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BOISEWEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

F E B R UA RY 8 – 1 4 , 2 0 1 7

VO L U M E 2 5 , I S S U E 3 4

“I think communities realize we’re not a seedy adult store. We’re just selling people happiness.”

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Club Ted

Ted Challenger talks China Blue stabbing and how the club scene has changed

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Full Ton of Talent

Steve Fulton is releasing his first new album in 11 years, and it’s been well worth the wait

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CITIZEN 21

Oscar Madness

Fill out the Red Carpet Movie Awards ballot and you might be the big winner FREE TAKE ONE!


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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Sami Edge, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Brooklyn Riepma, Devon Seefeldt Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Jared Stewart, jared@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Bingo Barnes, bingo@boiseweekly.com Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Bill Hagler, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Fax: 208-342-4733 Phone: 208-344-2055 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2017 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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EDITOR’S NOTE HOW TO STAY SANE IN A BAD NEWS WORLD: GO TO THE MOVIES David Sipriss has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker since 1998 and, as a middling scribbler in a past life, I’ve been a fan of his sketchy, expressive style for many of those years. It was an essay he wrote for the magazine, however, that caught my attention the other day. “How to Stay Sane as a Cartoonist in Trumpland,” published Feb. 3, riffed off the most popular piece he’s ever created: A onepanel drawing of a man and woman walking down a city street, the woman remarking, “My desire to be well-informed is currently at odds with my desire to remain sane.” According to Sipriss, he doesn’t remember what specific event or circumstance caused him to draw that particular cartoon, or even where it was first published. He wrote that it dated from sometime during the Clinton years. That it remains so readily shared on social media is a testament to its fundamental truth: If you stare too long into the abyss, it will stare back. One remedy for bad-news-overload is to escape into art, and we have a great opportunity for you to do just that in this week’s edition of Boise Weekly. For the second year in a row, BW has teamed up with The Flicks for the Red Carpet Movie Awards—a free contest in which you pick what Oscar nominated films will score a statuette and, if you choose wisely, win from a slate of prizes that will make it easy to leave this world of strife and division for a few hours of blessed entertainment. For a complete list of rules and prizes, plus a sample ballot containing BW film guru George Prentice’s picks, see Page 19. In the meantime, maybe carve out some time to take care of yourself by catching up on some of the best films of the year. As Sipriss wrote, among all the forms of self-care he’s come across in this dark night of the political soul, the best might be “just making sure to have fun now and then.” Good advice. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Seth “Emrynt” Spencer TITLE: “When it Snowed in May” MEDIUM: Watercolor and pen ARTIST STATEMENT: A scene from the Salmon River. The mountains where the Wild Gods live. The mountains where my dad fell into pieces. The picturesque falls away; the sublime remains. Emrynt.com

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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Boise Philharmonic presents “This cello prodigy belongs in the family of the greatest artists of all time. The audience gave him an enthusiastic ovation in recognition of a divinely magical evening.” LA PROVENCE

BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

BUSY SIGNAL WITH A BIG CHANGE TO IDAHO’S ARE A CODE SC HEDULED TO GO INTO EFFECT L ATER THIS YE AR, IDAHO HOUSE STATE AFFAIRS COMMIT TEE CHAIR TO M LOERTSCHER CALLED THE ADDITION O F A S EC O N D A RE A C O D E A “ M ES S .” REGUL ATORS BRIEFED THE COMMIT TEE ON HOW IDAHO WAS R APIDLY RUNNING OUT OF PHONE NUMBERS WITH THE ARE A CODE 208 . MORE AT NE WS/CIT YDESK.

OVER EASY

Elgar

Cello Concerto Edgar Moreau, cello

PLUS

Bench residents are salivating about the opening of a new Original Sunrise Cafe on Overland, in the space formerly occupied by Idaho Pizza Company. Get the details at Food&Drink/Food News.

FREEDOM OF SPEECH An emotional hearing prompted an Idaho House panel to call for formal licensing of sign language interpreters for the deaf and hard of hearing. More at News/Citydesk.

EVERYBODY INTO THE POOLE Boise-based Marshall Poole has dropped a new music video in advance of the band’s appearance at Treefort Music Fest 2017. See the video and read more at Music.

OPINION

Verdi:

Overture to “La Forza del Destino”

Mussorgsky:

Pictures at an Exhibition

FRI 8pm

FEB 17

BRANDT CENTER, NAMPA

SAT 8pm

FEB 18

MORRISON CENTER, BOISE

Andrés Franco, conductor

Starting at $22.50 Tickets are also on sale for these concerts:

TIX 344-7849 or boisephil.org FEB 11: Silent Movies with Ben Model, organ FEB 25: Chamber 360° - BP Master Chorale MAR 10&11: Tchaik. Violin Concerto w/David Kim MAR 18: Annual Gala “An Evening at the Oscars”

Endowment Foundation

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OPINION GET RELENTLESS We have tons of scum to mop up BILL COPE For eight years, I looked forward to writing the column that would have appeared in the Boise Weekly on Nov. 9, 2016. So confident was I about the outcome on Nov. 8, I was willing to take a chance and have it ready for publication well before the election. I knew exactly what I wanted to say because, in November 2008, I knew Barack Obama was going to be a popular president. I knew Hillary Clinton would be running again in 2016. And I knew she would win. I was right. Obama left office a popular president. Clinton ran again in 2016. And she won. It was no surprise Republicans would attack Clinton like meth-crazed wife beaters; but she had already withstood two decades of insult from those to whom the most fearful figure in politics is a woman who is smarter than they are. I figured she could weather one more campaign season of baseless nonsense and sludgy minds. Again—and not to brag, mind you—I was right. A total of 65,844,954 Americans voted for Clinton, 2.9 million more than went for her opponent. I actually anticipated she would win by more than that. I had her at an easy 54 percent. I was also quite sure that she, like Obama before her, would leave office in eight years as an immensely popular figure. So, on Nov. 9, 2016, the column I waited eight years to publish would have been addressed to conservative voters of an age at and around my own. My lead sentence: How does it feel to realize that it’s unlikely you will ever see another Republican president in your lifetime? Lucky for ol’ Bill, on Nov. 9, 2016, I was no longer writing for Boise Weekly. ••• To be fair, though, how could I have known that an unholy alliance would form between the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the most vicious fascist on the planet, Vladimir Putin? And that the pair, working like a well-oiled pas de deux, would toss just enough monkey wrenches into the works... would twist just enough nipples in a handful of states... would play the Electoral College like a Russian prostitute... in order to hand the presidency to the scummiest human being in the United States. OK, he may not be THE scummiest human being in the U.S. There is certainly no shortage of contenders for the title—and we know more about them now that he has given them so many positions in his administration. Still, there’s nothing unusual about scummy people banding together to steal power in the U.S. Republicans, going back at least three decades, have been jiggering elections any way they can. Even more disturbing than the decay of BOISE WEEKLY.COM

a political party into a criminal cartel is that there were at least 62,979,879 Americans for whom scumminess didn’t disqualify Donald J. Trump. And there are more who may not have voted for him, but who now insist we give him a chance. A chance at what? A successful presidency? A chance to accomplish the dismemberment of every transcendent impulse that has arisen in this nation, from public schools to public lands to public broadcasting? A chance to put all of American governance and beneficence on the auction block? But... I’ve heard it argued... maybe he won’t be as bad as feared. Doesn’t matter. Even were he to turn out ideologically to be a secret Bernie Sanders— which he won’t—his policies and politics are not what make him unfit to be the leader of this, or any other, country. There is nothing he can do to make it right that he’s in that office, and if you haven’t already absorbed that reality from your brain to your gut, there is probably no argument to be made that will convince you. The sort of evil represented by Donald Trump depends on people insisting it be given a chance. Oh, and if you’re offended I’ve resorted to the “e” word to characterize this noxious sleaze, objection noted. It’s not a word that should be tossed about. Too often, just using the word like a casual insult turns into its own brand of evil. But in my world, a man can tell only so many lies, assault only so many women, defraud only so many associates, threaten only so many vulnerable people, enrich himself only so much on the impoverishment of others, before we are left with only one word to describe him. Trump passed that bar long before he ever announced he would run for president. In light of the catastrophe the election has unleashed upon America, Boise Weekly has asked me to return to these pages on a limited basis. I was happy to say yes. To not be an active participant in the resistance to Mr. Scummy is not an option. But those of us committed to resisting the evil must understand something: There will be no help from the Republican Party because there are no values, of any sort, left within the Republican Party. All of them—cultural values, ethical values, the value of nature, the value of education, the value of law, the value of decency and yes, family values... every value and every virtue worth defending—is now on our side. It is as clear an imbalance of moral authority as we are apt to experience more than once every few generations. Sadly, if moral authority is what decided historical outcomes, we wouldn’t be having this discussion. I’m afraid it’s going to take some muscle, too. BOISEweeklycFEBRUARY 8–14, 2017c5


St. John’s Cathedral, where Boise Catholics consider the need to aid refugees and immigrants.

WHEN IMMIGRATION POLITICS AND FAITH COLLIDE Under the domed ceiling of St. John’s Cathedral in Boise’s North End neighborhood, the teachings of the prophet Isaiah echoed during the Liturgy of the Word. In the passage, Isaiah tells the Jews to clothe the naked, feed the hungry and shelter those in need. His message is a core teaching of Abrahamic religions from Judaism to Islam, and though recent political developments regarding immigration and refugees were not explicitly mentioned during mass, it was a pointed reminder that a recent ban on Syrian refugees and immigration from several Middle Eastern countries contradicted a calling within numerous faiths to practice charity toward the downtrodden. “The idea of aiding refugee communities is not a remote or optional part of the Christian life from a Catholic perspective,” said Catholic Charities of Idaho Executive Director Douglas Alles. The controversy began Jan. 27, when President Donald Trump issued an executive order preventing Syrian refugees from entering the United States and barred immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries. Days later, Rep. Greg Chaney (R-Caldwell) introduced House Bill 76, which would deny state sales tax funding to cities harboring undocumented residents. For faith communities, many of which have immigrant members and serve refugees, these developments came as a blow. Alles was unable to comment directly on immigration politics, but did say Trump’s executive orders come at a time of “significant instability in the world.” That sentiment was echoed in a Feb. 2 statement from Boise Bishop Peter Christensen, in which he affirmed the church’s “commitment to accompanying and supporting the vulnerable in our society, including immigrants and refugees.” “It is my hope that our federal government focus its efforts on comprehensive immigration reform and humane refugee resettlement for [families split by immigration status], but also our entire country,” Christensen wrote. Trump’s orders quickly became mired in the courts, but not before sparking widespread protests at airports across the country (including in Boise). The Boise City Council joined the fray, unanimously passing 8 the “Welcoming City” resolution that underscored its commitment to making 6cFEBRUARY 8-14, 2017cBOISEweekly

NEWS

GEORGE PRENTICE

KE L S E Y HAWES

CITYDESK

THE MAYOR OF 6TH AND MAIN

Ted Challenger on his past, the China Blue stabbing and tighter security GEORGE PRENTICE The corners of Sixth and Main streets in downtown Boise mean different things to different age groups. Professionals might point to City Hall or the Pioneer Building—but for thousands of college-age Boiseans, Sixth and Main is the centerpiece of their weekend nightlife. The density of watering holes inspired Boise Weekly to dub the area the “Barmuda Triangle” and, while more than a few bars and bar owners have come and gone, Ted Challenger has endured. “I’ve always been drawn to the energy of a bar, for good or bad. I’d be the first to say that my behavior wasn’t always the best,” said Challenger, who has been Sixth and Main’s most infamous entrepreneur for more than a quarter of a century. “And the people in this town? They don’t forget.” There has been plenty to recall: a 2013 promotion promising a free “boob job” to one lucky Mardi Gras reveler, or the time Challenger used social media to shame and track down a man who stole money from an employee’s purse. Challenger admits his career has been colorful but, in a wide-ranging interview with questions about his checkered rise to fame, he was candid about his alcohol- and sex-fueled attraction to the industry, the rapidly-changing bar scene and the Jan. 14 stabbing at China Blue that left 21-yearold Daviel Ruiz-Gomez dead. “It’s my understanding that Daviel was an amazing person. We have complete surveillance at each of my locations and when we watched the video…” Challenger didn’t finish the sentence. He looked away before adding, “It happened right between the dance floor and the bar. The video… it was hard to watch.”

THE CHINA BLUE STABBING Type “China Blue” into Google; scroll past Facebook, Yelp and FourSquare listings of the bar; and you’ll find a slew of posts with headlines like “China Blue Nightclub Stabbing” or “China Blue Nightclub Owner Discusses Stabbing.” “In retrospect, I regret giving that interview to KTVB-TV. I was still in shock,” said Challenger, referring to a Channel 7 interview that aired hours after the attack. “I hadn’t humanized it.” Ruiz-Gomez was much loved and social

Longtime Boise bar owner Ted Challenger: “I’ve always been drawn to the energy of a bar, for good or bad.”

media lit up with concern at the news he was stabbed at approximately 1:40 a.m. on Jan. 14. Ruiz-Gomez’s wife, Danielle, posted a series of heartbreaking Facebook and Twitter updates, using #DavielStrong, and thanking friends for their prayers. She wrote, “He is in bad condition” after Ruiz-Gomez was rushed to Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center for treatment of stab wounds to the chest and torso. Three days later, he was declared brain dead at Saint Al’s, where he had been on life support. “R.I.P. my love. You are my everything and always will be,” Danielle wrote on Facebook. “I was home asleep, and I had turned the ringer off on my phone,” said Challenger of the early morning events of Jan. 14. “Someone had to drive to my home to wake me up. Half awake, I thought I was having a nightmare. I got down to China Blue as fast as I could.” The following morning, Challenger gathered his employees to debrief and, more important, to check on their well being. “They were scared. They had worked so hard to build up the reputation of China Blue. They were saddened and in shock,” said Challenger. “I immediately offered anonymous grief counseling. I said, ‘Just send me the bill.’” The surveillance footage was turned over to Boise police, who arrested Jesus Garcia, 24, of Nampa. He was charged with second-degree murder shortly after Ruiz-Gomez died, adding to an already robust history of violence: Garcia was convicted in 2010 for aggravated assault, and was out on bail after being arrested in December 2016 for felony drug possession. He has also been charged with a felony count of aggravated battery for

stabbing a second man (his identity has not been made public) at China Blue on Jan. 14. Three weeks later, on Feb. 2, a shackled Garcia was led into the Ada County Courtroom of Fourth Judicial District Court Judge Michael Swain. Clad in a yellow- and white-striped prisoner’s uniform, Garcia flashed a smile and winked to relatives in the courtroom. Neither his attorney nor the Ada County prosecutor’s office were ready to move forward with the case, so Swain pushed the preliminary hearing to Tuesday, March 7. Nearly a minute after he entered the courtroom, lawmen escorted Garcia to a waiting bus, returning him to the Ada County Jail where he’s being held on $2 million bail—far higher than an initial $500,000, which prosecutors successfully argued should be raised based on his criminal history. “Ten seconds. That’s how fast it happened,” said Challenger. “My doormen moved in and cops were here in a heartbeat. I think it took Boise police one minute to be on the scene. We applied first aid and paramedics were here in four minutes. The suspect? To the best of our knowledge, he was in the bar for about eight minutes.”

PREVENTING THE NEXT INCIDENT “Orlando changed everything,” said Challenger. On June 12, 2016, Omar Mateen, 29, walked into an Orlando, Fla. nightclub and began shooting, killing 49 people and wounding 53 others before he was shot and killed by police. The domestic terrorism incident stunned the nation and had American restaurant 8 and bar owners on alert. “It wasn’t long after that incident that BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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NEWS we began Krav Maga training. We have that training for our doormen and [door] woman every three months,” said Challenger, referring to the self-defense techniques, including disarming a gunman, developed by the Israeli Defense Forces. Additionally, Challenger has surveillance cameras capturing images in every corner of his four venues: Amsterdam Lounge, China Blue, Dirty Little Roddy’s and Tailgate. “There are 63 cameras. I can watch them on my cellphone at any time, and I certainly look at the feeds from my desktop at home,” he said. “If someone does something wrong down here, I’ve got them on camera, and I have no problem putting their image on Facebook.” Take, for instance, an incident in January 2015 when Challenger learned someone had stolen cash from employees’ purses. Surveillance footage showed a male rifling through bags. Challenger posted the video on his Facebook page. Within two days, someone gave him a name. “That guy was down here, sliding an envelope with the cash under our door, in no time flat,” said Challenger. (The matter was also turned over to police). One of the biggest issues for any bar is customers with weapons, particularly in “concealed carry” Idaho, where citizens are permitted to keep their weapon of choice close at hand. “But there’s no place for guns anywhere near alcohol,” said Challenger. Signs warn customers their firearms aren’t welcome in his establishments, but gun-toting customers have walked through his doors. On July 4, 2010, an off-duty Ada County sheriff’s deputy was packing heat inside Dirty Little Roddy’s. “He was riding the mechanical bull and there it was: his sidearm,” Challenger said. Deputy Ron Lowe was asked to leave the bar but, according to police, he refused. Lowe was ultimately escorted out of the bar by law enforcement and cited for being under the influence of alcohol while carrying a concealed weapon. Lowe actually had two guns on him, neither of which was his service weapon. The stabbing incident at China Blue triggered another change—one that Challenger insists should bring even more safety to his establishments. “As soon as Boise police publicly released the name of the stabbing suspect, I looked him up on the Idaho court repository and saw his connection to violent crime,” said Challenger. “So, very soon, we’ll begin looking up people’s prior criminal histories.” Challenger has invested in a new system that will require customers to swipe their driver’s license or ID, which will then be checked against a criminal database. “Anyone with a violent act in their past? They’ll be gone,” said Challenger. “I hope that it will be in place by the end of February.”

ADA COUNT Y SHERIFF’S OFFICE

HARRISON BERRY

CITYDESK

6

Thousands of Idahoans have demonstrated in support of refugee communities.

Boise immigrant-friendly, but fell short of declaring Boise a community that would 6 stand up to federal authorities seeking undocumented residents. “This is not a statement of Boise as a sanctuary city,” said Boise City Councilwoman and Democratic Sen. Maryanne Jordan. “This is more personal. Sometimes you have to say something because it’s the right thing to say.” During discussion of the resolution, Boise Mayor Dave Bieter said it was “a reaffirmation of who we are.” The immigration and refugee bans were designed to address what the administration sees as a terrorist menace coming from countries in the Middle East, but their effects have been felt keenly by those in Boise’s Muslim community. Members of that community have come to Boise as refugees, and others as immigrants to work at Boise State University and the city’s growing technology sector. Some, like Said Ahmed-Zaid, feel Trump’s policies harken back to post-9/11 Islamophobia. “In the early days right after 9/11, law enforcement agencies were casting these wide nets, looking at every Muslim with suspicion,” he said. “I’m saddened that this administration is going back to those early days.” Speaking on behalf of the Islamic Center of Boise, Ahmed-Zaid said the congregation has strong ties to the city of Boise and Boise Police Department. For its part, the Islamic Center has worked to help members adjust to their new lives as Americans. Ahmed-Zaid worried, however, that legislation like HB 76 has its origins in the teachings of people like Shahram Hadian, an anti-Islam pastor who spoke at the Idaho Statehouse in January 2016. “We’re looking at a minority of legislators who are getting their information from antiMuslim sources,” he said. In conjunction with Trump’s executive orders, Ahmed-Zaid said pieces of legislation like Chaney’s enable anti-immigrant sentiment and are pathways to roundups of immigrants. That would, in turn, “really push them into the dark,” making them unwilling to seek services or communicate with law enforcement. ICB strives to be apolitical, but recent events have it “caught between a rock and a hard place.” “These orders are coming at us like a flurry of punches,” he said. “We’re actually exhausted.” —Harrison Berry 8cFEBRUARY 8-14, 2017cBOISEweekly

Jesus Garcia, 24, of Nampa, was charged with second-degree murder following a Jan. 14 stabbing incident at China Blue that left 21-year-old Daviel Ruiz-Gomez dead.

BOOZE, SEX AND HATERS “I was 19, working at the Red Lion hotel downtown, and I was a banquet waiter,” Challenger said. “But I was always drawn to the bar.” By his own admission, Challenger “had a mouth” on him. It got him into trouble and occasionally fired, but even former employers would tell him, “If you owned your own bar, you’d probably do pretty well,” and he always gravitated back to the bar business. To say Challenger was a hustler is an understatement. Name a rule, and he bent or broke it. Once Challenger slipped $300 to a doorman in order to get himself hired. One time, he wanted to be a bar manager so badly, he got an existing manager hired somewhere else so he could take over. At 22, Challenger was offered a partnership in the Main Street Bistro. He eventually struck a deal in which he assumed the debt of his partner and took full ownership of the establishment. “I tore out the dining room, changed uniforms and concentrated on the bar. I think Main Street Bistro was doing about $280,000 worth of business each year back then. Our best year? $2 million,” said Challenger with a smile. All the while, his reputation grew. To some, he was a nice guy, a tough guy, a fun guy, a hard-ass, a shrewd businessman, a sexist provocateur. “When I was 22, I was a fat little kid who didn’t get any attention. Suddenly, that attention shifted in my direction and people wanted to be around me. I went crazy,” said Challenger. “I worked my ass off. I had my own little posse. We partied. I did a lot of wrong things. I wasn’t happy. I was living a fake life.” Challenger is particular when describing his attraction to the nightlife.

“I had a strong desire for high levels of dopamine,” he said, referring to the neurotransmitter that sets the pace for human behaviors, many of them hyper. “And I chased that. I wanted to fulfill that. There was the alcohol. There was the sex.” And there were more businesses. He added China Blue and Dirty Little Roddy’s, he transformed Main Street Bistro into Amsterdam Lounge and, last July, bought Cheerleaders Sports Bar near Boise State University and turned it into Tailgate Sports Bar. Challenger also was gaining a reputation for exploitive marketing. “Bikini bull riding? Remember those ads using just a pair of tits? I had to change,” he said. “I met a great woman, and I needed to be a better partner. And she has a daughter. I started asking, ‘How do I treat girls?’ ‘Are we sexualizing them?’ I had to change our promotions. It was life-changing. I put myself into deep counseling.” Despite his efforts, Challenger concedes he still has plenty of “haters.” “For instance, there was a lot of shit-talk on social media in the wake of the stabbing incident,” he said. “All of my enemies came out of the woodwork. I responded by writing, ‘Have you heard of the word slander?’ I’m through with it.” For now, Challenger has his eye on the future. A new security system. Gender-appropriate promotions. And hiring more people, he said, that can readily adapt to the his ever-changing industry. “When someone isn’t too shy, walks up to me and sincerely wants to know more about succeeding, that’s a great sign,” said Challenger. “They take great pride in who they are. I take great pride in them, too.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY FEB. 8 Festivals & Events 2017 MERIDIAN STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS AND TASTE OF MERIDIAN—Learn about what the city accomplished in 2016 and what is to come in 2017. Then check out the Taste of Meridian reception. 4 p.m. FREE-$10. Meridian Middle School, 1507 W. Eighth St., Meridian, 208-855-4225. 24TH ANNUAL VALENTINE FOR AIDS—Through Feb. 12. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeehouse, 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-3454320, flyingmcoffee.com.

On Stage BOISE BREWING FREE COMEDY NIGHT: ELI NARY—7 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing Co., 521 W. Broad

St., Boise, 208-342-7655, boisebrewing.com.

University Drive, Boise, 208-4261242, finearts.boisestate.edu.

PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—During a very bad performance of Murder Me Always, an actual murder takes place off stage. Luckily, Detective Joe Mamet has staked out the audience. Optional dinner available with show. 6:30 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-7790092, playhouseboise.com.

CRAFTING RESISTANCE GROUP SHOW—Through March 28. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208426-3994. GERALDINE ONDRIZEK: CHROMOSOME PAINTING II—Through June 4. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Art 2017 ANNUAL STUDENT JURIED EXHIBITION—Through Feb. 15. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter. BRYAN ANTHONY MOORE: NATIONAL MYTHSTORY—Through Feb. 19. 7 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910

THURSDAY, FEB. 9

THURSDAY FEB. 9 On Stage COMEDIAN TIM NORTHERN—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—6:30 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

Kids & Teens IDAHO THEATER FOR YOUTH: STUART LITTLE—School-age children will enjoy Joseph Robinnette’s play adapted from E.B. White’s classic novel. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208972-8200, idahoshakespeare.org/ idaho-theater-for-youth.

Talks & Lectures 2017 DENTON DARRINGTON LECTURE—Join Chief Justice Charlie Daniels of the New Mexico Supreme Court for “Pretrial Justice Reform: Promoting Public Safety and Constitutional Rights Through Evidence-Based Release and Detention.” The lecture will address

SATURDAY, FEB. 11

Firkin awesome.

criminal justice reform initiatives under discussion in Idaho. In the Lincoln Auditorium. 4 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-4339705, uidaho.edu/law/news/upcoming-events/darrington-lecture.

Food BOISE ROTARY CLUB’S 2ND ANNUAL FIRKIN FROLIC—Enjoy sampling unique, locally brewed firkin beers, as well as traditional beers from your favorite local brewers. Plus food vendors, music and more, all to benefit the Rotary Club of Boise. Participating breweries include Boise Brewing, Barbarian Brewing, Mother Earth Brew Co., Powderhaus Brewing, Sawtooth Brewery and Woodland Empire Ale Craft. 5:30 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-5097 or 208-3429983, boisefirkinfrolic.org.

SUPERFOOD CHOCOLATE AND WHOLE FOOD DESSERTS—Learn how to be deliciously healthy with raw desserts. Jennifer Mac will be demonstrating raw chocolate recipes. In addition to sampling the recipes, participants can take a small container of raw chocolate home. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $55. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, jumpboise.org.

FRIDAY FEB. 10 Festivals & Events BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT’S BIKIN’ FOR LOVIN’—Dress to impress in your finest old-timey garb for a pedal-powered social ride from the BBP shop to Pollo Rey, who’s teaming up with Bittercreek Alehouse to serve a delicious Lovin’ Taco Dinner. Dinner tickets available two complimentary beers. Plus live

SATURDAY, FEB. 11

Gangsters, gambling and giggle water for a great cause.

Like they do on the Discovery Channel.

BOISE ROTARY 2ND ANNUAL FIRKIN FROLIC

SPEAKEASY BOISE: A DAPPER FLAPPER NIGHT

WOO AT THE ZOO

The Brits have bequeathed us many great words: barmy, chuffed, codswallop, rumpy pumpy. Add to that “firkin”: “a unit of liquid volume equal to half a kilderkin (about 11 gallons or 41 liters).” Pour a firkin of beer into a firkin-sized cask and you have yourself a party. In this case, the Boise Rotary Club’s Firkin Frolic. Calling it a “frolic” (from the 16th century Dutch vrolijk, meaning “merry” or “cheerful”) might be kind of an understatement. The Rotarians will be cracking open a slate of local beers conditioned in firkin casks, alongside other offerings from breweries including Barbarian Brewing, Boise Brewing, Mother Earth Brew Co., Powderhaus Brewing, Sawtooth Brewery and Woodland Empire Ale Craft. Throw in some food vendors and musical entertainment at the Basque Block, and we’d upgrade that “frolic” to a bacchanal. 5:30 p.m.; $15 adv., $20 door. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., 208-331-5097 or 208-342-9983. boisefirkinfrolic.org.

Get down to local band The Green Zoo while you toss back moonshine, hit the blackjack tables and dance the night away in your best pinstripes and flapper dresses at Speakeasy Boise, where fun and function go together like Bonnie and Clyde. A portion of the proceeds from this 1920s party benefit Family Advocates, a program that helps keep southern Idaho families healthy by offering education and support for parents/guardians, and managing CASA, which advocates for child victims of abuse and neglect. Lindsay Biedel, relationship manager for Family Advocates, says FA served 1,100 children last year through CASA and another 300 families through its programs. Fundraisers and individual contributions make up 60 percent of the group’s budget, Biedel said. If you can’t make it to the fundraiser, Family Advocates is always looking for more volunteers. 8 p.m., $55, 21 and older only. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212. knittingfactory.com.

Nothing screams romance quite like a guided tour of animal foreplay. Lovers are invited to spend the day before Valentine’s learning all about the “intimate secrets of exotic animal mating and dating” with the zookeepers at Zoo Boise. (One might imagine that they’ve seen it all). In addition to the guided tour, the date night includes a pasta dinner, drinks and a take-home box of chocolates. If nothing else, it’s bound to be a Valentine’seve you’ll never forget. Space is limited to 30 people, so get your tickets soon. While lovers (18+) learn what the Bloodhound Gang meant by “Do it like they do on the Discovery Channel,” kids aged 5-10 can camp out at a PG pizza party with zoo staff. They’ll get to play games, do crafts and visit the animals to learn about their nocturnal activities. Adults: 4-7 p.m. $40-$45. Kids: 4-7 p.m. $15-$20. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Dr. 208-608-7760.zooboise.org.

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Your day begins with a great breakfast!

CALENDAR music by James Orr, Lovin’ Photobooth, beer from Payette Brewing Co., silent auction, art and limited edition signed Bikin’ for Lovin’ 2017 prints by Bruce Maurey. 6-10 p.m. FREE-$30. Pollo Rey, 222 N. Eighth St., Boise. 208-429-6520. CANYON COUNTY HOME AND GARDEN SHOW—Through Feb. 12. 5-9 p.m. FREE-$3. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000.

On Stage 2017 IDAHO MISS AMAZING— Witness the amazing talents of girls and women with disabilities at the 2017 Idaho Miss Amazing pageant. 6 p.m. $10. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter. com. BALLET IDAHO: WINTER REPERTORY—Ballet Idaho performs one of choreography legend George Balanchine’s early masterpieces, “Concerto Barocco,” a timeless, el-

egant, unique journey into Johann Sebastian Bach’s baroque score. Plus “Night Crawlers,” Peter Anastos’ hilarious ballet of mishaps and mayhem, with music by Frederic Chopin, and “The Monster and the Gift,” a new ballet by Daniel Ojeda set to music by Jeremy Stewart and Daniel Kerr. Featuring live music by Boise Baroque Chamber Orchestra and Del Parkinson. 8 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261110, balletidaho.org. COMEDIAN TIM NORTHERN—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—6:30 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208779-0092, playhouseboise.com. STARBELLY SCHOOL OF DANCE: 7TH ANNUAL BIG BAD-ASS BELLY DANCE SHOW—Join Starbelly School of Dance for a hero’s journey as she transitions from oppression to liberation through

SATURDAY, FEB. 11

her imagination. You’ll be treated to an exciting mix of traditional and modern Raqs Sharqi (belly dance), with live music performances by Fleet Street Klezmer Band and Jen Potcher. 9 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-891-6609, ceciliabellydance.com.

Literature FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY FEBRUARY FICTION SALE—Find some fantastic fiction at bargain prices from among an assortment of hardback and paperback fiction in a variety of genres. Through Feb. 12. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Warehouse, 762 River St., across from main branch, Boise, 208-384-4076, boisepubliclibrary.org/friends. REDISCOVERED BOOKS BOOK TRAILER CONTEST VIEWING PARTY—Get a look at the top three finalists for each category of Rediscovered’s Book Trailer Contest. Viewers will vote in-store and online for the winner, which will be announced Feb. 24. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Sports & Fitness

BARREL HOUSE IS NOW OFFERING SUNDAY BRUNCH FROM 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM Feature drinks include Mimosa's, bloody Mary's and some wonderful coffee drinks. 2 0 8 - 3 7 6 - 4 2 0 0 • 5 1 8 1 N GL EN WO O D STREET, GARDEN C I TY M O N - S AT – 1 1 A M - 1 0 PM • SU N – 1 0 AM-8 P M • I N F O @ B ARREL H O U SE.B EER

YOUR CAR IS HIGH TECH. IS YOUR TECHNICIAN? Computerized Diagnostic Engine Analyzer Late Model Volkswagen & Audi Service & Repair Scheduled Factory Maintenance

Jeff’s Import Auto 4433 Adams Street Garden City • 376-4686 jeffsimportautowerks.com

BOISE GOLF AND TRAVEL SHOW VIP NIGHT—Get treated like a VIP at the Boise Golf and Travel Show. Tickets include early access to the show, with exclusive access to manufacturer reps and show specials, free play on the long putt and long drive with special prizes, weekend entrance to the Boise Golf and Travel Show and a drink. 5-8 p.m. $20 adv., $25 door. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, boisegolfshow. com/vip-night.

LIVE COMEDY 6 NIGHTS A WEEK

TNORITMHERN

Religious/Spiritual

The event title might say “losers” but it’s a winner.

FIFTH ANNUAL LOVERS AND LOSERS BALL Only at the Balcony can you find events like Meryl Streep trivia, a fundraising ball and wizard-themed bash in the span of a single month. Get to the club on Saturday, Feb. 11 for the fifth annual “Lovers and Losers Ball,” hosted by the Imperial Sovereign Gem Court of Idaho—the oldest LGBT nonprofit in the state. Funds raised at the ball will benefit the Jerry Swett Fund, which helps people living with HIV/AIDS pay for rent, utilities and other expenses. The party will be hosted by emcees Martini—crowned Gem Empress 11 in the “Insanity of the Gem” reign—and Empress 36 1/2 Minerva Jayne VanAllen, president of the Gem Court board of directors and Boise Weekly’s advice columnist. Entertainment includes a silent auction, raffle and lineup of performers so enthusiastic about the event that the roster maxed out three months ago. 7 p.m. $5. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., 208-336-1313, facebook.com/thebalconyclubboise. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

DHARMA TALK WITH ZEN MASTER BON SOENG—All are welcome, newcomers included, to join Zen Master Bon Soeng of Empty Gate Zen Center in Berkeley, Calif., for this hourlong dharma talk. 7 p.m. By donation. Boise Institute for Buddhist Studies, 660 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-661-6277, bibscenter.org.

Food ANGELL’S VALENTINE’S DAY WEEKEND—Check out Executive International Chef Franck Bacquet’s fantastic Valentine’s dinner menu, or his excellent regular menu will also be available. Angell’s will celebrating Valentine’s Day Weekend through Tuesday, Feb. 14, including Sunday, Feb. 12. 5-10 p.m. Angell’s Bar and Grill Renato, 999 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-4900.

FEB 9-12

FEB 16-19

CECOONSOTMOAPKOLIIS

$10 THURSDAY-SUNDAY AT 8 PM & 10:00 PM$12 FRIDAY & SATURDAY

BUY TICKETS NOW! LIQUIDLAUGHS.COM | 208-941-2459 | 405 S 8TH ST BOISEweeklycFEBRUARY 8–14, 2017 c11


CALENDAR SUNNYSLOPE WINE TRAIL WINE AND CHOCOLATE WEEKEND—Nothing goes together better than wine and chocolate. The Sunnyslope Wine Trail will celebrate this classic couple over a romantic open house weekend, with each winery or restaurant offering something a little different and a lot special. See web for more information on pairings, tastings and specials. Tasting fees may apply and are set by the individual wineries. For ages 21 and older. Through Feb. 12. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Sunnyslope Wine Trail, Southwest Idaho, sunnyslopewinetrail.com.

appetizers and dessert. A portion of the proceeds with be donated to Family Advocates. For ages 21 and older. 8 p.m.-midnight. $55. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, knittingfactory.com.

WINE AND CHOCOLATE WEEKEND—Join Huston Vineyards for Wine and Chocolate Weekend, through Feb. 12, Noon-5 p.m. $5. Huston Vineyards, 16473 Chicken Dinner Road, Caldwell, 208-4557975, hustonvineyards.com.

WOO AT THE ZOO: A WILD VALENTINE’S CELEBRATION FOR ADULTS—Birds do it. Bees do it. Snow leopards do it. Find out how animals at Zoo Boise woo each other. Open to both singles and sweethearts 18 and older, this memorable Valentine’s Day event will reveal the intimate secrets of exotic animal mating and dating. Plus a pasta dinner, dessert, drinks, photos with your sweetheart and take-home chocolate are included. 4-7 p.m. $40-$45. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise. org/event/woo-at-the-zoo-3.

ZHOO ZHOO VALENTINE OPEN HOUSE—Join local wine sisters, the Zhoo Zhoo girls, for wine tastings, sweet treats, and specials from both wineries on bottle purchases. Through Feb. 12. Noon-5 p.m. $5-$8. Hell’s Canyon Winery, 18835 Symms Road, Caldwell, 208-454-3300, zhoozhoo.com.

YOUR HEALTH IDAHO ENROLLMENT OPEN HOUSE—Don’t miss your last chance to have questions about this year’s Your Health Idaho program answered by Amanda Davison, certified Your Health Idaho agent and independent agent at University Financial Group. The

deadline to apply is Feb. 11. In the first floor Simplot Room. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

BALLET IDAHO: WINTER REPERTORY—8 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, balletidaho.org.

On Stage

COMEDIAN TIM NORTHERN—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

2017 IDAHO MISS AMAZING— Witness the amazing talents of girls and women with disabilities at the 2017 Idaho Miss Amazing pageant. 12:30 & 6 p.m. $10. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. 5TH ANNUAL LOVERS AND LOSERS BALL—Join your fabulous emcees Martini and Minerva Jayne for an evening of exciting performances to bring you to your feet. Plus a silent auction, 50/50 raffle and tons of surprises all night long. Proceeds benefit the Jerry Swett Fund, which helps those living with HIV/AIDS with their living expenses like rent and utility bills. 7 p.m. $5. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, facebook.com/ events/1416510518377135.

SATURDAY FEB. 11 THE MEPHAM GROUP

Festivals & Events

| SUDOKU

STARBELLY SCHOOL OF DANCE: 7TH ANNUAL BIG BAD-ASS BELLY DANCE SHOW—9 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-891-6609, ceciliabellydance. com.

Food BISHOPS’ HOUSE VALENTINE’S DINNER—Elegant decor, delicious catered dinner, candlelight and flowers will set the tone for a romantic evening. Go online or call Elizabeth at 208-342-3279 to reserve your table. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45. Bishops’ House, 2420 E. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-342-3279, thebishopshouse. com/page/events. CIDER, CHOCOLATE AND CHEESE PAIRINGS—Experience some killer chocolate from The Chocolat Bar, and cheese from The Local, all paired with carefully selected ciders. Through Feb. 12. Noon-9 p.m. $10-$12. Meriwether Cider Co., 5242 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-972-6725, meriwethercider.com. CONCERT IN THE CELLAR: FREUDIAN SLIP—Got plans for Valentine’s Day? This year, why not avoid the wait lists? Celebrate with Coiled and Telaya a little early

during their Concert in the Cellar, featuring Freudian Slip. Plus food by El Gallo Giro and lots of good wine. 7-10 p.m. $7. Coiled Wines, 240 E. 32nd St., Garden City, 208820-VINO, coiledwines.com. FREE WINE TASTING—2-7 p.m. FREE. City Center Wines, 574 W. Main St., Boise, 208-972-3385, facebook.com/citycenterwines.

SUNDAY FEB. 12 On Stage COMEDIAN TIM NORTHERN—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. FRANKLY BURLESQUE: A NERDY VALENTINE’S FOR ALL—This Valentine’s Day, Frankly Burlesque is turning into Frankly Nerdlesque, and they’re gonna spread some dirty, nerdy fun. Featuring performances by Kate E. Gaga, Laydee Bravado, Leazetta Rose, Lilian St. ArDust and Juniper Rose. 8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Saloon, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344, facebook.com/ PengillysSaloon.

Literature

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

Kids & Teens WOO AT THE ZOO FOR KIDS— Kids will have an evening of animal-themed fun, starting with a pizza dinner, followed by a guided zoo walk to see what critters do at night, a sneak peak at the Zoo Kitchen, games, crafts, and an up-close animal encounter. Open only to kids ages 5-10 years whose parents/guardians are enrolled in Woo at the Zoo. 4-7 p.m. $15-$20. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760.

LOVE LOCALLY VALENTINE’S DAY POP-UP SHOP—Get all your Valentine gifts for your sweetie locally in one spot. You will find local artists and vendors with art, flowers, chocolate, wine by the bottle, cake balls, and more. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Evermore Prints, 780 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-3837, evermoreprints.com.

SPEAKEASY BOISE: A DAPPER FLAPPER NIGHT FOR A GOOD CAUSE—Dress up in your best Roaring ‘20s attire and head over to Speakeasy Boise for a night with flappers, gangsters, gambling and moonshine. Enjoy music by Green Zoo, along with dancing,

PLAYHOUSE DINNER THEATER: MURDER ME ALWAYS—6:30 p.m. $15-$50. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

LAURA INGALLS WILDER BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION—There will be fun for folks of all ages, and birthday cake for everyone. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

LOVE IS IN THE AIR AT KLEINER PARK—Grab some sweet goodies for your Valentine, including fresh roses. You can also enjoy lunch, with food and treat options on site, roses, Valentine’s gifts from local vendors, massage and live music. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Meridian Senior Center at the Park, Julius M. Kleiner Park, 1920 N. Records Way, Meridian. 208-353-2678, facebook.com/ events/1693458670945104.

OLD IDAHO PEN’S SECRET SATURDAYS—You and a friend can visit the Old Pen for the price of one. There will be guided tours at 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. (first come first served), with last admission at 4:15 p.m. Noon5 p.m. $6. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-334-2844, history. idaho.gov/old-idaho-penitentiary.

I-ACT FESTIVAL 2017— The Idaho Association of Community Theatre is excited to host the second Idaho Biennial State Theatre Festival. Enjoy five one-hour productions from some of the best community theaters in the state, including Stage Coach Theatre at 12:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $5 per show; $20 full day pass. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, facebook. com/pg/IdahoAssociationOfCommunityTheatre.

moths, bats’ echolocation abilities and what some moths around the world are doing to avoid being eaten. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-493-2530, bee.cityofboise. org/foothills.

Odds & Ends Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISE CONTRA DANCE—With the Acrasians, and calling by Pat Blatter. 8-10:30 p.m. $4-$8. Broadway Dance and Event Center, 893 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-342-6123.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Animals & Pets FOOTHILLS FAMILY DAYS: BATS AND MOTHS—Join Dr. Jesse Barber of Boise State to learn about the complicated predator-prey interactions between bats and

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CALENDAR Literature

Citizen

AUTHOR TRACY MANASTER READING AND SIGNING—Author Tracy Manaster will read from and sign copies of her novel The Done Thing. 1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

BOISE SCHOOL BOARD MEETING—6 p.m. FREE. Boise School District Services Center, 8169 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-8544125, boiseschools.org.

Sports & Fitness IDAHO KRAV MAGA VALENTINE’S DAY PUNCH AND BRUNCH—Enjoy this special self-defense workout for couples followed by a delicious brunch. All proceeds will be donated to Cpl. Kevin Holtry. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $40 couples. Idaho Krav Maga, 880 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-6608778, idahokravmaga.com. PAYETTE BREWING GELANDE QUAFFING: ROUND 1—Gelande Quaffing is back bigger and better than ever, so go thirsty and ready to compete or watch one of the best drinking competitions ever. 1:30-5 p.m. $10 individuals, $40 teams. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-344-0011. YOGAFORT LAUNCH PARTY 2017—Get a sneak peek at what’s to come in March. Coiled Wines will have tastings along with light snacks. All guests will be entered into a raffle for Yogafort tickets, Yogafort swag and more. 1-3 p.m. $25. Coiled Wines, 240 E. 32nd St., Garden City, 208-820-VINO.

MONDAY FEB. 13 On Stage

KEGS 4 CAUSE: SNIP— Join SNIP at the Payette Brewing Company for Kegs 4 Cause, during which half of beer sales will be donated to SNIP to prevent animal overpopulation in the Valley through SNIP’s spay/ neuter programs. There will be a food truck, 5-10 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208968-1338, payettebrewing.com/ payette-forward.

TUESDAY FEB. 14 On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: WHEN HARRY MET SALLY—Take your special someone to the ever-romantic Egyptian Theatre on Valentine’s Day to see Rob Reiner’s arguably perfect romantic comedy. 7 p.m. $9 online, $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, boiseclassicmovies.com/deals. VALENTINES ROMANTIC COMEDY NIGHT—Enjoy a good laugh and a wonderful meal. 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. $20-$99. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, valentinesboise.bpt.me.

A VERY SPECIAL VALENTINE’S COMEDY SHOWCASE—Laugh your way to romance this Valentine’s Day at Liquid’s very special comedy showcase featuring all your local favorites: Emma Arnold, Jeni Adams, Alisha Donahue, Jynx Jenkins, Sophie Hughes, Brett Badostain, Eli Nary, Eric Lyons, Kaz Gable and Thomas Paul. 7 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Workshops & Classes FINALLY HOME! HOMEBUYER EDUCATION CLASS—Homebuyer Education can help you navigate the home-buying process, find the right lender, avoid costly mistakes, get a better interest rate, and may even help you qualify for down payment assistance. Attendance at both classes (Tuesday and Wednesday) is required to certify completion. Preregistration required at finallyhomeidaho.com. 6-9 p.m. $20. NeighborWorks Boise, 3380 W. Americana Terrace, Ste.120, Boise. 208-258-6225, finallyhomeidaho.com.

Food BOISE BREWING VALENTINE’S DAY PASTA POP-UP—Featuring eats by B-Town Bistro. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing Co., 521 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-342-7655, boisebrewing.com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

BROADWAY IN BOISE: THE IRISH ROVERS—The Irish Rovers have charmed and entertained audiences around the world with their exciting stage shows for more than four decades. 7:30 p.m. $30-$50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208426-1110, morrisoncenter.com.

Talks & Lectures DR. ATUL GAWANDE: THE VALUE OF COMMUNITY AND CHOICE AS WE GROW OLDER—Join Dr. Atul Gawande, best-selling author of Being Mortal, in a live webcast at Saint Al’s McCleary Auditorium. Followed by a discussion and Q&A led by Dr. Kara Kuntz, a geriatrician at Saint Al’s, and elder law attorney Susan Graham, board chair of Boise at Home, a nonprofit village serving seniors in Boise and Garden City. 3 p.m. FREE. Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center, 1055 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-367-2121, saintalphonsus. org. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

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NOISE T R I S T A T E

HEATING & COOLING How Will You Spend Valentine’s Day? •Candle Light Dinner For Two •Romantic Movie Out •Shivering in a Cold House

Enjoy the Finer Things Janice will Fix the Furnace

It has been 11 years since Steve Fulton released a new album. Our patience has been rewarded.

THE NAME OF THE GAME

Local musician-producer Steve Fulton ends a decade of dearth with jam-packed Eponym AMY ATKINS retro folk “Good Morning,” it’s like a sonic It has been nearly 20 years since local band journal affording a glimpse into the facets of House of Hoi Polloi released an album, but Fulton, with one disc containing uptempo, band co-founder Steve Fulton still gets asked what the name means—and he still doesn’t have funkier tunes and the other revealing the more introspective storyteller side. Both somehow a satisfying answer. “I just liked the way it sounded,” Fulton said reflect a value at Fulton’s core: Whether he’s behind the soundboard or in front of it, the laughing, though like with most of his creative Golden Rule is a driving force in his life. choices, the decision wasn’t really uninformed: “I will never burn a bridge,” said Fulton, hoi polloi is Greek for “the masses” and House of who is approaching middle age. “I like to treat Hoi Polloi was a band for everyone. It worked hard to make sure “the masses” who came out to people with as much respect as I can and give dance the night away to its rock/funk/ska reggae them as many chances as I can.” In an industry where inflated egos run rampant, adopting that sound had fun. attitude would be a sound business decision. After HoHP, Fulton continued to perform That isn’t Fulton’s motivation. and tour as a solo act, opening for the likes of “People deserve [second chances],” he said John Hiatt, Jewell and Tori Amos. All the while, . “They might be having a shittty day, or they Fulton was recording and producing other musicians at his Garden City studio, Audio Lab, might have something going on that I don’t know anything about.” and it wasn’t until He said when someone is 11 years after his last STEVE FULTON MUSIC being nasty, instead of disrelease, Said & Heard Performing at Treefort Music Fest missing them, he stops and (self-released, 2005), March 22-26, downtown Boise stevefultonmusic.com, treefortmusicfest.com thinks, “‘Hmm. I wonder he sat down on the what’s going on with them. other side of the glass. I wonder why they’re this With help from a host of talented musicians, Fulton—a.k.a. Steve way.” Along with his music, that approach to Fulton Music—recorded the two-disc Eponym people is probably a factor in Fulton’s contin(self-released; Oct. 6, 2016). It’s a rich tapestry, ued popularity. He is active on social media, weaving together Fulton’s multi-faceted range responding to comments and requests, so it’s of tastes and talents, pulling from rock, reggae, not surprising he would have a few thousand folk, country and more. From the deceptively “likes” on his Facebook page as well as more simple “Nickels and Dimes” to the charming BOISE WEEKLY.COM

than 4,000 friends/followers. What is surprising is Eponym, which was released with only two months remaining in 2016, was the bestselling album of the year at The Record Exchange. “People still buy CDs,” Fulton said. “But I think it’s people who don’t look at an age thing or a genre thing. They just listen to music.” Though Fulton has embraced the more straightforward Steve Fulton Music moniker, it took a little while to get there. “With Hoi Polloi, I was forever explaining what the name of the band meant,” he said smiling. “Forever. So, I thought and thought and thought about what I was going to name my new band, my new thing. My first solo record was called Chakra Mission [which] started when I got the opening spot for Tori Amos, and I made 150 four-song CDs for that show. I sold every one of them.” Great news, but it meant he was now answering questions about another band name. So he began really thinking about it. “There are all of these musicians who go by ___ and so-and-so, like Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band. I didn’t want to do that,” Fulton said. “I thought, ‘I’ll just go by Steve Fulton,’ but I realized that didn’t make sense. I’m not just a solo artist. I work with a lot of really talented folks. So I went with Steve Fulton Music. Suddenly, it was so easy. I didn’t have to explain anything.” He’s right. Eponym says it all. BOISEweeklycFEBRUARY 8-14, 2017c15


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY FEB. 8 IDYLTIME—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow LEISURE WORLD AND MALADROIDS—8 p.m. $5. The Shredder STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THURSDAY FEB. 9 BEN BURDICK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SPENCER BATT—8 p.m. FREE. Piper SUNSET GOAT—7 p.m. Shangri-La VAULT 7 CD RELEASE SHOW: FOR LOVE OR METAL—With Faded Leroy, Break Surface, and Mortal Enemy. 7 p.m. $6-$12. Knitting Factory

SATURDAY FEB. 11 CONCERT IN THE CELLAR: FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. $7. Coiled Wines

CURTIS/SUTTON AND THE SCAVENGERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s DOUGLAS CAMERON—8 p.m. FREE. Piper GAYLE CHAPMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE BIG WOW BAND—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s THE LIKE ITS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole MICHAEL LAKY—6 p.m. FREE. Angell’s THE POMPITOUS OF LOVE: STEVE MILLER BAND TRIBUTE— With the San Diego band Daring Greatly. 7:30 p.m. $13-$18 adv., $18-$23 door. Sapphire

Electric

THE SUBURBANS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s TOM TAYLOR—7 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar

MICHAEL LAKY—6 p.m. FREE. Angell’s

WAYNE WHITE—6 p.m. Highlands Hollow

MICHAEL LAKY—6 p.m. FREE. Angell’s NEW TRANSIT—8 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

WALT AND TERESA HUNTSMAN—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

SUNDAY FEB. 12

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: LANDLADY—With Phantahex. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

LISTEN HERE

ALEXIS COLE: THE MAGIC OF DISNEY LOVE SONGS—2 p.m. $29-$36. Nampa Civic Center BOISE BLUES SOCIETY SECOND SUNDAY JAM—3-6 p.m. FREE. The Playhouse Boise BOISE STATE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—7:30 p.m. FREE-$7. Morrison Center ELLIE SHAW QUARTET: LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON—4 p.m. $12$15 adv., $15-$18 door. Sapphire Room

SLIM CESSNA’S AUTO CLUB—With Jimmy Sinn and the Bastard Kinn. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

AUGUSTUS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

FRIM FRAM FOUR: LOVE IS IN THE AIR—7:30 p.m. $12-$16 adv., $15-$20 door. Sapphire

SHON SANDERS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

STEVE’N’SEAGULLS—How often do you have the opportunity to hear a country band from Finland, playing bluegrass versions of well-known hard rock and metal songs? Now’s your chance. 8 p.m. $15 adv., $17 door. Neurolux

LATE NIGHT CD RELEASE PARTY—With The Deep Creeps, Unhallowed, and Ingrown. 10:30 p.m. FREE. High Note

MODERN CLASSICS: A JOURNEY THROUGH MUSIC EXOTICISM (PART 1)—7:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $13-$18 door. Sapphire

ANDY BYRON AND THE LOST RIVER BAND—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

STEVE EATON: HEY MR. DREAMER—7:30 p.m. $15-$20 adv., $20-$25 door. Sapphire Room

TUESDAY FEB. 14

VALENTINE’S ACOUSTIC—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

MIKE DOUGHTY: THE HEART WATCHES WHILE THE BRAIN BURNS—With Wheatus. 7 p.m. $17 adv., $20 door. The Olympic

FRIDAY FEB. 10

SPEAKEASY BOISE: A DAPPER FLAPPER NIGHT FOR A GOOD CAUSE—With Green Zoo. 8 p.m. $55. Knitting Factory

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

HECKTOR PECKTOR—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

KITCHEN DWELLERS—9 p.m. $5. Reef

TWENTY ONE PILOTS: EMOTIONAL ROADSHOW WORLD TOUR—With Jon Bellion, and Judah and the Lion. 7 p.m. $35-$45. Taco Bell Arena

OTF—10 p.m. $5. Reef

JA AKKO MANNINEN

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ROB HARDING—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SLIM CESSNA’S AUTO CLUB, FEB. 9, NEUROLUX Some cities have a sound: San Francisco, Philadelphia, Detroit. The “Denver Sound” isn’t typically grouped with those places; still, it exists, and one of its deacons is Slim Cessna. According to Westword, the Mile High City developed “a kind of Gothic Americana” in the late ’80s with bands like the Denver Gentlemen. Cessna, a former Gentleman, continued and furthered the tradition with his Auto Club, which has released more than a dozen albums in its 25 years on the scene. The most recent, The Commandments According to SCAC, dropped in September 2016 on Glitterhouse Records and oozes with all the happily doomed divine gloom that has made it an essential part of Denver’s musical DNA. Standout tracks include “Commandment 3,” a serpentine toetapper that traipses along on a throaty gothic-country drone; “Commandment 6,” a sweetly haunting anthem that evokes a tent revival chorus; and “Commandment 10,” another churchy cut infused with an airy south-Asian vibe that gives it a glow of absolution. Here’s an 11th Commandment: Thou shalt not miss this show. —Zach Hagadone With Jimmy Sinn and the Bastard Kinn. 7 p.m.; $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid STEVEN CANNON—8 p.m. $12. 9th St. Parallel at KFCH THOMAS PAUL—11 a.m. FREE. High Note TREBELLE PIANO TRIO: OLD PHOTOGRAPHS—3 p.m. $10. Eagle United Methodist Church

MONDAY FEB. 13 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid BROADWAY IN BOISE: THE IRISH ROVERS—7:30 p.m. $30$50. Morrison Center. SPENCER BATT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

STEVE ’N’ SEAGULLS, FEB. 11, NEUROLUX As a rule, novelty musical acts have the shelf life of a banana: They’re delightful at first, but can get old quick—Flight of the Conchords and Garfunkel and Oates being exceptions. Novelty cover bands wear thin even faster; they can be the equivalent of putting the banana in the freezer. There are exceptions here, too, though. Finnish export Steve ’N’ Seagulls gets points for the name alone (who doesn’t love a good pun?) but it’s the combination of musicality and cover-song choice that makes SNS fun and fresh. The band breathes new life into unforgettable classics like Guns N’ Roses’ “Paradise City,” AC/DC’s “You Shook Me All Night Long” or Iron Maiden’s “Run to the Hills,” with an authentic knee-slapping bluegrass/country sound delivered hillbilly style (in English), complete with costumes of overalls, undershirts, animal-skin caps and cut-off jeans. SNS music videos are a hoot, the members’ high-energy antics and joyful abandon showing a group of guys it would be fun to hang out with—for as long as possible. —Amy Atkins With The Lonesome Jetboat Ramblers. 8 p.m., $15 adv., $17 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com.

Classic 80s & OTHER PRE-2K MUSIC 80s cocktails at Brat pack prices

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THIS MONDAY • FEBRUARY 13 • MORRISON CENTER MC BOX OFFICE – MORRISONCENTER.COM – 208.426.1110

Choreographed by Kelli Brown, ‘Fire’ is inspired by flamenco, the passion that starts as a spark and ignites to flame.

‘Air’ plays on the flight of birds, as dancers seemingly float on air in this aerial and dance masterpiece choreographed by artistic director Katie Ponozzo.

Off Center Dance is proud to present ELEMENTAL IDAHO – a modern dance performance inspired by the elements and our beautiful state.

Performances at Boise Contemporary Theater 854 W. Fulton St. • Boise Feb. 16th & 17th 8pm Feb. 18th 2pm & 8pm BOISE WEEKLY.COM

‘Earth’ is inspired by the sand dunes as they shift and move with time, with original piano composition by Jeremy Allen. This original choreography by Katie Ponozzo is guaranteed to move you. Student $14, General Admission $18 VIP with reserved seat $30 Tickets available at: http://m.bpt.me/event/2753606 (Brownpapertickets)

Katie Ponozzo dazzles us again with new choreography in ‘Water’ which rounds out the performance by celebrating this essential element. BOISEweeklycFEBRUARY 8-14, 2017c17


“[The Shorts] offer a vision of what the Academy Awards® should and could be but very rarely are:

ECLECTIC, COSMOPOLITAN, SCRAPPY AND SURPRISING.” - A. O. Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES

HD

SCREEN HERE’S THE SCOOP How to win our Oscar contest GEORGE PRENTICE

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM NOMINEES

BORROWED TIME USA PEARL USA PIPER USA BLIND VAYSHA CANADA PEAR CIDER AND CIGARETTES CANADA/UK

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM NOMINEES

SING HUNGARY SILENT NIGHTS DENMARK TIMECODE SPAIN ENNEMIS INTERIEURS FRANCE LA FEMME ET LA TGV SWITZERLAND

PLUS ADDITIONAL ANIMATED SHORTS!

“Oscar®” and “Academy Awards®” are registered trademarks of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and used with permission. This is not an Academy release.

STARTS FEBRUARY 10

When I was but a lad, I won a contest in which my hometown newspaper asked readers to pick Oscar winners. Somehow, I picked every correct winner and, for that, I won a year-long pass to my local movie theater. Truth be told, I hadn’t seen 90 percent of the nominees. I wasn’t even old enough to see any of the adult-themed films. How did I pick the winners? It still beats the heck out of me. Here’s the point: you have as much chance to win our Red Carpet movie contest as anyone. Give it a try. On the opposite page, you’ll see what films, actors, directors, etc. I’m choosing this year, just in case you’re at a total loss. Meanwhile, here are a few inside tips that might increase your chances:

EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED

We’re More Than Just A Market… GONE TO SPAIN!

There’s always at least one big upset. This year, don’t be surprised if comes in the Best Picture or Best Actor contests. Nearly everyone (including me) is a bit ga-ga for La La Land; and, that alone, should make you skeptical about it winning the top prize. Casey Affleck (Manchester By the Sea) is also heavily favored to take home the Best Actor statuette, but keep in mind that Denzel Washington (Fences) pulled a Best Actor upset win at the Screen Actors Guild Awards (SAG membership makes up a huge voting bloc in the Motional Picture Academy).

THE LEADING ACTRESS/SUPPORTING ACTRESS SCAM

WE ARE CLOSED FEBRUARY 13-23RD

There’s one sure-fire way to win an Oscar. If you’ve delivered one of the best performances

It’s anybody’s guess what film will take Best Picture at the Oscars, but each of the above flicks would be worthy.

of the year, convince as many people as possible that you delivered a “supporting performance.” That’s why, for example, Viola Davis, who gave one of the year’s best female lead performances in Fences, will almost assuredly win the Best Supporting Actress Oscar (in spite of the fact that she appears throughout the film). It’s a strategy that has proved successful on multiple previous occasions (Alicia Vikander for The Danish Girl, Jennifer Hudson for Dreamgirls, Catherine Zeta-Jones for Chicago).

WRITERS (REALLY GOOD ONES) WIN OSCARS Some of history’s greatest writers have taken home Hollywood’s top prize. Horton Foote, Paddy Chayefsky and William Inge have all picked up Oscars for their screenplays. The Academy takes pride in honoring the work of writers from other mediums. So, this year, it’s a pretty good bet two of America’s best play-

wrights, Kenneth Lonergan (Manchester By the Sea) and the late August Wilson (Fences) will win Oscars for the year’s Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay, respectively.

THE BEST SONG? ANYBODY’S GUESS The Motion Picture Academy is notoriously tone-deaf when it comes to awarding the best song of the year. Consider the fact that these songs, all written for the screen, weren’t even nominated for Oscars: Goldfinger; A Hard Day’s Night; Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas; New York, New York; Gangsta’s Paradise; Springtime for Hitler. Really, Academy? Really? So, there’s the scoop, dear reader. Register for the Red Carpet Movie Awards at redcarpetballot.boiseweekly.com or text “boiseweekly” to 77948 and we’ll send a ballot to your smartphone. This year’s contest, sponsored by our friends at The Flicks, promises some great prizes.

We are taking the staff to Basque country. Come by on the 23rd to hear our stories!

SCREEN EXTRA OSCAR SHORTS: THEY’RE ALL WINNERS

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Only once per year can we see guaranteed Oscar winners before the gold statuettes are doled out—the annual screening of Oscar Nominated Short Films, two separate bundles of animated and live action nominees. The collections of Oscar Shorts, slated to open at The Flicks on Friday, Feb. 10, are

screened separately, and this year’s crop is wonderful. I must admit to always leaning toward the animated shorts, and the best of this year’s lot has to be Piper, from the Pixar studios. It’s a simple but magically-told tale of a newly-hatched sandpiper, venturing from her nest to the dangerous water’s edge of a nearby ocean. Another winner is Pear Cider and

Cigarettes from writer/director Robert Valle (Aeon Flux). It’s a wild, alcohol-fueled ride, including planes, trains, automobiles, risky transplant surgery in China and a mysteriously-missing big toe. Pearl, from Disney-veteran Patrick Osborne, chronicles a father, daughter and their collective coming-of-age through the car window of an old hatchback. It’s not officially a Dis-

ney film, but it’s just as good. This year’s live action shorts are equally entertaining. In my estimation, the Oscar frontrunner has to be Silent Nights, from Danish director Aske Bang, a perfectlytimed tale of homelessness and immigration told through the prism of a love story. —George Prentice BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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REDCARPET MOVIE

AWARDS 2017 BEST PICTURE This year, The Flicks is joining Boise Weekly in offering a bit of red carpet revelry with the 2017 Red Carpet Movie Awards. First prize is a pair of VIP passes to the Sun Valley Film Festival; second prize is an unlimited movie pass to The Flicks for a full year; third prize is two 10-admission movie passes to The Flicks; fourth prize is one 10-admission movie pass to The Flicks; and fifth prize includes two movie tickets to any show at The Flicks. One overall winner will receive an Amazon Gift Card for $250.

WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)

Arrival

Hell or High Water

Fences

La La Land

Hacksaw Ridge

The Lobster

Hell or High Water

Manchester by the Sea

Hidden Figures

20th Century Women

La La Land Lion

WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY)

Manchester by the Sea

Arrival

Moonlight

Fences Hidden Figures

DIRECTING Arrival—Dennis Villeneuve

Lion Moonlight

Hacksaw Ridge—Mel Gibson La La Land—Damien Chazelle

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)

Manchester by the Sea—Kenneth Lonergan

“Audition (The Fools Who Dream)”—La La Land

Moonlight—Barry Jenkins

“Cant Stop the Feeling”—Trolls “City of Stars”—La La Land

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Casey Affleck—Manchester by the Sea

“The Empty Chair”—Jim “How Far I’ll Go”—Moana

WIN TIC KE T S TO :

Andrew Garfield—Hacksaw Ridge Ryan Gosling—La La Land Entry is simple. Register at redcarpetballot.boiseweekly.com. You can also text “boiseweekly” at 77948 and have the ballot sent to your smartphone. Make your picks (and share them with your friends). That’s it. Voting is open until 5 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 26.

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

Viggo Mortensen—Captain Fantastic

Kubo and the Two Strings

Denzel Washington—Fences

Moana My Life as a Zucchini

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Isabelle Huppert—Elle

The Red Turtle Zootopia

Ruth Negga—Loving Natalie Portman—Jackie

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

Emma Stone—La La Land

Land of Mine—Denmark

Meryl Streep—Florence Foster Jenkins

A Man Called Ove—Sweden The Salesman—Iran

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Mahershala Ali—Moonlight

Tanna—Australia Toni Erdmann—Germany

Jeff Bridges—Hell or High Water

Need some help on some of the tougher categories? I’ve made my own picks on a sample ballot to the right (feel free to use any of them). Honestly, though, your guess is as good as mine. —George Prentice

Lucas Hedges—Manchester by the Sea

TIE BREAKER:

Dev Patel—Lion

Out of its 14 nominations, how many Oscars will La La Land win?

Michael Shannon—Nocturnal Animals

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Viola Davis—Fences Naomie Harris—Moonlight Nicole Kidman—Lion Octavia Spencer—Hidden Figures

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Michelle Williams—Carol BOISE WEEKLY.COM

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HARRISON BERRY

ARTS & CULTURE RIOTING, BODY COMEDY AND BALANCHINE Ballet Idaho explores risk, slapstick and the personification of violins HARRISON BERRY

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Join us for Valentines Day!!! Entree FILET OSCAR Jumbo crab stuffed prawns, a bacon-wrapped 6oz filet mignon topped in a bearnaise sauce, crab and asparagus. Served with potatoes au gratin and brussel sprouts with prosciutto.

Wine

Avignonesi Vino Nobile Di Montepulciano

Dessert

Chocolate Raspberry Truffle Cake RESERVATIONS NOT ACCEPTED Please call ahead 90 minutes prior to arrival or download the NoWait app to be put on our wait list.

Complete Italian Wine List Hours Mon-Sat 11am-9pm Sun 12pm-9pm

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Daniel Ojeda’s new ballet, The Monster and the Gift, begins in 1988. That’s when performance artists Marina Abramovic and her lover, Ulay, walked toward each other from the ends of the Great Wall of China, embraced and parted— ending their romance and working partnership. In 2010, they reunited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where Abramovic had sat motionless, staring into the eyes of thousands of people who lined up to sit across a table from her as part of her performance, The Artist is Present. Abramovic’s performance lasted more than 700 hours before Ulay took a seat. They reached across the table in tears and clasped each other’s hands, ending the performance. “You see everything they’ve been through,” Ojeda said. “That’s the last scene of the ballet.” The Monster and the Gift isn’t, strictly speaking, about Abramovic and Ulay, but it does recreate familiar moments of artistic separation and heartfelt reconnection, all through the aperture of a moment of recognition. It’s set to premiere at Ballet Idaho’s Winter Repertory, slated for the Morrison Center stage Friday and Saturday, Feb. 10 and 11, along with George Balanchine’s Concerto Barocco and Night Crawlers by Peter Anastos. This marks Ojeda’s third ballet to be performed at one of Ballet Idaho’s premier events, and certainly his most ambitious, with original music by pianist Jeremy Stewart and Daniel Kerr of Boise band Thick Business, and original art by Huma Aatifi. Ojeda said the content and presentation of the ballet constitute “a huge risk.” “This is not the right ballet to do,” he said. “I’m being given an opportunity by Ballet Idaho and I’m not at all playing it safe.” The reception of his previous ballets, however, suggests audiences should be skeptical of Ojeda’s skepticism. The Monster and the Gift is not the first time the choreographer has tapped a local songwriter to set his pieces to music, nor is it his first rodeo at the Morrison Center. Ojeda is using a formula for breathing life into ballet with serious themes and contemporary music that has worked in the past, but creating a ballet that satisfies this choreographer may be trickier

Ballet Idaho core dancers rehearsing Daniel Ojeda’s new piece, The Monster and the Gift.

than audiences giving it a standing ovation. “There’s failure when your piece bombs. Then, there’s failure when it’s venerated because it’s misunderstood,” he said. Discussing what constitutes success for The Monster and the Gift, Ojeda tipped just what kind of ballet audiences will see later this month. “Success is like when Stravinsky’s Rites of Spring premiered,” he said. In other words, if you love Ojeda’s work, don’t throw roses—riot. For his latest piece, Ballet Idaho Artistic Director Peter Anastos is pushing his dancers to do something unusual. “Dancers are almost never asked to be funny,” he said. The ballet, Night Crawlers, demands just that of its cast, harkening to the body comedy of the the Marx brothers, Charlie Chaplin and others. That kind of comedy, Anastos said, “has gone out of style, and I’m not sure why.” His is a ballet full of pranks, tripping, stumbling, bumbling and random acts of incompetence. Night Crawlers will break from the self-serious stereotype of the medium and appear to depart from its virtues of grace and athleticism. This is not his first foray into lighthearted ballet. His oeuvre at Ballet Idaho is full of classics (Cinderella), song-and-dance routines (Sinatra and More) and oddities like Aarrrgh! Pirates! His artistic directorship has been a balancing act between canonical dances and audience favorites on one hand, and gutsier, jazzier fare on the other. The effect is performances that are emotionally rich. It’s part of Anastos’ philosophy that the medium has the power to bring people together. “If I can make somebody laugh, I’ve made a friend out of that person,” he said. George Balanchine is one of ballet’s unqualified geniuses, but getting permission to stage his

dances is extremely difficult. To do it, a company must be vetted by the George Balanchine Trust in New York and have the production overseen by someone like Nilas Martins, who ensures the production is up to snuff. Ballet Idaho has staged a Balanchine for three years in a row. Martins is a former principal dancer with the New York City Ballet, which was founded by Balanchine himself in 1948. Martins knows Balanchine and his ballets inside and out and, while he oversaw Ballet Idaho’s production of Concerto Barocco, he offered words of wisdom for Boise audiences seeing the ballet for the first time. “As an audience member, you’re in awe watching it,” he said. “It’s one of [Balanchine’s] most perfect ballets in the way it’s structured.” Much classical ballet stresses uniformity. Early choreographies emphasized dancers share proportions and even facial features. Balanchine’s ballets break from that tradition, and Concerto Barocco strikes a balance between disciplined movement and the individuality of the dancers. “Balanchine looked at a quarter ballet as a field of flowers, no two of them are exactly the same. He liked to showcase individuality without it being distracting,” Martins said. Balanchine had a legendary passion for women and, over his long career, many served as his muses. Concerto Barocco features nine female dancers—eight in the chorus and a lead dancer, who performs opposite the male lead. Rule of thumb: The male dancer never steals the show. “He’s surrounded by all these girls, and it’s really about emphasizing, not hiding, because you are the man of the piece and the male figure, but you don’t want to overstep,” Martins said. “Balanchine said, ‘Ballet is a woman.’ The man should never upstage the woman.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN KARA MCGEE

‘We’re just selling people happiness’ Z ACH HAGADONE

Twenty years ago, a person might have felt a little illicit about visiting an adult shop. Kara McGee can sympathize, but times have changed. She and her husband, Kraig, are the franchisees behind Adam and Eve stores in Boise, Nampa, Pocatello and Coeur d’Alene; Portland and Salem, Ore.; and, most recently, Spokane, Wash. McGee said gone are the days of dim-lit, windowless spaces with sticky floors and brown paper bags. In the 10 years since the McGees got into the business with the Adam and Eve location in Nampa, the adult products industry has come out of the shadows as a way to promote sexual health, increase intimacy and, as she said, “sell people happiness.” How busy is this time of year for you? Usually the two weeks leading up to Valentine’s Day are the busiest of the year, and then Valentine’s Day and the weekend before we are double or triple as busy as we normally are. Has the internet impacted your business? The percentage of sales of DVDs has dropped from probably about 25 percent to 5 percent of sales. That’s OK, because it makes our stores a little more boutiquey and not as hard or hardcore, perhaps. More people feel comfortable coming in shopping as a couple, or women come in together; it’s not as intimidating for them. I feel like attitudes about sex and sexuality have changed a lot. Can you speak to that? I think communities realize we’re not a seedy adult store. We’re just selling people happiness. Things to promote their sexual wellness and increase their intimacy. It should be a good thing. Everybody has sex, so we wanted to make it accessible to everybody that feels comfortable coming in and asking questions and looking at things and talking about what they want. Do you feel like people are more informed consumers about these kinds of products? Sometimes. Sometimes we have people come in that have researched everything. Sometimes we have people coming in who have no idea what to even ask or where to start. That has to be kind of fun, helping people explore what they want. It is. I love hearing from our staff how much BOISE WEEKLY.COM

they love their job because they’ve helped this couple or helped this woman and kind of broken down those barriers so people don’t feel so awkward talking about their sexuality. Body positivity must a big part of the store. Absolutely. We carry lingerie from extra small to four- or five-X, so everybody has a chance to feel sexy. That’s one of the things our staff is trained on: To help somebody find something that makes them feel sexy. Is there anything that you see as particularly popular or gaining in popularity? I think the anal play section has grown significantly over the past 10 years and the bondage section, because of Fifty Shades of Grey, is huge. We used to have a small bondage section that was probably like this [McGee pointed to a small corner display of colorful whips] now it’s the entire wall [opening her arms wide to a selection of handcuffs, ball gags, chains and leather clothing]. I’m interested in that comment you made about being a couple’s store. Is that recent? Over the past 10 years our demographic has shifted. With people getting their videos online, I think more women and couples feel much more comfortable coming into a store like this together. I’m struck by how many products are related to or can aid with medical conditions. We have a lot of products that are definitely made for women’s sexual health. We obviously can’t promote any medical fixes, but we do sell products that help people recover from various things like surgery or maintain intimacy even though they may have a health condition. How do you gather that knowledge? Do you contact medical professionals? Yes, we have in the past, and I’d like to start a medical class series, like intimacy after cancer, or intimacy after chemotherapy, or intimacy with prostate issues. I’m hoping some local physicians would be open to coming in and offering some of those classes. … I was also a physician assistant in Pocatello and Boise, and I did that part-time as the kids grew up, which is probably why I emphasize the medical aspect so much. It’s important to me. BOISEweeklycFEBRUARY 8-14, 2017c21


WINESIPPER THE OTHER PORTUGUESE WINE The last “Winesipper” column lauded the pleasures of Port, the fortified dessert wine for which Portugal is best known. However, Portugal also produces excellent dry reds—some from Douro (the home of Port) and some from other regions. Many solid examples can be had for less than $10, but for this tasting we decided to amp it up a bit. Here are the panel’s top three Portuguese reds, all reasonably priced under $20. 2010 CASA ERMELINDA FREITAS TOURIGA NACIONAL, $18 From the Palmela region in southwest Portugal, this is a nicely aged wine that is a combo of old and new world styles. You get rich red aromas colored by new oak and cigar box. Dark cherry flavors combine with smooth oak and spicy cedar. Light anise and creamy berry come through on the long finish. 2011 QUINTA DO ROMEU, $19 A traditional blend of Port grapes, this Douro house has been producing fortified wines for five generations. Its dry red combines Touriga Nacional, Tinta Roriz, Touriga Franca and Sousao. On the nose, you get a dark plum core colored by pepper and spice. The palate is fresh and fruit forward, and bursting with racy ripe cherry and berry flavors. 2013 QUINTA DOS ROQUES, $16 Giving up teaching math for winemaking, Luis Lourenco crafts this Touriga Nacional dominant blend in central Portugal’s Dao region. It opens with candied cherry aromas that segue into tart cranberry. The flavors are filled with creamy cassis backed by light oak, earth and leather. Bright acidity marks the finish, along with soft tannins and an intriguing bit of tobacco. —David Kirkpatrick 22cFEBRUARY 8-14, 2017cBOISEweekly

FOOD V-DAY ON THE TOWN Where to take your Valentine’s date BW STAFF The way to pretty much anybody’s heart is through their stomach, and Valentine’s Day is a holiday that’s all about love, food and the love of food. Treasure Valley restaurants are pulling out the stops for V-Day with special menus and unique treats for Tuesday, Feb. 14. Here’s a by-nomeans complete listing of some hot spots around Boise where you can lavish your lover with a delectable night out. (More at boiseweekly.com.) Alavita—The special ($55) comes with rabbit agnolotti, lobster risotto with English peas and asparagus, and a blood-orange upside-down cake for dessert. 208-780-1100, alavitaboise.com. Barbacoa—A chef’s specialty four-course dinner will be served from 4-10 p.m. and includes a “chocolate souffle for lovers.” For $85 a person, you can get dinner and a dozen long-stem roses for the couple. 208-338-5000, barbacoa-boise.com. Berryhill—Starting at 3 p.m. on Valentine’s Day, those who made reservations can choose from a selection of items in a four-course meal that includes an appetizer, soup or salad, entree and dessert, all with varying prices. 208-387-3553, berryhillbacon.com. Bonefish Grill—Get more bang bang for no bucks: Make Valentine’s dinner reservations now, and take a copy of the Bonefish ad in this edition of Boise Weekly for a free order of Bang Bang Shrimp. 208-433-1234, bonefishgrill.com. Brick 29 Bistro—Though no price has yet been set, Brick 29 will offer a Valentine’s option alongside its regular menu. Choose from a 12-ounce lobster tail or surf and turf of prime flat-iron steak with baby-root vegetables. Dinner is served from 4-8:30 p.m. 208-468-0029, brick29.com. Brickyard—A reservation only, three-course dinner will be offered for $54 a person, including Brickyard’s signature salad cart, followed by an entree of filet mignon topped with tarragon bearnaise and Dungeness crab with sauteed scallops and prawns. 208-287-2121, brickyardboise.com. Capitol Cellars—Couples can reserve a fourcourse prix fixe dinner with a variety of entree

It’s all about love, food and the love of food.

options. Dinner is $85 a person and comes with a bottle of sparkling wine and a rose. Seatings at 5 and 7:45 p.m. 208-344-9463, capitolcellarsllc.com. Chandlers—Chandlers is booked for dinner and even the wait-list is topped out. If cocktails are your currency, though, Chandlers’ martini bar and newly expanded lounge area offer open seating. 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com Cottonwood Grille—Normal menu with specials to be announced. Dinner will be served from 4-9 p.m. Walk-in space will be limited, so reservations are recommended. 208-333-9800, cottonwoodgrille.com. Fork—The chef is still finalizing the details, but Fork will be serving filet Oscar and red velvet tart, as well as its beloved chicken and waffles. 208287-1700, boisefork.com.

Mai Thai—Choose from entrees including a traditional Thai curry with organic pork belly for $25; traditional Thai basil with ground chicken cooked in the wok with veggies and topped with a fried egg for $25; or whole fried catfish for $28. 208-344-8424, maithaigroup.com. The Melting Pot—For two nights, Feb. 13-14, you can choose from the Sweetheart Package ($110 per couple, $55 per additional person) or the Lovers Package ($140 per couple), which include a five-course dinner and keepsake candle. On Valentine’s only, splurge on the Ultimate Romance Package ($185 per couple). Get the courses, the candle, even more roses and even more strawberries. 208-343-8800, meltingpot.com

Grit American Cuisine—It’s also Taco Tuesday for those who make reservations. “Tacos for two” will be offered for $30 a person. Couples get three courses of tacos, chips and salsa, and a chocolate cake dessert. Don’t forget the margarita specials. 208-576-6666, gritcuisine.com.

Modern Hotel and Bar—Chef Nate Whitley is offering a prix-fixe menu inspired by Idaho and the Pacific Northwest and complemented by an optional drink pairing designed by master mixologist Michael Bowers. Two seatings (5:45 p.m. and 9 p.m.) are available and prices run $75 per person plus an optional $35 per person drink pairing. Reservations are required via eventbrite. com. Visit facebook.com/ModernHotelandBar for info. 208-424-8244, themodernhotel.com

Le Coq d’Or—Live music will accompany a three-course meal including a glass of sparkling wine and a rose. For $75 a person, reservations can be made for this special Valentine’s Day weekend on Feb. 10, 11, 13 and 14. 208-947-2840, chateaueagle.com.

Rice Contemporary Asian Cuisine—Choose from entrees including lobster, Angus steak, lobster sushi roll, chicken, vegan, or surf and turf for a three-course Valentine’s dinner that includes an appetizer and dessert. Dinner will be served from 4-9 p.m. 208-939-2595, riceagle.com

Luciano’s Italian Restaurant—The prix-fixe menu includes filet Oscar, potatoes au gratin, Brussels sprouts with prosciutto and chocolate raspberry truffle cake, paired with a Montepulciano wine. 208-577-6415, lucianosboise.com

Sofia’s Greek Bistro—Enjoy Greek seasoned beef and tomato sauce over pasta, plaki (fish baked with herbs, tomatoes and onions) and Aphrodite’s chocolate cake with raspberry sauce. 208-853-0844, sofiasgreekbistro.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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Must have 2 years deli experience and cheese knowledge Skills in Microsoft Office, valid driver’s license and transportation, maintain a clean driving record Contact Doug: 503-891-7288

CAREERS BW CAREERS AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 DRIVERS WANTED: Are you looking for a little extra income, or know someone who is? Boise Weekly is looking for a Route Driver for our Eagle Route. If you are interested or know someone who is, please contact our Distribution Manager, Stan “The Man” for details at: stan@ boiseweekly.com PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStation.net TECHNICAL SERVICES LIBRARIAN Concordia University, School of Law, Boise, ID. Duties: Responsible for all technical services functions in the law library, & manages the day to day workflow in the technical services department of the library. Req. MLIS from ALA accredited school & 3 yrs’ FTE exp. as a Technical Services Librarian, Serials Librarian, Graduate Assistant (Cataloging), Library Assistant, or Library Intern. Please see job# FAC195 on the Careers section of our website (www.cuportland.edu) for more detail and specific requirements. All education, training, & experience may be gained concurrently. Applicants must pass pre-employment background check. Applicants must be U.S. workers. Please apply online at: https://cu-portland. csod.com/ats/careersite/search. aspx?site=1&c=cu-portland.

MIND BODY SPIRIT BW CHILDBIRTH PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401

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MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Enjoy a relaxing massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492. ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377. Open again Saturday and Sunday.

ADOPT-A-PET

MAILING ADDRESS

Noodle Says...

P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

“Mention this ad for $25 towards your cat's dental cleaning during the month of February!”

COMMUNITY

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

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SEARCHING FOR WITNESSES A fatal motorcycle accident occurred on 11-25-16 in Eagle at State and Edgewood. If you think that you witnessed or have any information regarding this accident, please text 208-995-6050. Your help is needed.

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BW CONNECTIONS THANK YOU! We at Chevron on Chinden by Stagecoach and I realized I left my wallet at home. Would like to buy you dinner. Thanks again Pete 863-0313

SOPHIE: I’m a smart girl, and shy at first, but give me a little time and I’ll shower you with purrs.

SNUGGLES: Just like my name, I am very snuggly. I want a human to love forever.

KRONK: I’m a confident leash walker and love playing with my roommates.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!

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DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

BW BIRTHDAYS

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY STELLA!

PETS DASH: 10-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Curious, loves life and stays busy. Best in a home with adults or older, careful kids. Likes other dogs. (Kennel 410–#33967350)

MUFFIN: 5-year-old, female, American Staffordshire terrier mix. Has so much potential. Needs a cat-free home. (Ask at front desk to meet her–#34425994)

RUSTY: 2-year-old, male, terrier mix. Loves fetch, going to the park and adventures. Doesn’t always like big dogs and chases cats. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#30018014)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT

HOUSING BW ROOMMATES

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

CHERYL: 7-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Perfect mix of sassy and sweet. Enjoys attention and loves to lounge on the couch with her family. (IHS cattery–#34169867)

MISTRESS: 1-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Reserved, likes to quietly take in her surroundings. A little shy at first, but will let you pet her. (Kennel 101–#34502234)

O’DEAN: 9-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Overwhelmed by high-energy dogs or cats. May be best as an only pet. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center–#25218849)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

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Brett- you handsome armadillo, you make me swoon. Let’s go get lost... And look for snails. -E

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NYT CROSSWORD | FIRST LADIES ACROSS

23 When soap operas first flourished 24 They’re measured by pluviometers 25 Geneticist’s study 26 Rage 28 Sheena who sang “U Got the Look” with Prince 29 “No worries” 30 It helps you achieve balance 33 Highlighter shades 34 %: Abbr.

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BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Nikki Ann Wanner Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1622022 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(adult) A Petition to change the name of Nikki Ann Wanner, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Nikki Ann Eytchison. The reason for the change

in name is: stepfather Delbert Eytchison would like to adopt me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) Feb. 28, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Oct. 03, 2016 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Jan. 18, 25 Feb. 1 & 8 LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS FOR PUBLICATION. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF, THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, IN the Matter of the Estate of : JOHN WORTH WALKER, Deceased, DANIEL WALKER, Personal Rep-

BY SAM TRABUCCO / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

35 Reply to “No offense” 37 Aid after a computer crash, say 40 Get 41 Mark 44 Mosaic pieces 46 Question after a photo finish 47 “How’s it hangin’?” 48 Click “Going” on a Facebook event, e.g. 49 2013 best seller by Sheryl Sandberg 10

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1 Superfluous part of an essay 2 *One who 64-Acrossed for Supreme Court justices … 3 Emphatic refusal 4 After deductions 5 Gift-shop item 6 Hurriedly showed oneself out? 7 “J to ____ L-O!” (Jennifer Lopez album) 8 *… for astronauts 9 Like over four billion people 10 “Victory is yours”

When Harry Met Sally

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boiseclassicmovies.com 11 Mexican president Enrique Peña ____ 12 Zac of “Neighbors” 13 Professors answer to them 14 Reading material for a Hollywood agent 15 *… for British prime ministers 16 Most-wanted invitees 17 Texting while driving, e.g. 18 Anchor’s place 27 Enter, as data 31 Cousin of “OMG!” 32 Guido who painted “Massacre of the Innocents” 36 Today 37 “Hmm, guess so” 38 Loo, for short 39 ____ rally 42 What boats shouldn’t do 43 ____ Gay (W.W. II plane) 44 Best Foreign Film of 2005, set in South Africa 45 Kennedy who was the mother of Maria Shriver 46 Aid for the handy, informally 49 Letters of “pride” 50 Alternative to a pound 51 Emphatic agreement 52 Org. with a travel ban? 54 Bills, e.g. 55 Hit record? 57 “Yi-i-ikes!” 58 Pacific 59 Ending with teen 61 Certain conservative skirt 62 Hillary Clinton in 1969 or Bill Clinton in 1970 63 Monster 65 Fictional spacecraft created by the Time Lords 66 Like lettuce

67 West Coast air hub 73 Overly 74 Two-____ (smallish car) 75 ____-fi 76 Yapping dog, for short 77 *… for secretaries of state 78 “Don’t be so dumb!” 81 Rip off, informally 82 Clown (around) 83 [Yawn] 85 Rule by governing board 87 Altar constellation 88 *… for Best Directors 89 Ranger’s station 90 Che Guevara’s real first name 93 Puts forward, as effort 95 Factor in area calculation 96 “____ little silhouetto of a man” (Queen lyric) L A S T P O T T E D

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97 Desert NE of the Sinai Peninsula 98 *… for Nobel laureates 99 1941 chart-topper “Maria ____” 101 Slice for a hearty appetite 102 Miner’s strike 104 Catches off base 109 Apologia pro vita ____ 111 60 minuti

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resentative. Case NO. CV 1016-22226. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice of said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of the court. DATED this 18th day of January, 2017. Daniel Walker c/o Penelope S. Gaffney, GAFFNEY LAW, P.O. Box 937, Boise, ID 83702, (208) 991-0158. Pub. Jan. 25, Feb. 1 & 8. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Anna Grace Coate Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1623317 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Anna Grace Coate, now residing in the City of Eagle, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Andy Coate. The reason for the change in name is: because of a personal preference for the name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Mar. 14, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Dec. 26, 2016 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT CHRISTOPHER D. RICH DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 1, 8, 15 & 22

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Tara Annelle Stuivenga Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1700787 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Tara Annelle Stuivenga, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Trevor Anthony Stuivenga. The reason for the change in name is: personal. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Mar. 21, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Jan. 20, 2017 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT CHRISTOPHER D. RICH DEBBIE PERKINS DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 1, 8, 15 & 22 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Dianne Marie Harenberg Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1701113 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Dianne Marie Harenberg, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Drew Mar Harenberg. The reason for the change in name is: personal preference. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Mar. 21, 2017 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against

the name change. Date Jan. 23, 2017 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEBBIE PERKINS DEPUTY CLERK PUB Feb. 8, 15, 22 & Mar. 1

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hear from you. Write to Amanda Stolp c/o Elmore County Jail 2255 East 8th North, Mountain Home, ID 83647. I am a single white female 35 years old blonde hair blue eyes 5’6” and 135 pounds. I have two wonderful children both boys ages 12 and 1 ½ years old. I would really like someone to write to and maybe connect to. I am looking for men ages 25-55 or woman ages 25-40. Jennifer Thomas #111548 East Boise Community Work Center 2366 E. Old Penitentiary Rd Boise, ID 83712.

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PAGE BREAK $GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH Much Obliged

DEAR MINERVA, I recently agreed to be part of a special event and was initially quite honored. I felt like I had worked up to it. Now that we are near the event, though, I have feelings of anxiety and regret for agreeing to be a part of it due partly to the way some of the people who are involved have treated me. I want out but I don’t know how to do it. How do you handle those situations? Sincerely, —Obligated

DEAR OBLIGATED, This is a difficult position to be in and, trust me, I have been there plenty of times. Sometimes our expectations of an event and the process leading up to it fall short. It is very rare that I will cancel my obligation to something once I have committed, even if it is a painful experience. I know that I will regret canceling and leaving them high and dry far more than I will regret the pain or frustration I am going through to remain a part of the event. I think that these are growing experiences that teach us to set expectations early on as well as train us to be particular about the events we choose to do. No matter how much I have fretted during the creating process leading up to the event, it all melts away when I take the stage and get to interact with the crowds. Stick with it and you’ll be happy you made it through.

BUCKET OF DOOM We’ve all been awake at 3 a.m. worrying about some disaster we’re convinced will befall us at any moment. Maybe the weird mole you just noticed on your neck is going to kill you. The sound your car made on the drive home is probably going to cost at least $2,000 to diagnose and fix. Your parents are disappointed in you and will make their feelings bucketofdoom.co.uk, known at the next family gathering. $18.15 Worst-case scenarios don’t have to cause anxiety. They can be fun. Card game Bucket of Doom, from British-based Big Potato, invites those with a suitably morbid sense of humor to imagine horrific situations like, “Oh great, you wake up and you’re the back-end of a human centipede,” and draw on objects like a tin of spinach, diet pills or ET’s finger to invent a solution. Fellow players vote on the best combination and explanation of why it would work. (It should go without saying that these stories get raunchy real quick, so don’t play the game with your kids.) Who knows? Maybe solving fake crises will inspire a solution to your seemingly intractable real-life problems. —Zach Hagadone

1,521

1840S

Number of years since Pope Gelasius I declared Feb. 14 as Valentine’s Day in honor of a clergyman who was executed for secretly marrying couples in ancient Rome.

Era in which the first mass-produced Valentine’s Day cards were sold. (Census)

Taken by instagram user boisesbakery.

Should Boise become a sanctuary city?

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2.  3.  4.  5. 

“MIXTAPE OF THE OPEN ROAD,” MARTIN SEXTON

“ONE MORE FOR THE ROAD,” CURTIS STIGERS “LIPS OF CALYPSO,” LOUNGE ON FIRE “LIFE WITHOUT SOUND,” CLOUD NOTHINGS

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

#boiseweeklypic

FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

“RUN THE JEWELS 3,” RUN THE JEWELS

“WHAT THE DEVIL?,” STORIE GRUBB

Yes: 63.46%

“BLURRYFACE,” TWENTY ONE PILOTS

No: 34.30%

“NEAR TO THE WILD HEART OF LIFE,” JAPANDROIDS

I don’t know: 2.24%

6. 7.  8.  9. 

“LA LA LAND SOUNDTRACK,” VARIOUS ARTISTS

10.

“I SEE YOU,” THE XX

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to be a scientif ic sample o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

54.2 MILLION

$1.7 BILLION

$18.9 BILLION

58 MILLION

$1.7 BILLION

Estimated number of single people in the U.S.

Estimated annual revenue from the online dating industry.

Total amount spent by Americans on Valentine’s Day.

Pounds of chocolate purchased during the week of Valentine’s Day.

Dollars spent on candy alone during the week of Valentine’s Day.

(statisticbrain.com)

(eater.com)

(eater.com)

(eater.com)

(statisticbrain.com)

$150 Average amount spent by men on Valentine’s Day, compared to $74 spent by women. (eater.com)

(U.S. Census Bureau)

26cFEBRUARY 8-14, 2017 cBOISEweekly

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your reputation is in a state of fermentation. Will this process ultimately produce the metaphorical equivalent of fine wine or else something more like pungent cheese? The answer to that question will depend on how much integrity you express as you wield your clout. Be as charismatic as you dare, yes, but always in service to the greater good rather than to selfaggrandizement. You can accomplish wonders if you are saucy and classy, but you’ll spawn blunders if you’re saucy and bossy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Using a blend of warfare and diplomacy, Napoleon extended French control over much of Western Europe. In 1804, he decided to formalize his growing sovereignty with a coronation ceremony. He departed from tradition, however. For many centuries, French kings had been crowned by the Pope. But on this occasion, Napoleon took the imperial crown from Pope Pius VII and placed it on his own head. Historian David J. Markham writes that he “was simply symbolizing that he was becoming emperor based on his own merits and the will of the people, not because of some religious consecration.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Taurus, you have the right to perform a comparable gesture. Don’t wait for some authority to crown you. Crown yourself.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Have you heard the fable about the four blind men who come upon an elephant for the first time? The first man feels the tail and declares that the thing they’ve encountered must be a rope. The second touches one of the elephant’s legs and says that they are in the presence of a tree. The third strokes the trunk and assumes it’s a snake. Putting his hand on a tusk, the fourth man asserts that it’s a spear. I predict that this fable will NOT apply to you in the coming weeks, Gemini. You won’t focus on just one aspect of the whole and think it’s the whole. Other people in your sphere may get fooled by shortsightedness, but you will see the big picture. CANCER (June 21-July 22): For now, at least, your brain is your primary erogenous zone. I suspect it will be generating some of your sexiest thoughts ever. To be clear, not all of these erupting streams of bliss will directly involve the sweet, snaky mysteries of wrapping your physical body around another’s. Some of the erotic pleasure will come in the form of epiphanies that awaken sleeping parts of your soul. Others might arrive as revelations that chase away months’ worth of confusion. Still others could be creative breakthroughs that liberate you from a form of bondage you’ve wrongly accepted as necessary.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Human beings upload 300 hours of videos to YouTube every minute of every day. Among that swirling flow is a hefty amount of footage devoted exclusively to the amusing behavior of cats. Researchers estimate there are now more than 2 million clips of feline shenanigans. Despite the stiff competition, I suspect there’s a much better chance than usual that your cat video will go viral if you upload it in the coming weeks. Why? In general, you Leos now have a sixth sense about how to get noticed. You know what you need to do to express yourself confidently and attract attention— not just in regards to your cats, but anything that’s important to you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I know you haven’t literally been wrestling and wrangling with a sweaty angel. But if I were going to tell a fairy tale about your life lately, I’d be tempted to say this: Your rumble with the sweaty angel is not finished. In fact, the best and holiest part is still to come. But right now you have cosmic permission to take a short break and rest a while. During the lull, ratchet up your determination to learn all you can from your friendly “struggle.” Try to figure out what you’ve been missing about the true nature of the sweaty angel. Vow to become a stronger advocate for yourself and a more rigorous revealer of the wild truth.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Even if you’re not an occult wizard or pagan priestess, I suspect you now have the power to conjure benevolent love spells. There’s a caveat, however: They will only work if you cast them on yourself. Flinging them at other people would backfire. If you do accept that limitation, you’ll be able to invoke a big dose of romantic mojo from both your lower depths and your higher self. Inspiration will be abundantly available as you work to reinvigorate your approach to intimacy and togetherness. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here’s some advice from Scorpio writer Norman Rush: “The main effort of arranging your life should be to progressively reduce the amount of time required to decently maintain yourself so that you can have all the time you want for reading.” It’s understandable that a language specialist like Rush would make the final word of the previous sentence “reading.” But you might choose a different word. And I invite you to do just that. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to devotedly carve out more time to do The Most Important Thing in Your Life. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sixteenth-century Italian painter Titian was renowned for his brilliant use of color. He was also

prolific, versatile and influential. In 2011, one of his paintings sold for $16.9 million. But one of his contemporaries, the incomparable Michelangelo, said that Titian would have been an even greater artist if he had ever mastered the art of drawing. It seems that Titian skipped a step in his early development. Is there any way that your path resembles Titian’s, Sagittarius? Did you neglect to cultivate a basic skill that has subtly (or not so subtly) handicapped your growth ever since? If so, the coming weeks and months will be an excellent time to fix the glitch. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Our obsessive use of digital devices has diminished our power to focus. According to a study by Microsoft, the average human attention span has shrunk to eight seconds—one second less than that of a typical goldfish. I’m guessing, though, that you Capricorns will buck this trend in the coming weeks. Your ability to concentrate may be exceptional even by pre-Internet standards. I hope you’ll take opportunity of this fortunate anomaly to get a lot of important work and play done. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The time is now, brave Aquarius. Be audacious about improving the big little things in your life. (That’s not a typo. I did indeed use the term “big little things.”)

For example: Seek out or demand more engaging responsibilities. Bring your penetrating questions to sphinx-like authorities. Go in search of more useful riddles. Redesign the daily rhythm to better meet your unique needs. Refuse “necessary” boredom that’s not truly necessary. Trust what actually works, not what’s merely attractive. Does all that seem too bold and brazen for you to pull off? I assure you that it’s not. You have more clout than you imagine. You also have a growing faith in your own power to make subtle fundamental shifts. (That’s not a typo. I did use the term “subtle fundamental shifts.”) PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Love does not at first mean merging, surrendering, and uniting with another person,” wrote the poet Rilke, “for what would a union be of two people who are unclarified, unfinished, and still incoherent?” That’s an excellent meditation for you to entertain during the Valentine season, Pisces. You’re in the right frame of mind to think about how you could change and educate yourself so as to get the most out of your intimate alliances. Love “is a high inducement for the individual to ripen,” Rilke said, “to become something, to become a world for the sake of another person.” (Thanks to Stephen Mitchell for much of this translation.)

BOISEweeklycFEBRUARY 8-14, 2017 c27


June 14–25 Morrison Center TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY 10AM AT MORRISON CENTER BOX OFFICE • 208-426-1110 • MORRISONCENTER.COM

Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 34  

Club Ted, Full Ton of Talent, Oscar Madness

Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 34  

Club Ted, Full Ton of Talent, Oscar Madness