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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

APRIL 19–25, 2017

“People are much bigger idiots about politics than they are about baseball.”

6

Safe House?

Clean and sober housing is growing in Idaho, but the rules are murky

8

Three’s Company

After a recent convention, the Boise polyamorous community is looking to connect

VO L U M E 2 5 , I S S U E 4 4

CITIZEN 19

18

River of Time

Looking back on 25 years since A River Runs Through It saved The Flicks

FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Brooklyn Riepma, Devon Seefeldt Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Jared Stewart, jared@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Bingo Barnes, bingo@boiseweekly.com Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Ryan Johnson, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Andy Hedden-Nicely, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2017 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE A LIVELY WEEK As philosopher Carl Jung famously said, “There is no coming to consciousness without pain.” In other words, “Being a person is hard.” Apparently, we were in a thinky mood, as several stories in this edition of Boise Weekly have to do with life and how we live it. First, on Page 6, BW News Editor George Prentice digs into how people who have struggled with addiction find help in “safe and sober” housing. On paper, the practice of providing a stable environment in which to kick a habit makes sense. However, as Prentice found, Idaho lacks any oversight requirements for such spaces. The result: Too often, “safe and sober” ends up being anything but. Rather, many of these houses turn into for-profit halfway houses. One man wants to change that, however, with a clean living program that lives up to its name. On Page 8, BW Staff Writer Harrison Berry takes us inside a lifestyle community that typically flies under the radar. Unbeknownst to most Boiseans, more than 100 people gathered at the Riverside Hotel earlier this month to share their experiences with polyamory—the practice of being in a relationship with more than one partner. Often stigmatized as either “swingers” or polygamists, polyamorists push back against both perceptions. At the Boise convention, attendees talked about “ethical non-monogamy” as an alternative form of relationship that can provide as much physical and emotional well-being—even a rich family life—as monogamy. On Page 18, Prentice considers the life and times of The Flicks. Boise’s beloved indie theater was on the ropes 25 years ago, but securing a rare screening of A River Runs Through It (itself a film about life) put it in the black for the first time and may well have saved it from going dark. Finally, on Page 19, Berry has a conversation with renowned pollster and political guru Nate Silver, who was in town for Hackfort last month with the crew of his popular blog FiveThirtyEight. In their talk, Berry and Silver touch on the ways polling can give people a clearer understanding of what’s going on in the world— which, we would hope, might help ease the pain of consciousness. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Randall Brown TITLE: “Give One” MEDIUM: Acrylic on board ARTIST STATEMENT: With the new administration, international issues and global turmoil, the one thing that is assured is that there will be change. For good or bad can depend on whether or not people are willing to give a rat’s ass. Images from the Visual Idioms Series are available at RandallBrownsStuff on Esty. Personalizations are free if you know someone who has one or needs one.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

LOATHSOME LOTHARIO THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE IS SUING AN ALLEGED FR AUDSTER WHO GOES BY MANY DIFFERENT NAMES BUT HAS CONVINCED HIS FO RMER LOVERS TO HELP DEFR AU D INVESTORS OF MILLIONS. THE SUIT NAMES RICHARD GU YO N, BUT HE HAS A L SO G O N E BY M I C H A E L B A N KS , RIC K GARRISON, RICK THOMSON AND MARK THOMP SON. MORE AT NE WS/CIT YDESK.

HOT WATER A protest erupted outside a newly opened Las Vegas aquarium owned by Boise businessman Vince Covino, alleging animal mistreatment at the attraction. More at News/ Citydesk.

TO MARKET, TO MARKET The Capital City Public Market has opened for the season, joining the Boise Farmers Market in hawking some of the best produce in the region. More at Arts & Culture/Culture.

PAGE-TURNERS The Cabin has revealed its slate of literary luminaries for the 2017-2018 Readings and Conversations series, which opens Friday, Nov. 17 with Zealot author Rez Aslan. More at Arts & Culture/Lit.

OPINION

4 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

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CITYDESK

IS BODO PRIME REAL ESTATE? Developed for $65 million and built in 2006, owners of the Boise downtown business district known as BoDo currently collect rents from two dozen tenants, including Edwards Boise Downtown Stadium 9, Office Depot, Idaho Trust National Bank, P.F. Chang’s, Yoi Tomo, Urban Outfitters, Ann Taylor and Caffe D’arte. For nearly a decade, BoDo—at Eighth and Broad streets—saw the only constant consumer traffic in the downtown core south of Front Street. Post-recession, the area has been framed by some of the most robust construction in recent memory: to the north, the Boise Centre underwent dramatic expansion with a newly designed Grove Plaza; to the south, the first phase of The Afton will soon finish with 28 condos at Eighth and River streets; to the west is the JUMP complex; and to the east, the recently opened Inn at 500 and soon-to-open Marriott Residence Inn Suites have joined the skyline. One block farther east is The Fowler, a 159-unit apartment complex on Broad Street. Now, BoDo is for sale. The asking price, according to Colliers International—also a BoDo tenant—is $30 million and the deadline for offers is Friday, April 28. Colliers adds that the official BoDo property does not include the buildings once collectively known as Eighth Street Marketplace, which now house Bodovino, Solid/Liquid, Fresh Off the Hook and a number of retail shops. Colliers’ financial analysis of the BoDo sale details how much rent BoDo tenants currently pay. Office Depot’s annual base rent is $265,650 for its 19,320 square feet ($13.75/ sq. ft.); P.F. Chang’s pays $184,404 for 6,350 square feet ($29.04/sq. ft.); and Urban Outfitters pays $186,480 for 10,360 square feet ($18/sq. ft.). Some of BoDo’s smallest tenants pay some of the highest rents. Caffe D’arte (1,369 square feet) pays $28.50/sq. ft. and Yoi Tomo (1,981 square feet) pays $26.14/ sq. ft. In total, the two dozen current BoDo tenants pay about $2 million in rent per year. There are currently three vacancies in BoDo, plus, the Snake River Winery Tasting Room recently closed its BoDo location and the Boise State Bronco Shop will move at the end of May. The Colliers analysis shows traffic in and around BoDo is at an all-time high, with Front Street seeing more than 38,000 vehicles per day and 22,000 per day on Capitol Boulevard. —George Prentice 6 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

GEORGE PRENTICE

KE L S E Y HAWES

Got $30 million? All of this could be yours.

NEWS WHAT CONSTITUTES CLEAN, SOBER AND SAFE?

‘Outside of Idaho, clean and sober homes usually don’t house parolees’ GEORGE PRENTICE The questions about “safe and sober” housing in Idaho are simple: Clean? Sober? Safe? The answers don’t come easily—particularly from the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. “We’re going to direct you elsewhere,” an IDHW spokesperson said in response to a basic inquiry. “You’re going to need to talk to BPA Health.” Boise-based BPA Health, formerly known as Business Psychology Associates, is a for-profit behavioral health and managed services company. It is sanctioned by the state of Idaho—and paid for with tax dollars—to oversee Gem State resources for mental health and substance abuse services. Additionally, BPA makes it possible for providers to bill the state of Idaho for services but not for helping men and women struggling with recovery transition to a healthier life. “We oversee the credentialing and oversight of any safe and sober living facility that would fall into our network,” said Janice Fulkerson, who joined the BPA leadership team earlier this year. “Safe and sober housing might serve a variety of clients. Some may be able to pay on their own, but a number of them may have no insurance and would need funding through a state source. And, yes, there could be some folks released from prison and would come to safe and sober houses through the Idaho Department of Correction.” Two more questions quickly emerge: How many facilities are there in Idaho that promise safe and sober living? Is it a successful model to mix probationers/parolees into safe and sober housing? The answer to No. 1 is short but perplexing. Nobody knows. There are lists on the IDHW website, indexing dozens of sober, transitional or halfway houses in multiple communities, most of them in the Treasure Valley. Those lists are only a fraction of

Brandt Gibson stands outside a West Boise residence that, come Monday, May 1, will be better known as The River. Probationers and parolees won’t be allowed to reside at the “clean and sober” house.

the houses, condos or apartments—many of them unlicensed—that provide shelter and may or may not provide support or supervision. The state of Idaho doesn’t require licensing and, as Boise Weekly has chronicled in previous reports, such houses may advertise or promise to provide shelter for those in recovery; even local municipalities don’t know who is operating the facilities in their city limits. “Look, it’s a private residence, and I’m renting rooms,” one such operator told BW in 2010. “There’s no code or law—federal, state or city— overseeing my homes.” The answer to No. 2 depends on who is asked. The head of one of Idaho’s biggest sober living operations (he wouldn’t tell us exactly how many locations) defended the concept of his safe and sober houses allowing probationers and parolees. “We don’t discriminate against anybody for any reason,” said Marc Archambeau, CEO of Blackhorse Construction, the parent company of Rising Sun Sober Living, which has at least 11 safe and sober houses in Boise. “We’re here if they need a safe place to live while they go through recovery. We don’t do treatment, but we’re a safe place to live,” he said. Brandt Gibson will soon open The River, a new safe and sober house in Boise. He said discrimination has nothing to do with recovery, and he has seen too many instances of safe and sober houses becoming halfway houses for probationers and parolees. “It’s interesting to note that, outside of Idaho, clean and sober homes traditionally don’t house parolees, but when I moved back to Idaho and applied to live in a safe and sober house, they gave me an address of a three-bedroom apartment

where six guys were living. Every other person was on parole,” said Gibson. “There were no services. No feeling of peer support or camaraderie. No on-site manager or even an assistant manager. Put yourself in the shoes of someone who had never been incarcerated before. I can see how they could have felt threatened. Basically, the structure of sober living houses here in Idaho makes them more like halfway houses.” Gibson’s story is as harrowing as it is hopeful. He started drinking at age 16 and said he “laid a path of wreckage” for the next 10 years. He was arrested more than once for DUI, lost his driver’s license on multiple occasions and, in 2009, spent six months in the Los Angeles County Jail. Alcoholism triggered seizures, and Gibson was hospitalized and then homeless. He said he contemplated suicide. Then, more than a year ago, while living in Boise and barely hanging on to a job as a waiter, Gibson had an epiphany. “I had been in that situation too many times: The same type of apartments or houses. By then, I had been in 10 or 15 different places that called themselves clean and sober,” he said. “There was no management, just somebody who would come by for about five minutes, take your money and leave. “The business model was a place that accepted state funding for individuals on parole,” Gibson added. “If they happened to run into somebody not on parole with no place to go, they housed them, too. That was the basic environment.” So Gibson reached out to a colleague— someone he would only identify as a “silent partner”—to purchase a large West 7 Boise home not far from Franklin and Maple Grove roads. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


How a new law gives users more access to water

Cash prizes for America’s Best Communities will be doled out Wednesday, April 19.

AND THE WINNER IS…

BROOKLYN RIEPMA If Idaho has an abundance of anything this spring it’s water, with steady snowmelt pushing area rivers past flood stage. If you’re a farmer, however, you don’t dare touch much of the water rushing through your land without first securing Idaho water rights. For years, Gem State water right laws have capped farmers’ temporary use of water at a volume of five acre feet. Now, under an amendment to Idaho Code approved by the 2017 Idaho Legislature and signed into law by Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter, those temporary caps have been lifted in case of emergencies such as flooding. “The five-acre-foot limit would have been so minimal that it wouldn’t allow it to be effective, so there was a change made by the Legislature to the statute governing the temporary use of water that removed the limit for three specific uses,” said Matthew Weaver, deputy director of the Idaho Department of Water Resources. “Those three uses are, No. 1, the diversion of water to prevent flood damage; No. 2, to recharge groundwater aquifers; and, No. 3, to remediate ground and surface water that has been contaminated.”

A recently enacted change to Idaho Code will lift the cap of the volume limit on temporary water uses, primarily to prevent flood damage and recharge groundwater levels.

Heavy winter snow and equally heavy spring rains have triggered flooding, washouts, mudslides, avalanches and damage to property around the state. To date, 25 of Idaho’s 44 counties have been issued emergency declarations by Otter. “That water is doing damage because of flooding and in other instances it’s leaving and flowing out of the state of Idaho,” said Weaver. “There are people out there who could take that water that’s going to be lost from Idaho and put it in the ground. They could recharge and benefit some of our groundwater resources that are in decline.”

Gibson began furnishing the location in preparation for the Monday, May 1 opening of what he hopes will be the first in a series 6 of “River” homes. “The first thing we have to do is break the perception that many Idahoans have of such facilities,” he said. “Unfortunately, in Idaho, a clean and sober house being confused for some kind of halfway house isn’t a misconception. It’s reality. So, the first thing we have to do is talk about what we’re doing different. For one, we’ll have a live-in house manager holding residents accountable to a zero-tolerance policy. No. 2, we’ll concentrate on life skills, like resume building and job interviewing. Residents will be accountable to their AA, NA or recovery programs. And, perhaps most importantly, we’ll be accountable to our neighbors, making the house look great.” The first River house is considerable in size—its six bedrooms will house five individuals in addition to the on-site manager—and it sits in a typical Boise cul-de-sac, which is home to about a dozen families. “It’s really important that I meet our neighbors face to face and tell our story,” said Gibson. “They need to know who we are and who we aren’t.” Fulkerson said that’s critical. “If safe and sober housing is going to succeed, they have to be a good neighbor,” she said. “Transition into society and it’s good for the community, but it’s ultimately important that the house works extra hard to respect the BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Still, it’s not as if users can divert spring flows at their whim. IDWR is accepting applications for the temporary use of water, and officials said they’ve already heard from a number of Idaho canal companies and irrigation districts. “What this does is allow people to do opportunistic [aquifer] recharge and flood-fighting without having to go through the formal, drawnout process of establishing a water right,” Weaver said. “We can process these applications quickly because it’s not going to be a permanent use and because we are less concerned about injury.”

neighbors and the neighborhood housing association.” Archambeau was reluctant to share too much about Rising Sun’s operations, repeatedly pointing to the company’s website. “As far as anything else, we prefer to be under the radar. We want to avoid controversy of any kind,” he said. Archambeau knows, however, his industry is as busy as ever. “The need is as great as it has ever been, unfortunately,” he added. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, addiction “continues to impact every segment of American society.” Nearly 24 million, or one in every 10 Americans over the age of 12, are addicted to alcohol or drugs. That’s roughly the population of Texas. “Idaho’s biggest substance abuse problem is addiction to alcohol. There are approximately as many alcohol-dependent people in Idaho as all other addictive substances combined,” according to the website for Boise-based NorthPoint Recovery counseling center, “I think life’s complications are happening faster than ever before, certainly faster than what we’re prepared for,” said Gibson. “It’s becoming more widespread.” Gibson walked around his new West Boise safe and sober house to give it one more inspection prior to its opening. “Honestly, we can’t open soon enough,” he said.

Think of it like a high-stakes game show. There won’t be any spinning chairs or voting off the island but, on Wednesday, April 19 at about 2:15 p.m., a team from Valley County will stand before a panel of judges who will award as much as $3 million to what they deem “America’s Best Community.” The West Central Mountain Economic Development Council, made up of public and private interests in Valley County and Meadows Valley, has steadily risen from a field of 350 contestants to a quarter-final round of 50 communities, then to a semi-final round of 15 communities and, now, eight finalists. After the judges weigh in, prizes of $3 million, $2 million and $1 million will be doled out to the top three. The Valley County team will be competing against their counterparts in Chisago Lakes, Minn.; Darrington, Wash.; Huntington, W.V.; Lake Havasu, Ariz.; Madison, Ind.; Statesboro, Ga.; and Tualatin, Ore. The contest is sponsored by Frontier Communications, Dish Network, The Weather Channel and CoBank, challenging U.S. communities to think big in reimagining their futures. The West Central Mountains Economic Development Council has laid out an ambitious 125-page strategy that could dramatically change McCall, Cascade, New Meadows and all the tiny communities that connect to make up their region of central Idaho. Plans include an expansion of bus service, a trust to help create more workforce housing, a coalition to support a more resilient local food system, youth activities and scholarships to develop future leaders. The team of three—Sherry Maupin and (longtime Boise Weekly contributor) Andrew Mentzer, both from the West Central Mountains group, and Valley County Commissioner Gordon Cruickshank—will need to make their presentation concise and compelling to get a shot at the $3 million. The presentations and grand prize ceremony will take place in Denver. Interest is so great in Valley County that there will be two parties to watch a live web stream of the presentations and awards: one at Idaho First Bank in McCall and another at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade. Among the finalists, the Valley County team will represent the smallest community by population but the biggest in land area. —George Prentice BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 7

KE L S E Y HAWES

KE L S E Y HAWES

WATER, WATER… AND THEN SOME

NEWS

CITYDESK


RYAN J OH NSON

ALONG CAME POLY

A Boise convention brings polyamory out in the open HARRISON BERRY

J

ennifer Hyde was initially skeptical of her boyfriend, Tyson Downey, discussing his relationship with his wife of nearly 20 years. “Talking about your marriage? I don’t know...” she said. Downey later called his wife from the lobby of the Riverside Hotel to ask her consent—which she gave—to divulge details about their marriage. The Downeys’ relationship has been “open” for almost as long as he’s been married, and Hyde is one of his several girlfriends. They call this kind of arrangement “polyamorous”—being in more than one significant romantic relationship simultaneously—and it was the focus of RelateCon, the first-ever Boise convention for polyamorous people, which took place March 31-April 2 at the Riverside. The event, which brought 120 people to Boise from across North America, was a big moment for people who have disavowed monogamy in favor of having their romantic, emotional and physical needs met by multiple partners. RelateCon brought into the open a community that has gained momentum online but, because of Idaho law and misrepresentation in the media and broader society, has been largely secretive. “I just want people to not feel so alone in what they’re doing,” said Hyde, who is president of the Boise Polyamory Network, a mostly online group of approximately 450 people who practice or are interested in polyamory in the Boise area. The purpose of the convention was for the group to meet openly, expose members to national resources and discuss pressing issues related to what they call “ethical non-monogamy.”

8 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

HOW TO FIND A PARTNER Many of the presentations at RelateCon were lighthearted, with titles like “50 Shades of Real Life,” “The Cuddle Puddle Project” and “Painless Poly Dating 101.” One of two talks Downey hosted was about regaining passion in long-term relationships in the midst of “new relationship energy” from other partners. “For years, my wife and I would check in every night before we went to bed, but the conversation wasn’t of much substance,” he said. “We made an effort to have extended conversations about our feelings and our passions, and we found a lot of changes had taken place for us over the years that we weren’t aware of.” Another presenter, Masami Tadehara-Hinkle, offered attendees a “relationship shopping list” for identifying new partners and maintaining healthy relationships with existing partners. More than a checklist to be applied to others, however, Tadehara-Hinkle said it encourages people to be introspective, considering carefully what they want out of their new relationships. “The idea is that it’s more effective in terms of relationship structure to define the relationship in terms of individual needs, rather than having a set of rules,” she said. Tadehara-Hinkle’s idea for a checklist came from the website morethantwo.com, which she described as “the poly bible.” There, site curator Franklin Veaux has collected tutorials, tips, howtos and common mistakes by newcomers to the practice. There’s also a “relationship bill of rights” and advice on when and how to be openly polyamorous. Websites like More Than Two are ways for people to connect online and build a sense of community, but talking about ideas face to face offered Tadehara-Hinkle some satisfaction she couldn’t find online. A frequent self-help conference and workshop attendee, she delivered an address for the first time at RelateCon. When it became clear her audience wouldn’t fit in the room where she was scheduled to talk about the relationship checklist, the group moved to another, larger space. Tadehara-Hinkle was thrilled there was so much interest in what she had to say. “It was a good experience to get the feedback and see how many people were excited about the idea of using the checklist in their daily lives,” she said. Conference organizers said socializing was one of RelateCon’s most important functions. Activities included poly bingo; a fancy dinner where polyamorous couples, triples and beyond could mingle; and meet-and-greet events at the hotel bar. Because polyamorous groups are spread across the state, the informal events were some of the first times people who may have known each other online could meet in person.

CONNECTING TO A NATIONAL CONVERSATION The Boise polyamorous community started small. For the past three years, Hyde and the Boise Polyamory Network organized monthly potlucks at members’ homes, sang karaoke and went bowling. Though they typically met in small groups, attendance at some events could reach 30 people. Most of their interactions took place online, but Boise Polyamory Network aimed higher—for a must-attend event that would bring the community together and connect it to the national polyamory movement. “We’re reaching and we hope to spread,” said RelateCon organizer Heather Franck. “This is a national conference and we want reach across the nation.” Most RelateCon attendees were from Idaho and the Treasure Valley area, but many came from Utah, Oregon and farther afield—from the East Coast and even Canada. It also pulled nationally recognized speakers and organizers, including Atlanta, Ga.-based Relationship Equality Foundation, which has connections to established polyamorous communities in places like Cleveland, Chicago and on the eastern seaboard. The group’s mission is to offer education and resources to conferences on relationship structures and affiliated organizations. When Boise Polyamory Network asked REF for support, it sent four educators to the City of Trees. “It’s part of our mission to support new and up-and-coming organizations,” said REF Vice President Billy Holder. “Relationship Equality Foundation is growing by leaps and bounds, and we’re doing it by grassroots empowerment of organizations like RelateCon.” Beyond affiliating with national communities, REF collects data about polyamorous people through its legal survey, spotlights local events and organizations, and helps present large conventions like Atlanta Poly Weekend and the Chicago NonMonogamy Conference. It’s also an awareness-raiser, spreading the word on ethical non-monogamy—a job that gets a little easier every year thanks to increased media attention given to the lifestyle. That attention, however, is of mixed quality. In 2013, CNN aired Polyamory: When Three Isn’t a Crowd, an expose of the growing culture that featured Holder, his family and relationships. Filming and research for the segment took months and, when it aired, it offered monogamous viewers a glimpse into an alternative lifestyle that shares many characteristics with their own—including emotional satisfaction and family life. Though Holder said the CNN report was a relatively fair introduction to polyamory, subsequent profiles have been less balanced. In 2014, Fox News host Bill O’Reilly described the lifestyle as a “logical progression” from same-sex marriage, BOISE WEEKLY.COM


despite the fact that it is not a sexual orientation. Some fictional representations of polyamory are equally problematic, with many focusing on salacious sexual aspects of open relationships and its associations with the “swinger” lifestyle. Others, like The Magicians, normalize the practice by presenting polyamorous characters in an understated way. “It’s been a lot more prevalent in the media, and there’s a lot less stigma now than there was five, six, seven years ago,” Holder said.

ETHICS, CHILDREN AND FAITH Jennifer Hyde has seven children. Heather Franck is trying to conceive with her partner. Tyson Downey and Billy Holder are both fathers. Children are a fact of polyamory and a test of the ethics of the lifestyle. “If you exclude any element of the family— a child, a partner, a husband, a mom—you’re excluding the element of family,” Holder said, describing the importance he places on being honest with his children. Ethics was a central feature of RelateCon, encompassing nearly every aspect of polyamorous relationships, from intersections with the law, sex, introducing the practice to partners and discussing the lifestyle with children. Holder had been polyamorous for 20 years when he brought a new partner into his home. At the time, his children were aged 14, 12 and 4, and he knew he couldn’t—and shouldn’t—hide the facts of his lifestyle from them. That said, each child needed a different level of knowledge about the new living arrangement. “We didn’t want to be sneaking around, lying to our children,” Holder said. “That creates a huge trust issue.” Conversations about the polyamorous lifestyle between parents and children can be uncomfortable. In many cases, parents’ goals for such conversations are to express their affection for their kids and their partners, and reinforce a sense of family stability. However, they often run into social norms around monogamy that make their jobs harder. During one of these interactions, Hyde’s then 5-year-old daughter called her a “cheater” for dating more than one man. When Hyde asked her where she learned about infidelity, the child told her she learned it from the Disney Channel. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

“Here’s my daughter, who’s only been on earth for five years, and already she’s been ingrained,” Hyde said. The cultural emphasis on monogamy poses a legal challenge for polyamorists. Poly parents have lost children in custody battles because of misconceptions about the stability of nonmonogamous families. According to Franck, in right-to-work state Idaho, polyamorous people have lost their jobs because of the perceived ethical failings associated with “swinging.” Several RelateCon presentations sought to address these and other issues. Topics included identifying abusive relationships and how to help people in them, safe sex practices and BDSM, the roles of consent and honesty in the lifestyle, and legal issues related to polyamory. Missing from the roster was the relationship between polyamory and religion, but attendees to the conference were happy to talk about their experiences with faith—often distancing themselves from it. “The biggest difference is always the ethical portion of it,” said Franck. “Polyamory really focuses on adult consent. And polygamy often does not have that because it would be more of a cultural norm and you can marry outside your age range.” Despite its strong undercurrent of ethical practice and the ongoing fight for recognition in the wider culture, polyamory still bucks against its association with polygamy—particularly the form of polygamy practiced by some members of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of LatterDay Saints. “Polyamory brings up the religious polygamy mindset, and it takes explaining to understand how it actually works,” said Jeremy Hall, a web administrator for Boise Polyamory Network and RelateCon attendee. The fight for acceptance, he said, is far from over; but RelateCon pushed Boise’s polyamorous community toward achieving its goals. It helped to burst that community out of its (mostly) online bubble, reinforced the ethics of ethical non-monogamy and put Boise on the polyamorous map. Speaking a week after the conclusion of the conference, Hall said he believed it served its purpose. “It gave people a chance to be themselves,” he said. “They didn’t have to feel like they were hiding from themselves or anybody else.” BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 9


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY APRIL 19 On Stage BCT: THE CLEAN HOUSE—This wildly funny play is a whimsical and poignant look at class, comedy and the true nature of love. After hiring Matilde, an aspiring comedian from Brazil, as their housekeeper, married doctors Lane and Charles have to deal with the mess that is their lives after Charles finds his soulmate in one of his patients. 8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. COMEDIAN KYLE KINANE—Actor/comedian/writer Kyle Kinane was the voice of Biker Dude in the 2013 animated film Epic; he voices Ice Cream in the nutty Warner Bros./Disney XD animated series Right Now Kapow; and

he helped develop the twisted Comedy Central animated sketch show Triptank. Stand-up, however, is where Kinane is making his biggest mark—he’s done three one-hour Comedy Central specials and much more. Dylan H. and local comic Emma Arnold open. 7 p.m. $20 adv., $22 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886. SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: DISNEY’S HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL ON STAGE—7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208498-0571, spotlight-theatre.com.

Art BOISE STATE ART METALS ANNUAL SHOW—Through April 29, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. FREE. R. Grey Gallery Jewelry and Art Glass, 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, facebook.com/ BSUArtMetalsStudio.

WED.-SAT., APRIL 19-MAY 6

DEANNA SCHERRER: EFFERVESCENCE—Through May 28. 7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4261242, finearts.boisestate.edu. JAKE PRENDEZ: DON’T SELFCONCHAS—In the SUB Student Diversity Center through May 13. 7 a.m.-midnight FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO. JANYRAE SEDA: CALLING FROM A SUMMER—Through May 21. 7-a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242, janyrseda.com.

Talks & Lectures YOUR WATER FOOTPRINT—Ever wondered how much water you use daily and how you compare to others? Find out in this interactive class by the Boise WaterShed Education Center and SUEZ. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public

Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, readmetv.com.

BLT: 37 POSTCARDS—7:30 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

Sports & Fitness

BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: CADDYSHACK—Beer and wine will be available. This showing for 21 and older only. 7 p.m. $9 online; $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3871273, boiseclassicmovies.com/ deals.

BOSTON MARATHON DOCUMENTARY—The story of the world’s oldest annual marathon, from its origins in 1897 through the tragedy of the 2013 bombing and the triumphant return the following year. Also showing at Edwards Boise Stadium 21. 7:30 p.m. $16. Edwards Boise Downtown Stadium 9, 760 Broad St., Boise, 208-338-3821.

THURSDAY APRIL 20 On Stage BCT: THE CLEAN HOUSE—8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

FRIDAY, APRIL 21

CHINESE MOVIE NIGHT: HERO—Enjoy a free showing of a Chinese movie (in Mandarin with English subtitles) and free popcorn. Starring Jet Li as the nameless protagonist, Hero is based on the story of Jing Ke’s assassination attempt on the King of Qin in 227 BC. In Room 162. 6:30 p.m. FREE. University of Idaho Water Center, 322 E. Front St., Boise, 208-484-9898.

LARP: THE MUSICAL—Presented by the Boise State Theatre Majors Association. 7:30 p.m. $10. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4263980. SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: DISNEY’S HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL ON STAGE—7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208498-0571, spotlight-theatre.com. STAGE COACH: MAURITIUS—7:30 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. YUM YUM COMEDY—With Emma Arnold, Jen Adams, Thomas Paul, Minerva Jayne and Kaz Gable. 8 p.m. $5. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9180597, facebook.com/YumYumComedy.

COMEDIAN NATHON BRANNON—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208941-2459, liquidboise.com.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, APRIL 21-22 STE VE SMITH

OLIVIA NEGRON Spring cleaning.

Pedal power to the people.

“First star to the right and straight on ’til morning.”

THE CLEAN HOUSE AT BCT

BBP SHOP EXPANSION GRAND UNVEILING

BALLET IDAHO: PETER PAN

One of the most anticipated plays of the season sweeps into Boise Contemporary Theater Wednesday, April 19 and cleans house through Saturday, May 6. Penned by playwright Sarah Ruhl and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for drama, The Clean House was championed by The New York Times as a “gorgeous” production of “theatrical audacity and emotional richness.” Directed by Drew Barr, the cast includes Tracy Sunderland, Paula Rebelo, Denise Simone, Arthur Glen Hughes and Olivia Negron. BCT promises “a whimsical and poignant look at class, comedy and the true nature of love.” This one is not to be missed. 8 p.m.; matinees Saturdays, April 28 and May 6, 2 p.m.; $16$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org.

Boiseans love their bikes—and they love the Boise Bicycle Project, which took first place in the Best of Boise Local Nonprofit Organization category each year from 2009-2014. BBP is going from best to even better with its newly expanded space at 1027 Lusk St. The culmination of more than a year of work, BBP is capping off its Riding to Raise the Roof Expansion with a celebration Friday, April 21, when Boise Mayor Dave Bieter will cut the ribbon at 2 p.m. Following the ribbon cutting, attendees can cruise by for a tour of the 2,000-square-foot larger space. At 6 p.m., the party shifts gears with pulled pork sandwiches and smoked (vegan) spaghetti squash sandwiches from BBQ 4 LIFE and beers from 10 Barrel Brewing. The event is free to all ages of bike lovers, which—if we had to guess—includes most of the city. 2-8 p.m., FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

Peter Pan was born—literally, as a wee baby—in the 1902 novel The Little White Bird by J.M. Barrie. The Scottish poet apparently couldn’t give him up, as Pan appeared and reappeared in Barrie’s work until 1911, when he adapted his play, Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, into the novel Peter and Wendy. That makes Peter Pan 115 years old; still, he has never fully grown up. Likewise, audiences are never too old to fly away to Neverland, with its Lost Boys, pirates, Tinker Bell and dangerous croc. The tale gets yet another treatment, this time from Ballet Idaho, with a production choreographed by Peter Anastos and set to music by Camron DeLeone at the Morrison Center. It’s timeless entertainment for all ages—even 115-year-olds. April 21, 8 p.m.; April 22, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; $38-$58. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, balletidaho.org.

10 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR Talks & Lectures AN HOUR WITH JASON STOLWORTHY OF INL—Learn about partnering with the Idaho National Laboratory, the nation’s leading center for nuclear energy research and development. Noon. FREE. Trailhead, 500 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-5483. THE IDEA OF NATURE: THE GHOSTLY LANGUAGE OF THE ANCIENT EARTH—Join Professor Scott Ashley of Newcastle University, U.K., to hear about the echoes that come out of the deep past and decipher what we can learn from them about the entangling of the human and natural worlds and the origins of the idea of Nature. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, scholarworks.boisestate.edu/ ideaofnature.

SEVDAH MUSIC FESTIVAL LECTURE—Join the Bosnian and Herzegovinia Cultural Center of Idaho for two days of entertainment and enlightenment at the Sevdah Music Festival April 20-21. Kick off the festival by learning all about this music genre. Find out more at the group’s Facebook page. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, facebook. com/BHCCID.

Citizen CREATIVE GOOD BENEFIT AUCTION—Check out this benefit auction of professional creative services to local businesses. All proceeds go to Interfaith Sanctuary and the homeless families they serve. Register for the auction and bid. Dinner and a drink is included. Creative professionals can register and put your services or goods up for auction. See online

SATURDAY, APRIL 22

for registration and more information. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$20. The Owyhee, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, creativegood. info.

Odds & Ends ART ZONE 208 THIRD THURSDAY ART PLAY—Release your inner creativity as instructors guide your artful play through a variety of art projects, from watercolor to mixed media. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-322-9464.

FRIDAY APRIL 21 Festivals & Events BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT SHOP EXPANSION GRAND UNVEILING— It’s been more than a year in the works, but Boise Bicycle Project is finally ready to unveil its Riding to Raise the Roof Expansion. Stop by the shop for a tour of the new shop space. Then at 6 p.m., BBP will crank up the celebration with barbecue sandwiches (vegan/vegetarian option available) from BBQ 4 Life and brews from 10 Barrel. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-4296520, boisebicycleproject.org.

On Stage 7TH ANNUAL SPROUT FILM FESTIVAL—Celebrate the diverse lives and creativity of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. You won’t want to miss this inspiring, heartwarming event. Hosted by The Arc Idaho. 7 p.m. $8-$10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, thearcinc.org.

March of progress.

IDAHO MARCH FOR SCIENCE This year, the Idaho Legislature cut climate change instruction from the K-12 curriculum requirements. Nationally, topics like climate change and evolution remain politically controversial, even as demand for graduates in science, technology, engineering and math fields increases. That’s the backdrop for the upcoming Idaho March for Science, slated for the morning of Saturday, April 22. The event is a show of support for the benefits of disciplines like medicine, electricity, technology and safeguarding resources like clean air and water. It’s also a plea for political leaders to make decisions based on evidence and empiricism rather than politics, ideology or special interests. The March for Science will include speeches, booths with information and opportunities for activism. 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m., FREE. Idaho State Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705, facebook.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BALLET IDAHO: PETER PAN— This classic tale is sure to delight the whole family. 8 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261110, balletidaho.org. BCT: THE CLEAN HOUSE—8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: 37 POSTCARDS—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN NATHON BRANNON—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459. LARP: THE MUSICAL—7:30 p.m. $10. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-3980.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 11


CALENDAR CULTURE/EXTRA

BILL BURR ON BABIES AND BUILDING A NEW HOUR In any sense of the word, Bill Burr is successful. His stand-up shows are often sold out; he co-created animated Netflix series F is for Family; has had TV and movie roles in everything from New Girl, Kroll Show, Breaking Bad and Chappelle Show to Date Night, The Heat and Daddy’s Home; and (at the time of this writing) his Monday Morning Podcast was No. 11 on itunescharts.net Top 40 U.S. Comedy Podcasts list. Burr is well-read, opinionated and polarizing, and the comedian/actor/writer has added a new title to his resume: Father. He and wife Nia recently welcomed a little girl, but fans concerned dadhood will nullify Burr’s neurotic musings can relax. “I’ve learned, for the most part, parents are crazy people,” Burr said. “You know what it is? It’s the fear and worry that you’re immediately hit with. The same level of fear and worry matches the [unconditional love]. This is why parents are not sane: Last night, I was trying to keep my daughter from crying. I have a little porch right off a room in my house, so I walked her out there and as the screen door was closing, I was like, ‘What if that locked me out? What if no one was home? What if it was the middle of the day, and it was hot out? What would I do?’ I would have to climb down, but I can’t climb down with the baby. I pictured setting her down, climbing down, running around, breaking a window and getting in. But in that moment, I pictured a bird of prey coming in, grabbing my baby and flying away. That’s what I thought about just walking out on the porch. Before I had a baby, I would just walk out on the porch.” When he’s not worrying about a giant raptor taking his tot, Burr is working. His most recent Netflix comedy special, Walk Your Way Out, was released in January, yet he’s already building a new hour and going about it in an interesting way: Burr is on tour and, instead of playing a big hall for one night, he’s doing two or three nights in theaters and clubs. For his Boise stop, he’ll perform Saturday, April 22 -Sunday, April 23 at the Egyptian. He said he prefers doing multiple shows because he feels like by doing one big show in a city, then another big show in another city and so on, he “burns out” the cities. “It takes me two years to feel that my hour [of stand-up] is ready,” Burr said. “If I’m knocking out three cities a weekend, I start running out of places to go to,” Burr said. “Then when I need to build a new hour up, there’s no cities left. Plus, if I do a three-day run, it’s a lot easier to do ‘the road’: Land at the airport. Do a show. Next morning, back to the airport. Do another show. It becomes a thrash ... I did three nights in Durham [North Carolina], and I found this great soul food place, I got to go to a basketball game, I walked around the city. I got to experience the town instead of blowing through like I’m robbing banks. For the audiences and the venues, I think it’s a better experience, too. Fuck, I just love doing stand-up. Isn’t it better to do something you love three times instead of just once?” —Amy Atkins Saturday, April 22, 7 p.m. and 10 p.m.; Sunday, April 23, 7 p.m.; $45-$47. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. 12 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

PINTO BENNETT AND THE FAMOUS MOTEL COWBOYS REUNION— Saddle up for the 14th edition of the FMC reunion. Along with Pinto Bennett and the Famous Motel Cowboys, this three-day event features outstanding musicians and bands from all over the country. 5 p.m. $15. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557.

Odds & Ends

RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: H2OOOOO—Sail the seven seas and explore everything wet with burlesque, aerial acrobatics, modern dance, partner acrobatics, boylesque and more. 9 p.m. $15-$35 adv., $20-$40 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, rlvs-boise.com.

Food

SEVDAH MUSIC FESTIVAL CONCERT— Join the Bosnian and Herzegovinia Cultural Center of Idaho for two days of entertainment and enlightenment at the Sevdah Music Festival. Friday’s concert features world-renowned performer Damir Imamovic, along with the local band Boise Sevdah Club and a performance by Mladi Behar folk dance group in JUMP’s Pioneer Room. Bosnian food will be available for purchase. $5-$10. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, facebook.com/ BHCCID. SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: DISNEY’S HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL ON STAGE—7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208498-0571, spotlight-theatre.com. STAGE COACH: MAURITIUS—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Literature CHILDREN’S AUTHOR PALOOZA—Check out this panel discussion and signing with the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. Featured authors include Bonnie Becker, A Visitor for Bear; Leslie Patricelli, Yummy, Yucky; Tess Hilmo, With a Name Like Love; Alane Furgeson, Dragon Fly Eyes; Kristiana Gregory, Jenny of the Tetons; Gloria Skurzynski, Virtual War. With author panels, interviews and readings at 4 p.m., followed by book signings at 6 p.m. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208376-4229, rdbooks.org. READING: SOMA LANDS WITH PETRA KUPPERS—Part of Boise’s National Poetry Month celebration. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-407-7529.

BANDS, BOARDS AND BREWS SKATE JAM WITH LAST GIANT AND CAMACHO—The ramp will be set up and ready to roll and the rock will be ready to roll as well. This is gonna be a burner. 7 p.m. $5. The Shredder, 430 S. 10th, Boise, 208-345-4355.

FOOD TRUCK FRENZY FUNDRAISER—Help raise money for the Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline while enjoying delicious food from some of your favorite food trucks: Mad Mac, Kanak Attack, Urban Smoke, Tacos y Tortas el Paco, Burgerlicious, The Rusty Dog and Spponthumb Ice Cream. All trucks will be donating 15 percent of their sales to the hot line. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208888-4433.

SATURDAY APRIL 22

the Star Wars 501st members or watch the wrestling show performed by the Idaho Wrestle Club. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Anser Charter School, 202 E. 42nd St., Garden City, 208-801-1098, timezonetoys.com. RECORD STORE DAY 2017—The Record Exchange celebrates Record Store Day with a full day of festivities, and you get to take your pick from among more than 350 limited-edition exclusive releases, including vinyl, CDs, cassettes and other fun formats. View the full list of exclusives online at recordstoreday.com/ SpecialReleases. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208344-8010, therecordexchange. com. SERENATA ORCHESTRA BEACH NIGHT FUNDRAISER— Enjoy a night at the beach with Serenata, Boise’s community orchestra, along with food, beer and wine (for purchase), a silent auction and loads of fun activities, with live music by Willie and the Single Wides. 7-10 p.m. $25. Bridge Event Center, 6200 N. Garrett St., Garden City, boiseserenata.com.

On Stage BALLET IDAHO: PETER PAN—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, balletidaho.org. BCT: THE CLEAN HOUSE—8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: 37 POSTCARDS—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. BOISE CHORDSMEN BARBERSHOP CHORUS ANNUAL SHOW—2 p.m. and 7 p.m. $10$12, $40 family. Parkview Christian Church, 201 W. Ustick Road, Meridian, 208-888-3099. COMEDIAN BILL BURR—With five critically acclaimed hour-long stand-up specials, Bill Burr is one of the top comedic voices of his generation, selling out theaters internationally. 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. $45 adv., $47 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

Festivals & Events BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove Streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

BOISE MARCH FOR SCIENCE—Join this march for science to show public support for all that science has brought us—food, medicine, energy, technology, transportation, clean air and clean water. 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Market goers will find booths full of fresh local produce, beautiful flowers, delicious specialty food items, and one-of-a-kind locally crafted art. Saturdays through Dec. 16. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-3453499, capitalcitypublicmarket. com. EARTH DAY ELECTRIC CAR SHOW—Celebrate Earth Day at the Sierra Club’s Electric Car Show. Several green businesses and nonprofits will be inside the Whole Foods Market, and the parking lot will be filled with all kinds of electric vehicles. 2-5 p.m. FREE. Whole Foods Market, 401 S. Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-287-4600. GREENBELT TOY AND COLLECTIBLE SHOW—Find Star Wars, Transformers, He-Man, Gi Joe, Funko Pop and sports cards. You can also check out

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR COMEDIAN NATHON BRANNON—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10-$12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. JEFF FOXWORTHY AND LARRY THE CABLE GUY—Both comedians will deliver laughter-packed sets of all new material before they come together on stage for an uproarious encore you won’t want to miss. 7 p.m. $27-$197. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1900, tacobellarena. com. LARP: THE MUSICAL—2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $10. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3980. MERIDIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA RISING STARS CONCERT—7:30 p.m. $4-$11. Centennial High School Performing Arts Center, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-891-2721, meridiansymphony.org.

RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: H2OOOOO—9 p.m. $15-$35 adv., $20-$40 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, rlvsboise.com. STAGE COACH: MAURITIUS—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

GHOSTS AND PROJECTORS 2017 POETRY SPEAKEASY— Featuring The Cabin, Big Tree Arts, Death Rattle and Campfire Stories. Free admission; private readings for $5 apiece. Part of Boise’s National Poetry Month celebration. 7 p.m. FREE-$5. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000.

Sports & Fitness Literature 9TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON YOUTH AND CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND WRITING— Featuring Wendy McClure, managing editor at Albert Whitman. Plus picture book workshop with Bonny Becker, and breakout sessions on voice, writing mysteries, revising like an editor, keynote luncheon and more. 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $85-$155. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426INFO, idcclw.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

TREASURE VALLEY ROLLER DERBY— 5 p.m. $10 adv., $5$15 door. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, tvrderby.com.

Kids & Teens IDAHO STATE YO YO AND KENDAMA CHAMPIONSHIPS— Watch the top players in Idaho compete for the official state championship in both Yo-Yo and Kendama. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Anser Charter School, 202 E. 42nd St., Garden City, 208-8011098, timezonetoys.com. WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILDREN CELEBRATION—Enjoy fun for the kids (birth–8 years) and valuable community resources for parents. Connect with community programs and businesses to learn about summer camps, after-school programs, early literacy, healthy eating, child care, fishing licenses and more. Crafts, kid’s Zumba, bicycle rodeo and obstacle courses are just a few of the activities planned. Plus live music by Blues Collective and free access to explore the Idaho Botanical Garden. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208345-1090, idahoaeyc.org.

SIN is TUESDAYS 7 p.m. to Close!

at

If you work in the service business, then this is your night!

SUNDAY APRIL 23 On Stage COMEDIAN BILL BURR—7 p.m. $45 adv., $47 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre. net. COMEDIAN NATHON BRANNON—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

OPERA IDAHO ART SONG RECITAL—Join Opera Idaho’s Resident Company singers for this series of recitals dedicated to the form of under-produced music called art songs. These non-staged songs often incorporate well-known poems and seasonal themes with complex music and piano. 2:30 p.m. FREE. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-3531, 1617, operaidaho.org.

• FREE POOL

GGo ne Drin kin’

(not really we don’t have pool tables.)

• KARAOKE (NO!! We don’t want to hear you sing.)

• STRIPPER POLE (Nope, we will leave that to the professionals.)

• Half price Beer! Wine! Most liquor! Food! • Come in your uniform or bring us your paystub.

THAT’S 50% OFF (We know you understand percent numbers better.) 150 N. 8th St. (8th & Main) Second Level, Boise 208.343.3444 BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 13


PETER PAN AT THE MORRISON CENTER

CALENDAR RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: H2OOOOO—The Sunday brunch show features intimate cabaretstyle table seating with food trucks on site. Noon. $35-$45. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, rlvs-boise.com.

THIS WEEKEND ONLY

STAGE COACH: MAURITIUS—2 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Talks & Lectures

For tickets visit BalletIdaho.org Thank You to our Sponsors John and Joan Carley, Howard and Dottie Goldman, Jo-Anne and Jeff Smith, and Ann Wood

BUZZSAW SHARKS OF IDAHO—Have you heard of the “prehistoric whorltoothed sharks” of Idaho? Join Dr. Leif Tapanila of Idaho State University and the Idaho Museum of Natural History in Pocatello for a lecture that will appeal to all ages. 1 p.m. FREE-$5. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-368-9876, idahomuseum.org. STAR TREK CAPTAIN’S CHAIR UNVEILING— See how it feels to sit where Capt. James Tiberius Kirk commanded the USS Enterprise and take a photo in the captain’s chair. Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Re-POP Gifts, 3107 W. State St., Boise, 208-991-6112.

MONDAY APRIL 24

of children. In the third-floor Marion Bingham Room. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, boisepubliclibrary.org. VETERANS HOUSING OUTREACH—Veterans are invited to stop by Boise Public Library on Monday mornings to visit with Bryan Bumgarner, an outreach specialist for homeless veterans from Boise’s Veterans Affairs. He’ll help connect you with essential VA services such as housing and medical care. 10:30 a.m.-noon. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org/calendar.

TUESDAY APRIL 25 On Stage

Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, storystorynight.org.

Talks & Lectures HEMINGWAY CENTER: PATRICIA FUMERTON—Join U.C Santa Barbara English Professor Patricia Fumerton for “The Limits of the Shakespearean Stage: Rejigging The Winter’s Tale.” 5:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Forum, 1910 University Drive, Boise. HIKING WITH SCOTT MARCHANT—Join local author Scott Marchant to learn about his latest book, The Hiker’s Guide to McCall and Cascade, and great places to hike in our area. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-972-8300, boisepubliclibrary.org.

STORY STORY NIGHT: (TAKE A) HIKE (UP)— Hike to the summit of storytelling at the final show of Story Story Night’s 201617 flagship season. Enjoy two featured storytellers and a special mini-musical adaptation from a slammer’s story shared earlier this season. Plus special guests, surprises and birthday cake to celebrate SSN’s seventh anniversary. 7 p.m. $12. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W.

E VENT S

visit our boiseweekly.com for a more complete list of

calendar events.

On Stage U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY FALCONAIRES JAZZ BAND—The professional airmen-musicians in the Falconaires Big Band follow in a long blue line of talented Air Force Academy bandsmen who are dedicated to serving our nation. Patrons can pick up tickets (limit four) at the Morrison Center box office while supplies last. Seating is general admission and on a first-come, first-served basis. 7 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, morrisoncenter. com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Citizen FAMILY ADVOCATES STORY TOUR—Join Family Advocates to learn about the children their volunteer guardians serve, the incredible relationships they form, and how everyday people become heroes to a child in need. Family Advocates recruits, trains and mentors volunteers to provide the crucial service of Guardian ad Litem for children in foster care. Family Advocates works to strengthen these families and keep kids safe by empowering everyday people to protect and enrich the lives Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

14 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BEERGUZZLER CELEBRATE IDAHO REDUX In honor of Idaho Craft Beer Month, the most recent Beerguzzler column featured Idaho ales (specifically India pale ales). This time around it’s Idaho lagers, the flip-side of the beer coin. The difference is in the yeast. Ales use top-fermenting yeast that often contributes a fruitiness to the aromas and flavors. Lager yeast is bottom-fermenting and requires cooler brewing temps, with the emphasis on crisp, clean flavors. Here are three Gem State takes on the lager style: LAUGHING DOG THE DOGS OF HELLES, $1.60-$1.90 This lightly cloudy straw colored pour sports a two finger head with good retention. The crushed saltine cracker aromas carry through to the palate, which is marked by just-sweet malt; spicy, soft hops; and a touch of lemon. Helles is German for “bright” and that’s a good overall descriptor for this refreshing lager. PAYETTE BREWING NORTH FORK LAGER, $1.60-$1.90 A nice, creamy head covers this pale straw brew. The aromas are a soft mix of grass and grain, with a hint of citrus. Sweet but subtle malt comes through on the palate, along with biscuit and very lean hops. Light is the word for this easy-to-quaff entry, making it a good “after mowing the lawn on a hot summer’s day” choice.

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WOMEN’S & CHILDREN’S

#denimday

ALLIANCE

#WCABoise

WEAR JEANS for a PURPOSE

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. There is no excuse and never an invitation for sexual assault. Find out more at: www.wcaboise.org

WOODLAND EMPIRE PILSNER, $1.30-$1.60 A hazy, light gold in the glass, it’s topped by a porous egg-white head that leaves a lovely lacing. There’s a bit of dustiness on the nose with aromas something like a corn tortilla with a touch of lime. Clean, crisp and refreshing up front, it’s a balanced mix of subtle malt and hops. It’s a bit short on the finish, but a credible homage to the pilsner style. —David Kirkpatrick BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 15


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY

G JONES—With Yheti and Proko. 10 p.m. $15. Reef

SATURDAY

HECKTOR PECKTOR—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

JEN AND JOHN PIASANO—7 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar

APRIL 19

GUESS WHEN—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

APRIL 22

HOBOSEXUAL—7 p.m. $8. The Olympic

ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

JIM LEWIS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

ANDREW SHEPPARD—10 p.m. $5. Reef

ASHLEY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

MARSHALL POOLE—With Overlake and Dark Swallows. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic

JEFF DILLON—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

JOSHUA POWELL AND THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

CLAY MOORE TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LLOYD AND BECKY BLAKE—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

DEEP CREEPS—10 p.m. FREE. High Note

RYAN WISSINGER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SPENCER BATT—8 p.m. FREE. Piper

EMILY TIPTON—8 p.m. FREE. Piper

THE SUBURBANS—8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SHON SANDERS AND THE FOUR PENNY PEEP SHOW—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

BEATS ANTIQUE—With Mr. Bill. 8 p.m. $22-$50. Knitting Factory CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MICHAEL J. LAKY—6 p.m. FREE. Sa-Wad-Dee MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

RECORD STORE DAY LISTENING PARTY—5-7 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange

LISTEN HERE

SUN BLOOD STORIES ALBUM RELEASE—With With Child, Clarke and the Himselfs and Run On Sentence. 8 p.m. $7. Neurolux

APRIL 20

SUNDAY

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

APRIL 23

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE EXPENDABLES—With RDGLDGRN and Tribal Theory. 8 p.m. $12-$65. Knitting Factory

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRIDAY

APRIL 21 ALL THINGS BLUE—8 p.m. $5. Neurolux ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ANDY BANJO—7 p.m. FREE. High Note CLAY MOORE TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FREE X SHOW: STITCHED UP HEART—With Through Fire. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

LIL WAYNE—With Bonaphied, Yung Verb, Alec Neves and Zero. For all ages. 8 p.m. $55-$125. Revolution

GARY TACKETT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

VANDELLA—8 p.m. $5. The Olympic

THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WILLIE AND THE SINGLE WIDES—7-10 p.m. $25. Bridge Event Center

THURSDAY

SPAWNBREEZIE—10 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Reef

SCOTT KNICKERBOCKER—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

TAUGE AND FAULKNER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

NE-HI—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE OBSESSED—With Karma to Burn, Fatso Jetson and guests. 7 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. Neurolux

PINTO BENNETT AND THE FAMOUS MOTEL COWBOYS, APRIL 21-23, HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S

THE SIDEMEN:—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

For 14 years, legendary Pinto Bennett and The Famous Motel Cowboys have been getting together for a blowout mini-music fest that has to be seen (or heard) to believe. Rather than wax eloquent about the 2017 FMC Reunion—hosted by Rocci Johnson and Rob Matson—we’ll let the slate of performers speak for itself. Friday, April 21: The Lemmon Family Band, Andrew Sheppard, The Neckid Rednecks, John Hansen, Famous Motel Cowboys, Steve Eaton and Friends and The Rocci Johnson Band. Saturday, April 22: Muzzie Braun, Montana Rose, Kenny Saunders and Friends, Tylor And The Train Robbers, Famous Motel Cowboys, Kip Attaway and The Rocci Johnson Band. Sunday, April 23: David Lyle “Pops” Evans, Dan Costello and The Truck Stop Trio, Rob Harding, New Transit, Reilly Coyote, Sergio Webb and Joshua Tree. Beyond the posted schedule, the event features a jam session hosted by Joshua Tree and surprise guests throughout. Saddle up and hold on. —Zach Hagadone

THOMAS PAUL—11 a.m. FREE. High Note

April 21-22, 5 p.m.; April 23, 2 p.m.; FREE-$15. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., 208-345-7557, humpinhannahs.com.

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

609 W MAIN ST

WEDNESDAYS

MONDAY

APRIL 24 CHUCK SMITH—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GABE HESS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TUESDAY

APRIL 25 CHARLEY CHOLO—With Black Irish Texas and Lost Men. 9 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder

RECORD STORE DAY, APRIL 22, RX Thomas Edison’s phonograph was long considered the mechanism upon which the oldest human recording was made. Then, nearly 10 years ago, a group of American historians discovered a recording made by French typesetter Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville on the phonoautograph in 1860—28 years before Edison. This year marks another milestone in recording history: The 10th annual Record Store Day. The Record Exchange can’t contain all the festivities to one 24-hour period, so the party begins Thursday, April 20, with back-to-back performances by local bands Sick Wish and Toy Zoo, celebrating the release of their limited edition, split 7-inch “7th Song/Man Down” on Hi-Fi Mantra, a new local vinyl label. Even though the official release party is Saturday, April 22, at Neurolux, local band Sun Blood Stories performs Friday, April 21 at RX, so it can celebrate its new album, It Runs Around the Room With Us, with its fans of all ages—the 21-and-over set can toast the new release with free beer from Payette Brewing. Friday is also the day to get a preview of 350 RSD exclusives, and enter to win passes for RSD on Saturday. Doors open at 8 a.m. Get a full list of exclusives and festivities at therecordexchange.com. —Amy Atkins Thursday, 6 p.m., FREE; Friday, 7:30 p.m., FREE; Saturday, 8 a.m.-9 p.m., FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com.

to Recycle e c a l P R U YO ure gear t n e v d A r Outdoo arth Day! Happy E

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671 South Capitol Blvd | 208.429.1124 1545 E Iron Eagle Dr. Suite 106 Eagle, ID 83616 | 208-957-5425 BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 17


SCREEN A RIVER RUNS THROUGH THE FLICKS

How Robert Redford and his classic film changed the iconic Boise movie theater GEORGE PRENTICE

STARTS FRIDAY, APRIL 21st

18 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

On screen, Robert Redford will always be the Sundance Kid. Behind the lens, he’s the Oscar winning director of Ordinary People and Quiz Show. In life, he set the standard for political When Flicks owner Carole Skinner encountered Robert Redford at a Boise event in 1992, that set into motion a plan and environmental activism. to bring Redford’s A River Runs Through It to the Boise jewelbox theater, changing the fate of The Flicks forever. To The Flicks, he will always be looked on as a sort of godfather. Not the Vito Corleone screens,’” said Skinner. “I called our good In the summer of 1992, then-Idaho Govervariety, but a man whose 1992 film A River friends at National Trout Unlimited and said we nor Cecil Andrus invited Redford to Idaho— Runs Through It steered the Boise independent would put on a big fundraiser for them when the two had been friends since the ’70s—to movie theater to financial success, inspired an the movie opened.” speak at a fundraiser at the Morrison Center. expansion to four screens and helped lay the On Oct. 9, 1992, A River Runs Through It “We heard there wasn’t going to be a meetgroundwork for The Flicks to be the go-to opened to critical and box office success. At The and-greet after the event, so I jumped from my destination for independent film. Flicks, screenings were sold out for weeks. “It was 1992 and The Flicks was only 7 years seat and followed him,” said Skinner. “He was “Lines were around the block,” said Skinner. old,” said theater owner Carole Skinner. “Quite just about to get into a limo when I shouted, “But the really great news came on the Monday ‘Robert Redford, Robert Redford, I want to frankly, we were in the red for the whole seven after the opening weekend.” years. My husband and I were shoveling money meet you!’ He was very gracious and shook my That’s when Skinner made her usual trek to a hand. I told him I was big fan of the book, and into The Flicks like coal into a furnace.” local bank to make her deposit. When the teller I was so excited about the movie and asked if However, it wasn’t finances that inspired asked Skinner for identification, she was a bit he could put a word in for The Flicks to play A Skinner to seek out Redford and his then-just surprised. River Runs Through It. He said, completed film, A River Runs “I thought they only needed ID when you ‘It was very nice to meet you, Through It, based on the 1976 A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT but unfortunately I don’t get in- took money out; but the teller said they also novella of the same name by (PG-13) volved in that.’ They drove away, wanted ID when we started putting large author Norman Maclean—it deposits into our account,” said Skinner, with and I thought, ‘OK, fine.’” was Skinner’s love of the Directed by Robert Redford a huge smile. “We had been in the red all those Several weeks later, there story, which celebrates the Starring Brad Pitt, Craig Sheffer years and now, we were in the black. More was a knock on the door hours Rocky Mountain West and and Tom Skerritt before the theater was scheduled importantly, people were discovering The Flicks all things fly fishing. Thursday, April 20, 7 p.m. at to open. Skinner didn’t recognize for the first time. It has only gotten better. A When she heard Redford The Flicks River Runs Through It made all the difference in the man standing there. had directed the big screen the world. Who knows? Maybe we would have “I had no idea who he was, adaptation, Skinner knew she given up at some point. But after that movie, had to secure a showing at The Flicks. Unfortu- but I let him in,” said Skinner. “It was David we started thinking about expansion. We added nately, an award-season run of a big Hollywood Carroll, head of sales for Columbia Pictures. our third and fourth screens in 1997.” Wow.” feature wasn’t in the cards for The Flicks in the On Thursday, April 20, The Flicks will Skinner gave Carroll a tour of The Flicks, early ’90s. celebrate the 25th anniversary of A River Runs which was significantly smaller than the cin“It was still pretty early in the emergence eplexes that Columbia was accustomed to when Through It with a special one-time screening at 7 of independent film. There were a few pretty showcasing its new features. popular titles like Kiss of the Spider Woman and p.m., presented by The Idaho Film Foundation, “I remember his words as if he said them The Trip to Bountiful, but 1992 was still near the Rediscovered Books and The Cabin. yesterday. He said, ‘I like you and I like your beginning of the independent film craze,” said “Plus, it will be sponsored by our great Skinner. “As a result, The Flicks was still off the theater. I’ll give you the movie to play exclufriends at Trout Unlimited,” said Skinner. “It’s a sively, but you have to play it on both of your radar for a lot of folks.” gorgeous film, and it means so much to us.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN

BW OFFICE HOURS

NATE SILVER

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Stats whiz on elections, ethics and how to pronounce ‘Boise’

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

HARRISON BERRY

ADOPT-A-PET Longtime sports statistics guru Nate Silver made a name for himself as a political fortune teller when he foresaw the results of the 2008 election that swept then-Sen. Barack Obama into the White House. He has since published a book about the power of data and founded the popular polling and statistics blog FiveThirtyEight. Silver was also one of the few pundits to acknowledge Donald Trump had a fighting chance at winning the presidency in the 2016 election. While the FiveThirtyEight crew was in Boise to record a podcast during Hackfort, Boise Weekly sat down with the data whiz to get his take on pronouncing “Boise,” data in journalism and the Trump upset. You put up a poll measuring how people pronounce ‘Boise.’ What were the results? I think only about a third of people got it right. I think some people thought we were making fun of Boise, but we weren’t. I was in a playing mood. You come from a baseball stats background. What are the lessons learned from transitioning from sports to political stats? The one thing is, people are much bigger idiots about politics than they are about baseball. I think even sports fans who don’t think they’re data savvy look up statistics all the time. Journalists covering [politics], everything is filtered through this partisan lens. That’s quite different. Do you think there might be more resourceful reporting done if politics were treated more like a sport? I think a lot of the bad habits that some political journalism has are efforts to cater to partisans or being afraid of being labeled a certain way. That’s a dimension that is something I’ve noticed. How do you use the data analysis you provide to tell compelling stories? We want to tell true stories, right? That’s the first priority. We also hope they’re compelling. We spend a lot of time on our editing process, trying to make sure the truth is as interesting as fake news or alternative facts, potentially. There’s all this concern now about being truth-driven. Well, we think the way to be more truthful is to BOISE WEEKLY.COM

be more empirical, which means experience and being evidence-driven. It means being transparent and not relying so much on inside information where you can’t show the reader where you’re coming to your conclusions from. Are you a journalist? Sure, why not? We do a lot of traditional reporting. Half our stories involve some sort of reporting, which means talking to and interviewing people, but I don’t understand why that type of reporting is held up on a pedestal—and particularly that type of reporting where you’re just talking to insiders. The thing is that if you have a data set you’re looking at, first of all, it could be a different way to have more people represented. Polling is just a more scientific way to interview people than going out into the field and talking to people at a rally or something. There’s value to doing both, but we’ve seen lots of times where a reporter will have a prejudicial view of a story and interview people in a way that confirms those prejudices, whereas polling is a way to interview thousands of people in a way that’s more objective and is a check against whatever the reporter’s bringing to the table. What about the fracas over polling and the 2016 elections? How and why did so many people get that so wrong? I don’t think the pollsters got it that wrong. We’d flowed from periods where [Hillary] Clinton had leads of six or seven points and periods where it was quite competitive in part because, at least according to our math, Clinton had an Electoral College disadvantage: Because her vote was concentrated in coastal, urban areas, she could do fairly well in California and Massachusetts and places like that, and really struggle in the middle part of the country. We thought that was clear even though it went against conventional wisdom. The fact that she was struggling so much in Iowa and Ohio should have been a tipoff that Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania were a problem for her. Her coalition was, like, perfectly engineered to be inefficient in the Electoral College. And also the fact—and I’m in run-on mode here—voters could dislike Trump and vote for him anyway because it was a change election and people were fed up with having the same party have the presidency for eight years.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com PEANUTS: I’m a relaxed old gal who just needs a quiet place to spend my golden years.

DUCKY: I’m devilishly handsome, affectionate and love people—especially kids.

TIKA: I am equal parts independent and loveydovey, with an expressive tail.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. COOPER: 5-year-old, male, miniature pinscher mix. Confident, playful and smart. Needs an experienced owner. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#34996166)

FOXXY: 8-year-old, female, corgi/Chihuahua mix. Sassy and independent, but loyal. Does not do well with cats or kids. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#35004742)

RONIN: 4-year-old, female, shiba inu. Friendly and smart, but sensitive to some handling. Needs an adult-only home without small animals. (Kennel 402–#35051047)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT CHICAGO: 6-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Loves tummy and chin rubs. Needs a home without young kids or animals. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#35051812)

MAXWELL: 10-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Loves to be petted. Calm, curious, attentive boy despite his age. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#35048487)

MELL: 4-year-old, female, domestic longhair. Arrived at the shelter as a stray. Playful, talkative and affectionate. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#35013777)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 19


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124 127

128

73 Exam with a readingcomprehension sect. 74 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 77 Hoedown partner 79 Pester 81 Setting off 83 [Right in the kisser!] 85 Lament of the defeated 90 Job-search time, maybe 91 Go postal 93 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 94 Dreyer’s ice cream partner 95 Go on a run? 96 Brownie, e.g. 98 Emails discreetly 101 Check 102 Overdo the criticism, say 103 It may be brown or blond 104 Santa Fe summer hrs. 106 Many a Wall St. recruit 108 Like a goner 110 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 114 Many a B.Y.U. attendee 117 “Pick me! Pick me!” 119 Rich breakfast item 121 Played out 122 Fiat 123 Collides hard with 124 48th vice president 125 Modern-day problem solvers 126 Meyers of late-night 127 In a foul mood 128 Interjected

DOWN

109

121

123

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HOUSING

118

1 Close 2 Prayer figure 3 Decide somehow by chance 4 Offers at motorcycle dealerships 5 Pharaoh ____ 6 Luxury-hotel amenity 7 “Here’s what I think,” briefly

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boiseclassicmovies.com 8 Poindexter 9 Something getting stuck in a trunk? 10 Answer to “Are you …?” 11 Grayish 12 “Hairspray” matriarch 13 Kind of plane 14 Vox co-founder Klein and others 15 Signal for dinner 16 White-bearded sort 17 Hell week, e.g. 18 Assuage 21 Point of transition 25 Meditation syllables 27 South American cash crop 30 Cuts on the back? 32 Wedding rings? 36 Group lampooned in “Django Unchained” 37 Is Greek? 39 Arnold Schwarzenegger’s middle name 40 Needed resupplying 41 Pea nut? 42 Phonograph stat 43 Inits. in some portfolios 45 Woodworking tool 46 Crew crew 49 Evince 51 Aquafina rival 52 Attends 53 Austen matchmaker 54 Breather 56 It may leave you in stitches 60 Drunk 62 Top secret? 64 Creative field 65 It’s passed down 66 “____ Eyes” (Eagles hit) 67 Bacchanalia 69 Mass leader 71 Electrocutes

104 Satisfies 105 TiVo, for one 107 Amigos 109 Sweetly, on a score 111 Mark indelibly 112 River through ancient Nubia 113 Casino opening 115 365 giorni 116 Native Rwandan 118 Mind 120 Electric-bill unit: Abbr. 121 Place for a bachelorette party

75 Hymn starter 76 Wind this way and that 78 Repeated part of a five-mile hike? 80 Aggravates 82 Either of a pair of brothers in folklore 84 Act like a baby, maybe 86 Moved, jocularly 87 How you can count things up to five 88 “Rugrats” father 89 Rug rat 92 One looking to grab a bite? 97 Sphinx, in part 98 Probable money loser 99 Composer Debussy 100 Boston athlete 101 Philatelist’s collection 102 Vernacular L A S T A C H T

B L O O M

P L A Y

R A C E

B O B R O B E R T S

S P E W

M I R A

A N T I

I M A M S

M A D A M

P I A N O

O T T H B I T S W V I E A S E C U T U S S A T H O B E R L L M U P E S L I N E L E A L E N D R I R N Y G

S A H I B S A E R E O E G G S A L A D

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S C R O N U T S E S A U R W Y G O G O

A C L E F

T H E

F E A U C D N E D A T H U L B A L A F L O O C I A R L E

M O N S T E R S B A L L O O N

A N S W E R S C R A Y O L A G A L A P O L O D O A

R E I G N

I N D A

P E E L S L O G E F L I F O W N C A R S S O O H N S E O N O B D L A R I V O M I P I E S T R

R E F S L P E R X E T E E A S A R T G O S O N O S D W A W H Y O I S M P O A L N A T S E H A K O A L A S

O N T O E

O D E O N

S O N N Y

O C H O

O R E O

N U N N

T U R N T O G O L D

U P D O

B E S T

N O R M A

P S A T

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Amber Joy Gill Legal Names Case No. CV 01 1704911 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Amber Joy Gill now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Faolin Joy Gill. The reason for the change in name is: personal A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on

EVENTS

(date) May 16, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Mar. 22, 2017 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Mar. 29, Apr. 5, 12 & 19 LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV01-16-23512, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Soda Springs Subdivision Homeowners Association Inc., Plaintiff, v. Macy J. Hill, Defendant. TO: MACY J. HILL You have been sued by SODA SPRINGS SUBDIVISION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV01-16-23512. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 6126 W State St, Ste. 311, Boise, ID 83703, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy

of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 27th day of March, 2017, CHRISTOPHER D. RICH DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB. DATES: Mar. 29, Apr. 5, 12 and 19 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Saline A Grisaffi Legal Names Case No. CV 01 1703293 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Saline A Grisaffi, a minor, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Luca Alexander Wolfe. The reason for the change in name is: transitioning. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) May 16, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Mar. 22, 2017 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Apr. 5, 12, 19 & 26 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Ruben Edward Medrano Jr Legal Names Case No. CV 01 1705480 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of

Ruben Edward Medrano Jr. now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Ruben Edward Scheerer. The reason for the change in name is: Change to mom and step dad’s last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) May 25, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date April. 6, 2017 DEBBIE NAGELE CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Apr. 19 & 26, May 3 & 10

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BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 21


PAGE BREAK $GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH FWB

DEAR MINERVA, I’ve been seeing this guy regularly. We click but I think of him as more of a “friend with benefits” (FWB). We’re not exclusive and can see other people. I’m feeling guilty because I have just spent the night with an amazing man. I need to tell my regular FWB about it but I know he’ll freak out. I wasn’t planning on hanging out with this guy tonight but he was insistent and pursued me hard. His amazing personality and kind soul make it harder. He and I connected on a very different spiritual and emotional level and I can see him being more than a FWB. How and when do I tell him about this new one and should I feel this guilty? —Twitterpated

#boiseweeklypic

FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

BOISE PARKS AND REC ACTIVITY GUIDE The official start of summer is still two months away, but the season typically heats up early in the Treasure Valley. To help residents and visitors alike plan their summer adventures, the Boise Parks and Recreation Department has released its 2017 Summer Activity Guide. Spread across 64 pages and organized with sections for youths, teens and adults, the Free guide offers an expansive listing of everything parks.cityofboise.org from camps and classes to sports, arts, clubs and special programs. It also includes profiles and information on various Boise facilities, including swimming pools, golf courses, parks and venues like Idaho IceWorld, Zoo Boise, Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center and more. Summer program registration opened for Boise residents on April 17, and non-residents can register starting Wednesday, April 19. Scholarships are also available to offset fees or other activity-related expenses. —Zach Hagadone

DEAR TWITTERPATED, “Friends with benefits” is such a modern convenience but, from the sounds of it, you feel some sort of loyalty to your FWB. You already feel the need to tell him about what you’ve done, but is it fair to burden him with your guilt? While this new man could be “the one,” don’t let your one night with him overtake your imagination. Chemistry is undeniable, but one night does not the romance of the century make. Get to know him better. If you truly have no strings attached, it would be cruel to talk about it with your FWB unless that’s part of the arrangement. No one needs to hear about the newer, shinier model until you’re breaking it off. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2.  3.  4.  5. 

6. 7.  8. 

“ONE MORE FOR THE ROAD,” CURTIS STIGERS

“ALL-AMERIKKKAN BADA$$,” JOEY BADA$$

“HOORAY FOR LOVE,” CURTIS STIGERS

“SUNLIT YOUTH,” LOCAL NATIVES

“WHITEOUT CONDITIONS,” THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS

“PURE COMEDY,” FATHER JOHN MISTY

9. 10.

“EMPEROR OF SAND,” MASTODON “THE FAR FIELD,” FUTURE ISLANDS

“HOT THOUGHTS,” SPOON

53%

14.3%

26%

34%

Federal tax rate for an average American family, amounting to a tax hit of $9,656 on gross income of $67,564.

Percentage of U.S. gross domestic product equivalent to the amount of tax revenue collected in 2014.

Average tax as a share of GDP among member countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Denmark is highest (almost 50 percent) and Mexico is lowest (about 15 percent).

(taxpolicycenter.org)

(time.com)

How important is it to you that President Donald Trump release his tax returns?

It’s very important: 83.08% I care somewhat: 3.53% It doesn’t matter to me: 13.4%

“INFINITE,” DEEP PURPLE

Percentage of Americans who, according to a recent Bloomberg/Morning Consult poll, said President Donald Trump should be forced to release his tax returns.

(fool.com)

Taken by instagram user pnwjordanv.

$65.6 BILLION Idaho GDP—roughly equivalent to the economic output of Uzbekistan. (newsweek.com)

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to be a scientif ic sample of loc a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

10TH

$4,549

$743

Idaho’s ranking among lowest overall state and local tax burdens in the U.S., including the District of Columbia, in 2014.

Average credit card debt in Idaho, compared to the national average of $4,879 per borrower.

Average weekly wage in Idaho, as of the second quarter of 2016.

(Idaho Press-Tribune)

(nationaldebtrelief.com)

(boisestatepublicradio.org)

(taxpolicycenter.org)

CONGRATULATIONS JEN SORENSEN! 2017 PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST Find her cartoon on the inside back page of the Boise Weekly 22 | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | BOISEweekly

“For editorial cartoons that delivered sharp perspectives through flawless artistry, biting prose and crisp wit.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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TED RALL

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HOBO JARGON

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): After George Washington was elected as the first president of the United States, he had to move from his home in Virginia to New York City, which at the time was the center of the American government. But there was a problem: He didn’t have enough cash on hand to pay for his long-distance relocation, so he was forced to scrape up a loan. Fortunately, he was resourceful and persistent in doing so. The money arrived in time for him to attend his own inauguration. I urge you to be like Washington in the coming weeks, Aries. Do whatever’s necessary to get the funds you need to finance your life’s next chapter. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Fantasize about sipping pear nectar and listening to cello music and inhaling the aroma of musky amber and caressing velvet, cashmere and silk. Imagine how it would feel to be healed by inspiring memories and sweet awakenings and shimmering delights and delicious epiphanies. I expect experiences like these to be extra available in the coming weeks. But they won’t necessarily come to you freely and easily. You will have to expend effort to ensure they actually occur. So be alert for them. Seek them out. Track them down. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Contagion may work in your favor, but it could also undermine you.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

On the one hand, your enthusiasm is likely to ripple out and inspire people whose help you could use. On the other hand, you might be more sensitive than usual to the obnoxious vibes of manipulators. But now that I’ve revealed this useful tip, let’s hope you will be able to maximize the positive kind of contagion and neutralize the negative. Here’s one suggestion that may help: Visualize yourself to be surrounded by a golden force field that projects your good ideas far and wide even as it prevents the disagreeable stuff from leaking in. CANCER (June 21-July 22): A reader named Kris X sent me a rebuke. “You’re not a guru or a shaman,” he sneered. “Your horoscopes are too filled with the slippery stench of poetry to be useful for spiritual seekers.” Here’s my response: “Thank you, sir! I don’t consider myself a guru or shaman, either. It’s not my mission to be an all-knowing authority who hands down foolproof advice. Rather, I’m an apprentice to the Muse of Curiosity. I like to wrestle with useful, beautiful paradoxes. My goal is to be a joyful rebel stirring up benevolent trouble, to be a cheerleader for the creative imagination.” So now I ask you, my fellow Cancerian: How do you avoid getting trapped in molds that people pressure you to fit inside? Are you skilled at being yourself even if that’s different from what’s

expected of you? What are the soulful roles you choose to embody despite the fact that almost no one understands them? Now is a good time to meditate on these matters. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the coming weeks, there will be helpers whose actions will nudge you—sometimes inadvertently—toward a higher level of professionalism. You will find it natural to wield more power and you will be more effective in offering your unique gifts. Now, maybe you imagine you have already been performing at the peak of your ability, but I bet you will discover—with a mix of alarm and excitement—that you can become even more excellent. Be greater, Leo! Do better! Live stronger! (P.S.: As you ascend to this new level of competence, I advise you to be humbly aware of your weaknesses and immaturities. As your clout rises, you can’t afford to indulge in self-delusions.) VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I love to see you Virgos flirt with the uncharted and the uncanny and the indescribable. I get thrills and chills whenever I watch your fine mind trying to make sense of the fabulous and the foreign and the unfathomable. What other sign can cozy up to exotic wonders and explore forbidden zones with as much no-nonsense pragmatism as you? If anyone can capture

greased lightning in a bottle or get a hold of magic beans that actually work, you can.

deeper, collaborate stronger, compromise smarter and give more. Do you have any other ideas?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A friend told me about a trick used by his grandmother, a farmer. When her brooding hens stopped laying eggs, she would put them in pillowcases that she then hung from a clothesline in a stiff breeze. After the hens got blown around for a while, she returned them to their cozy digs. The experience didn’t hurt them and she swore it put them back on track with their egg-laying. I’m not comfortable with this strategy. It’s too extreme for an animal-lover like myself. (And I’m glad I don’t have to deal with recalcitrant hens.) But maybe it’s an apt metaphor or poetic prod for your use right now. What could you do to stimulate your own creative production?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “If I had nine hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend the first six sharpening my ax,” said Abraham Lincoln, one of America’s most productive presidents. I know you Sagittarians are more renowned for your bold, improvisational actions than your careful planning and strategic preparation, but I think the coming weeks will be a time when you can and should adopt Lincoln’s approach. The readier you are, the freer you’ll be to apply your skills effectively and wield your power precisely.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Now would be an excellent time to add deft new nuances to the ways you kiss, lick, hug, snuggle, caress and fondle. Is there a worthy adventurer who will help you experiment with these activities? If not, use your pillow, your own body, a realistic life-size robot or your imagination. This exercise will be a good warm-up for your other assignment, which is to upgrade your intimacy skills. How might you do that? Hone and refine your abilities to get close to people. Listen

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Zoologists say that cannibalizing offspring is common in the animal kingdom, even among species that care tenderly for their young. So when critters eat their kids, it’s definitely “natural.” But I trust that in the coming weeks, you won’t devour your own children. Nor, I hope, will you engage in any behavior that metaphorically resembles such an act. I suspect that you may be at a low ebb in your relationship with some creation or handiwork or influence that you generated out of love. But please don’t abolish it, dissolve it or abandon it. Just the opposite, in fact: Intensify your efforts to nurture it.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Your astrological house of communication will be the scene of substantial clamor and ruckus in the coming weeks. A bit of the hubbub will be flashy but empty. But much of it should be pretty interesting, and some of it will even be useful. To get the best possible results, be patient and objective rather than jumpy and reactive. Try to find the deep codes buried inside the mixed messages. Discern the hidden meanings lurking within the tall tales and reckless gossip. If you can deal calmly with the turbulent flow, you will give your social circle a valuable gift. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The best oracular advice you’ll get in the coming days probably won’t arise from your dreams or an astrological reading or a session with a psychic, but rather by way of seemingly random signals, like an overheard conversation or a sign on the side of a bus or a scrap of paper you find lying on the ground. And I bet the most useful relationship guidance you receive won’t be from an expert, but maybe from a blog you stumble upon or a barista at a café or one of your old journal entries. Be alert for other ways this theme is operating, as well. The usual sources may not have useful info about their specialties. Your assignment is to gather up accidental inspiration and unlikely teachings.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 19–25, 2017 | 23


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Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 44  

Safe House, Three's Company, River of Time

Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 44  

Safe House, Three's Company, River of Time