAL JUMBLE (RUMMAGE) SALE—8 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. St. Michael’s Episcopal Cathedral, 518 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-5601, stmichaelscathedral.org.

WASSMUTH CENTER K-12 EDUCATOR SUMMER INSTITUTE: FROM HOLOCAUST TO HUMAN RIGHTS—This three-day institute for Idaho educators draws on the lessons of the Holocaust to shape the integration and examination of contemporary human rights issues in the classroom. June 13-15, 9 a.m. $50. Marriott TownePlace Suites, 1455 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter. org.

WALKABOUT BOISE WALKING TOUR—11 a.m. $12. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, preservationidaho.org/walkaboutboise-2016.

Animals & Pets IDAHO SAINT BERNARD RESCUE ADOPTION EVENT AND DOG FOOD DRIVE—11 a.m.-2 p.m. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

12 | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


342-4222 ★ 646 FULTON ★ theflicksboise.com

• cinemas • café • videos • fun

Inside: Special Events & July-September Film Schedule Additional films not listed may be shown. Check www.theflicksboise.com

Schedule is subject to change. VOL. 33, NO. 3

Opens June 16 Eleanor Coppola, (Francis Ford Coppola’s wife) is a filmmaker in her own right. She won numerous awards for her 1992 documentary Hearts of Darkness; this comedy is her first feature film. Diane Lane stars as a neglected filmmaker’s wife who finds joy and romance on a road trip in France. Alec Baldwin co-stars.

Opens June 9 Brian Cox, Miranda Richardson and John Slattery star in this drama set in June of 1944. Winston Churchill, at war with Hitler’s Germany and at odds with allies, is poised to make the biggest decision of his life. D-Day could end the war in Europe or be an unrivaled catastrophe.

Opens June 23

Opens June 9

Salma Hayek plays a healer from Mexico who clashes with a wealthy guest (John Lithgow) at a dinner party in this social comedy written by Mike White and directed by Miguel Arteta. (NR)

Daphne Du Maurier’s suspenseful novel was adapted for the screen by director Roger Michell. Sam Claflin plays Philip, an Englishman who believes his beloved cousin and guardian was murdered by the mysterious woman he married on holiday in Italy. When the young widow (Rachel Weisz) appears at the estate, Philip becomes infatuated.

“This might be the best performance Salma Hayek has ever given, her quiet, observant reserve eventually giving way to bewilderment and resolve.” BILGE EBIRI, VILLAGE VOICE

Opens June 23

Opens June 30

British auteur Ken Loach is known for exploring working class lives. Daniel Blake (Dave Johns) is a carpenter at the mercy of the welfare system who is disabled by an accident. A single mother (Hayley Squires) finds herself in similar straits. Winner of 8 international awards, including the Palme d’Or at Cannes 2016

Opens July 7

Writer-comedian Demetri Martin stars in this movie about a cartoonist grappling with his mother’s death. Kevin Kline plays his father-who is dealing with grief in a different way. Mary Steenburgen and Gillian Jacobs co-star.

Timothy Spall, Colm Meaney, Freddie Highmore, Toby Stevens and John Hurt star in a drama directed by Nick Hamm about the 2006 resolution of differences between Irish Separatists and British Loyalists after a decades long conflict.

Opens June 30

“One of Loach’s finest films.” OWEN GLEIBERMAN, VARIETY

“Winner of this year’s Narrative Feature Award at Tribeca, Dean is a hilarious, heartfelt picture.” KRISTIN KIM, COLLIDER

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Sofia Coppola adapted Thomas Cullinan’s novel set in a school for girls in 1864 Virginia. Sheltered from the outside world, their discovery of a wounded Union soldier tangles the ties of their insular society. Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning star. Winner, Best Director at Cannes Film Festival. BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 13


SPECIAL EVENTS AT THE FLICKS i48 Competition and Festival JUNE 10 AT 12:45PM & 2:45PM Join us for the Idaho Forty Eight Hour Film Competition! Teams have 48 hours to write, shoot, and edit an original 3-6 minute short film. The 14th annual “All Films” screening is Saturday, June 10th at The Flicks and the “Best of the Fest” screening and awards ceremony is Sunday, June 11th at the Egyptian. Tickets are $5.00 for The Flicks and $7.00 for the Egyptian. More information www.idaho48.org

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE

Non-credit courses, lectures and events for the intellectually curious over age 50.

Kinky Boots for Pride Movie Night

Preservation Idaho Presents Citizen Jane

Treasure Valley Food Coalition Presents “At the Fork”

JUNE 14 AT 7:00 Boise Choruses hosts the official Pride Movie Night with the crossdressing comedy. Sexy shoes and outrageous outfits highly encouraged! Sponsored by Pride Foundation, tickets are $10 in advance and at the door.

JULY 18 AT 7:00

JUNE 27 AT 7:00

Jane Jacobs was a journalist, activist and anthropologist who fought the destruction of neighborhoods in Manhattan. Ideas presented in Matt Tyrnauer’s documentary, seen through the lens of one of preservation’s greatest champions, are still applicable today. Presented by Idaho Modern, an advocacy committee of Preservation Idaho, with sponsorship from Scott and Carol McDougall, tickets are $12 in advance and at the door.

John Papaola’s film is about the way animals are raised for our consumption. Q & A with local meat producers and chefs will follow the film. Tickets are $12 and are available now at www.tugg.com/events/at-the-forkzqfw and at the door after 4:00 on June 27.

Freshwater Film Shorts presented by Engineers Without Borders JULY 23 AT 7:00 Your $10 ticket will create a clean drinking water system for Villa America, Peru. Our Local Epic-Saving Box Canyon. The Wild President, In Love with Frank (Church), Freshwater Fueling Your Every Adventure.. http://state.awra.org/idaho/

Season Tickets, k Student Tickets & Pay-per-Play Layaway available

Become a member now!

Now!

$35 osher.boisestate.edu (208) 426-1709

Robyn Kerr, Love’s Labor’s Lost (2016). * Member Actors’ Equity. DKM Photography.

www.idahoshakespeare.org or call 208-336-9221

! a m o h a l Ok ers & Rodg

cert n o C in

August 18, 20 & 21

Tickets: $24 to $48 • 387-1273 Group, Senior, Child, Military & Student discounts available. Ticket prices do not include sales tax or applicable fees.

Jewelry | Furniture | Glass 415 S. 8th Street | Downtown Boise 208.385.9337 | rgreygallery.com 14 | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | BOISEweekly

Join us for the 2017-2018 Season: L’elisir d’amore, Madama Butterfly & A Streetcar Named Desire Subscribe today for as low as $57!

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Opens July 21

Opens July 21

Comedian Kumail Nanjiani fell in love with writer Ellen Gordon (Zoe Kazan) and then had to navigate her illness, the U.S. health care system, cultural and religious differences and her parents (Holly Hunter and Ray Romano) in this true story of romance, healing and marriage.

Ethan Hawke plays Everett Lewis, a Nova Scotia recluse who hired the shy aspiring painter Maud Dowley (Sally Hawkins) as a housemaid in 1937. Aisling Walsh directs this true story from a script by Sherry White.

“A funny and tender drawn-from-life love story.” JOHN DEFORE, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Opens July 14 Molly Shannon, Alison Brie, Aubrey Plaza, Kate Micucci, Nick Offerman, John C. Reilly, Fred Armisen and Dave Franco don medieval garb for this romp set at a 14th Century convent. Based on one of the stories of the Decameron; Jeff Baena directs.

“The first two Oscar-worthy performances of 2017 belong to Sally Hawkins and Ethan Hawke.”

“A winning ensemble brings present-day attitude to Boccaccio’s irreverent sex comedy.” JOHN DEFORE, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

KAPLAN VS KAPLAN

Opens August 4 Alice Birch adapted the novella by Nikolai Leskov about a young woman sold into marriage by her father . This debut of director William Oldroyd has already won multiple awards and has jump started the career of star Florence Pugh. Christopher Fairbank and Cosmo Jarvis co-star. “This brilliantly feminist British indie film plunges a cold, sharp knife into the back of bonnet dramas.” CATH CLARKE, TIME OUT

“Winning and impassioned...” OWEN GLEIBERMAN, VARIETY

Rooney Mara plays a new widow whose recently deceased husband (Casey Affleck) is drawn back to their home to watch over her in this meditation on love, loss and the passing of time. Sonia Acevedo costars; David Lowery (Ain’t Them Bodies Saints) directs. “A film that I can guarantee you people will revisit and discuss for years to come. It’s daring, strange, and unforgettable.” BRIAN TALLERICO, ROGEREBERT.COM

Opens August 18

Opens August 4 Don’t miss Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk’s follow-up to the 2006 Al Gore climatechange documentary. The film presents new science and addresses climate deniers in government who are allowing decisionmaking to be hacked by corporate interests. (NR)

Opens July 28

Opens August 11 Jeanette Walls bestselling memoir about growing up on the road with an artistic mother and brilliant alcoholic father is brought to life by director/screenwriter Destin Cretton. Brie Larson, Naomi Watts and Woody Harrelson star.

Menashe Lustig stars as a new widower at odds with his orthodox Hasidic community that dictates a man cannot raise his son without a mother. Joshua Weinstein directs. Set in Brooklyn; in Yiddish with English subtitles. (NR)

“Striking throughout are the seemingly caught-on-the-wing moments that subtly enrich the film’s characterizations.” SLANT MAGAZINE

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 19


Season Sixty-Nine

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Opens August 18

Opens August 25

In this comedy debut directed by Matt Spicer, Aubrey Plaza stars as social media addict Ingrid, who moves to L.A. to meet Taylor (Elizabeth Olsen), her latest Instagram obsession. O’Shea Jackson Jr. shines as Dan, Ingrid’s landlord, who thinks this lunatic is adorable. (NR)

Kyle Mooney stars as an audience of one who is sad the Brigsby Bear TV show has gone off the air, so he dedicates himself to finding out how the story ends. Claire Danes, Greg Kinnear and Mark Hamill co-star in this comedic fantasy.

Winner of the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award at Sundance 2017.

“...the rare comedy – one of a very special sense of humor and a big heart.” Nick Allen, ROGEREBERT.COM

Opens August 25 In 17th century Amsterdam, a painter (Dane DeHaan) falls in love with the subject of his latest portrait (Alicia Vikander). Christoph Waltz, Judi Dench, Tom Hollander and Jack O’Connell co-star for Justin Chadwick. Tom Stoppard adapted the novel The Dream of Tulips by Deborah Moggach.

Opens September 8 Opens September 1

Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon are on the road again. Trading barbs and This Academy Award Nominee for Best Foreign Language outdoing each other with celebrity Film last year is based on the true story of Estonian impressions, they sample exotic foods fencer Endel Nelis, who fled from Soviet Secret and enjoy the country and people of Police to his homeland, where he became a P.E. Spain, to hilarious effect. Michael teacher in a small town. Kirill Käro stars. In Estonian Winterbottom directs. (NR) and Russian with English subtitles. (NR) “A jaunty, funny, entertaining personal “This well-acted, smoothly crafted drama and geographical journey, brushing up tells a story of cross-generational bonding in the face against moments of truth that can sting.” of historical oppression.” JUSTIN CHANG, VARIETY

20 | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | BOISEweekly

JASON BAILEY, FLAVORWIRE

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NOISE LIGHT IN THE DARK

Local band Ealdor Bealu releases heavy, beautiful debut album Dark Water at the Foot of the Mountain BEN SCHULTZ When Carson Russell was starting a new band, the singer-guitarist wanted a name that suited the music he and his bandmates had written. “I was really interested in ancient language, as far as having it be a part of the project,” he said. “I think the music, to me, is kind of melancholy. It’s finding happiness in sadEaldor-bealu is defined as “vital evil,” “necessary evil” or “evil in life.” That (literally) sounds about right. ness—finding light in dark, I guess.” Eventually, Russell found ealdor-bealu, an Anglo-Saxon word that captured the feeling. Obscured by the Sun. “I’ve seen definitions [of the word] as ‘vital then you walk out, and it’s gone.” “Obscured was one of the first [Boise] Water isn’t the only element that plays a evil’ or ‘necessary evil’ or … ‘evil in life,’” he bands I really liked … I remember seeing large part in how Ealdor Bealu thinks about said. “I think the idea of having something Travis early on and hoping maybe we could its music. The high deserts of Idaho and Nenegative but necessary is a really interesting play in a band someday.” vada inform the band, too. concept.” His chance came in 2014, when Mother “I think we’re all on kind of a similar The name Ealdor Bealu is well-suited. The Shipton disbanded and Russell began writing plane,” said guitarist Travis Abbott. “It’s like band’s debut album, Dark Water at the Foot what would become Ealdor Bealu songs. the barren desert makes you bored, in a way. of the Mountain (self-released, 2017), is both “When that project finished, I was listening I don’t know, when it comes to me, it just dazzling and menacing. It combines solemn to a lot of heavier stuff,” he said. “I was really makes me want to fill it with something less melodies, measured tempos, sinuous guitar influenced by Chelsea Wolfe, Earth and Mark boring … like watching a spaghetti western. lines and roaring distortion to create a sonic Lanegan. I really wanted to do things slower That sound almost subconblend of beauty and power. sciously has an influence on a lot and more thoughtful—heavy, but not in a Most of Dark Water was EALDOR BEALU DEBUT ALBUM metal sense.” of us, I think.” recorded at a house in the RELEASE The music may be heavy but the members People may not be familcoastal town of Yachats, With special local guests Red of Ealdor Bealu made sure recording Dark iar with Ealdor Bealu and its Ore. Hands Black Feet, Lucid Aisle, music—at least not yet—but the Water wasn’t. “We use a lot of samand DJ Kid Yoshida and DJ Sage. 8:30 p.m., $5. Neurolux, 111 “I was terrified the neighbors were gonna band’s roots go back to Russell pling from rivers and stuff N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, be like, ‘What the hell? We’re finally at the and drummer Craig Hawkins’ like that; we’ve done that neurolux.com. Oregon coast for this relaxing vacation, and high school days. kind of stuff from the be“We never really did a whole we got this group of scumbags,’” Collingwood ginning of it,” Russell said. said. “People reacted so positively. Everybody lot of gigs, but we were doing The house not only gave [around us] was from Boise, and it was awea lot of jamming and stuff like that,” RusEaldor Bealu members the chance to relax some because they were like, ‘You’re in a band? sell said. “We ended up getting a space at the and record for long, undisturbed stretches, Ooh!’” the coastal landscape also fit the themes of the Bomb Shelter in Boise about five or six years Collingwood and his bandmates will soon ago and really threw everything we had into album. embark on an eight-day Northwest tour, music.” “We started to see we were writing a lot Russell, Hawkins and Collingwood formed and they’re also working on new material for about water,” singer-bassist Rylie Collingwood which the Idaho landscape should provide rock band Mother Shipton with original said. “We wanted to take it back to where it ample inspiration. Ealdor Bealu drummer Alex Wargo in 2012. started, and what better place? All the water “Everything here has such an amazing abilevaporates, it goes back to the ocean, it comes Russell said he remembered being impressed ity to adapt to extreme conditions,” he said. by several Boise bands formed around that back through. It’s just cool to be in a place “There’s a lot of beauty in that.” time, including Abbott’s post-rock project, [where] you walk outside and the tide is in, BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 21


LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 7 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: SHOOK TWINS—With Ned Evett Electric Experience (4:15 p.m.), and Steve Fulton (5:15 p.m.) 6:15 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

AA5: SHOOK TWINS, JUNE 7, GROVE PLAZA After a year of downtown construction and a season at the Basque Block, the Alive After Five concert series is returning home to the new and improved Grove Plaza. The kick-off to the 2017 season will begin earlier than usual, with an official welcome to the renovated space at 4 p.m. Ned Evett will provide the tunes for the welcome ceremony, followed at 5 p.m. with the re-dedication of the Grove fountain and music from Steve Fulton Music. At 6:15 p.m., Idaho-bred/Portland, Ore.-based singer-songwriters Laurie and Katelyn Shook will headline with their ethereal, infectious brand of Americana-psychedelia-indie-folk-pop, which has earned the Sandpoint-born identical twins accolades ranging from author Neil Gaiman to USA Today and Mason Jennings. Forget potatoes, The Shook Twins are one of Idaho’s most winning exports. —Zach Hagadone With Ned Evett and Steve Fulton. 4 p.m., FREE. Grove Plaza, Eighth Street between Main and Front, downtownboise.org.

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

ZACH FORSMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

THURSDAY JUNE 8

FRIDAY JUNE 9

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ADA JO—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BILLY BRAUN—7 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DUELING PIANOS—With Jason Buckalew, Todd Sprague and Todd Dunnigan. 8 p.m. FREE. Whiskey Bar

DIVINITY ROXX—With Electric Coconut. 7 p.m. $8. The Olympic

EMILY TIPTON BAND—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—5-8 p.m. FREE. Westside Drive-In MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers OPEN MIC AND JAM—8 p.m. FREE. Eastside Tavern OUTLAW FIELD: JOHN MELLENCAMP—6:30 p.m. $70.50$75.50. Idaho Botanical Garden ROOFTOP ACOUSTIC—With Lindzey Autumn. 8 p.m. FREE. Reef SEAN HATTON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE— Smooth Avenue. 6:30 p.m. FREE$10. Idaho Botanical Garden HELLYEAH—8 p.m. $23.50-$55. Knitting Factory IAN FITZGERALD—7 p.m. FREE. High Note PHUTUREPRIMITIVE—With Psycache and Lovegunz. 10 p.m. $12 adv., $18 door. Reef RYAN WISSINGER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 XASTHUR ACOUSTIC—With Johanna Warren and Miriah. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

ANDREW SHEPPARD— 10 p.m. $5. Reef BIG D AND THE KIDS TABLE— With Left Alone, The Doped Up Dollies and Urban Outfielders. 7 p.m. $13. The Olympic BIG WOW BAND— 8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s BOISE BLUES SOCIETY: BEN RICE BAND—7:30 p.m. $15. The Playhouse CLAY MOORE TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Chandlers EALDOR BEALU ALBUM RELEASE—With Red Hands Black Feet, Lucid Aisle and DJ Kid Yoshida. 7:30 p.m. $5. Neurolux

SHON SANDERS BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar TOM TAYLOR—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TRAVIS WARD—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar WAKE THE DEAD 2017—With Midline, Childzplay, Hand of Doom and Vindicata. 7 p.m. $10. Mardi Gras

SATURDAY JUNE 10 18 STRINGS—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s BLACK STONE CHERRY—With Citizen Zero and Letters From The Fire. 8 p.m. $16.50-$35. Knitting Factory BLAZE AND KELLY—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s BREAD AND CIRCUS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CLAY MOORE TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

FRIDAY NIGHT JAM—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

COMMON GROUND COMMUNITY CHORUS: LET THE SUNSHINE IN—7 p.m. $5. First Congregational United Church of Christ

IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION LIVE AT THE BISTRO— With Buck Buchanan. 6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard-Meridian

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MUSIC GUIDE CUBBAGE—7:30 p.m. FREE. High Note ELEMENT SKATEBOARDS 25TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY—With Andrew Sheppard and L.A.-based DJ duo The Blackouts. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Visual Arts Collective FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse GAYLE CHAPMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 GORDON LIGHTFOOT—8 p.m. $45-$100. Egyptian IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION CLUBHOUSE CONCERTS—With Buck Buchanan. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall THE LIKE ITS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Fairview

MONDAY JUNE 12 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid DOUG BROWN—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND EMILLY TIPTON—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s SPENCER BATT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TUESDAY JUNE 13 ADDAM CHAVARRIA—7 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar

BAD FLOWER—With Goodbye June. 7 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. Neurolux DIRTY BOURBON BOYS—With Samm Bones and Jimmy Sinn. 9 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION LIVE AT THE BISTRO— With Wilson Roberts. 6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard-Meridian OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s REBECCA SCOTT—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar ROB HARDING—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SAMPLE SOME OF THE FINEST CRAFT BEER IN THE NORTHWEST

THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

OVER 30 CRAFT BREWERS FROM THE NORTHWEST AND IDAHO

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

The Lowest Pair

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DISCOUNTS ON ACCOMMODATIONS AT LOCAL HOTELS

RAFFLE PRICES, GREAT MUSIC, AND GREAT FOOD

June 17th, Noon to 6:00 PM—Ketchum, Idaho @ the Ketchum Town Square

For more details visit facebook.com/RotaryBrewfest OR sunvalleybrewfest.com

THE LOWEST PAIR—With Anna Tivel. 7 p.m. $8-$10. The Olympic MERIDIAN SYMPHONY FREE CONCERT IN THE PARK—7 p.m. FREE. Kleiner Park, Meridian NEW TRANSIT—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar PILOT ERROR—10 p.m. $7. Reef REBECCA SCOTT BAND—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar SPENCER BATT—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar WORLD VILLAGE FEST AFTERPARTY: EASY STARS ALLSTARS—With The Elovaters. 10 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. Neurolux

SUNDAY JUNE 11 THE DAVID GLUCK BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar IDYLTIME— 2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar JIM LEWIS— 11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid SONGWRITERS AT AVIMOR— With Brook Faulk and Emily Tipton. 4 p.m. FREE. Avimor Clubhouse. THOMAS PAUL—11 a.m. FREE. High Note WE OUT HERE—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

GORDON LIGHTFOOT, JUNE 10, EGYPTIAN THEATRE If you could read Gordon Lightfoot’s mind, you might discover how the Canadian singer-songwriter has been able to entertain audiences for nearly eight decades. Maybe you’d get a little insight into how he has written some of the most iconic songs in folk-rock history. As cool as that might be, it would be much more fun to see Lightfoot live and let hit song after hit song wash over you. Even though Lightfoot will celebrate his 79th birthday later this year, he’s still touring and performing across Canada and the U.S., including a stop in Boise on Saturday, June 10, when he and his 12-string will take the stage at the Egyptian Theatre. Not only is it impressive that Lightfoot is still touring, it’s a wonder he is still alive, let alone performing: He survived an aortic aneurysm and tracheotomy, and he was in a coma for six weeks. In his 1970 song, “If You Could Read My Mind,” Lightfoot sang: “If you could read my mind, love. / What a tale my thoughts could tell.” Soon, learning more about Lightfoot won’t require a psychic skill—The Canadian Press reported earlier this month that a muchanticipated biography on the private Lightfoot will hit bookstores this fall. —George Prentice 8 p.m., $45-$100. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208345-0454. For tickets, visit ticketfly.com or call 1-877-987-6487.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 23


CULTURE NEWS

KE L S E Y HAWES

IDAHO SHAKESPE ARE FESTIVAL

ARTS & CULTURE IN PRINT

Laura Welsh Berg presents a pitch-perfect prince.

HAMLET, THY NAME IS LAURA WELSH BERG At the June 2 production of Idaho Shakespeare Festival 2017 opener Hamlet, the audience was treated to something even diehard Bard fans may not have seen before: a female actor playing the title role. This is the first time in more than a decade ISF has staged Shakespeare’s famous tragedy, and the first time it has cast a woman as the hand-wringing Danish prince who must negotiate tortured relationships with his mother and girlfriend while plotting revenge against his murderous uncle-turned-stepfather. Laura Welsh Berg and Jonathan Dyrud will alternate portraying the prince throughout the season, and it was Berg who brought Hamlet to life opening night, capturing the brooding, baleful qualities and feverish energy of the character. Berg joins a long line of actresses playing Hamlet. In the 18th century, Charlotte Clarke and “Mrs Powell” were the first, and there have been many others HAMLET June 6, 7, 10, 14, 15, 16, since—includ20-24; 8 p.m. June 11, 18, 27; ing acclaimed 7 p.m. $27-$75. Idaho Shakecontemporary speare Festival, 5657 Warm performances Springs Ave., 208-336-9221, by Frances de idahoshakespeare.org. la Tour and Maxine Peake. This year, Berg is one of at least two women cast as Hamlet in the U.S.—the other is Lenne Klingaman, who will portray him during the July-August run of the play at the Colorado Shakespeare Festival. Seeing a woman deliver the lines “Frailty, thy name is woman” and “Get thee to a nunnery” imbues them with particular consequence and venom, and it also cuts the deja vu. Hamlet is sacred in the theatrical canon, but the 400-year-old-play is so overly familiar, much of it has become cliche over time, with few surprises as actors deliver iconic line after iconic line: “To be, or not to be” is buried so deep into pop culture, it can feel at odds with the thoughtful speech it initiates. Berg in the role of Hamlet is enough to once again pull in audiences and loosen the play from the grip of popular understanding. It’s a chance to see Hamlet with new eyes—and it doesn’t get much more modern than that. —Harrison Berry 24 | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | BOISEweekly

Why and how downtown bookstore Rediscovered Books is getting into the publishing business HARRISON BERRY Rediscovered Books nearly doubled in size after an expansion in 2015, which allowed the downtown Boise shop to host literary events and book release parties with ease. It has paid off: This week, the bookstore is hosting a special release party to celebrate a new local book and announce a foray into the world of publishing, as well. “We’re looking at publishing two to three hyperlocal history books a year for kids, teens or adults,” said Laura Delaney, co-owner of Rediscovered. The release party for Half the World: Refugees Transform the City of Trees is at Rediscovered on Thursday, June 8. A panel of authors, contributors, and book editor and former Boise State University Professor Todd Shallat will discuss issues brought up in the book, answer questions and sign copies. The Delaneys and others at the store said though Half the World is a history text, it touches on contemporary issues near and dear to Boiseans. The collection of Boise refugee narratives will be a test run for the freshly minted imprint of Rediscovered Publishing. Rediscovered Books has fronted the printing fees for the title, and its success or failure will be a lodestone as the store prepares to take on full publishing responsibilities for future books, which will include fielding pitches, editing, fact-checking, design, marketing and distribution. Profits from the distribution of Half the World will go toward funding future Rediscovered Publishing titles, though Delaney and her husband Bruce didn’t tip what the first fully in-house published title will be or when it will be released. Half the World—the eighth entry in the Boise State Investigate Boise Community Research Series—will be the last entry edited by Shallat, who said Amanda Ashley, assistant professor of the Department of Community and Regional Planning, will take the helm going forward. According to a Boise State Public Policy Survey published in January, the City of Trees is the friendliest region of Idaho for refugees: 63.8 percent of residents favoring resettlement in the Boise area. When The New York Times crunched the numbers in 2016, more Syrian refugees had relocated to Boise than New York and Los Angeles combined.

Rediscovered Books—a longtime downtown Boise destination for bibliophiles—plans to publish two to three “hyperlocal history books” each year for audiences ranging from kids to adults.

Refugees became a hot topic in Idaho in 2015, when a ballot initiative appeared in Twin Falls County that would have banned refugee centers there—notably the College of Southern Idaho Refugee Center—as the still-raging Syrian civil war displaced millions from their homes. The ballot measure failed, but Half the World is a testament to local interest in the issue (see Page 6). It’s also the kind of book the Delaneys said flies off the shelves at their store. They said Rediscovered Publishing will fill a gap in demand for quality local publications left by large and medium-sized publishers. Books on local history have landed among the top-10 bestselling titles at the store for the last five years. Surviving Minidoka: The Legacy of WWII Japanese-American Incarceration by Shallat and Russell M. Tremayne, which accompanied the October 2016 Boise Art Museum exhibition Minidoka: Artist as Witness, was a top seller last year. Other local titles that have cracked the top-10 sellers list at the store have included the short story collection Naked Me by Christian Winn,150 Boise Icons to Celebrate the City’s Sesquicentennial by Anna Webb and Stanley F. Steiner’s P Is For Potato: An Idaho Alphabet. Boise author Anthony Doerr’s Pulitzer Prize-winning All the Light We Cannot See appeared on the top-10 bestseller lists at Rediscovered Books in 2014 and 2015. Driving demand are two kinds of customers, according to Bruce: travelers buying souvenirs and locals curious about what’s in their backyards. A handful of organizations, like TAG Historical Research, which has published titles like Legendary Locals of Boise and South Boise

Scrapbook: A Neighborhood History; the Boise City Department of Arts and History and the Images of America series by Arcadia Publishing, have dipped their toes into the local history market. The Delaneys said they can do the same without stepping on too many of them. “For every book that’s being done, there’s 10 books that aren’t,” said Bruce. “If we’re going to do this, we should look at doing that hyperlocal history. That was the genesis of what we’re doing.” Rediscovered Books is following in the footsteps of other small bookstores that have diversified into publishing. City Lights Booksellers & Publishers in San Francisco is perhaps the most famous. It was the first all-paperback bookstore in the country when it was opened by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Peter Martin in 1953, and began publishing its Pocket Poets series in 1955. One of the Delaneys’ primary models is Biblioasis in Windsor, Ontario. Opened in 1998, it began publishing collections of poetry in 2004 and has since established an impressive stable of award-winning authors. It also expanded its enterprise to include novels, short story collections and more. In 2015, two Biblioasis titles—Arvida by Samuel Archibald and Martin John by Anakana Schofield—were nominated for Scotiabank Giller prizes. The Delaneys would like to recreate the success of Biblioasis but, for now, they’re limiting publishing to history and other non-fiction topics. “Every store does something different,” Bruce said. “We see what people come in every day and ask us for. … We can say people came in asking for this sort of thing.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


COURTESY AMERICAN FEDER ATION OF ARTS

ARTS & CULTURE

IDAHO FORTY EIGHT HOUR FILM COMPETITION

AND FESTIVAL “All Films” Festival the Flicks Theatre Sat. June 10th, 2:45pm & 12:45pm “Best of the Fest” screening & awards ceremony Egyptian Theatre / Sun. June 11 , 5pm Among the pieces in When Modern Was Contemporary are (left) Old Gold Over White by Mark Rothko and (right) Number 8 by Jackson Pollock.

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Filmmaker After Party Saint Lawrence Gridiron Sun. June 11, 7pm For screening times and ticket info visit

Idaho48.org

Renowned When Modern Was Contemporary exhibition makes its Northwest U.S. debut in Boise ALE X ANDRA NEL SON

and work with materials, colors and mediums in If you had 107 years to live, how would you new ways to depict their subjective experiences spend it? Roy R. Neuberger, a New Yorker born rather than the religious or mythological scenes in 1903, chose to become a patron of the arts. Seven years after his death in 2010, his collection often commissioned by wealthy patrons prior to the 19th century.” of masterworks by 52 of America’s best known However, when Neuberger began seriously modern artists will make its Northwestern debut collecting art in 1929 after a trip to Paris, the at the Boise Art Museum, in an exhibition that runs Saturday, June 10 through Sunday, Aug. 27. term “modern art” hadn’t yet been coined. The exhibition, titled When Modern Was Con- Instead of important figures, the artists he patronized were simply the new kids on the block, temporary: Selections from the Roy R. Neuberger making European-inspired art that didn’t yet Collection, features works by Jackson Pollock, have a definition. Georgia O’Keeffe, Alexander “This was a pivotal time in Calder and Mark Rothko WHEN MODERN WAS CONTEMart history and in American hiswho were under-recognized PORARY: SELECTIONS FROM THE ROY R. NEUBERGER COLLECTION tory,” BAM Executive Director in Neuberger’s day. In hindJune 10-Aug. 27 Melanie Fales said. Neuberger sight, these artists are seen as Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis captured it in “one of the most key figures in the canon of Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuprestigious American collections modern art (1860s-1970s). seum.org. of art,” she added. According to the Museum Fales worked with the of Modern Art, “modernism and modern art can be traced back to the Indus- American Federation of Arts to bring the 52 works, drawn from the Neuberger Museum of trial Revolution, a period that lasted from the 18th to the 19th century, in which rapid changes Art in New York, to Boise, ensuring BAM the honor of hosting the collection on its inaugural in manufacturing, transportation, and technology profoundly affected the social, economic, and Northwest U.S. visit. “Typically these works were collected on cultural conditions of life in Western Europe and North America. Artists began to explore dreams, the East Coast, they were displayed on the East symbolism, psychology and personal iconography Coast, and they really did not have widespread BOISE WEEKLY.COM

viewing throughout the United States,” said Fales. “This work really would not be accessible to people in Idaho unless they were to travel to much larger metropolitan areas. So from that standpoint, it was important to us to bring this caliber of work and the level of importance of these 20th century influential artists to our Idaho community.” Although the exhibition doesn’t officially open until June 10, art buffs keen to examine the art in advance can attend an opening celebration at BAM on Friday, June 9, starting at 5:30 p.m. A selection of archival materials relating to Neuberger’s collection—including original receipts of his art purchases, and the albums presented to him on his 50th and 75th birthdays by the artists he patronized—will be on display alongside the masterworks. Plus, an illustrated catalogue of the exhibition will be for sale in the BAM store. Fales hopes BAM visitors take a moment to appreciate how art and the way we consider it evolves over time, and how one man’s dedication to the work of his contemporaries can help preserve an entire movement. “You really only get to see these [works] in the art history books these days,” Fales said. “So it’s pretty exciting to have them here in Boise. I’m thrilled about every single one of them.” BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 25


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New film about British icon Winston Churchill looks at the man, not the legend GEORGE PRENTICE Churchill, a new biopic of one of the greatest 20th century leaders, is a good film. It’s a cigar length away from greatness, but it’s still better than most of the movies out this year. Churchill features a towering performance from Brian Cox (Deadwood, Super Troopers, Rise of the Planet of the Apes) in the title role, and three jolly good turns from John Slattery as U.S. General Dwight Eisenhower, James Purefoy as King George VI and Miranda Richardson as Clementine, Churchill’s iron-willed wife. A word of caution: Churchill is not an epic chronicling the statesman’s life, sweeping across time from battlefields to the ballot box. Instead, author/historian/screenwriter Alex von Tunzelmann wrote a nuanced screenplay dialing down much of Churchill’s bombast and portraying him as a man struggling to muster courage while wrestling with his own failings. In the hands of director Jonathan Teplitzky, who helmed the underappreciated The Railway Man, Churchill may be the perfect film for our times. With the current state of affairs in the world being tested by the winds of war, Churchill is a reminder that saber-rattling is a fool’s errand and war is not a place for amateurs. The film is a

Brian Cox dials down the bombast of Enligsh Prime Minister Winston Churchill for a nuanced portrait of courage.

snapshot of three days in June 1944, when Allied forces were mulling something called Operation Overlord—the world would soon know the operation, on the sixth hour of the sixth day of the sixth month, as D-Day. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill is against the plan. Repeatedly pleading with Allied Commander Eisenhower and British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, Churchill balks at the massive attack on the French seaside, fearing a repeat of his own Gallipoli Campaign in 1915, when Churchill—then the British first lord of the Admiralty—landed troops in Turkey in one of history’s bloodiest conflicts. Eisenhower, whose repeated debates with Churchill over the D-Day invasion become increasingly heated, explains if the invasion doesn’t go as planned, the Allied effort might fail entirely. “If we don’t win this, I don’t know what kind

of world we’ll be left with,” Eisenhower tells Churchill. It’s not enough for the British leader, still obsessing over his previous loss in Gallipoli. “I send men to die. Hundreds, no thousands of them. Their blood soaks my hands,” says Churchill. Meanwhile, sitting quietly nearby, a woman can no longer hold her silence. “I thought you were the bravest man in England,” she tells Churchill, tears streaming down her face. “My fiancee is on one of those ships for Operation Overlord. I don’t want to hear that he’ll be dead, and I don’t want to hear it from you.” What follows is in the history books. Churchill, the movie, isn’t about the D-Day invasion. It’s about one man’s courage and conviction. That should be enough for now.

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An entire subgenre of American pop culture specializes in the military spoof; and, from Joseph Heller’s iconic Catch 22, to Stripes, 1941, Dr. Strangelove and Hot Shots, the battlefield is littered with comedies (good, bad and biting) mining the tragedy of war and, often, the ineptitude of those who wage it. Now comes War Machine (Netflix, May 26), starring Brad Pitt as Gen. Glen McMahon, a fictionalized version of four-star Gen. Stanley McChrystal—the former commander

of international forces in Afghanistan. McChrystal, who enjoyed an otherwise illustrious military career, resigned in 2010 following a scandalous expose published in Rolling Stone revealing widespread disdain for then-President Barack Obama and other officials in the administration. The picture painted in the piece, by freelance journalist Michael Hastings, was of a hubristic warfighter surrounded by officers more loyal to their boss than civilian leadership. War Machine, written and directed by David Michod, was based on Hastings’ book The Operators, and

tees off in the months preceding the magazine profile as a reporter Sean Cullen (a fictional Hastings played by Scoot McNairy) bears witness to the off-kilter general and his staff. “Off-kilter” would be a good way to describe the movie as a whole. It’s more goofy than incisive, relying too much on Pitt’s physical performance, which combines Jeffrey Goines in 12 Monkeys with Lt. Aldo “The Apache” Raine from Inglourious Basterds. While the tragicomedic theme is well taken, it never rises to the level of sophistication necessary for satire. The exception is Sir Ben

Kingsley, whose portrayal of former Afghan President Hamid Karzai is a spot-on send up of the crafty leader, whose half-assed power position gets closest to striking at the dark heart of the Afghan mess. “You have my approval, general,” Karzai tells McMahon when asked for permission to conduct an operation. “We both know it was never really mine to give, but… I thank you for inviting me to participate in the ‘theater’ of it all.” Too bad the rest of War Machine couldn’t have been as theatrical. —Zach Hagadone BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOOZEHOUND

CITIZEN DERRICK DAVIS

You are only the third African-American actor to wear the mask of the Phantom. You must embrace that piece of history. It’s a weighty responsibility and a huge honor. I’m just so grateful to the company and creative team for being as open-minded as they are in so many respects, but specifically for allowing somebody of color to take this role, based solely on their ability to tell the story. I’m thinking of the young boys and girls of all colors who come to your show, see you center stage and then get a chance to meet you backstage or ask for an autograph. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

PHY

Can I assume your professional roads have led you to the Phantom, probably the greatest musical theater role for an actor? I studied music in high school straight through college. I started in opera but began auditioning for musical theater, my first love. I did regional productions and was eventually cast as Mufasa in The Lion King on tour, in Las Vegas and eventually on Broadway. That ultimately led me to this role.

MUR

Derrick Davis remembers the first musical he saw when he was a young boy living in New York City. It was the newly opened Broadway smash The Phantom of the Opera, and Davis knew in an instant what he wanted to do with the rest of his life. He started singing in a church choir, studied opera at Long Island University and began auditioning for professional productions. Davis has since performed on stages across the U.S., and opera, concerts, television and film performances are all on his resume. From 2012 through 2016, he performed in The Lion King, both on Broadway and in the touring production, and recorded his first album, Life Music (CD Baby, 2015). Currently he’s the man behind the mask in the title role of The Phantom of the Opera, which is touring across North America and will stop at the Morrison Center, Wednesday, June 14 through Sunday, June 25.

THEW

GEORGE PRENTICE

M AT

On The Phantom of the Opera, his historical performance and the ‘music of the night’

When I see young people coming to the stage door or connecting with me on social media, it warms my heart because I know what seeing Phantom did for me and my own journey. It’s a privilege to do that for someone else. We were in Atlanta when a mother, an AfricanAmerican woman, brought her son to the stage door. The mother was in hysterics and grabbed her son by the shoulder and said, “Look at him. Look at his face. Now you know, you can do anything.” Moments like that constantly remind me of the responsibility that I have, not only to tell the story but to be an example to generations that will come after me. I must admit that I haven’t seen The Phantom of the Opera since it opened in London in 1986. It’s my understanding your production is “re-imagined.” There’s a lot more realism in this production. The characters are fleshed out in a much more grounded and less mystical way, and in the 30 years since this musical opened, technology has moved forward in great strides— especially the pyrotechnics, lighting and sound design. The new set design is… well, it’s mindblowing. I don’t want to give too much away. Promise me the new production still has a giant chandelier that comes crashing down. I promise you that there’s absolutely a chandelier. Trust me, you’ll get your money’s worth. Can you put us in the moment of the iconic scene as the Phantom sings “Music of the Night?” The Phantom is disfigured, but he’s also a musical savant and architectural genius. In many ways, he operates on sound, almost like a bat, by not relying on the senses of sight, taste or touch. For him, it’s all about what you hear, especially in the dark. In the moment that he sings to his protege, Christine, he’s leading her to experience life by not using the senses we would normally use above ground or in the daylight, but to feel life through sound and, ultimately, the music of the night.

THE FRENCH 75 The canon de 75 modele 1897 was a 75-millimeter piece of artillery invented by the French and employed by France and its allies in World War I and II. The cannon was quick firing, mobile and carried a punch, capable of launching a 12-pound shell at targets more than five miles away. Its use at the First Battle of the Marne in September 1914 cemented its reputation, where it earned the grim nickname “Black Butcher” from soldiers of the Kaiser. About 12 years after its murderous performance at the Marne, legendary publican Harry MacElhone, owner of Lost Generation haunt Harry’s American Bar in Paris, is said to have bestowed the honorific “French 75” on a mixture of gin, simple syrup and lemon juice, shaken and poured into a chilled flute, then topped with champagne. As the writers at ginfoundry.com put it, “The gun was known for its accuracy and speed, and the French 75 is said to have such a kick that it felt like being hit by just such a weapon.” Ginfoundry.com goes further, tracing its origins as far back as Dickens’ England, when gin was king and the author himself was known to serve it mixed with bubbly to his guests. Charles Dickens, the French Army and Harry are enough recommendation for us. We mixed our French 75’s with the reasonably priced $19.95 Boodles London Dry Gin (first distilled in 1845, when Dickens was 33) and Schloss Biebrich sekt sparkling wine ($5.99 at Trader Joe’s and a nod to the Jerries who fell to the Black Butcher at the Marne). BOTTOMS UP There’s a lot of hype around the French 75—the cocktail even makes an appearance in Casablanca—all of it well earned. Objectively, though, it violates all the rules of responsible drinking: mixing wine with liquor, the inclusion of sugar syrup and carbonation, and the only mixer is lemon juice. In a case of “you have to know the rules to properly break them,” the resulting combination is light, lively and only semi-sweet. Plus, it has an added bonus of icy citrus-tinged bubbles, which refresh as the gin warms and relaxs. However—and this is a big one—it’s important to remember the French 75 is named for a weapon capable of hurling 15 rounds per minute, so consider no more than two rounds an hour with its liquid counterpart.

hats for sale at the Boise Weekly Office. $12 + TAX benefiting the WCA.

—Zach Hagadone BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 27


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NYT CROSSWORD | ADVICE TO WRITERS ACROSS

27 Lo ____ 29 So 30 Contractor’s guidelines 33 Writing tip No. 2 38 Yearn for 39 Unlike the wind 40 Lead-in to guess or game 41 Got up there 42 Balneotherapy site 45 Bi- and bi-? 48 Train part

1 Drawing tool 8 One not acting alone 14 Literally, “great O” 19 Ackbar’s rank, in “Star Wars” films 20 Relating to an eye layer 22 What fan fiction is not 23 Writing tip No. 1 25 Accessory 26 Plant anew 1

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49 Writing tip No. 3 54 Relating to a major vessel 55 Hexagonal state 56 Invalidate 59 Restaurant chain with a flag in its logo 62 Band aids 65 Make suitable for indoors, as a plant 67 Home of Ithaca, Athens and Olympia 10

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94 ____ group (structure found in proteins) 95 Old English letter 96 Shoot the breeze 97 Turn on 101 4,840 square yards 103 Cylinder-shaped pasta 104 Writing tip No. 6 109 Regarding 110 Large Hadron Collider org. 111 Hoity-toity sort 112 Became adept in 114 1983 Michael Keaton title role 116 Writing tip No. 7 123 Operative 124 Less watertight 125 Energetic pooch 126 Graph parts 127 Knights’ needs 128 Primes

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68 Writing tip No. 4 74 They go from town to town: Abbr. 75 That, in Tijuana 76 Ed.’s request 77 Cell parts 78 “Uh-huh” 80 German auto co. 82 Flew off the handle 85 Writing tip No. 5 93 Bill Clinton or Barack Obama

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BY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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1 Give the ax 2 Poem of homage 3 2005, to Cato 4 Ring bearers, maybe 5 Bring in 6 Droops 7 It “knits up the ravell’d sleave of care,” per Macbeth 8 Doctrines 9 Atop, poetically 10 RR stop 11 Up to 12 Jungian inner self 13 Knocked to the ground 14 Andean tuber 15 Like the movies “Brian’s Song” and “Sharknado” 16 Circumvention 17 It uses the PageRank algorithm 18 Irritates 21 Classic camera brand 24 Prefix with liberal 28 Vice President John ____ Garner 30 Digitize, in a way

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boiseclassicmovies.com 31 Bounce along, in a way 32 Anticipatory days 34 Gala 35 Where to find some very wet sponges 36 Gives in confidence 37 Gosling of “La La Land” 42 Tried 43 Favorite 44 Santa ____, Calif. 46 Templeton from “Charlotte’s Web,” e.g. 47 Visibly awed 50 “Me, neither,” formally 51 Refuse to talk, with “up” 52 Conductance quantities 53 Like a good proof 57 “Makes sense” 58 ____ Day (June event, informally) 59 Not needing a cane, say 60 Commanded 61 Syria’s Bashar al-____ 63 Person of note? 64 Fee-free spot, briefly 66 Unruly hair, metaphorically 69 Jacob’s twin 70 Composer of many patriotic tunes 71 Conveyor part 72 Course part 73 Something tacky to hang on the wall? 79 Stroke of luck? 81 Bill Clinton or Barack Obama, informally 83 It’s mined, all mined! 84 Stayed on the shelf 86 Homework lover, maybe 87 Military stints

88 Like some audiobooks 89 Romance writer Roberts 90 “Yikes!” 91 When repeated, an old sitcom catchphrase 92 Leave in 97 Character that goes “waka, waka, waka …” 98 Exceed 99 Wriggled 100 Punitive 102 Goes in 103 Gently towel 105 Peace signs 106 W.W. II danger 107 Cape ____ 108 Early days 113 Patella site 115 Much of W. Virginia

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Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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117 Mike’s confectionery partner 118 Dungeons & Dragons piece 119 Like William Carlos Williams’s wheelbarrow 120 Actress Peeples 121 Ron of the Dodgers 122 ’17 and ’18

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: DOUGLAS RICHARD BERGNER Legal Names Case No. CV 01 17 06773 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of DOUGLAS RICHARD BERGNER now residing in the City of Garden City, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Douglas Tiny Stark. The reason for the change in name is: I don’t want my father’s name or his family name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) June 20th, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date May 10. 2017 CHRISTOPHER D RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB May, 17, 24, 31 & June 7

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: MAIRA PAZ FERNANDES Legal Names Case No. CV 01 17 07928 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Maira Paz Fernandes now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Mayra Guadarrama. The reason for the change in name is: my name was misspelled on my birth certificate and I got married. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) July 25th, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date May 12. 2017 CHRISTOPHER D RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT NICOLE SHOCKLEY

DEPUTY CLERK PUB May. 17, 24, 31 & June 7 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: RICHARD ERIC NIELSEN Legal Names Case No. CV 01 1706861 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of RICHARD E NIELSEN now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Richard Eric Wilson. The reason for the change in name is:So my S.S. + Drivers License match. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) July 11th, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date May 25. 2017 CHRISTOPHER D RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB May. 31, June. 7, 14 & 21 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: JOSUE ISAI HERNANDEZMANTEMAYOR JAZMIN ARAHI HERNANDEZMONTEMAYOR Legal Names Case No. CV 01 1708864 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Josue Isai Hernandez-Montemayor and the name of Jazmin Anahi Hernandez-Montemayor, all minors now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The names will change to Isai Hernandez; Jazmin Anahi Hernandez. The reason for the change in name is: The names are to long and are having trouble all the time at drivers license + school. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) August 15th, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date May 30. 2017 CHRISTOPHER D RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB June. 7, 14, 21 & 28

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DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

* Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES

BILLY: I spent my first month here scared in a drawer, but I have blossomed into a flirty boy.

LOIS: I can be a bit crotchety, but really I’m a sweet gal who loves attention.

TOOTSIE: I’m a beautiful little snuggle bug who would love to shower you with purrs and cuddles.

We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

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ABBY: 1 ½-year-old, female, Siberian huskyboxer mix. Gentle, sensitive, loving, playful, shy best in a home with adults and older children. (Kennel 417–#35401154)

SARAH: 1-year-old, female, domestic mix. Bends and contorts while receiving scratches. Happiest around people. Playful and affectionate. (Kennel 14–#35468382)

DAISY: 9-year-old, female, golden Lab mix. Loves hugs, gentle, easy going, good leash manners. Gets along with children, cats and dogs. (Shelter D Kennel 2 –4908932)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 29


PAGE BREAK $GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH JUST DESSERTS

DEAR MINERVA, I love summer parties with my friends. Every time we have a function where we are all supposed to contribute food and drink, one of our friends always does something tacky. It makes me unreasonably angry. He will bring something to the party to share—usually some kind of dessert item we’d eat later. He then consumes the food and drink everyone else brought but inevitably has to leave early, taking dessert with him. It seems like poor manners to me. What does Boise’s Blonde Bombshell say? Sincerely, —Over Him

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FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

KUHN RIKON CORN ZIPPER The word “zipper” isn’t usually in such close proximity to “corn” (or any other vegetable). The Kuhn Rikon Corn Zipper, with the corn-on-the-cob design on the handle, is such a great kitchen utensil, we don’t care what it’s called. The Swiss-designed Zipper, made of stainless steel and a durable plastic handle, cleanly and quickly strips cooked kernels from the cob. It sells for about $12 at multiple retailers; but the best deal, $22, includes the zipper and an accompanying pack of 18 heat-resistant corn holders that can be screwed into ears of corn even before putting them in boiling water. The $12-$22, Zipper and holders are all dishwasher safe. kuhnrikonshop.com A rose by any other name is still a rose. The Kuhn Rikon Corn Zipper by any other name is still one of the coolest new gadgets around. Check out the video of the Zipper in action at kuhnrikonshop. com. —George Prentice Taken by instagram user bayleecolton.

DEAR OVER HIM, It is poor form to bring food to share and then take it back if it isn’t consumed while one is at the party, but there may be a good reason for this behavior. Perhaps it was his raising. Maybe he has financial issues and needs the food. Maybe he’s selfish. Etiquette dictates food brought to an event should be left with the host(ess) of the party unless they request people take things home. Sharing is a virtue held in high regard, but often it is something people miss the mark on. While it is bad manners for him to take the food to go, it would be even worse to point out his faux pas at the party. The first and most important tenet of hospitality is making sure your guests feel comfortable. Your friend now has the reputation for being stingy and selfish—I guess that is his just desserts.

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2.  3.  4.  5. 

“SGT. PEPPER’S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND,” THE BEATLES “THIS OLD DOG,” MAC DEMARCO “HUMANZ,” GORILLAZ “FROM A ROOM VOL. 1,” CHRIS STAPLETON

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11,469

118

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3 MILLION+

The number of refugees from Syria admitted into the U.S. Oct. 2015-Sept. 2016

The number of Syrian refugees resettled in Boise

The number of refugees resettled in the U.S. since 1975

(idahorefugees.org)

(mcclatchydc.com)

The number of Syrian refugees resettled in New York/L.A., respectively Oct. 2015-Sept. 2016

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IS BACK!

Bicycle Scavenger Hunt

11 or more: 9.38%

“ONE MORE FOR THE ROAD,” CURTIS STIGERS

1948

(mcclatchydc.com)

1-5: 75% 6-10: 15.62%

“AWAKEN MY LOVE,” CHILDISH GAMBINO

The year the Displaced Persons Act, the first refugee legislation, was enacted

(mcclatchydc.com)

How many times are you getting out of town this summer?

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to be a scientif ic sample of loc a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

21.3 MILLION $126 MILLION The estimated number of refugees in the world (UNHCR.org)

The amount of money the UN Refugee Agency needs to help citizens in war-torn Mosul, Iraq (UNHCR.org)

9 The number of refugee resettlement agencies in the U.S. (idahorefugees.org)

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B OISE W E E KLY

TED RALL

JEN SORENSEN

HOBO JARGON (RERUN)

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you chose me as your relationship guide, I’d counsel you and your closest ally to be generous with each other; to look for the best in each other and praise each other’s beauty and strength. If you asked me to help foster your collaborative zeal, I’d encourage you to build a shrine in honor of your bond—an altar that would invoke the blessings of deities, nature spirits, and the ancestors. If you hired me to advise you on how to keep the fires burning and the juices flowing between you two, I’d urge you to never compare your relationship to any other, but rather celebrate the fact that it’s unlike any other in the history of the planet. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Milky Way Galaxy contains more than 100 billion stars. If they were shared equally, every person on Earth could have dominion over at least 14. I mention this because you’re in a phase when it makes sense for you to claim your 14. Yes, I’m being playful, but I’m also quite serious. According to my analysis of the upcoming weeks, you will benefit from envisaging big, imaginative dreams about the riches that could be available to you in the future. How much money do you want? How much love can you express? How thoroughly at home in the world could you feel? How many warm rains would you like to dance beneath? How much creativ-

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ity do you need to keep reinventing your life? Be extravagant as you fantasize. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “When I grow up, I’m not sure what I want to be.” Have you ever heard that thought bouncing around your mind, Gemini? Or how about this one: “Since I can’t decide what I want to be, I’ll just be everything.” If you have been tempted to swear allegiance to either of those perspectives, I suggest it’s time to update your relationship with them. A certain amount of ambivalence about commitment and receptivity to myriad possibilities will always be appropriate for you, but if you hope to fully claim your birthright, if you long to ripen into your authentic self, you’ll have to become definitive and specific about what you want to be and do. CANCER (June 21-July 22): As a Cancerian myself, I’ve had days when I’ve stayed in bed from morning to nightfall, confessing my fears to my imaginary friends and eating an entire cheesecake. As an astrologer, I’ve noticed that these blue patches seem more likely to occur during the weeks before my birthday each year. If you go through a similar blip any time soon, here’s what I recommend: Don’t feel guilty about it. Don’t resist it. Instead, embrace it fully. If you feel lazy and depressed, get really lazy and depressed. Literally

hide under the covers with your headphones on and feel sorry for yourself for as many hours as it takes to exhaust the gloom and emerge renewed. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the early days of the internet, “sticky” was a term applied to websites that were good at drawing readers back again and again. To possess this quality, a content provider had to have a knack for offering text and images that web surfers felt an instinctive yearning to bond with. I’m reanimating this term so I can use it to describe you. Even if you don’t have a website, you now have a soulful adhesiveness that arouses people’s urge to merge. Be discerning how you use this stuff. You may be stickier than you realize. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Ancient Mayans used chili, magnolia and vanilla to prepare exotic chocolate drinks from cacao beans. The beverage was sacred and prestigious to them. It was a centerpiece of cultural identity and an accessory in religious rituals. In some locales, people were rewarded for producing delectable chocolate with just the right kind and amount of froth. I suspect, Virgo, that you will soon be asked to do the equivalent of demonstrating your personal power by whipping up the best possible chocolate froth and, according to my read-

ing of the astrological omens, the chances are good you’ll succeed. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Do you have your visa for the wild side? Have you packed your bag of tricks? I hope you’ll bring gifts to dispense, just in case you’ll need to procure favors in the outlying areas where the rules are a bit loose. It might also be a good idea to take along a skeleton key and a snakebite kit. You won’t necessarily need them, but I suspect you’ll be offered magic cookies and secret shortcuts, and it would be a shame to have to turn them down simply because you’re unprepared for the unexpected. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’re like a prince or princess who has been turned into a frog by the spell of a fairy tale villain. This situation has gone on for a while. In the early going, you retained a vivid awareness that you had been transformed, but the memory of your origins has faded, and you’re no longer working so diligently to find a way to change back into your royal form. Frankly, I’m concerned. This horoscope is meant to remind you of your mission. Don’t give up. Don’t lose hope. And take extra good care of your frog-self, please. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): People might have ideas about you that are at odds with how you understand yourself. For example,

someone might imagine that you have been talking trash about them—even though you haven’t been. Someone else may describe a memory they have about you, and you know it’s a distorted version of what actually happened. Don’t be surprised if you hear even more outlandish tales, too, like how you’re stalking Taylor Swift or conspiring with the One World Government to force all citizens to eat kale every day. I’m here to advise you to firmly reject all of these skewed projections. For the immediate future, it’s crucial to stand up for your right to define yourself—to be the final authority on what’s true about you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “God doesn’t play dice with the universe,” said Albert Einstein. In response, another Nobel Prizewinning physicist, Niels Bohr, said to Einstein, “Stop giving instructions to God.” I urge you to be more like Bohr than Einstein in the coming weeks, Capricorn. As much as possible, avoid giving instructions to anyone, including God, and resist the temptation to offer advice. In fact, I recommend you abstain from passing judgment, demanding perfection, and trying to compel the world to adapt itself to your definitions. Instead, love and accept everything and everyone exactly as they are right now.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Lysistrata is a satire by Aristophanes. It takes place during the war between Athens and Sparta. The heroine convinces a contingent of women to withhold sexual privileges from the soldiers until they stop fighting. “I will wear my most seductive dresses to inflame my husband’s ardor,” says one. “But I will never yield to his desires. I won’t raise my legs towards the ceiling. I will not take up the position of the Lioness on a Cheese Grater.” Regardless of your gender, Aquarius, your next assignment is twofold: 1. Don’t be like the women in the play. Give your favors with discerning generosity. 2. Experiment with colorful approaches to pleasure like the Lioness with a Cheese Grater, the Butterfly Riding the Lizard, the Fox Romancing the River, and any others you can dream up. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Take your seasick pills. The waves will sometimes be higher than your boat. Although I don’t think you’ll capsize, the ride may be wobbly, and unless you have waterproof clothes, it’s best to just get naked. You will get drenched. By the way, don’t even fantasize about heading back to shore prematurely. You have good reasons to be sailing through the rough waters. There’s a special “fish” out there you need to catch. If you snag it, it will feed you for months—maybe longer.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 7–13, 2017 | 31


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Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 51  

Transformative, Rad World, Behind the Mask

Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 51  

Transformative, Rad World, Behind the Mask