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“Our government knows more about these refugees than it will ever know about me as a natural-born citizen.” MAIL 5

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Trump’s Clumsy Sweep How new immigration policies are being addressed in Idaho

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First Thursday March forth on March 2 for this month’s First Thursday

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Another Round

More controversy surrounding Idaho law regulating alcohol and R-rated movies FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Sami Edge, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Brooklyn Riepma, Devon Seefeldt Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Jared Stewart, jared@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Bingo Barnes, bingo@boiseweekly.com Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Ryan Johnson, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Bill Hagler, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2017 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

EDITOR’S NOTE FEAR FULL

Six months ago on this day, I was sitting on a beach in St. Croix, one of the U.S. Virgin Islands, celebrating my 10th wedding anniversary. It was a steady 82 degrees with a slight breeze, and I was sipping a cold Presidente beer. Boats were bumping lightly in the harbor and that electric blue Caribbean Sea was running gently against the sand in front of my cabana. All was well. Too well. Six months later, the world is a much different place. It’s angrier and uglier, and you can bet it will only get more so in the next six months. In St. Croix, back in the first week of August 2016, the town of Christiansted was papered with “Hillary Clinton for President” posters. The Crucians were having their own local elections but because of the USVI’s status as a U.S. territory, only the ex-pats could cast ballots for president. Still, the feeling was heavily Democratic and celebratory amid the waning of President Barack Obama’s two-term administration. I don’t know what the mood is on St. Croix these days, but Stacey Plaskett, a USVI delegate to the U.S. Congress, wrote in the St. Croix Source shortly after the election that the outcome was “difficult for many people to comprehend,” noting fear in the 76 percent Afro-Cuban population that President Donald Trump’s “populist movement and nationalist-identity politics” would spur his base to “engage in a ‘post-Obama’ backlash similar to the post-Reconstruction era of American history.” Considering the centuries-old legacy of slavery, racism, colonialism and disenfranchisement on the U.S. Virgin Islands, I imagine those fears are palpable. Likewise with others living in the mainland U.S., whose experiences have been marked by institutional marginalization, bigotry and economic disadvantage. Far from the deceptively calm beaches of St. Croix, immigrants and refugees in the Treasure Valley are navigating their fears as Trump’s policies threaten to fracture their families with sweeping deportation and detention rules. Boise Weekly staff writer Harrison Berry took an in-depth look at how some local organizations and industry groups are approaching Trump’s hardline approach to foreign-born residents. Find his report on Page 6. Also, inserted in this week’s paper, you’ll find We Are Boise—a brand-new, full-color glossy magazine in which local merchants celebrate our community in their own words. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST

Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Christine Raymond TITLE: “Dark Passage II” MEDIUM: Mixed media on paper construction ARTIST STATEMENT: Christine Raymond and Sue Latta open their two-person show at Gallery five18 this month on First Thursday, March 2. “Dark Passage II” is Raymond’s response to the challenging political times that we are witnessing.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each

week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 3


YOUR CAR IS HIGH TECH. IS YOUR TECHNICIAN? Computerized Diagnostic Engine Analyzer

BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

Late Model Volkswagen & Audi Service & Repair

READING, WRITING AND SALARIES THE IDAHO LEGISL ATURE’S BUDGE T WRITING C OMMIT TEE HAS APPROVED A PROP O SED FISCAL YE AR 2018 PUBLIC SC HOOL S BUDGE T, TOTALING NE ARLY $1.7 BILLION IN GENER AL FUND DOLL ARS . THAT’S A 6.3 PERCENT YE AR- OVER-YE AR INCRE ASE. THE PROP O SED SPENDING PL AN INCLUDES $62 MILLION TO FUND THE SO - CALLED “CAREER L ADDER” FOR K-12 EDUCATORS . MORE AT NE WS/UNDA THE ROTUNDA

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TAKING AIM

Greg Pruitt, of the Idaho Second Amendment Alliance, says he isn’t done fighting for gun rights: “You’re either 100 percent for the Second Amendment, or you’re against us.” More at News/Citydesk.

MORRISON CENTER IDAHO’S PREMIER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

ON THE CAMPUS OF

BEST LOSER

Hollywood is still smarting over the Oscar debacle that saw La La Land awarded Best Picture one moment and Moonlight being given the same award seconds later. More at Screen/Screen News.

SOMETHING FISHY

A group of Northwest conservation advocates have filed suit against the Environmental Protection Agency, alleging the EPA has been negligent in protecting salmon. More at News/Citydesk.

OPINION

BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

FREET EVEN March 10 • 8:00 PM “. . . w h e n h e r e a d s P i n t e r ’s p o e m s. . . yo u fe e l t h e p l ay w r i g h t ’s p r e s e n ce.” ~ T h e N e w Yo r k T i m e s General Admission, Limit 4 (pick up at the MC Box Office), First-Come First-Served This production includes mature language

MC Box Office • MorrisonCenter.com • 426-1110 4 | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


OPINION NOT MY VALUES

Perspectives change after a month in a refugee camp MEGAN PAINTER The words “not my country” will never cross my lips. I have traveled the world and seen immeasurable suffering first hand. Every time I have returned from such travels, I have been overwhelmed with how lucky I am to be a citizen of the United States of America. I am so appreciative and thankful for things others take so much for granted. Toilets, water from a tap, washing machines, refrigeration, reliable electricity; but, primarily, the safety and security that my country affords me. I love my country. Burn my flag and you burn a hole in my heart. The words “not my president” will also never cross my lips. I value our democracy and free and open elections. So many have fought for fair and open elections, and I respect those valiant efforts. Our elections are an anomaly. Most countries around the globe do not have elections without fear of persecution or violence. Many countries’ elections are riddled with corruption and unrest. I will respect a free, open election even if the candidate I voted for isn’t elected, as was the case in this most recent election. I was raised in a remote town in eastern Montana with a population of less than 5,000. This town was three hours from an airport or a shopping mall. There is not a single mosque or Islamic prayer center within a 10-hour drive. Ninety-four percent of the population is Caucasian, which is 20 percent higher than the national average. Fifty-eight percent of the population affiliates as Catholic or Protestant, with only 4 percent stating “other” as a religion. If there is anyone with an excuse to be narrow-minded or sheltered to international politics, I believe it would be me. I have only ever held residence in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. I am a Caucasian female, aged 30, affiliated as a non-denominational Christian. I am an emergency room nurse. Very rarely do I spend a day at work in which my actions do not intervene in a way that saves another person’s life, even if that person treats me poorly or disrespectfully in the process. I spent November working as a nurse in a refugee camp in Greece. I was terrified and overwhelmed when I left Boise. I knew I would be working with predominantly Muslim refugees displaced by conflicts in the Middle East. I felt awkward and uncomfortable, my family and friends worried about my safety. I vowed to open my mind and focus on something familiar: working hard. No heroics or patting myself on the back as a do-gooder, just good old fashioned “do more than is asked of you.” I was wrong. I played basketball and trash talked an Iraqi man in his 50s while we body-checked and B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

fouled each other to no end. Apparently, no matter where you’re from or what customs you have, no man likes to lose to a trash-talking girl. Sweaty and out-of-breath hugs, back slapping and smiles were shared by all. I rode shotgun with a 22-year-old hijab-clad Muslim woman while we both cursed in-car navigation systems as we tried to find a local hospital where one of our critical patients had been transported. We listened to her choice of music on the way and I realized some of the same artists she prefers make up an entire playlist I listen to while snowboarding. We chatted about relationships, marriage, careers and goals like I chat with my girlfriends in the States. Nearly every day I did pull-ups and wall sits with two Syrian teenage boys from Damascus. They had fled Syria because their mother, a French teacher, and their father, an engineer were academics and valued education. When one of their sons graduated high school, he was going to be forced into fighting and they fled so he could become an optometrist rather than a soldier. I helped to teach them how to use an AED, CPR and first aid. I also helped teach them the finer points of American education: English slang and profanity, ’80s hip-hop and resume writing. We Facetime still and they call me their “sister from another mister.” I could sit here and write all day about my experiences and how my expectations were absolutely wrong about these people, their religion and their customs. The words that will cross my lips right now are “not my values.” I will not stand by silent as we make mass generalizations about such a large group of people. I will not support sweeping political policies that alienate human beings based on religion, race, stereotypes and labels. I will not listen to the fear mongering that refugees are “terrorists who haven’t been vetted.” Eight federal agencies are involved in the current vetting of refugees that make it to the U.S. Six security databases are utilized and five background checks, as well as four biometric checks, are logged and performed to ensure our safety. This process at minimum usually takes 18 months and can take up to two years. Our government knows more about these refugees than it will ever know about me as a natural-born citizen. This is not a political issue, this is a human rights issue. Basic. Human. Rights. We owe it to these people to open our minds, educate ourselves to the facts, and speak forcefully and with conviction against violations of basic human rights. We also owe it to ourselves and to our country.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 5


UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

NEWS TRUMP’S CLUMSY SWEEP Idaho immigrants caught in a political divide HARRISON BERRY

A Nampa lawmaker wants to get the government out of school bond elections.

EFFORT TO QUASH ELECTIONEERING ON SCHOOL BONDS MOVING FORWARD AT IDAHO STATEHOUSE

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6 | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | BOISEweekly 

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—George Prentice

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In spite of stiff opposition from the Ada County clerk’s office, school boards throughout Idaho and the ACLU, the Idaho House State Affairs Committee has moved forward with a bill that would impose new restrictions on what it called “governmental interference” in school bond and levy elections. “It’s very apparent that there’s a problem. You have a stack of examples in front of you,” said bill sponsor Rep. Jason Monks (R-Nampa), pointing to flyers and mailers promoting past and upcoming bond elections. “Look at this one. It’s a packet handed out to school children to take home. It talks about when the election is or what’s on the ballot. No problem. But to include an application for an absentee ballot or why the school needs the bond? That doesn’t seem appropriate.” Monks said his proposal would restrict the use of public resources to advocate for a bond or levy, unless the same resources were available to any member of the public opposing the measure. The debate in front of the State Affairs Committee stretched into two full mornings of public testimony, including from Ada County Clerk Chris Rich, who questioned the bill’s ambiguity; Idaho School Board Association Executive Director Karen Echeverria, who argued the legislation “conflicted with existing law”; and ACLU-Idaho Policy Director Kathy Griesmyer, who said the bill “raises constitutional concerns and restriction of free speech.” Fred Birnbaum, vice president of the Idaho Freedom Foundation, argued in favor of the bill, saying a recent College of Western Idaho marketing campaign prior to a CWI bond measure, was “fundamentally unfair, taking money out of taxpayers’ pockets,” to push for a “yes” vote. Ultimately, the committee voted to send HB 189 to general orders for some tweaking, but agreed that the measure should head to the full House for its consideration.

The ACLU-Idaho activist training session attracted almost 50 people—too many for the Minority Caucus Room on the fourth floor of the Idaho State Capitol Building. An announcement relocating the Feb. 20 session was made, and the crowd migrated en masse to EW240 in the basement, which minutes before had been an overflow room where many of the future activists heard Rep. Greg Chaney (R-Caldwell) introduce the latest version of his anti-sanctuary cities bill. “His system, his beliefs, don’t belong here,” Rep. Paulette Jordan (D-Plummer) told the group. Jordan sits on the House State Affairs Committee where Chaney’s bill, HB 198, was introduced, and mounted a vocal opposition to its being granted a hearing. Her audience of concerned citizens had come to the Statehouse to learn the ropes of opposing Chaney’s bill—part of a growing resistance to the brisk pace of Republican-led immigration policy changes. Suspense has been thick around how President Donald Trump would tackle the issue of undocumented immigrants, and now that his enforcement preferences have been outlined, critics are deriding them for splitting

up families, posing serious threats to civil rights and potentially causing serious damage to Idaho’s economy. Trump kicked off his campaign by calling Mexicans criminals, rapists and drug dealers, painting a picture of immigrants from Latin America as sources of criminality and a drain on America’s resources. Since his election, Trump has followed up on his campaign rhetoric with greatly expanded guidelines for identifying, apprehending and deporting undocumented immigrants that have bred uncertainty and fear among immigrants—undocumented and documented alike. The new guidelines constitute a nationwide sweep. They include placing detainer holds on any undocumented person suspected or convicted of a crime and swelling the ranks of Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents nationwide from 20,000 to 30,000—a move said to be unworkable, as 60 percent of ICE agent candidates fail to matriculate. The new policies also end the practice of placing people caught entering the U.S. into the immigration system rather than returning them to their countries of origin. Expedited removal, the practice of returning undocumented immigrants to their countries of origin without a judicial hearing if they’re caught within 100 miles of the border and two weeks after crossing it, will be expanded to include the entire nation. According to the ACLU, that could mean someone caught crossing the border years ago but now living anywhere in the country could be picked up by ICE agents at any time without due process. Child immigrants caught near the border will be funneled into the immigration system but their parents could be subject to prosecution. The Trump administration has said it has no plans yet to round up approximately 750,000 Deferred Action for Child Arrivals recipients, known as Dreamers and, according to The New York Times, Trump indicated he will “deal with DACA with heart.” Meanwhile, the Trump administration has said it wishes to train and enlist local law enforcement as de facto immigration enforcement agents. The plan would allow police to target undocumented immigrants with far greater precision than ICE, but when a similar plan was put into place by controversial Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, it was criticized for enabling racial profiling. For many Mexican

nationals, confusion over Trump’s orders abounds. Jorge Palomino, communications director for the Mexican Consulate in Boise, said the consulate has been reaching out to the Treasure Valley Latino community fielding questions from people concerned that if they leave the country they may not be able to return, even if they have appropriate documentation. The consulate is providing whatever information it can to the broader community and helping individuals obtain documentation for their Mexican citizenship. “This is new for us,” he said. It doesn’t help that tensions between the U.S. and Mexico have been high. Trump’s campaign promises and the early days of his presidency have contrasted sharply with decades of positive relations between the two countries. He has stood by a promise that Mexico will pay for a border wall, which could cost as much as $40 billion to construct, despite adamant resistance from Mexico City, which has also said it will not accept deportees who are not Mexican citizens. Palomino called the diplomatic situation and its effect on Mexican nationals living in the U.S. a “crisis.” Concerns over Trump’s proposals made January the busiest month in Boise immigration law firm Wilner & O’Reilly’s 13-year history. Managing attorney Jordan Moody said he has “four or five clients” who will “be having to make serious life choices, and will likely be leaving pretty soon.” Others are clients who are shoring up their documentation status, sometimes after years of neglect. “They’ve been eligible to adjust status or become legal permanent residents. They just kind of don’t do it. ... They push it off until it becomes necessary,” Moody said. The new directives are ripe for legal challenges. According to Moody, a number of the new rules “definitely” pose due process and racial profiling concerns that groups like the ACLU and American Immigration Lawyers Association could use to stymie portions of Trump’s orders in the courts. Some, including Moody, have noted that police departments around the country have worked to earn the trust of immigrant communities, and co-opting them into performing immigration enforcement would damage those relationships while adding new burdens to the job. Visas are available for immigrants who are witnesses or otherwise prove valuable to criminal investigations, but the strength of that visa program— which Moody said has had a particular impact on immigrant women—is jeopardized by Trump’s orders: “It takes years for people to understand law enforcement is there to help them. Now, who knows? I wouldn’t be able to tell them, ‘Yeah, call B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


RYAN J OH NSON

NEWS

the police,’ because there’s a chance they might deport you.” At Caldwell High School, the political actions poised to shift America’s approach to foreign nationals are already being felt. Ydalia Yado, who works at Caldwell High as an instructional coach and migrant graduate specialist, said the election has produced a wave of anti-immigrant sentiment. “Enough people felt [Trump’s] language and rhetoric were OK, and now it’s OK for others to use that same language and those same tactics,” she said. “[T]he people who chose him sent a message that kind of language and behavior is acceptable.” Yado works with nearly 50 Caldwell High students who come from migrant families, most of them in “mixed-status” families, in which parents or siblings may not all share the same immigration status. Children from mixed-status families face an uphill battle receiving the same educational opportunities as their U.S.-born and other immigrant student counterparts. They face lower high school graduation rates, sometimes attend several schools in a single year and frequently don’t have access to education funding through the Federal Application for Student Aid. Yado’s job is to help these students get the most out of their time at Caldwell High and push them toward higher education post-graduation, but her efforts are complicated by students’ cynicism toward the immigration system and a “fear [of ] not being able to have the same opportunities as their peers.” She has lately noticed an uptick in their disillusionment in the form of black humor: “I’ve heard more jokes, and I feel like they’re coping mechanisms. They’re jokes like, ‘Oh, how many of [us] are going to be deported?’” The political climate has caused students to sort between those who would be unaffected by Trump’s directives and those who wouldn’t, and though Caldwell High administration doesn’t tolerate racism or bullying, there has been an increase in anti-immigrant sentiment both in the school and the community. Boise has become a battleground for immigrants. In January, the City Council unanimously passed its Welcoming City resolution—a reaffirmation that the city seeks to be supportive of all who live here—but shied away from making the City of Trees a sanctuary city that refuses to comply with federal immigration officials asking for information about undocumented immigrants. “This is not a statement of Boise as a sanctuary city,” said Boise City Council member and District 17 Democratic Sen. Maryanne Jordan. “This is more personal. Sometimes you have to B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

say something because it’s the right thing to say.” There is much debate about how much protection cities can offer undocumented immigrants. Most municipal police departments book inmates at their local county jails, which cross-reference inmate information with national databases searching for outstanding warrants. This common practice puts undocumented immigrant inmates on ICE’s radar, regardless of whether they have been convicted of a crime or violated the stated policies of the city in which they live. Immigration authorities can then issue detainer requests asking county jails to hold people believed to be undocumented immigrants. It’s Ada County Sheriff’s Office policy to honor such requests after a suspect’s charge has cleared, but new directives could put detainees in ICE’s hands before they’ve been granted due process—or told their families they’ve been arrested. “It’s a very inhumane way to carry out enforcement and the people who suffer the most are children,” said Andrade Legal founder Maria Andrade at a panel discussion on immigration law at the University of Idaho College of Law in February. From Jan. 1, 2016 to Jan. 31, Ada County held 89 inmates on detainer requests for ICE. There are no sanctuary cities in Idaho, but Chaney’s bill raises the stakes for city councils that resist the reset of immigration policy coming from the White House. The bill would deny up to half of sales tax revenue to cities that refuse or fail to comply with federal immigration law.

This is not Chaney’s first stab at creating what he called a “proactive prohibition of the sorts of policies that intentionally seek to obstruct Immigration and Customs Enforcement.” A previous version, HB 76, was fiercely opposed by Idaho agricultural groups as an attack on their labor force, which is estimated to be 90-95 percent foreign born. HB 198 is Chaney’s attempt at “splitting the baby”—aimed at easing the concerns of powerful interest groups in his district that would “allow them to remain neutral” to his effort. It didn’t fly. “We would never be supportive of the bill, and we’re reassessing whether we can remain neutral,” said Idaho Dairymen’s Association Executive Director Bob Naerebout, who joined Braden Jensen of the Idaho Farm Bureau and Hyde Park Mennonite Fellowship Pastor Marc Schlegel-Preheim to call for fixes to the guest worker visa program. Naerebout said he has no knowledge of undocumented laborers at his members’ dairies, but it’s likely the percentage of Idaho agricultural and dairy workers who are undocumented immigrants reflects the national average of more than 70 percent. The requested changes to the H2A worker visa program would lengthen the duration of a guest worker’s stay to up to three years, allowing laborers to work non-seasonal agricultural jobs. If adopted, the expanded-stay visas would send a message of stability to employers and employees, but the movement coming from the Idaho Legislature and Washington, D.C. has sent another message. If Chaney’s bill becomes law, and cities and counties are railroaded into compliance with the immigration sweeps proposed by Trump, the result would be the destruction of the Gem State’s agricultural industry, which makes up approximately 20 percent of its total economic output. According to a study by the New American Economy, there are nearly 103,000 immigrants living in Idaho—6.3 percent of the population. Their combined spending power is approximately $1.5 billion and, in 2014, they paid more than $460 million in taxes. Immigrant-owned companies employ 14,616 people. Approximately 42,000 of them are thought to be undocumented. Though, as a whole, foreign-born people have lower education attainment rates than native-born citizens, foreign nationals make up 6.6 percent of the STEM worker population, 10.9 percent of STEM master’s degree candidates and 36.7 percent of STEM Ph.D. students. “If you wave a wand and the labor’s gone, Idaho’s economy collapses,” Naerebout said.

Saturday, March 11th, 2017 10am -8pm Four rivers Cultural Center 676 sW 5th ave, ontario, or $5 admission (Free admission For kids under 12) For Tickets visit www.bordertowncomiccon.com or www.eventbrite.com For more information call 541-889-8191 or email bordertoWnCC@gmail.Com

BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 7


FIRST THURSDAY Central ARTISAN OPTICS—Check out the entire collection of Mykita eyewear from Berlin. Purchase the first pair of prescription lenses and get the second pair of lenses at half price. Drop by the store for details. In-network with most insurances. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. 190 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-0500, artisanoptics.com.

BERRYHILL—Sample select wines from Berryhill’s list, then purchase at special First Thursday pricing. Plus enjoy Flippin’ Happy Hour with 2-for-1 specials from 3-6 p.m. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, johnberryhillrestaurants.com.

CHANDLERS—Enjoy some special new bites at Chandlers New Social Hour from 4-6 p.m., featuring a menu of delicious small plates and creative cocktails, all priced between $5-$7. 4-9 p.m. FREE. 981 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOM—Take advantage of specials on products, as well as audio/visual presentations on spiritual healing based on the Bible. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 222 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-344-5301, cschurchboise. org/readingroom.html.

BITTERCREEK ALEHOUSE—Enjoy a different DJ from Radio Boise every First Thursday. A dollar per beer sold during the set will be donated to Radio Boise. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-429-6340, bcrfl.com/bittercreek.

THE CHOCOLAT BAR—Join Meriwether Cider and The Chocolat bar for cider and chocolate pairings, and stock up on chocolates for spring. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 805 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-3387771, thechocolatbar.com.

COSTA VIDA—The coast is calling at Costa Vida downtown. Surf in for the best beach-inspired fresh Mexican food, available downtown on the Grove. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 801 W. Main St., Boise, 208429-4109, costavida.net.

MARCH 2

5 to 9PM

art, music, in-store promotions, dining, wine tastings & more

DOWNTOWN BOISE ASSOCIATION—Do you love First Thursday? Do you want to win tickets to Eric Church? Snap a photo of your favorite First Thursday stop, and tag @downtownboise and #FirstThursdayBoise for a chance to win. 5-9 p.m. FREE, Downtown Boise, downtownboise.org. EVERMORE PRINTS—Evermore kicks off its juried 2017 exhibitions with Painterly Destinations by Paula Ryan. Enjoy landscapes from around Idaho and the world. Plus lively conversation, beverages and light snacks. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 780 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-3837, evermoreprints.com. FLATBREAD NEAPOLITAN PIZZERIA—Enjoy happy hour from 4-6 p.m. with 50 percent off all cocktails, beer and wine. After 5 p.m., take 20 percent off all bottles of wine until they’re gone. Kids under 12 eat free with the purchase of an adult meal; limit two per table. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 800 W. Main St., Boise, 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com. THE GYRO SHACK—Stop by The Gyro Shack and take 10 percent off your order. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 777 W. Main St., Ste. 115, Boise, 208-918-0004, thegyroshack.com. JAMBA JUICE—Enjoy free samples of premium freshly squeezed juices, including all natural fresh produce, all day long. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. 132 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-658-1765, jambajuice.com. MAI THAI—Get 2-for-1 drinks all evening, as well as Happy Hour menu items. Enjoy the Kao Soi Wings, Fuji Mountain Roll and many other modern Asian cuisine selections. 5-10 p.m. FREE. 750 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8424, maithaigroup.com. MIXED GREENS MODERN GIFTS—Mad Swede Brewing will be on hand with beer samples. This will be the last First Thursday in this location before Mixed Greens moves next door, so stop by to share a beer one last time. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 237 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-344-1605, ilikemixedgreens.com.

eastside

THE MODE LOUNGE—Hang out with photographer Chuck Christeson and his collection of images, Summer Vacations Past. See vintage signs, vintage autos, drive-ins, motels and rapidly vanishing roadside attractions. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 800 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-342-6633, themodelounge.com.

FETTUCCINE FORUM SPACEBAR ARCADE

OLD CHICAGO—Enjoy happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring food and drink specials: $1 off all pints, $3 wells, and $5 mules. 4-9 p.m. FREE. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-0037, oldchicago.com.

southside

RUBY LOU CLOTHING BOUTIQUE—Join Ruby Lou for an evening of chocolates, bubbly and shopping. Check out spring arrivals and great clearance prices, with 70 percent off original prices. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 130 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-333-9610, shoprubylou.com.

BALLET IDAHO SNAKE RIVER WINERY TRAILHEAD Roving First Thursday Entertainment thanks to Food Services of America!

CHOCOLAT BAR RUBY LOU CLOTHING BOUTIQUE

westside

GALLERY 601 IDAHO MOUNTAIN TOURING

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SCOTTRADE SECURITIES—Drop by and say hello to the Scottrade team and the newest team member from Salt Lake City. They’ll have some goodies to share. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 176 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208433-9333, scottrade.com. SNAKE RIVER TEA CO.—Enjoy live music by Soma and, as always, free tea samples. BOGO 12-ounce drinks and get 20 percent off teawares and specialty loose leaf teas 6-8 p.m. 6-8 p.m. FREE. 801 W. Main St., Boise, 208-841-9746, facebook.com/ SnakeRiverTeaCo. SUPERB SUSHI—Swing on down for samples of wine and the in-house smoked salmon samples. Get unlimited $1 nigiri with the purchase of any sushi roll all night. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 280 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-0123, superbsushidowntown.com. TREEFORT MUSIC FEST— It’s beginning to look a lot like Treefort... *Art Walk: Businesses will display art in their windows made by participating artists. *The Owyhee: Foul Weather, Treefort Art Gallery, raffle to win two pair of five-day passes! *Red Feather cellar: For Ale Tales, an Alefort/Storyfort collaboration, local brewers and beer aficionados share stories about brewing, beer history and more *Record Exchange: Treefort Warmup Party. 5 p.m., FREE, treefortmusicfest.com/first-thursdayingtreefort.

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1ST THURSDAY AT THE M

FIRST THURSDAY WARD HOOPER GALLERY AND VINTAGE SWANK—Take advantage of special deals on vintage decor and clothing, T shirts, mugs, stickers and cards featuring the art of Ward Hooper. You can also check out the large gallery wrap canvas selection. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. 745 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-866-4627, wardhooper.com.

East Side BARDENAY—Catch the distillers and tour the distillery to learn all about our nation’s first small batch distillery pub—a Boise original, indeed! 5-9 p.m. FREE. 610 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-4260538, bardenay.com. BASQUE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER—Head over to the Basque Museum for free admission, guided tours of the Cyrus Jacobs Uberuaga House and live folk music. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. 611 Grove St., Boise, 208-3432671, basquemuseum.com. CAPITOL CELLARS—Enjoy 25 percent off Idaho wines by the bottle and Pinney’s Potato Croquettes for $7.43 starting at 5 p.m. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 110 S. Fifth St., Boise, 208344-9463, capitolcellarsllc.com. FETTUCCINE FORUM—The Boise City Department of Arts and History celebrates the 20th anniversary of its grant program. Amy Fackler, grants manager, will recap its two-decade evolution and discuss recent trends in cultural grant making. Featured grant recipients will also share how funds contribute to enlivening the city’s cultural landscape. 5:30 p.m. FREE, Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise. FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE— Check out local artist Nathan Field’s mixed media show, Idiosyncratica. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. GOLDY’S CORNER—Stop by and check out the work of March’s featured artist, Travis Seibolt. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 625 W. Main St., Boise, 208-433-3934, goldyscorner.com. GUIDO’S NEW YORK STYLE PIZZERIA—Enjoy pizza with an attitude, and get a large one-topping pizza and one bottle of select wine, two bottles of beer, or four fountain sodas for only $22 plus tax. Dine- in only. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 235 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-3459011, guidosdowntown.com. HIGH NOTE CAFE—Enjoy live music by Sophie Griffin beginning at 6 p.m., plus $2 specialty mimosas with homemade juice all day, from-scratch menu and local art for sale. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-429-1911, thehighnotecafe.com. THE MELTING POT—Take advantage of the First Thursday 2-for$22 special: Receive a cheese fondue for two and two glasses of house wine. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 200 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-343-8800, meltingpot.com/boise.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

SPACEBAR ARCADE—Enjoy a pinball tournament with Hop Valley Brewing. 7-10 p.m. FREE. 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9180597, spacebararcade.com. WHISKEY BAR—Enjoy whiskey flights and cheese pairings from 6-10 p.m. FREE. 509 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-2505, whiskeybarboise.com.

South Side ATOMIC TREASURES—Check out the collection of vintage, retro, art and found objects. Find decorative and unique treasures for home, jewelry, books, collectibles and vintage ephemera. Lots of weird stuff, cool junk, unusual and unforgettable gifts. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3440811. BALLET IDAHO—Check out Ballet Idaho’s Spring Fashion Show, where dancers model hand-picked fashions for an evening of elegant style, dance performances on the runway and a fabulous silent auction. Fashions by Piece Unique, Lux Fashion Lounge, Ruby Lou Clothing Boutique, LaNeige Bridal and more. 7 p.m. $40-$100. 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3430556, balletidaho.org. BODOVINO—Enjoy artwork donated by LaBry Fine Art, plus complimentary wine tasting. 5-7 p.m. FREE. 404 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-8466, bodovino.com. FRESH OFF THE HOOK SEAFOOD—Voted “Best of Boise” 10 years in a row, FOTH will be offering $2 off all beer on tap, wine and appetizers. Enjoy a great selection of beer, wine, appetizers such as calamari strips, seared ahi, crab cakes and more. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 401 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0220, freshoffthehookseafood.com. GALLERY FIVE18—Sue Latta and Christine Raymond present The Meaning of Meaning, an exhibition of current work. Both artists work in mixed-media. Raymond’s artworks include paper constructions and paintings; Latta’s include cast metal relief-sculpture and images. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 518 S. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-342-3773, galleryfive18.com. HA’ PENNY BRIDGE IRISH PUB AND GRILL—Enjoy 20 percent off food and drinks, plus live music. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 855 Broad St., Boise, 208-343-5568, hapennybridgepub.com. HAIRLINES—Call today to make an appointment for a new DU by Lui The Hair Whisperer. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-383-9009. HAPPY FISH SUSHI AND MARTINI BAR—Enjoy a 20 percent discount on Happy Fish’s great sushi, which is rolled to order and made with the freshest ingredients. Plus full bar. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 855 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-343-4810, happyfishsushi.com.

JACK’S URBAN MEETING PLACE—Join JUMP to recognize Read Across America. There will be free activities for all ages in the Jump Room, including bookmark and mini-book crafts, story time, dancing, and more. Adults age 21 and older can stop by the Book Swap Bar in The Loft. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, jumpboise.org. LIQUID LOUNGE—First Thursday special: BOGO comedy show tickets. 5-9 p.m. $10. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. MERAKI GREEK STREET FOOD— Enjoy drink specials: $3 local draft beers, $4 local wines and 20 percent Greek wines by the bottle. Get $2 off all appetizers like Greek cheese sticks, spanakopita and baklava, and check out Greek-inspired art by local artists. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 345 S. Eighth St., Boise, facebook.com/merakigsf. MR. PEABODY’S OPTICAL—Mr. Peabody’s is always getting in new frame styles, with frame and single-vision lenses starting at $95. Now taking vision insurance. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-1390, mrpeabodysoptical.com. QUE PASA—Enjoy the best in Mexican expression, featuring thousands of items from Mexican master craftsmen: Sterling silver, pottery, blown glass, Talavera, dragons, fairies, mermaids and Day of The Dead. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3859018.

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MARCH ARTIST

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Restaurant gift cards

20% OFF

R. GREY GALLERY JEWELRY AND ART GLASS—Check out work by new artist Maurizio Ticchi, an Italian designer who works in 18 carat gold, pearls, diamonds, precious and semi-precious gemstones. Plus hors d’oeuvres, wine and positively energized water. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com. SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Join Snake River Winery for the last First Thursday before their big move. Everything is on sale, so it’s time to stock up. Stop by and hear about the big plans. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-345-9463, snakeriverwinery. com/tasting. SOLID GRILL & BAR—Don’t miss out on the free tasting, free art show and free appetizers. Plus 2-for-1 drinks and live music. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620, solidboise. com. SWANK BOUTIQUE—Check out jewelry, accessories and home decor, and get 20 percent off one item. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 860 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-331-4126. TRADER JOE’S—Irish or not, get your jig on at Trader Joe’s, with fun food, beer and wine samples. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 300 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-336-7282, traderjoes. com.

BerryHill $50 value for $40 Mai Thai $50 value for $40 Boise Brewing $20 value for $16 & $25 value for $20

Limited quantities, stop by Boise Weekly and get them while they last! Located on the corner of Sixth and Broad streets, Downtown Boise • 344-2055 BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 9


FIRST THURSDAY TRAILHEAD NORTH—Join Wells Fargo, Mayor David Bieter and Trailhead for the grand opening of Trailhead North. Take a tour, check out where the Code School is located, and stay for a drink. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Trailhead North, 404 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-5483, trailheadboise.org/north.

West Side THE ALASKA CENTER—Enjoy Judson Cottrell’s 2-D and 3-D fractal art; Allan Ansell’s complimentary portraits and photo essay Faces of Treefort; Radio Boise’s open house; Chi E Shenam Westin’s new paintings; Joseph Pacheco’s pen-and-ink drawings, oceans-

capes and handmade greeting cards; and The Bellmont barber shop. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1020 W. Main St., Boise. ALLAN R. ANSELL PHOTOGRAPHY—Open studio, complimentary portraits and photo essay Faces of Treefort. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Alaska Center, 1020 W. Main St., Boise, 208-863-2808, ansellphotography.com. ART SOURCE GALLERY—See Fantastic Felts and Fibers by Betty Maguire Hayzlett, who uses handmade felt to create wall pieces and vessel forms with rich textures and bright colors. Much of her current work focuses on landscape. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

BOISE CITY HALL

BEN & JERRY’S—As always, enjoy $2 scoops all day on First Thursday. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. 103 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-342-1992, benjerry.com. BOISE ART GLASS—Enjoy live glassblowing demos. Call to book a make-your-own hummingbird feeder glassblowing class for $40, or a try out flameworking in a two-hour group torch class for $59. Plus snacks and beverages. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com. CHI E SHENAM WESTIN—Check out the new series of small oil paintings, Trees of the Boise River, and new painting “Paleo Ruins of Utah.” 5-9 p.m. FREE. Alaska Center, 1020 W. Main St., Boise.

It has been 20 years since the Boise City Department of Arts and History began funneling grants to local artists, organizations and businesses. In that time, almost 400 grants have been given, totaling more than $1.1 million in support—$200,000 in fiscal year 2017 alone. Those numbers have real-world significance. Just in the past fiscal year, Arts and History grants benefited more than 30 recipients, from the Basque Museum, Boise Philharmonic and Boise Rock School, to Global Lounge, the Idaho Horror Film Festival, Opera Idaho and Story Story Night. Public investment in arts is also a winning economic proposition. To date, the city’s art collection is worth $4.2 million, and public art projects in process are valued at $1.2 million. To celebrate 20 years of Arts and History grants, department grant manager Amy Fackler will speak at the Fettuccine Forum, where she will share how the program has developed and outline how the city addresses trends in cultural grant making. 5 p.m., FREE. Boise City Hall, 150 Capitol Blvd., 208-6087050, boiseartsandhistory.org. 10 | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | BOISEweekly 

GALLERY 601—Spend the evening honoring artist James Christensen. Gallery 601 will have a great collection of Christensen’s artwork for purchase, with 20 percent from each sale donated to the James Christensen Scholarship. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 211 N. 10th St., Boise, 208336-5899, gallery601.com. IDAHO MOUNTAIN TOURING— Enjoy ladies night, with wine, cheese and in-store specials on cycling apparel and accessories for women, plus raffle prizes from Club

TRAILHEAD NORTH

Don’t take public art for granted.

GRANTED: CITY SUPPORT FOR ARTS AND CULTURE

FIREFUSION STUDIO—Enjoy a demonstration of a beautiful torch fire enameling technique. Each student will take home two pieces. Call to sign up. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3451825, firefusion-studio.com.

Your trail to success can start at Trailhead North.

GRAND OPENING

For hikers, a trailhead marks a starting point. For many local entrepreneurs, the journey also begins at a Trailhead—in this case, a start-up hub on Eighth Street where they can “find resources and explore new technologies” and have “access to the tools and connections they need to build something with impact.” The open floor plan is conducive to collaboration but for something a little more private, now there’s Trailhead North. Across Myrtle from what Trailhead Community Manager Matthew Gilkerson affectionately called “base camp,” Trailhead North has dedicated spaces available. “North is more like office space … with dedicated desks and 24/7 access,” Gilkerson said. Spaces at TN are available on a month-to-month basis, and a membership includes use of all of Trailhead’s amenities—plus a complimentary coffee and snack bar. Join Trailhead, Wells Fargo and Boise Mayor Dave Bieter for a tour, a drink and to celebrate the grand opening of Trailhead North. It just might be the first step on a new path. 5-7:30 p.m., FREE. 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 204, 208-3445483, facebook.com/trailheadboise.

Ride, Prana and many more. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1310 Main St., Boise, 208-336-3854, idahomountaintouring.com. LANEIGE BRIDAL AND TUX—Stop by and find the dress of your dreams. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Alaska Center, 1020 W. Main St., Ste. 104, Boise, 208-514-0439, laneigebridal.com. LOCK STOCK & BARREL—Enjoy 25 different varieties of wine to choose from for just $20 each. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1100 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-336-4266, lsbboise. com.

SACA ENTERTAINMENT—Enjoy music in the atrium by SACA Entertainment. 5-9 p.m. FREE. The Alaska Center, 1020 W. Main St., Boise. XTREME FITNESS AND WELLNESS—Enjoy fresh fruit and veggie smoothies and check out Xtreme’s workout facility in connection with Endurance Boise. Meet the owners and coaches who can answer any questions you may have about your fitness program. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1114 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 310-489-0828, xtremefitnessandwellness.com.

RADIO BOISE—Enjoy the open studio. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1020 W. Main St., Alaska Building, Boise, 208-424-8166, radioboise.org.

VARIOUS LOCATIONS

It’s an artful evening for March First Thursday.

ART AROUND DOWNTOWN

First Thursday is a great opportunity to see great work, and this FT is no exception. Art Source Gallery is hosting Fantastic Felts and Fibers by Betty Maguire Hayzlett, whose colorful works explore the many facets of felt. Evermore Prints is kicking off its juried 2017 exhibits with Painterly Destinations, landscapes of Idaho and the world by Paula Ryan. See Nathan Field’s Idiosyncratica at Flying M Coffeehouse, stunning pieces by Italian designer Maurizio Ticchi at R. Grey Gallery, photos of vintage America in Chuck Christeson’s Summer Vacations Past at The Mode Lounge, and what promises to be a dynamic exhibit at Gallery Five18: The Meaning of Meaning, with work by renowned local artists Sue Latta and Christine Raymond. More First Thursday listings on these pages and at downtownboise.org.

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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY MARCH 1 On Stage JUMP MOVIE NIGHT: THE LION IN WINTER—Celebrate film, fun and community with this award-winning film about King Henry II and his three sons, who fight to inherit the throne. 6 p.m. FREE. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, jumpboise.org. PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—During a very bad performance a murder will take place. 6:30 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

Art 2017 IDAHO TRIENNIAL—Through July 16. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia

Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Literature

Citizen

BOISE STATE MFA THESIS EXHIBITION—. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter.

THE SPILL: STORIES OF CURRENTLY FORGETTING—Join the Death Rattle Writers Festival for true stories told by real people. Attendees are invited to tell a five-minute true story live that relates literally or figuratively to the poem of the night: “List of Things I am Currently Forgetting (that I Took Pride in Knowing Once)” by local poet Lydia Havens, who will be at the event to read her poem live. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, facebook. com/deathrattlewritersfestival.

JEMFRIENDS SECOND ANNUAL AGING-OUT AWARENESS MONTH PROCLAMATION SIGNING—Join JEMfriends for the proclamation of March as Aging-out Awareness Month in Idaho. 10:30-11:30 a.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208863-0222, jemfriends.org.

CRAFTING RESISTANCE GROUP SHOW—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/ visualartscenter. IDAHO WATERCOLOR SOCIETY 33RD ANNUAL CAPITOL ROTUNDA ART SHOW—Through March 4. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705, idahowatercolorsociety.wildapricot.org. INNER STRENGTH: PORTRAITS OF BASQUE IMMIGRANT WOMEN—7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-1242.

THURSDAY, MARCH 2

Talks & Lectures WILD IDAHO: FISHING SPOTS— Join Fishing and hunting feature writer Tom Claycomb for the inside scoop on some of the best fishing spots in and around the Treasure Valley. 7 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451.

Animals & Pets BOISE BIRDING SERIES: SPRING MIGRATION—Learn about the effects of these varying migratory patterns and how climate change may play a role in the future. And if you’re thinking of taking a trip to the Oregon Coast, shorebirds will be discussed, too. 9 a.m. FREE. Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-4932530, bee.cityofboise.org/foothills.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 2-5

THURSDAY MARCH 2

BLT: A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE—7:30 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater. org.

Festivals & Events

COMEDIAN ZOLTAN KASZAS—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

BALLET IDAHO SPRING FASHION SHOW—Ballet Idaho dancers model handpicked spring fashions at this evening of elegant style, fabulous silent auction, and exclusive dance performances on the runway. 7 p.m. $40-$100. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy Annex, 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0556, balletidaho.org/events/balletidahos-spring-fashion-show.

On Stage ALLEY REP: BUYER & CELLAR—7 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org.

PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—6:30 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208779-0092, playhouseboise.com. TREEFORT WARM-UP PARTY: COUNTRY LIPS—Treefort Music Fest (March 22-26) is almost here, and organizers are ready to get the party started with Country Lips. 6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, treefortmusicfest.com. URINETOWN, THE MUSICAL—This musical satire roasts the legal system, capitalism, social irresponsibility, populism, bureaucracy, corporate mismanagement, municipal politics

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8 HARRISO N BERRY

From Biochem to Better Call Saul.

WRITING FOR TV WITH HEATHER MARION

Heather Marion was a biochemistry student at Concordia University when she fell in love with comedy, and it changed her career trajectory forever. She moved to L.A., started interning, worked for comedians and TV shows, went to grad school at UCLA and was chosen as a writer for the Sundance Institute’s inaugural Episodic Story Lab in 2014. Later, she became a writer’s assistant for Breaking Bad spinoff Better Call Saul—a role that grew into a fullfledged writing gig on the show just in time for Marion to help pen the Season 2 finale. Boise State University Theater Arts Professor Leslie Durham will sit down with Marion on Thursday, March 2 to talk about that career trajectory in the first of a series of presentations aimed at exposing students to young professionals who have found success in creative careers. 7 p.m., FREE. Boise State Student Union Lookout Room, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-7090, ahi.boisestate.edu. 12 | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | BOISEweekly 

Oppression and a “pee-for-free” revolution.

URINETOWN: THE MUSICAL

“The oppressed masses huddle in line at the poorest, filthiest urinal in town.” That’s how Wikipedia set the scene for the bladdercentric comedy musical and social satire, Urinetown. The show, which got picked up for Broadway within a year of premiering at the New York Fringe Festival, explores the themes of oppression in a town where citizens must pay a strict tax to go to the bathroom. In a parody of revolution-themed musicals like Les Miserables, an unexpected love affair paves the way for a “pee-for-free” revolt. The show ended up running for three years on Broadway and won two Tony Awards for Best Book and Best Score. See the Boise State Theater Department’s rendition this week. Thursday, March 2-Saturday, March 4, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, March 5, 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.; $15-$18. Boise State University Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, 208-426-4636, theatrearts. boisestate.edu/urinetown-the-musical.

“Determination, graciousness and enthusiasm.”

‘INNER STRENGTH: PORTRAITS OF BASQUE IMMIGRANT WOMEN’

Through early April, the Boise State Student Union Gallery will host a photo collection compiled by Peter Oberlindacher titled “Inner Strength: Portraits of Basque Immigrant Women.” The 41 black-and-white environmental portraits are accompanied by excerpts of the women’s life stories, collected by Basque scholar Begona Pecharroman, in which the women reflect on their homeland, political oppression and what it’s like to integrate into a new country. “It’s an incredible sense of self [Basque women] have,” Oberlindacher told the Basque Museum. “Determination, graciousness and enthusiasm for life; also, an incredible amount of energy and pride in their culture. I tried to bring that out in the photos.” Reception: Wednesday, March 8, 5 p.m. Show through Friday, April 7, 7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-1242, finearts.boisestate.edu. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR and musical theater itself. In a Gotham-like city, a terrible water shortage caused by a 20-year drought leads to a ban on private toilets. 7:30 p.m. $15-$18. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, theatrearts. boisestate.edu/urinetown-themusical.

Talks & Lectures THE WILDERNESS: WHY?—Author and newspaper reporter Rocky Barker examines the place of wildness and spirituality in literature, the human experience and his own life. 7 p.m. FREE. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise, readmetv.com.

FRIDAY MARCH 3 On Stage ALLEY REP: BUYER & CELLAR—7 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. BLT: A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN ZOLTAN KASZAS—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-9914746, boisecomedy.com.

Sports & Fitness BUMPERSHOOT PINBALL TOURNEY—Join Spacebar Arcade for a night of IFPA-sanctioned pinball fun. Hop Valley Brewing is sponsoring and providing awesome prizes and rad beer. Free to attend; pay to play. 7-11 p.m. FREE. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208918-0597.

PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—6:30 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208779-0092, playhouseboise.com. STAGE COACH: SYLVIA— In this modern romantic comedy by A.R. Gurney, a stray dog (Sylvia) found in the park

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

becomes a major bone of contention between husband and wife. The New York Daily News called Sylvia “involving, beautiful, funny, touching and profound.” 8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Watch for The Flicks movie calendar next week in the center of the Boise Weekly.

theflicksboise.com

URINETOWN, THE MUSICAL—7:30 p.m. $15-$18. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Dr., Boise, theatrearts.boisestate.edu. YOUNG DUBLINERS— Although the Young Dubliners’ sound is most commonly called “Celtic Rock,” that label, as labels often can be, is misleading. The Irish influence is there, certainly, but it’s not the only influence that rears its head on their albums or in live shows. With The Giant Leprechauns and Thistledown. 8 p.m. $15-$30. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

Art ART ZONE 208 FIRST FRIDAY— Join ArtZone 208 for fun, food, beverages and live music by Jaz Cymry. Featured artist is Nancy Sathre-Vogel, metals. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-322-9464, artzone208.com/events.html.

Literature SUREL’S PLACE POETRY SERIES: CAROL DAVIS— Los Angeles poet Carol V. Davis completed her latest book while a resident at Surel’s Place last year. She is coming back to celebrate it’s publication with a special reading as part of the Surel’s Place Poetry Series. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-407-7529.

Talks & Lectures THE BEWILDERING ZOO OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS STARGAZING EVENT—Join the Boise State Physics Department to learn about how we find planetary systems that are not our own, what they can teach us, and what happens to them in the future. 7:30-10:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Multipurpose Classroom Building, 1910 University Dr., Boise, astrojack.com.

LIVE COMEDY 6 NIGHTS A WEEK

ZOLTAN

KASZAS

MAR 30-APR 2

Citizen Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

THINKING BOISE BOOK DRIVE— Help gather books for the neediest schools in the Boise School District. Join Thinking Boise Real Estate on the third floor of the Main Boise Library to drop off your books and enjoy free hot drinks and tasty treats. 3-6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-501-8899, thinkingboise.com.

MARCH 2-5

KEVIN FARLCEYE MARC PRI

$10 THURSDAY-SUNDAY AT 8 PM & 10:00 PM$12 FRIDAY & SATURDAY

BUY TICKETS NOW! LIQUIDLAUGHS.COM | 208-941-2459 | 405 S 8TH ST BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 13


CALENDAR Food CAMINO ALTO FIVE-COURSE WINE DINNER—Jake Arredondo, along with Dayne Bower, will guide you through an authentic Basque dining experience. Reservations required. 6 p.m. $60. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-4331208, thebasquemarket.com.

Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave., Boise, 208-344-5731, commongroundboise.org.

ST. MICHAEL’S LENTEN LUNCHES—11 a.m.-1 p.m. $3-$14. St. Michael’s Episcopal Cathedral, 518 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-5601, stmichaelscathedral.org.

LES BOIS FILM FESTIVAL—Enjoy nature and outdoor films that inspire viewers to forge a deeper connection with the natural world. Featuring three screening sessions, with free admission to the 11 a.m. premiere of Souls of the Vermilion Sea. Visit the festival website for film titles. 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. FREE-$18. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3871273. lesboisfilmfestival.org.

SATURDAY MARCH 4

PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—6:30 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

Festivals & Events

STAGE COACH: SYLVIA—8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

9TH ANNUAL MERIDIAN FIRE PIPES AND DRUMS CHILI COOK OFF—Try your hand at cooking and enter the competition or just sample all the different chili the teams make for the event. The Meridian Fire Bagpipes and Drums will perform. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $5. Meridian Dairy Barn, 335 S. Main St., Meridian. BAM 80TH ANNIVERSARY GALA—Celebrate BAM’s 80th anniversary with an evening full of dynamic art, fine cuisine and live entertainment. 5:30 p.m. $200. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum. org/special-events/gala.

On Stage ALLEY REP: BUYER & CELLAR—7 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. BLT: A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

URINETOWN, THE MUSICAL—7:30 p.m. $15-$18. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, theatrearts. boisestate.edu.

Sports & Fitness LES BOIS 10K TRAIL RUN—The out-and-back course starts and finishes at Fort Boise Park and is run completely on dirt roads. The course is a great trial run for those training for trail running. 9 a.m. $28. Fort Boise Park, 600 W. Garrison St., Boise, cityoftreesmarathon.com/les-bois-10k.

Citizen AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION FIGHT FOR AIR CLIMB—Join the Boise Fight For Air Climb to make a difference for Idahoans with lung disease. Climb 32, 64, 96 or 128 flights of the US Bank Plaza to support the mission of the American Lung Association in Idaho. 8-11:30 a.m. $25-$35. US Bank Plaza, 101 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3452245, climbboise.org. RALLY FOR PUBLIC LANDS—Calling all Idahoans who love their public lands to show our state and federal leaders that public lands belong to everyone. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705, facebook.com/ Idahoansforpubliclands.

Odds & Ends 63RD ANNUAL OWYHEE GEM AND MINERAL SOCIETY ROCK AND GEM SHOW—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$4. O’Connor Field House/ Caldwell Events Center, 2207 Blaine St., Caldwell, 208-4553004, owyheerocks.com. LATIN SPRING FLING—The big dance floor will be ready for the best of Salsa, Bachata, Zouk, Timba and Reggaeton. Enjoy a social hour from 8-9 p.m., with open dancing from 9 p.m.-midnight. Organized by the members of the Boise Latin Dance Community (formerly Casino Rueda) and sponsored by Idaho DanceSport. 8 p.m. $5 adv., $7 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Food TO DIE FOR CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL—Enjoy some of the best chocolate samplings that the Treasure Valley has to offer. Benefiting the Rotary Club of Eagle and Garden City. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Meridian Senior Center at the Park, Julius M. Kleiner Park, 1920 N. Records Way, Meridian, 208-888-5555, todieforchocolatefestival.com.

SUNDAY MARCH 5 On Stage ALLEY REP: BUYER & CELLAR—1 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. BLT: A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE—2 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Odds & Ends 63RD ANNUAL OWYHEE GEM AND MINERAL SOCIETY ROCK AND GEM SHOW—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$4. O’Connor Field House/ Caldwell Events Center, 2207 Blaine St., Caldwell, 208-455-3004, owyheerocks.com.

MONDAY MARCH 6 Literature POETICS BOISE— 6:30 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe, 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-429-1911, thehighnotecafe.com.

TUESDAY MARCH 7

job seekers. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-376-0464, ibleventsinc.com.

On Stage MUNDEK CLEMENT STEIN’S COMEDY SHOWCASE—8 p.m. $5. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise. com.

Art INITIAL POINT GALLERY ARTIST RECEPTION—Join the Meridian Arts Commission for another artist reception at Initial Point Gallery. 4:30-7 p.m. FREE. Initial Point Gallery, Merdian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway St., Meridian, 208-888-4433, meridiancity. org/initialpointgallery.

Festivals & Events

Kids & Teens

IDAHO JOB AND CAREER FAIR—Check out all the jobs available at the free Idaho Job and Career Fair. Positions include salaried, hourly, commission and own-your-own-business opportunities. Plus free workshops on resumes and interviews for

GURU DONUTS TASTY TALES STORYTIME WITH REDISCOVERED BOOKS—10-11 a.m. FREE. Guru Donuts, 928 W. Main St, Ste. 100, Boise, 208-571-7792. gurudonuts.com/tasty-tales.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

BROADWAY IN BOISE: DIRTY DANCING—1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. $50-$75. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110, morrisoncenter.com. COMEDIAN ZOLTAN KASZAS—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

BROADWAY IN BOISE: DIRTY DANCING—This worldwide smash hit tells the classic story of Baby and Johnny, two fiercely independent young spirits from different worlds who come together. Contains adult themes and is recommended for audiences in middle school and above. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $50-$75. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, morrisoncenter.com.

JAKE SHIMABUKURO—Don’t miss the American ukulele virtuoso and composer who shot to fame on YouTube. His music combines elements of jazz, blues, funk, rock, bluegrass, classical, folk and flamenco. 8 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, jakeshimabukuro. com. PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—3 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

COMEDIAN ZOLTAN KASZAS—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-9914746, boisecomedy.com. COMMON GROUND COMMUNITY CHORUS: WHY WE SING—Enjoy a concert with an international flavor, followed by a dessert auction. Proceeds benefit Create Common Good. 7 p.m. $5. First Congregational United Church of

REFUGE STAR PARTY—Enjoy activities as you learn how wildlife use the stars to navigate while doing some skywatching of your own. There will be a short presentation at dusk, followed by an hour of stargazing with volunteers and telescopes from the Boise Astronomical Society. Plus the College of Idaho’s StarLab. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor’s Center, 13751 Upper Embankment Road, Nampa, 208-467-9278, fws.gov/refuge/ deer_flat.

URINETOWN, THE MUSICAL—2 p.m. $15-$18. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, theatrearts.boisestate.edu.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

14 | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY MARCH 1

FRIDAY MARCH 3

THE OCTOPUS PROJECT AND SOUND OF CERES—8 p.m. $5 adv., $7 door. Flying M Coffeegarage

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BRETT REID—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

QUINN VAN PAEPEGHEM TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE BROTHERS COMATOSE— With Rainbow Girls. 7 p.m. $11 adv., $13 door. The Olympic

DOUGLAS CAMERON—8 p.m. FREE. Piper

QUINN VAN PAEPEGHEM TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—10 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LIKE A ROCKET—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s MICHAEL LAKY—5:30 p.m. FREE. Angell’s

DOUGLAS CAMERON AND JOHN FRICKE—7 p.m. FREE. SockeyeCole

ALEXANDER RASMUSSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Piper

ADELITAS WAY—With Letters From The Fire, The Black Moods, Manafest and Breakdown Boulevard. 8 p.m. $14-$35. Knitting Factory

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: THE STATESBORO REVUE—With Swillbilly. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CARTER FREEMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar

BLACK TIGER SEX MACHINE— With Dabin, Kai Wachi and A.Y.O. For all ages. 8 p.m. $15-$40. Knitting Factory

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

SATURDAY MARCH 4

RED LIGHT CHALLENGE—7 p.m. FREE. El Gallo Giro SOUL SERENE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

BLAZE AND KELLY— 8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

LISTEN HERE

CLAY MOORE TRIO— 8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MIA EDSALL—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

CLAY MOORE TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—10 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NEAL GOLDBERG—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

MICHAEL LAKY—5:30 p.m. FREE. Angell’s

STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

PISCES PARTY—With Knotty Brine, The Astrophobes and ARB. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

JAKE CLIFFORD

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THURSDAY MARCH 2 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers BRANDON PRITCHETT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers COUNTRY LIPS—With Curtis/ Sutton and the Scavengers. 8 p.m. $5. The Olympic FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JON WAYNE AND THE PAIN— 9:30 p.m. $5. Reef MICHAEL LAKY—5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Angell’s OPEN MIC—7-10 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s SOPHIE GRIFFIN—6 p.m. FREE. High Note SPENCER BATT—5:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

TREEFORT WARM-UP PARTY: COUNTRY LIPS, MARCH 2, RECORD EXCHANGE

Back in the day, Seattle was a rough and rowdy port town filled with raucous Old West characters. Likewise, not so long ago, country music was a freewheeling celebration of hard drinking, hard loving and hard living. Seattle-based Country Lips is a testament to both traditions, with a rollicking, fun-loving approach to the genre, which has too often accumulated a patina of righteous sappiness in recent decades. With Treefort Music Fest almost upon us (March 22-26), organizers are kickstarting the party Thursday, March 2 with a free in-store Record Exchange appearance by Country Lips. Show up at 5:30 p.m. with your 21+ ID and sip some complimentary suds from Payette Brewing Co. Five-day Treefort passes will be available for purchase, as will tickets for Country Lips’ 7 p.m. gig at The Olympic, where the band will be joined by locals Curtis/Sutton and the Scavengers, who have a Saturday, March 25 date with Treefort. —Zach Hagadone

OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

LISTEN HERE

MERRI CYR

CITY ROCKFEST—Christian rock’s largest annual tour comes to Southwestern Idaho with it’s best lineup ever, featuring veteran rock groups Disciple, Seventh Day Slumber and Project 86, along with Random Hero and Scarlet White. 6:30 p.m. $17-$27. Nampa Civic Center

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TUESDAY MARCH 7

WHITAKER AND OLIVER—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

ROCKEOKE—9 p.m. FREE. The Olympic THE SLOW AND HOLY WEAK—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

SUNDAY MARCH 5 THE CADILLAC THREE—8 p.m. $18-$45. Knitting Factory NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

MONDAY MARCH 6 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid I PREVAIL—With Wage War, Assuming We Survive, Villain Of A Story and AsFireFalls. For all ages. 7 p.m. $16-$40. Knitting Factory SCOTT KNICKERBOCKER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

6 p.m., FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., 208344-8010, therecordexchange.com. 7 p.m., $5. The Olympic, 1009 W. Main St., 208-342-0176, theolympicboise.com.

JAKE SHIMABUKURO, MARCH 5, EGYPTIAN THEATRE

The custom four-string Kamaka tenor ukulele played by Jake Shimabukuro measures 17 inches from nut to bridge. That’s somewhere between the length of a fly swatter and the kind of rolling pin used to make ravioli. Within those 17 short inches, however, Shimabukuro is able to operate with style, precision and sheer virtuosity unmatched by uke players—or even most guitarists—anywhere in the world. The Honolulu, Hawaii-based ukulele master has wowed crowds from Japan to England and even Boise, to which he will return with a performance Saturday, March 5 at the Egyptian Theatre. Beyond his near-unbelievable skill, Shimabukuro’s approach to his instrument (and music) is magnetic—“Maybe there is something over the top about it being an instrument of peace,” he told Boise Weekly ahead of a Boise appearance in October 2012. “But it makes people smile.” Damn straight it does, especially in the hands of an artist of unparalleled talent like Shimabukuro. —Zach Hagadone 7 p.m., $30-$35. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Electric

Classic 80s & OTHER PRE-2K MUSIC 80s cocktails at Brat pack prices

609 W MAIN ST

every Thursday B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 15


“THE BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR”

SLANT • SIGHT & SOUND • FILM COMMENT • CAHIERS DU CINÉMA • METRO • BUZZFEED

GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDs

®

NOMINEE

5

best foreign language film

WINNER

EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE

BEST BEST DIRECTOR ACTOR

3

WINNER

TORONTO FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION BEST BEST DIRECTOR ACTRESS

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

“ONE OF THE BEST FILMS OF THE YEAR.”

A.O. Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES • Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES • VULTURE • Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE Jessica Kiang, THE PLAYLIST • David Edelstein, NEW YORK MAGAZINE • Melissa Anderson, VILLAGE VOICE THE GUARDIAN • Michael Phillips, CHICAGO TRIBUNE • Steve Prokopy, AIN’T IT COOL NEWS Anita Katz, SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER • Michael Koresky, REVERSE SHOT

“sensational.

A WORK OF GREAT BEAUTY, GREAT FEELING AND GREAT CINEMA.” Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

PETER SIMONISCHEK SANDRA HÜLLER

CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

WINNER

BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR FIPRESCI GRAND PRIX

TELLURIDE FILM FESTIVAL

TONI ERDMANN

SCREEN

BOOZE AT THE MOVIES IV: THE PREQUEL Going dry at the cinema goes back to 2006 GEORGE PRENTICE

The New York Times

A FILM BY MAREN ADE

TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.TONIERDMANNMOVIE.COM

STARTS MARCH 3RD We’re More Than Just A Market… COME DINE WITH US Friday Night Dinners

3 COURSE ECLECTIC DINNER

This issue is yet another chapter of the seeminglyendless debate about mixing booze and movies in Idaho, so it’s like a sequel. However, it pre-dates the 2016 controversy over serving alcohol at Rrated films and is tied to a 2006 rule prohibiting anyone under the age of 21 from entering a movie theater where booze is sold—making it more of a prequel. “We’re talking about Idaho Administrative Code 11.05.01, section 22,” said Idaho State Police Captain Russ Wheatley, bureau chief of Alcohol Beverage Control, referring to the law passed by the 2006 Idaho Legislature banning movie theaters from selling beer or wine. “At the time, only a handful of movie theaters were grandfathered in, allowing them to continue selling alcohol.” Those theaters are The Flicks in Boise and The Magic Lantern in Ketchum. When the new Village Cinema in The Village at Meridian opened in 2013, developers opted to create an adultsonly section where patrons can order beer, wine and cocktails. Village Cinema also successfully challenged a clause prohibiting any theater that screened more mature content—including The Flicks, Magic Lantern or Village Cinema—from serving alcohol. The clause was nullified by the 2016 Legislature.

Only a handful of Idaho theaters, including The Flicks, The Magic Lantern in Ketchum and Village Cinema in Meridian, are allowed to sidestep a state law that otherwise prohibits the sale of beer or wine in movie theaters.

“The reason the Village can continue selling alcohol is that they have an entirely separate entrance to the adults-only section,” said Wheatley. The lack of a which leaves venues such as The Egyptian Theatre high and quite dry. “We sold beer and wine at Boise Classic Movies for the better part of our first four years,” said Wyatt Werner, the man behind showing oldiesbut-goodies at the downtown Boise theater. “But then, sometime last year, we were told that we could couldn’t sell alcohol.” Destiny McGinley, event coordinator and box office manager at The Egyptian, said it’s not the theater’s rule. It’s the law. “Alcohol is a privilege, not a necessity,” McGinley said. “The theater doesn’t even have an alcohol license. It’s something that is cateredout. As a result, the city of Boise and Alcohol Beverage Control both have to sign off on the permit.” Someone at the city questioning an adultthemed film Boise Classic Movies screened in

2016, contacted ABC and asked about the pending change in the obscenity clause. ABC said there was no problem with the adult nature of the film, but the phone call tipped off the division to Boise Classic Movies conducting alcohol sales—that triggered the new crackdown. “In our entire history, we had zero complaints, and since we stopped selling beer and wine, our attendance has been slowly dropping,” said Werner. “Now, I receive complaints before, during and after our movies from people who can’t buy beer or wine.” As for the immediate future, McGinley said she has meetings with the city of Boise and ABC scheduled in the coming weeks. Werner wonders if the issue shouldn’t be taken back to the Legislature for a new debate. “We’ve got to get people talking about it,” he said. “The Egyptian is primarily an event center and shouldn’t be occasionally lumped into a movie theater category. Alcohol [is sold] during the other events. It’s mind-boggling.”

Choose a starter, entrée and dessert from weekly seasonal and locally sourced Chef’s menu. reservations recommended.

Each Friday beginning at 5:30 pm

$25 per person

608 w. grove st. • 208.433.1208

Open Mon.-Sat. 10 am-6 pm, open extended hours on Tues., Thurs. & Fri., closed Sun.

www.thebasquemarket.com

16 | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | BOISEweekly 

SCREEN EXTRA MAYBE THEY SHOULD CALL IT I672

Time’s up. As Boise Weekly was hitting the streets Wednesday, March 1, the inaugural monthlong i48 February Challenge was finishing up. It’s the newest addition to the i48 family, which started 14 years ago with a summertime challenge for teams of filmmakers to turn a short film around from start to finish in 48 hours. The first addition came seven years ago with

h48, an October competition that tasks teams to make horror-themed mini movies. This year, i48 organizers debuted the i48 February Challenge, the biggest and most collaborative offspring yet. “This is something we’ve been thinking about for a while,” said i48 Co-Director Josie Pusl. “Now, we’ll have three i48 events, strategically spread across the calendar year.” The i48 February Challenge defies the previous rules as well as the i48 name: To produce a short

film of 10 minutes or less, filmmakers get the entire month of February. It could be dubbed i672, since that’s how many hours they have to complete the challenge. “But that just doesn’t have a ring to it, does it?” Pusl said with a laugh. “Considering [the teams] have a month, the quality should be impressive.” While i48 and h48 competitors are eligible for a long list of awards for acting, composing, writing and producing, the February Challenge

has only two: one for best screenplay and one for best film. Judging takes place throughout March, and all of the films will be screened in a one-time only showcase on Saturday, April 8 at The Flicks. “This particular competition should be interesting in that we’re expecting to see some crosspollination among the teams since we’re encouraging them to collaborate more,” said Pusl. —George Prentice B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


IDAHO

Prime-time Viewing Schedule March 3-19, 2017

Programming subject to change. For more and updated information, go to idahoptv.org.

Friday, March 3

7:30 Dialogue 8:00 Idaho Reports 9:00 Hamilton's America

Saturday, March 4

5:00 Country ountry Pop Legends (My Music) 7:00 Lawrence Welk's TV Treasures 9:00 Celtic Woman: Destiny

Sunday, March 5 5:00 6:30 8:00 9:00 10:10

John Denver: Country Boy Outdoor Idaho “My Excellent Adventure” Mercy Street Victoria on Masterpiece Victoria After-Party

Monday, March 6

7:00 The Highwaymen Live at Nassau Coliseum 8:30 Ken Burns: America's Storyteller 10:00 Carole King - James Taylor Live at the Troubadour

Pledge for Tickets!

Tuesday, March 7

7:00 Idaho: State of Wonder 8:30 Roy oy Orbison: Black & White Night 30 10:00 This Land Is Your Land (My Music)

Wednesday, March 8

7:00 Nature “Super Hummingbirds” 8:30 Science Trek “The Special” 9:30 70s Soul Superstars (My Music)

for Tune in un F Family n! Afternoo

Sun 3/12m 0p 3:00-5:3

Thursday, March 9

7:00 Transatlantic Sessions 8:00 Outdoor Idaho “Where the Road Ends” 9:30 Rock Rewind 1967-1969 (My Music)

Friday, March 10

7:30 Dialogue “Treefort Music Fest” 8:30 Idaho Reports 9:30 Simon & Garfunkel: el: The Concert in Central Park

Call in your gift of support 800-980-4788 OR donate online at idahoptv.org B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 17


PRESENTED BY

RE D CARPET ED CARP ET M OV IE AWA R DS 2017

THANK YOU TO THE FLICKS FOR SPONSORING OUR RED CARPET MOVE AWARDS 2017 AND PROVIDING WONDERFUL PRIZES AND TO SUN VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL FOR PROVIDING PRIZE PASSES TO THE UPCOMING FESTIVAL.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS THANKS FOR PARTICIPATING

YOU CAN STILL GET YOUR FIX AT THE FLICKS:

1ST PLACE: PAIR OF VIP SUN VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL PASSES - JOSEPH HIEGEL 2ND PLACE: ONE ANNUAL FLICKS PASS - UNLIMITED MOVIE ATTENDANCE FOR ONE YEAR - KEVIN GWIN 3RD PLACE: TWO FLICKS CARDS - 10 MOVIE ADMISSION EACHGOOD FOR ONE YEAR - DAVID FERGUSON 4TH PLACE: ONE FLICKS 10 MOVIE CARD - NEIL LAPINSKY 5TH PLACE: TWO MOVIE TICKETS TO THE FLICKS - FRED HILTON

NOMINEES NOW ON SCREEN: LION, THE RED TURTLE (BOTH HOLDING OVER THROUGH MARCH 9.) WINNER NOW ON SCREEN: THE SALES MAN (HOLDING OVER THROUGH MARCH 9) NOMINEE STARTING THIS FRIDAY: TONI ERDMANN

QUALITY ART LIMITED TIME ONLY EXPIRES 4/1/17

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WINESIPPER TEMPTING TEMPRANILLOS

Native to the Iberian Peninsula, Tempranillo is the grape that put the Rioja region of Spain on the map. It‘s typically blended with other indigenous varieties, like Mazuelo and Graciano. To be designated a Rioja Reserva, the rules require at least one year in oak, two in the bottle, but many wineries go longer (as with two of the favorites). The grape has found a home in the New World. Here are the panel’s top picks: 2014 CASTILLO DE FELICIANA TEMPRANILLO, $17 The Tempranillo grape does well in the Northwest, and this Washington entry stood out in an otherwise all Spanish line-up. The nose has a nice richness, offering candied cherry and berry, colored by hazelnut, vanilla and cedar. The equally rich palate features bright red fruits and an intriguingly different touch of peanut butter. A good buy. 2011 MARQUES DE MURRIETA RESERVA, $26 A Tempranillo dominant blend (89 percent) from the Rioja Alta, this Reserva spent 20 months in American oak. It opens with floral aromas highlighted by cherry blossom, backed by vanilla, berry and anise. A smoothly textured effort, it’s a well-structured wine with creamy cherry and dark plum flavors, with a nice hit of acidity on the long, lingering finish. 2011 RAMON BILBAO RESERVA, $23 Here’s another Tempranillo dominant blend (90 percent), also from the Rioja Alta, and also spending 20 months in oak. The nose is light on fruit, but big on secondary aromas, including cedar, leather, mushroom, mineral and anise. This is an old school, rustic style Rioja, where powerful dark fruit flavors play against bright cranberry with vanilla, leather and tobacco coming along for the ride. —David Kirkpatrick B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CITIZEN

BW

SAMANTHA ZIPPORAH

ADOPT-A-PET

P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

HARRISON BERRY

What’s ‘womb sovereignty’? It’s for the woman with the womb to have absolute power and self governance over the womb. To be sovereign over it means to be literate. You can’t be sovereign if you can’t understand the ecology and geography of the area that you’re governing. It’s a very political statement. To be able to be sovereign, you have to be able to know where your boundaries lie and how to defend them. What are threats to womb sovereignty? Whether it’s through penetration or the dominant paradigm of consumer culture, women are constantly under attack. Hormonal birth control is something people think is a path to liberation, but in reality it’s castration. Our ability to ovulate is on physical and spiritual levels. Women are choosing to suppress ovulation without being educated about what they’re giving up. What do you mean by ovulation on the ‘spiritual level’? Our bodies are not just a metaphor for the cycles of the earth and creativity: They’re part of it. One of the most tangible metaphors I like to share is the four seasons the earth goes through and the four weeks of the menstrual cycle. What’s holistic birth control? Birth should not be controlled. What people are talking about is “ovulation prevention.” Most conventional synthetic birth control controls ovulation. Birth control is a scheduled Caesarian. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS

On the politics of ‘womb sovereignty’

The harder Samantha Zipporah looked at how women conceived, gestated and gave birth to children, the more troublesome the process looked. For years a worker and volunteer at Planned Parenthood, she came to see modern medicine as impersonal toward women’s bodies, treating them like facets of consumer culture. A Boise native, Zipporah now bounces between the City of Trees and Portland, Ore., teaching “womb sovereignty” classes and the “womb continuum” of ovulation, menstruation, birthing and orgasm. She also delivers holistic health services tailored to individuals. Her practice is philosophy, anthropology, science-backed medicine and spirituality—one she says helps her clients be at home in their bodies even as they experience profound life changes.

OFFICE HOURS

Holistic contraception is awareness of your fertility signals.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

You describe yourself as an ally for women having abortions. What does that mean? One of the most important things I like to tell women who are avoiding pregnancy or ending pregnancy is to find the “sacred yes.” Our culture focuses on the fear of conception all the time, but being able to identify what it is you’re saying “yes” to and by claiming it balances the “sacred no.” You also talk about having better sex. I think the ultimate key is self awareness and presence. The individual being aware of their own body’s landscape and communicating it. That’s why I’m working with the multiple dimensions of self. For better sex and orgasms, you have to be aware of energetic and physical anatomy. You cannot compartmentalize energy that gets you through your day.

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

How do you assist in ending a pregnancy? It’s as individual as that person. I will support a woman who is terminating a pregnancy at any point of gestation. Professionally, I provide tools and consultation and education, and postpartum care that acknowledges that they just released a pregnancy—and emotionally and physically, they’re postpartum. The words I like to use are “pregnancy release.”

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com DOBBY: I’m beautiful and calm, and I like to keep a watchful eye out in my new home.

KRONK: I’m a confident leash walker and I love people. I want to meet you.

SNOWFLAKE: I’ve been here almost a year, and am starting to wonder if I’ll ever have a home.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

What made you passionate about this? I was blessed to have a path that was illuminated by flashing neon signs. My mother and sister struggled with health issues around their wombs and menstrual cycles. I was able to observe what they were going through and know intellectually I wanted something different for myself. What have you learned to do this? I’ve had to un-learn job titles in a big way. I thought I wanted to be a midwife for a while, and I thought I wanted to be a doula—and I was a doula for several years—and that container was not built to hold me. It started in Planned Parenthood. I realized what I had been doing there was treating fertility as a pathology. I stopped working at Planned Parenthood. Two years ago, I stopped attending births to focus on people avoiding and ending their pregnancies.

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. LICORICE: 10-year-old, female, terrier mix. Doesn’t let age slow her down. Needs a home with just adults and no big dogs. (Kennel 426–#34572632)

PRINCESS: 6 ½-yearold, female, Rottweiler mix. Friendly and affectionate. Needs an adult-only home or family with older kids. (Kennel 425–#11908096)

SPROUT: 3-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Nervous but likes being gently held. Enjoys other dogs. Best in a home with just adults. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#34680094)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT BORRIS: 3-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Came to the shelter as a stray. Will roll over for belly rubs if he wants attention. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#34663930)

FAYE: 3-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Playful and affectionate. Adores head massages. Would appreciate some toys. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#34511684)

ROLAND: 5-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Came to the shelter as a stray. Curious and adventurous boy. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#34669072)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 19


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NYT CROSSWORD | MIXED FEELINGS ACROSS

1 Word before “Ooh, didn’t mean to make you cry” in Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” 5 Maxim 8 Brother with a cross 13 Unfaithful sorts 17 Roasting place 18 Land between hills, poetically 19 ____ Palmer (“Twin Peaks” victim) 1

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73 Beast in rare “sightings” 74 Poet/musician ____ ScottHeron 75 One who can’t learn new tricks, they say 77 ____-Lay 79 Doze 82 “The king really wants to be around people right now”? 87 Professor’s goal, one day 88 Marvel role for Chris Hemsworth 89 Yazidis, e.g. 92 Go in (for) 95 Actor Curry 96 Go all in 98 What many 100-Across do in the spring 100 See 98-Across 103 Certain earring 105 Trader ____ 107 Baseball league for the Salt Lake Bees 108 “Yeah, let’s do it!” 109 Celebration after a coup? 112 Negative Nancy? 115 Words before a punch line 116 Muddies 117 2% alternative 118 Moving line on a tree trunk 119 Orange-and-white Pixar title character 120 Wild revelry 121 So, so awful, with “the” 122 Rapper with the mostviewed YouTube video of all time 123 P.M. after Churchill

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31 1982 Dustin Hoffman film 32 Place for a sponge 34 Annoying sort 36 Bro 37 Little bit 38 Coffee brewing style 40 Some scans, for short 41 Lifesaving team 44 “Stop insisting Ra doesn’t exist!”? 51 Pill-bottle info 54 Really comes down 8

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1 Weapon usually fired between a 45° and a 90° angle 2 Ducked 3 Go wherever 4 With 41-Down, first tennis player to win two Olympic singles gold medals 5 Potent sushi-bar cocktail 6 Dependent on chance 7 Against the jet stream 8 French region around Strasbourg 9 Tray of brownies, e.g.

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10 Philosopher who said, “The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion” 11 Christian school in Okla. 12 Skin art, informally 13 Character resembling a hat 14 Drawer, say 15 Flower named for a Swedish botanist 16 All done up, as hair 18 Den mother 20 Like original Buddy Holly and the Crickets recordings 22 Turned 24 Detergent brand with a fabric in its name 26 Gets back on base 31 “And that’s it!” 33 Abbr. on a pay stub 35 God: It. 36 Thoughtful 39 So-ugly-it’s-cute pooch 41 See 4-Down 42 One-named singer once married to Xavier Cugat 43 Letter feature 45 Take back, in a way 46 CD or DVD follower 47 “____ is life” 48 “We’re on!” 49 Muslim official 50 I, personally 51 E-business 52 By voice 53 One side in a pool game 58 Subject of a tinfoil- hat theory 59 Peak physical condition 60 Veer 62 Put up stakes 65 Stop seeing each other 66 Box on a mall map 67 Former tribe in western New York

69 Singer Simone 72 @@@ 76 Less stormy 78 Sea creatures with remarkably high I.Q.s 80 Turn-____ (thrills) 81 Congo red and gentian violet 83 San ____, Argentina 84 Volt/ampere 85 High-waisted, shamelessly unfashionable garment 86 Chief concern 90 Way overcooked 91 4:00 p.m., maybe 92 Made a declaration 93 Set adrift 94 V.I.P. 96 Instrument for Louis Armstrong 97 Doctors’ orders L A S T J A N K Y

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99 National Aviation Hall of Fame city 101 Macho 102 NASA’s ____ Research Center 103 Comedy 104 Crown insets 106 Letters on some lotion 110 It’s a deal 111 Unbeatable 113 Net letters 114 “Well, look at that!”

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

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U L A S N E P T U I T E E V E D S I V O T E E R S R Y N T I P A R T I X I E Z M O S Z E A N D B S E E P S S E T M U N O I R D F L S E E A D

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B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


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B OISE W E E KLY

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Enjoy a relaxing massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492. ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377. Open again Saturday and Sunday.

PETS BW PETS GENTLE GOODBYES Our goal at Gentle Goodbyes is to allow you to peacefully say goodbye to your pet in the privacy, comfort and familiarity of your own home. All euthanasia’s are performed at your home by a licensed veterinarian who is accompanied by a veterinary assistant. Our home euthanasia services are by appointment only. For more information: www.gentlegoodbyes.com or call 297-3990.

MUSIC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION PIANO LESSONS! Dedicated piano teacher seeking new students. Located off Marigold in Garden City, Beginner-Intermediate. Contact Peggy: 9414080 or pianopeggy0@gmail. com.

FOR SALE BW YARD SALE YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Dianne Marie Harenberg Legal Name

Case No. CV 01 1701113 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Dianne Marie Harenberg, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Drew Mar Harenberg. The reason for the change in name is: personal preference. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Mar. 21, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Jan. 23, 2017 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEBBIE PERKINS DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 8, 15, 22 & Mar. 1 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Esther Sujin Baek Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1701786 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Esther Sujin Baek, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Lois Sujin Urizar. The reason for the change in name is: Lois (preference), Urizar (marriage). A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Apr. 4, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Jan. 23, 2017 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK

PUB Feb. 15, 22, Mar. 1 & 8 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Kurtis Richard Wooldridge Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1701548 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Kurtis Richard Wooldridge, now residing in the City of Eagle, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Kurtis Odin Leatham. The reason for the change in name is: Middle Name Change for Personal Reasons Associated to Heritage. Last Name Change with Marriage to Taunie Jade Leatham on February 20, 2015. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Mar. 28, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Jan. 30, 2017 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 15, 22, Mar. 1 & 8

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 21


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN Advice for those on the verge “PLAYING POSSUM”

DEAR MINERVA,

Here’s one for ya: I can be all hot to trot, with everything “working” like it is supposed to. His pants come down, huge penis staring back at me and blam-o, mine plays dead. I’ve decided it’s penis envy. I dunno, but the older I get, the worse my issue is becoming. Oh, and I’ve tried the boner pills to no avail. I’ve pretty much given up on sex. I think my mind has taken over and created a monk. It really sucks! Sincerely, —Playing Possum

DEAR PP,

Erectile issues are zero fun, and I can tell that despite the attempts at humor, this is a painful issue for you. You say you are suffering from “penis envy,” so I’m gathering it’s a matter of feeling inadequate in size. That’s a difficult insecurity to overcome. I want to remind you that a man is not the size of his equipment but a multitude of facets that come together to create a dynamic person. You can’t help what the size of your penis is, but size really shouldn’t matter. According to a study done by King’s College London, the average penis length for 90 percent of men falls between 4 inches and 6.3 inches when erect. Even if your penis is smaller than that, it doesn’t mean someone won’t be interested or enjoy sexual activity with you. Don’t be afraid to see a doctor about it, either. Sex is a wonderful part of life, and you shouldn’t deny yourself because you assume you’re inadequate. You deserve love and intimacy. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

32.9 MILLION Oscar 2017 broadcast viewers—the highest was 46.5 million in 2000; the lowest was 31.8 million in 2008.

3 HRS., 49 MIN. Length of the broadcast— the longest in 10 years. (hollywoodreporter.com)

(hollywoodreporter.com)

22 | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | BOISEweekly 

#boiseweeklypic

FIND HSF SPILL AND FLOOD PACKAGE

From the National Weather Service to the old guy who’s lived in your neighborhood for 50 years, everyone agrees the Treasure Valley has experienced one of the harshest winters in recent memory. It has also been one of the wettest, with repeated worry and warning about flooding. The smart money is on being $40 prepared, and one of the easiest ways Boise Army-Navy is with an HSF Spill and Flood Pack4924 E. Chinden Blvd., 208-322-0660, age. Manufactured by Fb Systems, boisearmynavy.com the bright orange bag contains six patented FloodBloc bags, each of which will absorb five gallons or 40 pounds of water in fewer than three minutes; and two Rapid Pollution Deterrent barriers, which are similarly designed to soak up and retain fresh water, then be deployed to control spills, leaks or flooding. The package has been reviewed and approved by the federal InterAgency Board and is sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security. How’s that for peace of mind? —Zach Hagadone

Taken by instagram user soule_photography.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

Have you bought a Treefort Music Fest pass?

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Yes: 39.13%

“PRISONER,” RYAN ADAMS “UNLEASHED,” SKILLET “WINDY CITY,” ALLISON KRAUSS “PETALS,” ELEPHANT REVIVAL “ONE MORE FOR THE ROAD,” CURTIS STIGERS

6. 7. 8.

“25,” ADELE “TELL ME I’M PRETTY,” CAGE THE ELEPHANT

“A SAILOR’S GUIDE TO EARTH,” STURGILL SIMPSON

9. 10.

No, but I plan to buy a pass: 10.87% I haven’t decided yet: 15.22% No: 34.78%

“HIGHWAY QUEEN,” NIKKI LANE “DIRTY PROJECTORS,” DIRTY PROJECTORS

D i s clai mer: Th i s onli ne p oll i s not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of loc al, statewi d e or nati onal op i ni on.

$115 MILLION

2028

14

7; 20

20

0

Reported revenue ABC earned from ads during the broadcast.

Year the broadcast rights contract between ABC/ Walt Disney and the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences has been extended to.

Nominations for La La Land—tying the record with Titanic and All About Eve.

Acting nominations for performers of color; total performers nominated.

Record-breaking number of nominations for a single actor: Meryl Streep.

(variety.com)

(variety.com)

Nominations for Deadpool, which has earned $760 million to date, making it the highest-grossing R-rated movie in history.

(hollywoodreporter.com)

(hollywoodreporter.com)

(variety.com)

(disappointed Deadpool fans everywhere)

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


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TED RALL

JEN SORENSEN

HOBO JARGON

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): I predict you will have earned the title of Master Composter no later than March 26. Not necessarily because you will have packed your food scraps, wilted flowers, coffee grounds and shredded newspapers in, say, a deluxe dual-chamber tumbling compost bin. But rather because you will have dealt efficiently with the rotting emotions, tattered habits, decrepit melodramas and trivial nonsense that has accumulated; you will have worked hard to transform all that crap into metaphorical fertilizer for your future growth. Time to get started! TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s a good time for you to wield your emotional intelligence with leadership and flair. The people you care about need more of your sensitive influence. Any posse or tribe you’re part of will benefit from your thoughtful intervention. So get out there and build up the group morale, Taurus. Assert your healing ideals with panache. Tamp down the insidious power of peer pressure and fashionable nonsense. You have a mandate to wake up sleepy allies and activate the dormant potential of collective efforts. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you were ever in your life going to be awarded an honorary PhD from a top university, it would happen in the next few weeks. If there were even a remote possibility that

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

you would someday be given one of those MacArthur Fellowship “genius” grants, now would be the time. Likewise if you had any hopes of being selected as one of “The World’s Sexiest Chameleons” or “The Fastest, Sweetest Talkers on Earth” or “The Planet’s Most Virtuoso Vacillators,” the moment has arrived. And even if none of those things happen, I’m still pretty sure that your reputation and status will be on the rise. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’re wandering into places you’ve always thought you should be wary of or skeptical about. Good for you! As long as you protect your innocence, I encourage you to keep exploring. To my delight, you have also been fantasizing about accomplishments that used to be off-limits. Again, I say: Good for you! As long as you don’t overreach, I invite you to dream boldly, even brazenly. Since you seem to be in the mood for big thinking, here are other revolutionary activities to consider: dissolving nonessential wishes; transcending shrunken expectations; escaping the boring past; busting irrelevant taboos. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I did a good job of raising my daughter. She turned out to be a thoughtful, intelligent adult with high integrity and interesting skills. But I’m not sure my parenting would have been as effective if I’d

had more kids. I discussed this issue with Nathan, a guy I know. His six offspring are all grown up, too. “How did you do it?” I asked him. “Having just one child was a challenging job for me.” “I’ll tell you my secret,” Nathan told me. “I’m a bad father. I didn’t work very hard on raising my kids. And now they never let me forget it.” In the coming weeks and months, Leo, I recommend that you pursue my approach in your chosen field, not Nathan’s. Aim for high-quality intensity rather than scattershot quantity. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In her poem “Not Anyone Who Says,” Virgo writer Mary Oliver looks down on people who declare, “I’m going to be careful and smart in matters of love.” She disparages the passion of anyone who asserts, “I’m going to choose slowly.” Instead she champions those who are “chosen by something invisible and powerful and uncontrollable and beautiful and possibly even unsuitable.” Here’s my response: Her preferred formula sounds glamorous and dramatic and romantic—especially the powerful and beautiful part. But in practice it rarely works out well—maybe just 10 percent of the time—mostly because of the uncontrollable and unsuitable part. And now is not one of those times for you, Virgo. Be careful and smart in matters of love, and choose slowly.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The poet Rainer Maria Rilke bemoaned the fact that so many of us “squander our sorrows.” Out of self-pity or lazy self-indulgence, we wallow in memories of experiences that didn’t turn out the way we wished they would have. We paralyze ourselves with repetitions of depleting thoughts. Here’s an alternative to that approach: We could use our sadness and frustrations to transform ourselves. We could treat them as fuel to motivate our escape from what doesn’t work, to inspire our determination to rise above what demoralizes and demeans us. I mention this, Libra, because now is an excellent time to do exactly that. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It’s time for the Bliss Blitz—a new holiday just for you Scorpios. To celebrate it properly, get as buoyant as you dare; be greedy for euphoria; launch a sacred quest for pleasure. Ah, but here’s the big question: Can you handle this much relief and release? Are you strong enough to open yourself to massive outbreaks of educational delight and natural highs? Some of you may not be prepared. You may prefer to remain ensconced in your protective sheath of cool cynicism. But if you think you can bear the shock of unprecedented exaltation and jubilation, then go ahead and risk it. Experiment with the unruly happiness of the Bliss Blitz.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In his book The Horologicon, Mark Forsyth gathered “obscure but necessary” words that he dug out of old dictionaries. One of his discoveries is a perfect fit for you right now. It’s “snudge,” a verb that means to walk around with a pensive look on your face, appearing to be busy or in the midst of productive activity, when in fact you’re just goofing off. I recommend it for two reasons: 1. It’s important for your mental and physical health that you do a lot of nothing; that you bless yourself with a healing supply of refreshing emptiness. 2. It’s important for your mental and physical health that you do this on the sly as much as possible; that you avoid being judged or criticized for it by others. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I wish your breakfast cereal came in boxes decorated with Matisse and Picasso paintings. I wish songbirds would greet you each morning with sweet tunes. I wish you’d see that you have more power than you realize. I wish you knew how uniquely beautiful you are. I wish you’d get intoxicated with the small miracles that are happening all around you. I wish that when you made a bold move to improve your life, everyone greeted it with curiosity and excitement. I wish you would let your imagination go halfwild with fantasies during this, the Capricorn wishing season.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “You’re a different human being to everybody you meet,” says novelist Chuck Palahniuk. Now is an excellent time to contemplate the intricacies and implications of that amazing truth—and start taking better advantage of how much freedom it gives you. Say the following statements out loud and see how they feel: 1. “My identity isn’t as narrowly circumscribed as I think it is.” 2. “I know at least 200 people, so there must be at least 200 facets to my character.” 3. “I am too complicated to be completely comprehended by any one person.” 4. “Consistency is overrated.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your immediate future is too good to be true. Or at least that’s what you, with your famous self-doubt, might be inclined to believe if I told you the truth about the favorable developments that are in the works. Therefore, I have come up with some fake anxieties to keep your worry reflex engaged so it won’t sabotage the real goodies. Beware of dirty limericks and invisible ladders and upside-down rainbows and psychic bunny rabbits. Be on guard against accountants wearing boxing gloves and clowns singing Broadway show tunes in runaway shopping carts and celebrities telling you classified secrets in your dreams.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 1–7, 2017 | 23


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Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 37  

Trump's Clumsy Sweep: First Thursday : Another Round

Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 37  

Trump's Clumsy Sweep: First Thursday : Another Round