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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

OCTOBER 19–25, 2016

VO L U M E 2 5 , I S S U E 1 8

“Moderate voters have lives, and moderates don’t tend to vote in primaries.”

5

Dealing with Donald

Both Sen. Mike Crapo and challenger Jerry Sturgill have to reckon with Trump this election

13

Cover Art Auction

See a catalog of all the art going on the block at the 15th annual BW Cover Art Auction

CITIZEN 21

20

Truth Teller

Arguing the fact of the Holocaust, Denial explores the defence of truth against politics FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Sami Edge, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Annelise Eagleton, Alexandra Nelson Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Ryan Johnson, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Bill Hagler, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE COVER ART AUCTION: 15 YEARS AND COUNTING Fifteen years ago, Boise Weekly made a decision that has set it apart from most—if not all—alternative weekly newspapers in the country. Rather than devote the front cover to some splashy image illustrating the top story of the week, BW decided to use that space to highlight work by local artists. It was, and remains, a bold move. Over the years, our colleagues in the alt weekly world have frequently remarked on the policy, wondering how we can attract readers to our print edition without giving them an eye-catching idea of what’s inside. To that, we respond, the art itself is eye-catching and adds yet another element of content to the paper. What’s more, the cover art concept serves a community function. Not only do local artists get exposure for their work week after week, but they go home with a portion of proceeds from the sale of their original pieces at our annual Cover Art Auction, which—in case you haven’t been paying attention for the past few weeks—is going down Wednesday, Oct. 19 at Jack’s Urban Meeting Place (see Picks, Page 7). Doors open at 5 p.m. and the auction gets under way at 6 p.m. with hand-picked original works by some of the finest artists in our fair city (for a full catalog of works on the block, see Page 13). For $20, attendees will enjoy appetizers and drinks, plus the opportunity to own some of the art that has graced our front page over the past 12 months. Just to prove how much we truly do value our artistic community, in addition to funneling a chunk of sales revenue directly to the individual creators, we also set aside some of the auction cash for our Boise Weekly Cover Art Auction Grant program, which funds arts projects vetted by a panel of local creative luminaries. We take home a piece of the earnings to support our journalistic mission but, ultimately, the Cover Art Auction—like our weekly art covers—are all about celebrating the phenomenal talent that lives and works in the City of Trees. We invite you to join us at this annual event to bid, eat, drink, mingle and be merry with some of the people we think make Boise the artsy haven it is. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Anne Boyles TITLE: “Collage Eye” MEDIUM: Magazine clippings on wood ARTIST STATEMENT: Instagram @anneboylesart

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

SEEDS OF DISCONTENT WHEN CLIF BAR OPENED ITS NE W PL ANT IN T WIN FALLS, IDAHO AG LE ADERS APPL AU DED THE COMPANY. NOW THE Y ’RE BOOING, AF TER CLIF RELE ASED A FOUL-MOUTHED ANIMATED VIDEO CRITICIZING INDUSTRIAL AGRICULTURE PR ACTICES AS UNHE ALTHY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY DESTRUCTIVE. GE T DE TAILS AND SEE THE VIDEO AT NE WS/CIT YDESK.

TOTALLY GREAT Alley Repertory Theater opened its October performances of The Totalitarians with a pitch-perfect presentation of the laugh-out-loud, darkly humorous political play. Read a review at Arts/Stage.

EYEWITNESS A man booted from an airline flight after making sexist comments to a flight attendant is grabbing national headlines, in large part because a Boise native reported it online. More on News/Citydesk.

VON TEASER Boise filmmaker Will von Tagen released the teaser trailer for his new film After Walpurgis Night at the Idaho Horror Film Festival, showcasing the creepy German-set flick. See the trailer at Screen/Film.

OPINION

4 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


TRUMPED: HOW CRAPO AND STURGILL CAN’T GET FAR ENOUGH AWAY FROM THE DONALD ‘A seething undercurrent of disaffection’ GEORGE PRENTICE Idaho Botanical Garden’s Outlaw Field concert series recently finished its ninth season.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

RYAN JOH NSON

Democrat Jerry Sturgill says his political playbook is nuanced, detailing what he calls a path to victory over incumbent Republican Sen. Mike Crapo. But the No. 1—and No. 2 and No. 3— game-changer is as glaring as a bad comb over. “It’s Trump. It’s Trump. It’s Trump,” said Sturgill. “It’s obvious that Trump won’t play well in Idaho, especially toward the Mormon vote.” Both Crapo, 65, and Sturgill, 63, are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. When Crapo was first elected, he became the first Mormon to represent Idaho in the U.S. Senate. He’s now running for his fourth term and, while faith is not a primary factor in the Crapo/ Sturgill contest, morality casts a long shadow. Donald Trump was never Crapo’s choice to be the next U.S. president. “I liked Sen. Marco Rubio, Sen. Ted Cruz, Ben Carson,” Crapo told Boise Weekly, beginning a long list of would-be candidates who Donald Trump kicked to the curb through a bruising primary season. “One can speculate on whether a different nominee would be in a better position to beat Clinton, but this is the election we have,” he said. Crapo’s tepid endorsement of The Donald was upended Oct. 7 when a 2005 recording captured Trump claiming to have sex with a married woman, saying he could grab a woman “by the pussy,” adding, “I moved on her like a bitch.” “Trump’s repeated actions and comments toward women have been disrespectful, profane and demeaning,” said Crapo hours after the tape went public, urging Trump to “step aside” from the top of the GOP ticket. “Trump’s most recent excuse of ‘locker room talk’ is completely unacceptable and is inconsistent with protecting women from abusive, disparaging treatment,” he added. Trump insists he never acted on his claims and his statements were “only talk.” Still, the mounting evidence of Trump’s bad behavior only mounted. On Oct.12, The New York Times interviewed two women who said the real estate mogul and reality TV star touched them inappropriately. On the same day, CBS News reported a then-46-year-old Trump joked in a 1992 interview about dating a 10-year-old girl when she’s older. “This is not a decision that I have reached lightly,” wrote Crapo in a statement disavowing his party’s standard bearer. Sturgill said Crapo’s dismissal came too late.

“This latest group of detractors, including Sen. Crapo, look like a bunch of weak-kneed, last-minute deserters, demonstrating a history of poor judgment, hypocrisy and lack of independence,” said Sturgill. “These Trump ‘traitors’ are a symptom of a broken Congress, where any good judgement and independence are leached out in the mind-numbing marinade of Washington party politics.” Stung by a backlash from diehard Trump supporters on the far reaches of their own party, some of the same Republican members of Congress who previously demanded Trump step aside began changing their own course by Oct.12, when The New York Times reported a number of GOP senators and U.S. representatives conceded they would probably vote for Trump after all. Meanwhile Crapo’s criticism of Trump began catching flak from sectors of his own party. “Trump was chosen by us to represent us,” wrote Idaho County Republican Central Committee Chairman Jon Menough on Oct. 12. “With your announcement that you would no longer support Mr. Trump, in our opinion, you have relinquished your right to be associated with the Party we represent. Effective immediately, the Idaho County Republican Central Committee

will provide neither physical nor financial support to your effort to be re-elected.” Meanwhile, Idaho Republican Party leaders remained mum on Crapo’s non-endorsement of Trump, but were quick to issue a statement of their own. “Donald Trump has shown himself to be the agent of change,” wrote IDGOP Chairman Steve Yates on Oct. 11. “The Idaho Republican Party remains steadfast in its support for all of our nominees, selected by the people, from the top of the ticket to the bottom. As is our duty and privilege in the party, we will remain focused on electing Republicans in Idaho.” Meanwhile, Sturgill said the Trump debacle was “the No. 1 component of why Crapo is vulnerable.” “We’ve conducted our own internal polling and it revealed that the Trump effect was No. 1 in this race,” said Sturgill, who added that Crapo’s own “personal problem” had triggered what he called “a seething undercurrent of disaffection for Crapo after he got busted for DUI.” “When you Google Mike Crapo, what do you see? His mugshot,” said Sturgill. 6 The DUI incident occurred on the night of Dec. 22, 2012 when Crapo, by his

BOTANICAL GARDEN CRIES FOUL AT PROPOSED CONCERT SERIES FOR ANN MORRISON PARK Its formal classification is RFP-17-048-02017/wm, and the description from the city of Boise’s request for proposals is to, “Provide all services necessary to create a successful concert series.” Meanwhile, the Idaho Botanical Garden says the city’s proposal threatens the very livelihood of the nonprofit. “We don’t think we should be the only concert series in the Treasure Valley,” said Erin Anderson, executive director of IBG, whose Outlaw Field Concert Series played host this year to Tony Bennett, Bonnie Raitt and Neil Young. “We encourage healthy competition. But should the city subsidize a concert series that could negatively impact the Idaho Botanical Garden?” she added. “We want a fair playing field. But by the city hosting a concert series in a city park paid for with taxpayer dollars, it’s going to create a conflict.” The city’s RFP surfaced Sept. 28, asking promoters to submit a plan to create a “contemporary concert series” for Ann Morrison Park. The concerts would take place on available dates in 2017 and, according to the RFP packet, a number of dates would be available in late May; early June; the second, third and fourth weeks of July; the first two weeks of August; the final three weeks of September; and the final three weeks of October. The preferred proposal would carry a one-year agreement with a promoter, with a two-year extension option. “The City expressly retains the right to have sole discretion and approval of all entertainers proposed and selected by the proposer,” according to the RFP. “Performances would end no later than 10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and no later than 9 p.m. on all other nights.” Anderson told Boise Weekly that, having worked in the Boise Parks and Recreation Department before becoming IBG executive director, she knows for a fact that concert promoters have approached the city on a number of occasions about using a city park for concerts. “I have a little background, and some concert promotion companies have asked the city—quite often—to use park space. But it’s something the city has shied away from for quite some time because of the ordinance,” said Anderson. 6 According to Boise Parks and Recreation’s own policies, “City Code restricts BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | 5

KE L S E Y HAWES

NEWS

CITYDESK


NEWS own admission, drank vodka tonics alone in his Washington, D.C. apartment, got behind the wheel of a 1999 Jeep and drove through the Capitol Hill district, past the city’s iconic monuments and into Alexandria, Va., where he ran a red light. Crapo was pulled over and blew a 0.11 blood alcohol content level. Two weeks later, the senator pleaded guilty to drunk driving and was sentenced to a $250 file, a year’s suspension of his driver’s license, a suspended sentence of 180 days in jail and a requirement to enroll in an alcohol safety program. “I have recently made personal choices that are at odds with who I am, who Idahoans rightly believe me to be and who I strive to be,” said Crapo, minutes after stepping outside the courthouse. Four years later, Crapo is now being put to the political test, his first reelection effort since the DUI conviction. “As I said then, and I saw now, it was a terrible mistake,” Crapo told Boise Weekly. “It was a difficult time… very difficult. I was probably as hard on myself as anyone else. Out of it came a very strong self re-evaluation. The positive part of it is that I found the people of Idaho are very loving and forgiving. By far, the strong, biggest message delivered to me was, ‘I’m disappointed. You should not have done that. But react to it properly, build yourself back and be a strong senator.’ That’s what I’ve tried to do.” Crapo hasn’t taken anything for granted. In letters to constituents and financial backers, Crapo wrote he was taking Sturgill “very seriously.” “[Sturgill] is a corporate lawyer and investment banker with strong connections in New York City, where he used to work, and has the potential for attracting vast sums of money from his left-wing network,” wrote Crapo to potential funders. “He’s as liberal as I am conservative.” Sturgill says that’s about half-right. “An investment banker? Sure. Have I been helping small companies in Idaho grow? You bet. Since when was that a liberal idea?” he asked. Sturgill grew up in Twin Falls in what he described as a Republican family. “We talked politics every night at the dinner table. Dad was a Republican precinct chairman for Twin Falls County and I was president of the Teen Republican Club in high school,” he said, adding he even shook hands with then-President Richard Nixon in 1969 when the young Sturgill traveled to the nation’s capital to participate in a youth political event. “But my idol was Senator Frank Church, a Democrat from Idaho and the greatest example of a statesman than I can think of,” Sturgill said. After an LDS mission in Quebec, Canada, graduation from BYU law school and a stint in corporate law in New York City, Sturgill said he was anxious to return to Idaho in 1995. He was a fan of candidates on both sides of the political aisle, working on campaigns for former Democratic Congress members Richard Stallings and

AC CES S H OL LY WOOD

KE L S E Y HAWES

CITYDESK

5

The 2016 season at Outlaw Field included Tony Bennett, Bonnie Raitt and Neil Young.

the sale and advertisement of goods and services in city parks. The City of Boise 5 chooses to maintain public parks as open space accessible to all residents and visitors (no admission charges are permitted).” Anderson wonders how the city plans to do an end-run around its own rules. “Are they working around the ordinance? That’s what it feels like,” she said. “But I’m not sure how they envision that, which is why we’re looking for a formal sit-down conversation with the city.” That conversation will come Monday, Oct. 24 at Boise City Hall, where Anderson confirmed she’ll be meeting with a team of representatives from the Parks and Rec Department. According to the city’s own documents, there have been no previous attempts to create a series of concerts in Boise parks; but, if approved, “this series would be handled under a specific contract with [the] promoter.” The city would have some specific requirements of a concert series promoter. The RFP indicates a percentage or fixed amount of the proceeds from the concert series would go to a local charity. Concert promoters are being asked to identify up to five local charities that would receive funds from the proceeds. Additionally, each ticket sold would include a $3 “park improvement fee” that would go into city coffers. Under the terms of the RFP, a successful concert series promoter would reap the benefits of food and beverage sales, including some alcohol sales. At least 10 percent of any food sold at the venue for the first year of the series would have to be “healthy,” as defined by the city’s healthy food policy. By the second and third years of the concert series, healthy food choices would be required to make up 20 and 30 percent, respectively, of all food offered. Regardless of its management structure, Anderson said a competing concert series in a city park would strike at the very heart of the Idaho Botanical Garden’s sustainability. “This proposed concert series, only 3.3 miles away from our concert series, would come into direct competition,” she said. “Our big question [to the city] is: Why are you working around City Code when such a concert series would have such a negative impact on a beloved nonprofit in our community?” —George Prentice 6 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

A 2005 recording of Donald Trump and then-Access Hollywood co-host Billy Bush (left) in a conversation where Trump claimed he would grab a woman “by the pussy” and “move on her like a bitch.”

Walt Minnick but proudly donating to Mitt Romney’s failed 2008 presidential bid. “Here’s how I see Idaho. It’s basically in three parts: Republicans on the right, Democrats on the left and a very big swath of independents in the middle who have traditionally gone to the right,” said Sturgill. “So, what would happen if just enough voters leaned toward a Democrat? Quite frankly, our internal polling indicates that there is a tangible symptom of anti-establishment this year. And that hurts Mike Crapo.” In a rare move meant to accomplish statewide outreach, Crapo spent almost two years traveling to every incorporated city in Idaho—200 in all—meeting with constituents in town halls, restaurants and at their kitchen tables. “Have you ever been to Warm River, population 3? I just came back from there. It’s just above Ashton on the old highway to Yellowstone,” Crapo said. “There’s a nearby fishing lodge where I talked with nine people. There’s a town called Golden, population 1. I was there. There’s a house tucked behind a bunch of trees, but there’s a boulder out front with ‘Golden’ spray painted on it.” Crapo racked up thousands of miles over 22 months to visit the 200 cities and towns, and he said he’s continuously impressed by how engaged his constituency is. “The cowboy? He’s got a laptop in his saddlebag. Believe me, people are very sophisticated on national and international issues,” said Crapo. “There are some common themes, but there’s also an overriding anger about the fact that government is dysfunctional. More and more people are telling me that they’re concerned over intrusive, big government and that the national debt is huge.” If he is elected to a fourth term, Crapo will have served 24 years in the U.S. Senate in addition to six years in the U.S. House of Represen-

tatives and eight years before that in the Idaho Legislature. When asked “How long is too long in office?” Crapo argued it comes down to having the commitment to keep fighting for the principles that first put him in office. “I believe in a limited government, that the Constitution should be interpreted as-written; that we should have a free market with limited government control and a strong focus on individual rights,” said Crapo. “But I believe we’ve been sliding, quite aggressively, toward a huge federal government with extensive control over our economy and a subjugation of individual rights. As long as I can keep fighting the fight and effectively advocating for those original principles, I know I can be effective.” Sturgill says when he points to Crapo’s voting record in the U.S. Senate, he sees particular vulnerabilities when it comes to Idaho independents. “Let’s take a look at the Lilly Ledbetter vote,” said Sturgill referring to a 2009 “no” vote when Crapo joined 35 other Republicans to try to kill a measure Democrats said would strengthen equal pay protections for women. “I find it ironic that Senator Crapo has done such good work on legislation to protect women from violence, but voted against a paycheck fairness act,” said Sturgill. “But that’s just one issue that voters are telling me that they want change on. Public lands, stronger funding for education and a much stronger economy. That’s what I want to talk about.” Sturgill concedes the top of the ticket may be the ultimate factor in swaying his contest. “Quite frankly a lot of people in Idaho think Hillary Clinton is the devil incarnate and those are weeds I don’t have time to get into,” said Sturgill. “But Trump? You bet he’s going to influence this race and a lot of others. Get ready for change.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY OCT. 19 Festivals & Events BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART AUCTION—It’s that time of year again when Boise Weekly auctions off the original artworks featured on the cover during the previous year. It’s always a kickass party and for a kickass cause: A portion of proceeds goes to the artists, a portion supports BW’s Cover Auction Art Grant program and a piece of the pie is set aside to support BW’s investigative journalistic mission. Attendees will enjoy a no-host bar, food and awesome auction action. And take your auction wristband to the after party at Bonefish Grill for $5 martinis. 6 p.m. $20. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, jacksurbanmeetingplace.org.

IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN SCARECROW STROLL—Find scarecrows peeping out around the trees and shrubs throughout the Garden. . 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE$7. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. IDAHO VIRTUAL REALITY COUNCIL VR BASH—Meet executives of some of the biggest names in the industry like HTC Vive, Unity and more. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, idahovirtualreality.com.

On Stage AFROSONICS ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—Help the nine-piece Afro-indie group celebrate the release of their new album, People Meet Your People. 6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, afrosonics. com.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19

BCT: HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. COMEDIAN MATT BRAGG—Hosted by Kenny Wait, with Genki Takoyaki serving a Japanese-inspired menu. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing Co., 521 W. Broad St., Boise, 208342-7655, boisebrewing.com. THE MONKEES: GOOD TIMES 50TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR—Relive Monkee-mania with original members Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork performing such hits as I’m A Believer, Daydream Believer, Last Train to Clarksville and more. 7:30 p.m. $19.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110, morrisoncenter.com/events/ detail/the-monkees. THE SPEEDY FOUNDATION: PAPER TIGERS— Parents, teachers, providers and community members are invited to learn about the positive approaches to dealing with child and adolescent trauma and the effects that positive engagements have over punitive punishment. Immediately following the video screening, there will be a panel discussion. Admission is free and refreshments will be served. Screenings are sponsored by Optum Idaho, Idaho Federation for Families, Idaho Children’s Trust Fund and The Speedy Foundation. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Edwards Boise Downtown Stadium 9, 760 Broad St., Boise, 208-338-3821. thespeedyfoundation.org/papertigers.

Art AARON RODRIGUEZ AND JESSICA WINFREE: HUMANNATURE—Through Jan. 31. Noon-7 p.m. FREE. Studio Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Ste 106, Boise, 208917-7427. ALAN MACDONALD SOLO EXHIBITION—Through Nov. 4. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com. We bid you come bid on fine original works of art.

BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART AUCTION Each week since 2001, Boise Weekly has published a piece by a local artist on the front cover—a practice unique among alternative weeklies—and, every October, we gather up the original works that appeared over the previous 12 months and put them up for auction. It’s always a kickass party and for a kickass cause: a portion of proceeds goes to the artists, a portion supports BW’s Cover Auction Art grant program and a piece of the pie is set aside to support BW’s investigative journalistic mission. This year’s auction takes place Wednesday, Oct. 19 at JUMP, where attendees will enjoy a no-host bar, food and awesome auction action. The event is made possible by sponsors D.L. Evans Bank, Evermore Prints, Van Dyck Frame Design, Highlands Hollow Brewhouse and JUMP, but it’s also made possible by you. Doors 5 p.m., auction 6 p.m., $20. JUMP Room, JUMP, 1000 W. Myrtle St., 208-639-6610, jacksurbanmeetingplace.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOSCO’S OPENING DOORS: A GLIMPSE INTO THE ARTIST’S MIND III—Through Oct. 28. 7 a.m.-11:45 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4261242, finearts.boisestate.edu. DANIEL DIAZ-TAI: ABSTRACT PAINTINGS—Through Oct. 26. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | 7


CALENDAR EXCHANGE: ISU MFA STUDENT EXHIBITION AT BOISE STATE— Through Oct. 26. 7- a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art. boisestate.edu/visualartscenter. FOTOFILMIC: THE NEW FACE OF FILM—Through Oct. 31. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, Campus Lane (NE of Liberal Arts building), Boise, 208-426-3994, fotofilmic.com/ the-new-face-of-film. GIUSEPPE LICARI: CONTRAPPUNTO—Through Dec. 3. 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org. JIM BRITT: MATADOR, DEATH IN THE AFTERNOON—Through Nov. 1. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, comlib.org.

JUDITH KINDLER: DESIRE— Through Oct. 26. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-7265079, gailseverngallery.com. KAY COUGHRAN: CLOSE TO MY HEART—Through Oct. 28. 10 a.m.6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3313374, artsourcegallery.com. LAURA HEIT: EARTH AND SKY— Through Feb. 19. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330. MICHAEL GREGORY: LIGHT YEARS—Through Oct. 26. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. MINIDOKA: ARTIST AS WITNESS—Through Jan. 15. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19

This VR party is a reality.

PHOTOGRAPHER SCOTTY PERKINS: AMERICA’S WILDERNESS BEAUTY—Through Oct. 23. 7a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426INFO. finearts.boisestate.edu. TVAA: CELEBRATING PRIVATE IDAHO—Through Dec. 2. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

Talks & Lectures BEYOND BORDERS: BOISE BENCH HISTORY PROJECTS— Join local historians Jim Duran, Barbara Perry-Bauer and Angie Davis for a discussion of their work conducting historical research on the Boise Bench. 7 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Archives, 2205 N. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, history. idaho.gov.

Sports & Fitness ST. LUKE’S SPORTS MEDICINE CYCLING/LRC 2016 CYCLING CLUB FALL MEMBERSHIP PARTY—There will be beer, wine, snacks. 6:30-9 p.m. FREE. Reed Cycle, 238 E. State St., Eagle, 208938-7894, lostrivercycling.org.

Citizen PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE WATCH PARTY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-972-8320, boisepubliclibrary.org/calendar.

Food BASQUE MARKET PAELLA COOKING CLASS—Learn the traditional techniques for making the national dish of Spain. 6-8 p.m. $40. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208. thebasquemarket.com/classes.

THURSDAY-MONDAY, OCT. 20-31

You gotta hand it to ’em: These puppets are spooky.

THURSDAY OCT. 20 On Stage 5 POINT FILM FESTIVAL: FRIENDS OF THE SAWTOOTH AVALANCHE CENTER BENEFIT— These hand-picked short films are guaranteed to jump start your winter. 6-9:30 p.m. $10-$15. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-3871273, sawtoothavalanche.com. ALLEY REP: THE TOTALITARIANS—8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. BCT: HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

BLT: DRACULA—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, boiselittletheater.org. THE CENTER FILM SERIES: HERMITAGE REVEALED—The Sun Valley Center for the Arts kicks off its 2016–2017 film series with a documentary about the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, by award-winning filmmaker Margy Kinmonth. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Magic Lantern Cinemas, 100 E. 2nd St., Ketchum, 208726-3308, sunvalleycenter.org. COMEDIAN AMY MILLER—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. HOMEGROWN THEATRE: 5TH ANNUAL HORRIFIC PUPPET AFFAIR—The puppets are returning to shock, scare and satisfy your thirst for horror. Plus local brews and local food by Manfred’s Catering. For mature audiences. 8 p.m. $5-$10. Woodland Empire Ale Craft, 1114 W. Front St., Boise.

FRIDAY-MONDAY, OCT. 21-31

All aboard the crazy (scary) train.

IDAHO VIRTUAL REALITY COUNCIL VR BASH

FIFTH ANNUAL HORRIFIC PUPPET AFFAIR

HAUNTED HALLOWEEN TROLLEY TOURS

Whether you’re a VR enthusiast or you’re not even sure what those letters mean, check out the latest in a new wave of technology innovation at this family friendly party hosted by the Idaho Virtual Reality Council. “Our goal here is to open eyes,” said IVRC President Jessica Whiting. “Once you experience VR, your creativity ignites and you can see how to apply it.” Partygoers can try out more than 20 virtual and augmented reality experiences including everything from an unreleased game to a simulation that lets you take a car apart. Guest speakers are Mark Cranney, from Silicon Valley giant Andreessen Horowitz, who will talk business strategy; and Hardie Tankersley, winner of the first Emmy Award for VR, who will talk about virtual reality in Hollywood. Get free tickets online— and don’t forget about the after party. For reals. 5:30-7:30 p.m., FREE. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

In the horror series Puppet Master, puppets inhabited by human spirits are summoned using an ancient Egyptian curse and commit sadistic murders with knives and drill bits. The fiends are tiny, versatile and deadly—pure Halloween horror. For those with more lighthearted tastes than terrifying toys, there’s the Horrific Puppet Affair, now in its fifth year. Homegrown Theatre’s wildly popular tradition features original humorous and spooky tales—“Zomb-Erella” by Erika Jenko, “Time Trap!” by Matthew Baltzell, “Drown” by Heidi Kraay and more—told with custom made puppets. Performances run at Woodland Empire Ale Craft from the pay-what-you-want preview Thursday, Oct. 20, through the Halloween night closing bash. Oct. 20-22, 26-29, 31, 8 p.m.; Oct. 22, 29, 10:15 p.m. $5-$10. Woodland Empire Ale Craft, 1114 W. Front St., Boise, 208-4260510, facebook.com/HGTheatre.

Like any city, Boise has its share of ghosts. Get a spooky season primer on the spirits that wander the streets on a Haunted Halloween Trolley Tour offered by Boise Trolley Tours. The company’s vintage Molly Trolley will be decked out in frightful decorations for the creepy 1.5 hour cruises, which depart from Joe’s Crab Shack (2288 N. Garden St.) Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and then nightly during the week of Halloween. The Friday, Oct. 28 and Saturday, Oct. 29 tours are four-hour events that set out at 7 p.m. and includes a stop at the Old Pen’s Frightened Felons (tickets included). All tours are for ages 12 and older, except the nights of Saturday, Oct. 29 and Monday, Oct. 31, which are 21+ (alcohol will be served). A longtime Boise favorite, tickets for these tours sell out fast, so make like a ghost and get a boo-ve on. Times vary, $18-$35. Joe’s Crab Shack, 2288 N. Garden St., Garden City, 208-433-0849, boisetrolleytours.com.

8 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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CALENDAR OFF CENTER DANCE: SIDE EFFECTS—This haunting Halloween performance features new choreography by artistic director Katie Ponozzo and founder Kelli Brown. For ages 13 and older. 8 p.m. $10-$25. Xanadu, 5015 Bond St., Boise, 208-871-8662. STAGE COACH: THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—7:30 p.m. $12$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

different ways contemporary artists and writers have interpreted it. In 2014, Scott Fife spent a month living in the Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ residence in Hailey (the birthplace of the poet Ezra Pound), making work about both Pound and Hemingway. Fife will talk about how that work was the genesis for the project. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-7269491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Talks & Lectures

Art ARTIST TALK: THOMAS WESTPHAL—From the world of sports to the origins of child’s play, Helsinki-based German artist Thomas Westphal investigates the phenomenon of play and its implications on culture and society. 7:30 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-9494365, mingstudios.org.

BRIDGES TO CHINA: TREASURE VALLEY CONNECTIONS—Join Dr. Jeff Snyder-Reinke and Dr. Robert Dayley of The College of Idaho for a discussion of how in an increasingly globalized world, international experiences for college students are more important than ever. 6 p.m. FREE. University of Idaho Water Center, 322 E. Front St., Boise, 208-364-4054, uidaho.edu.

THE CENTER BIG IDEA: IDAHO STORIES ARTIST TALK WITH SCOTT FIFE—The Center’s newest Big Idea project presents a loose narrative informed by Idaho’s notable literary history and explores the

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Sports & Fitness BOISE STATE FOOTBALL VS. BYU—TV: ESPN. 8:15 p.m. Boise State Broncos Albertsons Stadium, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-4737, boisestate.edu.

Citizen NONPROFIT RESOURCE THURSDAYS—The Idaho Nonprofit Center and BPL invite nonprofit leaders, staff members and volunteers to learn about free and low-cost resources available. 4-6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200. boisepubliclibrary.org/calendar.

Odds & Ends POK-MONSTER MASH—All ages are invited to this PokemonHalloween mashup party. Catch ‘em all in the Pokemon scavenger hunt, score the biggest catch in Pokemon Go Safari, or win your age bracket in the Pokemon Trading Card Game Tournament and qualify to compete in a Grand Finale Tournament in November. Lures will be activated, snacks will be served, and costumes are encouraged. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org/ lakehazel. RANDOM FANDOM COSTUME CONTEST—Geeks and nerds are invited to join others like you for a costume contest like no other. Creativity and handmade costumes strongly encouraged. Prizes donated by The Reveal costume shop will be handed out for first, second and third place for most creative and best genre. For ages 18 and older. 6-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org/calendar.

FRIDAY OCT. 21 Festivals & Events

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

3RD ANNUAL WOMEN IGNITE IDAHO CONFERENCE AND TRADE SHOW—Enjoy some of the leading inspirational and educational speakers and trainers facilitating the hottest topics in business and beyond. Ticket includes two-day conference and trade show, Saturday lunch and Saturday evening comedy show. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. $95. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, womenigniteidaho.com.

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | 9


CALENDAR COMMUNITY COUNCIL OF IDAHO 45TH ANNIVERSARY GALA—Enjoy fine dining, live music, dancing, raffle and keynote speakers CEO Arturo Rodriguez of United Farmworkers and CEO Cid Wilson of the National Hispanic Association for Corporate Responsibility. 6 p.m.-midnight. $25. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, communitycouncilofidaho. org/45th_gala. CWI JOB FAIR—The event is open to the public and will focus on seasonal employment and jobs that may be ideal for students working their way through school. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho Nampa Campus, 5500 E. Opportunity Drive, Nampa, 208-562-3400, cwidaho.cc. DIA DE LOS MUERTOS—Celebrate Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) as you learn more about the history of this holiday and enjoy food, beverages and spectacular traditional Mexican folkloric dances by Folklorico Mexico Lindo dressed in full costume with Day of the Dead masks. Altars will be on display in the Harano Gallery. 6 p.m. FREE. Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum, 676 S.W. Fifth Ave., Ontario, 541-889-8191, 4rcc.com. MOTHER-SON DATE NIGHT— Heels to Hammers, the allwomen’s Habitat for Humanity Team, is having fundraising event with all proceeds going toward a Treasure Valley home build in 2017. Take your son, grandson or nephew on a date to teach them about values, worth and standards while enjoying dinner, live music, dancing, silent auctions and more. 5:30-9 p.m. $45 per pair adv., $50 per pair door. Honalee Farm Event Center, 7010 Moon Valley Road, Eagle, 208-286-0533.

COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com.

St., Garden City. 208-433-0849, boisetrolleytours.com.

HOMEGROWN THEATRE: 5TH ANNUAL HORRIFIC PUPPET AFFAIR—For mature audiences. 8 p.m. $5-$10. Woodland Empire Ale Craft, 1114 W. Front St., Boise.

BIRDS OF PREY FALL FLIGHTS— The Peregrine Fund will be hosting their popular Fall Flights every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday in October, weather permitting. A host of raptors will be showcased, including the Eurasian Eagle Owl and a Peregrine Falcon. Arrive by 2:30 p.m.; no admission once the program has started. 3-4 p.m. FREE with regular admission. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org.

OFF CENTER DANCE: SIDE EFFECTS—8 p.m. $10-$25. Xanadu, 5015 Bond St., Boise. 208-8718662. ROOFTOP REVOLUTION BENEFIT CONCERT— Beatles tribute band Rooftop Revolution presents the Beatles Tribute 50th Anniversary Concert to benefit Chase Away the Clouds, which provides a “home away from home” cost free for cancer patients from rural Idaho receiving treatment in the Treasure Valley. All-ages; 7:30 p.m. $25. Riverside Hotel 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3431871. facebook.com/RoofTopRevoluTion STAGE COACH: THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—8 p.m. $12$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Odds & Ends HAUNTED HALLOWEEN TROLLEY TOURS—Join the fun aboard the decorated vintage Halloween Trolley and learn about all the ghosts of Boise. (For ages 12 and older.) 8-9:30 p.m. $18-$35. Joe’s Crab Shack, 2288 N. Garden

Animals & Pets

ZOO BOISE SPOOKTACULAR—Join Zoo Boise for their annual merry-not-scary Halloween fun-fest, featuring a variety of fun Halloween displays, activities, and a few animal encounters, all designed for younger children. Plus a black light dance party, mascot meet-and-greets, professional magic, obstacle course, the Bone Yard, mini hay bale maze, a chance to hang out in the Bat House at night, and more. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$10. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise.org.

SATURDAY OCT. 22 Festivals & Events

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

On Stage ACTORS FROM THE LONDON STAGE FALL TOUR 2016: RICHARD III—Actors From The London Stage will unleash their new adaptation of Richard III, Shakespeare’s crooked king. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, facebook. com/AFTLSatBSU. ALLEY REP: THE TOTALITARIANS—8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. BCT: HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: DRACULA—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN AMY MILLER—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

10 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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CALENDAR 18TH ANNUAL IDAHO GOURD SOCIETY’S GOURD FESTIVAL— Check out the original gourd art on display and for purchase, plus gourd art competition, gourd art supplies and demonstrations, holiday gift items, make-and-take activities for kids and adults, silent auction and more. Also 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Sunday. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$2. Wyndham Garden Boise Airport, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-343-4900, idahogourdsociety.org. 2016 IDAHO WOMEN VETERANS CONFERENCE—Meet with other women veterans and share your stories. The focus this year will be on “Healthy Living, Healing and Informing.” Lunch and snacks will be provided. There will also be an auction, plus a wine event next door to the Riverside at Telaya Winery the night before. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871. 3rd Annual Women Ignite Idaho Conference and Trade Show—7 a.m.-5 p.m. $95. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, womenigniteidaho.com. BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287. facebook.com/ TheBoiseFarmersMarket. CANYON COUNTY CO-OP 2016 SUMMER COMMUNITY MARKET—9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Canyon County Co-op, 1415 First St. S., Nampa, 208-960-0328, canyoncounty.coop. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. HEALING HUT COMMUNITY GRAND OPENING—Celebrate the grand opening of this one-stop shop for comprehensive health care. They have tons of fun stuff planned for you to enjoy: meetand-greet with the practitioners, a tour of the clinic, light dinner and beverages, discounts on services, a raffle and a free gift for each guest. 4-6 p.m. FREE. Healing Hut, 7660 N. Horseshoe Bend Road, Ste. D, Boise, 208-939-6748. INN AT 500 CAPITOL JOB FAIR—The new Inn at 500 Capitol boutique hotel is hiring. Visit the website for details. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Inn at 500 Capitol Pre-Opening Model Studio, 333 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-2270500, innat500.com/careers/ careers1.htm. WALKABOUT BOISE HISTORIC DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR— Join Preservation Idaho for a 1.5-hour guided walking tour through 150 years of history and architecture. You’ll get an up-closeand-personal introduction to the built environment that makes downtown Boise like no other place. Walking tours run Saturdays through Oct. 29. Get starting location and additional details when you register or call 208-409-8282. 11 a.m. $10. Basque Block, Grove

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Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise. 208-4098282, preservationidaho.org/ boise-walking-tours-historic-boise. WEST BOISE SATURDAY MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise. 208-322-9464, facebook.com/ artzone208/timeline?ref=page_internal. WEST COAST SWING WEEKEND—Heirloom Dance Studio and Boise City Swing are bringing West Coast Swing instruction to Boise to give all dancers opportunities to grow, learn and dance at this weekend featuring award-winning instructor Jake Haning. Open to anyone of any skill level and age; no partner or previous experience required. Schedule includes Saturday workshops 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday dance 8 p.m.-midnight; Sunday workshops 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunday dance 8 p.m.-midnight. $15 dances, $20 workshops, $95-$120 weekend passes. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-8716352, boisecityswing.com.

RECYCLED MINDS 4TH ANNUAL HALLOWEEN SHOW—Join your friends on an epic adventure to fight back the darkness with laughter and joy. It’s going to take some brains and a lot of guts to get past hungry zombies, vampire boyfriends and a haunted stage. 8 p.m. $5-$10. The Hub, 1408 State St., Boise. recycledmindscomedy.com. STAGE COACH: THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—8 p.m. and midnight. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Literature AUTHOR DAVID GIBSON—Meet author and journalist David Gibson, who’ll be selling several of his novels, including Travel Required: A Young Man’s Journey to Adulthood, about a 16-year-old boy’s summer on a wheat harvest crew. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, www. rdbooks.org.

On Stage ACTORS FROM THE LONDON STAGE FALL TOUR 2016: RICHARD III—7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, facebook. com/AFTLSatBSU. ALLEY REP: THE TOTALITARIANS—8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. BCT: HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: DRACULA—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN AMY MILLER—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208991-4746, boisecomedy.com. HOMEGROWN THEATRE: 5TH ANNUAL HORRIFIC PUPPET AFFAIR—For mature audiences. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $5-$10. Woodland Empire Ale Craft, 1114 W. Front St., Boise. MAHAVIA FLAMENCO—Enjoy an evening of traditional Spanish Flamenco with MahaVia, featuring singer J.R. Rivero Kinsey, guitarist Derren Davidavich Crosby, and dancers Julianna Thomas and Kelli Brown. 7:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

Talks & Lectures WHEN GRAVESTONES SPEAK: A NIGHT WITH DAVID HABBEN— Join the Eagle Historical Museum for a night with cemetery historian David Habben. Limited capacity. RSVP required; call or email the Eagle Historical Museum. 5:30 p.m. FREE. The Brim Coffee House, 99 E. State St., Eagle. 208-9392669.

HOSTED BY:

Sports & Fitness BARRE FOR BOOBS—Barbells for Boobs strongly believe everyone has a right to know if they are living with breast cancer. They won’t stop until everyone, regardless of age, gender, income and insurance status has access to early detection services. Pure Barre Boise/Eagle is hosting a donation-only Pure Barre class in conjunction with Payette Brewing and Big City Coffee. A $40 donation to Barbells for Boobs will get you the workout, breakfast and yoga mat! 10 a.m.-12 p.m. By donation. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-344-0011, purebarre.com/id-boise. SPAZ FUN RUN, WALK, TRUNKOR-TREAT—Enjoy this familyfriendly Halloween-themed activity to raise money to help provide for the heating and cooling needs of those in need, PTSD alleviation activities for veterans, and STEM skill training for youth volunteers. All funds stay in the Treasure Valley. 9-11 a.m. $25. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 N. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-608-6128.

OCTOBER 27 EGYPTIAN THEATRE DOORS & RAFFLE: 6 pm FILMS: 7 pm TICKETS: EventBrite.com or AT DOOR

OFF CENTER DANCE: SIDE EFFECTS—8 p.m. $10-$25. Xanadu, 5015 Bond St., Boise, 208-8718662.

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CALENDAR Odds & Ends

On Stage

OCTUBRE SALSA—Octubre Salsa kicks off with beginner lessons at 9 p.m., followed by social dancing with DJ Giovanni. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. $6-$12. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, salsaidaho.com.

EAGLE HIGH CHOIR FUNDRAISING DINNER AND CONCERT—Enjoy food from Costa Vida restaurant and Dessert Dash, and entertainment by the EHS choir program. Proceeds support the choir’s activities, including their touring and education programs. 6 p.m. $15-$25 adv., $25-$40 door. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org.

Animals & Pets ZOO BOISE SPOOKTACULAR—6-9 p.m. FREE-$10. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise.org.

SUNDAY OCT. 23 Festivals & Events 22ND ANNUAL AUCTION FOR THE RIVERS— Help Idaho Rivers United fulfill its mission of protecting and restoring Idaho’s rivers, with music, food, and auctions of river trips, gear, unique and fun items. 4-8 p.m. $20. Barber Park Education and Event Center, 4049 S. Eckert Road, 208-343-7481, idahorivers.org.

TUESDAY OCT. 25 Festivals & Events ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL TOURS—Join docents for free 45-minute guided tours of the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial every Tuesday, through October. Meet at the statue of Anne Frank in the Memorial. No reservation required. For all ages. 12:15 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise. 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter.org/events.

IDAHO TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL’S HALL OF FAME 2016—This year’s inductees are the late Harry Morrison, co-founder of Morrison-Knudsen; and Faisal Shah, co-founder of MarkMonitor and longtime leader of Boise’s entrepreneurial community. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $110$125 ind., $850-$1,000 table for eight. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, idahotechcouncil.org.

On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: THE SHINING—All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, but costume contest with prizes and free popcorn if you take a carved pumpkin make this a fun night. 7 p.m. $9 online, $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3450454, boiseclassicmovies.com. GIRLS NIGHT OUT MALE REVUE—Ladies, make a date with the No. 1 male revue in the country. 8 p.m. $18-$50. The Shredder, 430 S. 10th, Boise, 208-345-4355, facebook.com/shredderboise. MUNDEK CLEMENT STEIN’S COMEDY SHOWCASE—8 p.m. $5. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise. com.

On Stage ALLEY REP: THE TOTALITARIANS—1 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

BLT: DRACULA—2 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN AMY MILLER—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Animals & Pets ZOO BOISE SPOOKTACULAR—5:30-8 p.m. FREE-$10. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise.org.

MONDAY OCT. 24 Festivals & Events CENTRAL BENCH NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING—Look ahead into the coming year, elect board leaders, select projects, apply for grants, and schedule neighborhood events. It’s an exciting time of brainstorming and collaboration, including updates on the proposed Maverik development and the future Franklin Park. 6 p.m. FREE. Wright Congregational Church, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-343-0292, wrightucc.com.

12 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | COVER AUCTION, 2016 | 13


1

Lauren Johnson, “On The Rocks,” Watercolor, Cover date: 10/7/2015

8

Suzanne Lee Chetwood, “Neo-Pangea,” Mixed-media, Cover date: 11/25/2015

Will Von Tagen, “Almosting It,” Photograph, Cover date: 10/14/2015

2

3

9

Mark Hardy, “Ecape from Burning Man,” Photograph, Cover date: 12/9/2015

Randy Van Dyck, “Apple Sider,” Acrylic, Cover date: 12/2/2015

Leslie Bock, “Hills,” Soft pastel on paper, Cover date: 10/21/2015

10

4

5

JanyRae Seda, “Bogus Basin Night Skiing,” Oil on canvas, Cover date: 11/4/2015

6

Bob Edgerly, “Port of Luminosity,” Oil on canvas, Cover date: 11/11/2015

7

11

12

13

14

Laura Yager, “Pumpkin, the Party Crasher,” Paper collage/mixed-media, Cover date: 10/28/2015

Francisco Telesfort, “Time,” Oil and acrylic on canvas, Cover date: 12/16/2015

Michelle Larsen, “Father Sun,” Oil on canvas with mixed media (tissue paper), Cover date: 12/23/2015

Katherine Grey, “Bison in Snow,” Linocut, Cover date: 12/30/2015

Tracie McBride, “Flower Garden,” Mixed-media glass mosaic, Cover date: 11/18/2015

Kelly Knopp, “Those old letters,” Watercolor and pen, Cover date: 1/6/2016

WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO?

15

Jennifer Manning, “Cock-a-doodle-blue, Boise!,” Letterpress and collage, Cover date: 1/13/2016

20

Sam Parry, “Shallow wheel thrown fruit bowl,” Ceramics, Cover date: 2/17/2016

16

Pat O’Hara, “Dressed in White,” Watercolor, Cover date: 1/20/2016

21

Jerri Lisk, “Code Breakers,” Acrylic on aluminum, Cover date: 2/24/2016

14 | COVER AUCTION, 2016 | BOISEweekly

17

Heather Bauer, “Departure,” Wax encaustic, Cover date: 1/27/2016

22

Betsie Richardson, “Wanda has all the right curves – everyone wants a piece.,” Oil on wood panel, Cover date: 3/2/2016

18

Martin Wilke, “Year of the Monkey,” India ink on archival paper, Cover date: 2/3/2016

Emily Wenner, “Fade,” Oil on canvas, Cover date: 2/10/2016

23

24

Tyrel and Heather Whitt, “Vintage Bubbles,” Mosaic glass on reclaimed door, Cover date: 3/9/2016

19

Alex Rhodes, “Usual Suspects,” India ink on bristol, Cover date: 3/16/2016

With the 15th annual Boise Weekly Cover Art Auction, we continue our mission to support local artists. Since its inception, our annual auction has raised more than $150,000 and made possible numerous public artworks, children’s educational programs, gallery shows and exhibitions. This year, we’re putting original work that appeared on the cover of BW over the past 12 months up for auction Wednesday, Oct. 19 at Jack’s Urban Meeting Place. Doors open at 5 p.m. and the auction action ramps up at 6 p.m. Admission costs $20 at the door and gets you in for an evening of bidding, wining and dining, with snacks and appetizers from local Chef Jered Couch and beer from Highlands Hollow Brewhouse. Following the auction, bring your event wristband across the street to Bonefish Grill (855 W. Broad St.) and enjoy $5 martinis. As in years past, a portion of proceeds from the sale of works will benefit the artists who created them; a portion will go toward BW’s Cover Auction Art Grant, which also supports local artists; and a piece of the pie will benefit BW’s journalistic mission. To apply for a grant, see the application and details at communityfund.boiseweekly.com. The deadline for grant applications is Friday, Feb. 10, 2017.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


25

Omaste Witkowski, “Endless Possibilities,” Acrylic print, Cover date: 3/23/2016

26

Wingtip Press, “Leftovers VI supporting Idaho Hunger Relief Task Force,” Fine art printmaking, relief, intaglio and planographic, Cover date: 3/30/2016

Rachel Teannalach, “tinyExpanse Boise,” Oil and wax on canvas, Cover date: 4/6/2016

32

Kristen Hill, “Composition in Symmetry,” Oil and medium on Arches oil paper, Cover date: 5/11/2016

33

S. E. Lisk, M. D., “Yellow Barn,” Color woodcut print, Cover date: 5/18/2016

34

John A. Briggs, “Summer Sun,” Digital art created on an iPad, Cover date: 5/25/2016

39

40

41

Frederick “Coyote” Choate, “Virtual World,” Oil on canvas, Cover date: 6/29/2016

Belinda Isley, “All They Ever Wanted Was To See The World,” Collage/assemblage, Cover date: 7/6/2016

27

Wil Kirkman, “The Seven Genders,” Glass and argon, Cover date: 7/13/2016

28

Karen Eastman, “Calla Leaf,” Oil, Cover date: 4/13/2016

Steven Santos, “Epiphytic Harmony,” Tree bark, tillandsia, Cover date: 4/20/2016

29

30

Shelley Jund, “Celebration of Corvid Courage,” Copper leaf and mixed-media on birch panel, Cover date: 4/27/2016

Don Winiecki, “ANA20140609111137 (Cloudy Concept),” Pigment ink on canvas 34,”w x 19,”h, Cover date: 5/4/2016

35

Tomas Montano, “Rosabel,” Mixed media on old shipping pallet, Cover date: 6/1/2016

36

Luz Camarena, “Tinta y Sangre; Blood and Ink,” Ink and acrylic on paper, Cover date: 6/8/2016

37

Shelby Chandler “Grove Cave,” Photograph, 6/15/2016

38

Adam Rosenlund, “Queen of the Solstice,” Ink and acrylic on wood panel, Cover date: 6/22/2016

42

43

44

45

Bob Neal (1961-2015), “Morning Constitutional,” Acrylic on paper, Cover date: 7/20/2016

Sean and Keana Hagerty, “Hope Sunrise,” Stained glass, Cover date: 7/27/2016

Kirsten Furlong, “Tweet and Dazzle,” Watercolor and ink drawing on paper, Cover date: 8/3/2016

31

Noi Thannoa, “Wading Through,” Oil on wood panel, Cover date: 8/10/2016

GRACIAS! MERCI!

46

Felicia Weston, “Bikini Bottom,” Oil on canvas panel, Cover date: 8/17/2016

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47

Annie Murphy, “Laughing Dog,” Acrylic on canvas, Cover date: 8/24/2016

48

Kinga Britschgi, “Tale of a City (Budapest),” Digital composite work, Cover date: 8/31/2016

49

Tracie McBride, “Unwavering Brilliance,” Mixed-media glass mosaic, Cover date: 9/7/2016

50

Barbara McCaslinSand, “Blood Moon Over Hot Springs trail,” Mixed-media collage, Cover date: 9/14/2016

51

Sam Abdul, “Old Man from Iraq,” Oil on canvas, Cover date: 9/21/2016

Thank you to all of our cover artists for their contributions. We would also like to thank D.L. Evans Bank, Evermore Printing, Zions Bank, Van Dyck Frame Design, Highlands Hollow Brewhouse, and JUMP. We appreciate your support.

BOISEweekly | COVER AUCTION, 2016 | 15


16 | COVER AUCTION, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY OCT. 19 AFROSONICS ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid BRANDON PRITCHETT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef BREAD AND CIRCUS—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers INDIGO GIRLS—8 p.m. $37.50$42.50. Egyptian

STEVE AND GRACE WALL BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Breakaway

FRIDAY OCT. 21

LIP SYNC BATTLE—8 p.m. FREE. Oak Barrel LUNG—With Tag Along Friend, Three Gunas and more locals TBA. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

ANDY BYRON AND THE LOST RIVER BAND—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s BAND OF HEATHENS—With Joe Fletcher and Weary Times. 7:30 p.m. $15. Neurolux CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE ELEMENTS OF HIP-HOP—8 p.m. $6-$12. Knitting Factory

KARAOKE—8 p.m. FREE. High Note

FIONA LURAY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

HAPPY DAPPLES—7 p.m. FREE. High Note THE LIKE ITS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

Margo Price MARGO PRICE—With William Tyler. 7 p.m. $15 adv., $17 door. The Olympic NED EVETT AND MUSIC BOX—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE The Monkees THE MONKEES: GOOD TIMES 50TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR— 7:30 p.m. $19.50. Morrison Center ORIGINAL JIM—6:30 p.m. FREE. The Edge SAFE IN SOUND—With Borgore, Snails, Terravita, and Eptic. 6 p.m. $25-$65. Revolution SPENCER BATT—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek STEVE EASTON— 5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TRUE WIDOW—With Low Lands. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

INDIGO GIRLS, OCT. 19, EGYPTIAN; GOO GOO DOLLS, OCT. 26, REVOLUTION

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

The folk-rock Indigo Girls and rock-rock Goo Goo Dolls have more in common than may be apparent at first glance. Members in both bands met in school, have been together (and active) for three decades, released albums in 1987 that were picked up by larger record companies in 1988, and both are world-renowned. IG and GGD are both such iconic acts, they’ve become part of our pop culture. From soundtrack inclusions to media mentions, references to the Indigo Girls have popped up in 30 Rock, The Office and South Park, while Goo Goo Dolls songs can be heard in TV shows and movies like 90210, Being Erica, Charmed, New Year’s Eve, Smallville and Transformers: Dark of the Moon. Last, but far from least, both iconic acts are performing in Boise on Wednesdays in October. Crazy, right? The Indigo Girls will fill the Egyptian Theatre with their dulcet harmonies on Oct. 19, while the Goo Goo Dolls will shake the walls when they rock out the Revolution Concert House on Oct. 26. —Amy Atkins

THURSDAY OCT. 20 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CINDER THURSDAY NIGHT LIVE—Bernie Rielly Band. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Cinder DEREK SCHAIBLE AND ASHLEY ROSE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. Pengilly’s KARL BLAU—With Lake. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux LIVE IN THE LOBBY—Featuring cosmic country music from Music Box. 5 p.m. FREE. The Owyhee OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Indigo Girls: 8 p.m., $38-$43, SOLD OUT. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. Goo Goo Dolls: With Safety Suit, 8 p.m., $35-$2,500 (seriously). Revolution Concert House, 4983 N. Glenwood St., 208-938-2933, cttouringid.com BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | 17


LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE OUTSIDE THE FRAME—10 p.m. $5. Reef QUINN VAN PAEPEGHEM TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers ROOFTOP REVOLUTION BENEFIT CONCERT—7:30 p.m. $25. Riverside Grand Ballroom SASSAFRAZZ—7:30 p.m. $12$15 adv., $15-$18 door. Sapphire TRAVELIN’ MILES—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

AFROSONICS, OCT. 19, RECORD EXCHANGE Globalization freaks people out—sometimes in a good way. As the world gets smaller, some people rejoice in new neighbors, the tastes of new food and, in the case of Boise band Afrosonics, the sound of new music. The local world fusion band is set to drop its new album, People Meet Your People, which, based on the lyrics, is all about the world getting smaller, embracing neighbors and getting freaky. The new album has a big, brassy, sexy sound, replete with the influences of reggae, jazz, electronica, funk and gospel. Join the band and new friends at The Record Exchange for the People Meet Your People release party, where you can pick up your copy of the album, which featuring nine original songs plus a bonus disc of remixes. —Harrison Berry 6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, reverbnation.com/afrosonics.

18 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

WESTWARD—With Atlas Novus. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

SATURDAY OCT. 22

TUESDAY OCT. 25

MAHAVIA FLAMENCO—7:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Sapphire MICHAEL HUNTER—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue

BOB LEARY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TAUGE AND FAULKNER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THIS END UP—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

SUNDAY OCT. 23 COSMONAUTS—With HiHazel and Urban Outfielders. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

Ben Folds BEN FOLDS: AND A PIANO—8 p.m. $32.50-$119. Knitting Factory CHUCK SMITH AND MISTY DAWN TAYLOR—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers EAGLE HIGH CHOIR FUNDRAISING DINNER AND CONCERT—6 p.m. $15-$25 adv., $25-$40 door. Eagle High

BERNIE REILLY BAND—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

CROWBAR CHILLED SUNDAYS—10 p.m. FREE. Crowbar

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH MISTY DAWN TAYLOR—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY OCT. 24

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 GHOST REVOLVER—7 p.m. FREE. High Note JARED AND THE MILL—With Edison and First Chair. 7 p.m. $12 adv., $15 door. Neurolux

1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

IDAHO SONGWRITERS FORUM WITH NED EVETT: SPOOKY, SPOOKY SONGS—6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: LOCH LOMOND—With Cult Bride and The Very Most. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux REBECCA SCOTT TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole WILLIE DALLAS—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

OPEN MIC NIGHT—6-9 p.m. FREE. Breakaway

ROB VERDI—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


WINESIPPER THE MANY MOODS OF MALBEC With so much so-so Malbec washing in from Argentina, it’s easy to take the variety for granted. Once a mainstay of Bordeaux red blends, it has fallen out of favor there. In France, only Cahors continues to champion the grape, but it was Argentina that rescued Malbec from obscurity, creating a surge in popularity. Eventually, supply outstripped demand, resulting in some less than stellar bottles imported to fill the gap. That said, as this tasting proved, good Malbec is hard to beat. 2013 CHÂTEAU LA GRAVE CAHORS, $14 The fruity aromas are a mix of dusty berry and spicy cedar. The palate is round, ripe and wellstructured with tangy cherry and red berry fruit wrapped around smooth tannins. With its velvety finish, this wine just gets better and better with time in the glass. For some six generations, La Grave has been crafting exceptional Malbec. 2013 HUSTON VINEYARDS MALBEC, $29 The nose is beautifully perfumed, offering spicy cherry and berry liqueur, vanilla bean and a kiss of oak. The savory flavors of dense berry fruit combine with intriguing layers of smooth oak, coffee, vanilla and licorice, while touches of pepper and leather come through on the finish. Cinder’s Melanie Krause crafts this outstanding Idaho Malbec for the Hustons. 2014 KAIKEN MALBEC RESERVA, $12 From this Argentine domaine, you get a wine with a healthy hit of oak backing the sweet berry aromas along with floral violet, anise, creamy coffee and black pepper. The ripe berry flavors are balanced by racy acidity and backed by dark chocolate and supple oak. Ripe tannins add grip to the finish—an amazing value. —David Kirkpatrick BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | 19


B L E EC KE R STRE E T F I LM S

SCREEN WHAT LIES BENEATH

Denial deconstructs one of history’s greatest liars GEORGE PRENTICE Imagine a lie so egregious, you could be jailed for spreading the deception. As many as 14 European nations have deemed Holocaust denial illegal; and, in the past decade, Austria, France, Germany and Hungary have sent at least 13 men and women to prison for insisting millions of prisoners were not murdered as part of Nazi Germany’s “Final Solution.” In the United States and United Kingdom, however, laws against Holocaust denial have been continually quashed, with many arguing free speech protections shelter such claims. Some even argue prosecuting Holocaust deniers elevates them to martyrdom. Denial, a new film from director Mick Jackson (Temple Grandin, The Bodyguard, L.A. Story), is based on a series of legal battles over Holocaust denial, which pitted denier David Irving against Penguin Books in a London courtroom. Irving sued Penguin and American There’s no denying the greatness, or importance of Denial, starring (left to right) Timothy Spall, Rachel Weisz and scholar Deborah Lipstadt for libel after the Tom Wilkinson. publication of her 1993 landmark best seller, Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory, in which she detailed Julius is expertly played in the film by anti-Zionist conspiracies. The Times of London his head, shouting, “I’ll give it to anyone who Andrew Scott, an actor well known to British can prove Hitler ordered the killing of the would eventually declare, “history had its day and American audiences alike for his role as Jews.” in court and scored a crushing victory,” but villain James Moriarty in BBC’s Sherlock. Also Denial is far from being the portrait of an only after Lipstadt discovered the burden of in the cast is Oscar-nominee Tom Wilkinson, anti-Semite, though—it never even tries to proof was on her: She had to prove the Holowho portrays barrister Richard Rampton, a deconstruct the psychology of Irving, a man caust happened. member of Lipstadt’s legal team. Early in the who dressed like an English gentleman, lived What makes Denial even more powerful film, Lipstadt learns about Britain’s two-tiered in the exclusive West London is that Lipstadt’s legal team legal system, which divides the defense team’s neighborhood of Mayfair and informed her neither she process between barristers and solicitors: soliciwas dubbed “a first-rate histonor any Holocaust surviDENIAL (PG-13) tors, such as Julius, formulate strategy, negotirian” by Sir John Keegan, famed vors would be called to the Opens Friday, Oct. 21 at The ate and craft legal documents, while barristers, British military historian and stand,“To win this case, Flicks knighted officer of the Order of such as Rampton, argue in court. which is about Holocaust Directed by Mick Jackson “This trial has importance over and above the British Empire. denial, Deborah Lipstadt Starring Rachel Weisz, Timothy and beyond itself,” said Lipstadt. “In an age Lipstadt, meanwhile, was will have to deny herself Spall, Tom Wilkinson and of relativism, kids grow up thinking ‘It must by her account, a “fish out the glory of standing up in Andrew Scott be true, I saw it on the internet.’ But not of water” in the British legal court and speaking to this everything can be true. There are not two system. “I had to learn to trust monster,” said Jackson at the my lawyers, keep quiet and have sides to every issue. Historians can debate how Toronto International Film the Holocaust took place; but the fact is, the Festival 2016 world premiere of Denial. “That faith in the process,” she told Boise Weekly at Holocaust happened.” the premiere. “My solicitor, Anthony Julius, act of self-denial is her only hope of beating History has already shown us Lipstadt was offered to take my case pro bono. He was Irving’s charges.” already famous for representing Princess Diana victorious in her now-legendary court battle. The movie opens with a fantastically realin her divorce case against the House of Wind- How she got there is the foundation of a life moment in which Irving (Timothy Spall) superb film. Denial should not be missed… or interrupts a lecture by Lipstadt (Oscar-winner sor. But now, he talks about my case as one of forgotten. Rachel Weisz) and waves $1,000 in cash above his most important.” 20 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN TOM DAVIS AND MARTIN FROST

Clinton vs. Trump, cable news and the partisan divide GEORGE PRENTICE

We may not see the likes of Tom Davis and Martin Frost in the chambers of Congress any time soon. The two former members of the U.S. House of Representatives—Davis represented northern Virginia for 14 years and Frost represented the Dallas-Fort Worth area for 26 years—came from opposite sides of the aisle: Davis is a staunch Republican and Frost is a diedin-the-wool Democrat. Yet, their years on Capitol Hill were distinguished by compromise and reasoned logic. More recently, they co-authored The Partisan Divide: Congress in Crisis (Fast Pencil Premiere, November 2014), a best-seller examining political differences not often bridged. On Thursday, Oct. 28, the pair will be keynote speakers at the annual Frank Church Conference on Public Affairs, dubbed “Politics and Prose.” Do you have a sense of whether more Americans are voting along party lines rather than for individual candidates? Davis: There’s a pattern where we’ve seen more straight party-line voting.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Frost: I think this election may be different and more unpredictable. Davis: Each presidential candidate is so unpopular but I still think, by and large, you’ll see mostly straight-ticket voting.

Davis: Martin and I have a saying: Liberal and conservative voters have passions. Moderate voters have lives, and moderates don’t tend to vote in primaries.

Is that why, when it comes time to govern, policy suffers—because so many of those Can you explain why once candidates are incumbents are afraid to compromise with elected, particularly to Congress, they a member of the other party? remain behind the wall of their political Frost: They don’t even want to be seen in parties? Is that out of fear of a primary public with the other party. But you really need challenge? to have compromise to get Frost: Extreme elements anything done. of your own party will chalDavis: eighty percent of the lenge you in a primary and 33RD ANNUAL FRANK CHURCH CONFERENCE ON PUBLIC AFFAIRS time we’ve had divided governthose extreme candidates ment in our nation. The way are usually fueled by money Thursday, Oct. 28, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Boise State Student Union, Simplot district lines are drawn for the from outside interests or Ballroom U.S. House of Representatives unreported dark sources. Conference is free and open to public. tend to favor Republicans. That makes things pretty The Senate’s Electoral College difficult for incumbents. divide gives Democrats a sigMost incumbents win their primaries but they do live in mortal fear of losing nificant, but not insurmountable, advantage. them.

Do you believe cable news contributes to the nation’s partisan divide? Tom: Between talk radio, the internet and cable news, you have different sets of Americans dealing with different sets of facts. Cable news is an offender, but not the only offender. Frost: But it’s a recent phenomenon. Some very smart people at Fox decided to build a cable news channel to cater to conservative folks. MSNBC did the same for liberals. They’ve both made a lot of money. Poor old CNN suffers when they go down the middle. I’m assuming you’ve decided whether you’ll be voting for Mrs. Clinton or Mr. Trump, but I’m curious about how enthused you are about your choice. Frost: I have no problem saying I’m for Hillary. Davis: I’m a Republican. I was a John Kasich supporter. We don’t always like the choices we get, but, ultimately, it’s about the direction of the country. That’s about all I’ll say on that.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | 21


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NYT CROSSWORD | EMOTION BY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS

26 Title for Palpatine or Amidala in “Star Wars”: Abbr. 27 Lose it 28 Novelist Pierre 29 Polynesian inn locale, maybe 31 Unnerve 33 Revision that satisfies both author and publisher? 35 Offspring 38 Jog the memory of 40 Amer. money 41 U.F.O. pilots

1 Full of sound and fury 8 Shampooing, e.g. 16 Hemsworth of “The Hunger Games” 20 Mine craft? 21 Endanger 22 ____-European 23 Goodyear’s carefully guarded secrets? 25 Neutral tone 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

20

13

14

15

16

36

28

38 43

48

39

61

44

45

63

72

76

64

58

65

82 88 94

52 59

66 69

73

74

77

81

83

84

89

79

85

86

90

95 101

105

97

102

103

106 113

87

98 104

107

108

111

112

117

118

119

120

121

122

22 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

80

91

96

114

115

116

109

74 Absorbs 76 Count in Lemony Snicket books 77 Director’s circle? 78 Reaction to a puppy video, say 79 First in command? 81 Nurse 83 ____ Kringle 84 Dating site? 88 Dependent (on) 90 Unleavened cornbread 91 Makeup of many a tribal council 92 “Eww!” 95 El ____ 96 Ones making lots of bucks? 98 Sap 99 Privileged time period? 103 Mulligans, e.g. 105 Purveyor 106 Make or break, e.g. 107 Nary ____ 108 Team V.I.P. 111 Flock 112 Color used by teams from both San Jose and Jacksonville? 117 Like much of Chile 118 Strict disciplinarian 119 Rehnquist’s successor as chief justice 120 Unit of force 121 Self-government 122 Place to rub elbows?

DOWN

75

78

100

54

47 51

68

71

93

46

57

67

53

41

50

62

19

30

40

56 60

18

34

49

55

29

33

37

17

25

32

42

99

12

22

27 31

92

11

24

26

70

10

57 Country with the smallest national capital in the European Union (about 9,000 people) 59 Fall times: Abbr. 60 Scalawag 63 Result of a Morton’s factory explosion? 67 Eng. or hist. 68 Strange and unsettling 69 “Stay” singer Lisa 70 Skater boys?

21

23

35

9

42 “Would you like me to?” 44 Be inclined (to) 45 Increases 48 What a pianist uses for tripletime pieces? 50 “Principia Discordia” figure 51 ____ donna 55 Ready 56 Japanese honorific

110

1 Follower of John 2 Rhyme for “door” and “more” in the first verse of “The Raven” 3 Gone flat? 4 Giving chicken soup or a foot rub, informally 5 Comics exclamation 6 Get in the loop? 7 Money in 74-Down 8 URL start 9 Reaction to a foot rub 10 Country whose capital is known to natives as Baile Átha Cliath 11 Related in a different way 12 Magna ____ 13 Got room service, say 14 Mens ____

15 Like the coda of “Hey Jude,” seemingly 16 Feudal superior 17 12 9 11 5 20 8 9 19 3 12 21 5 18 Adept 19 Gun supporters 24 Something not picked up at the beach 30 Make sense 31 “Mr.” of “Star Trek” 32 Athlete on Time’s list of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century 33 Hamstring 34 Ridge with a gentle slope on one side and a steep slope on the other 35 Ideologies 36 One starting 37 You might wish upon it 39 Chaps 43 “Hey, whatever pays the bills” 45 Is annoying 46 The “palm” and “olive” of Palmolive 47 Orwellian hoi polloi 49 Malicious fictional computer 50 Something to shoot off 52 Kind of challenge 53 N.Y.C. org. that operates 24/7 54 Pose 58 Words before a chivalrous act 61 Try to win 62 “The Price Is Right” airer 63 Diamond’s Lou 64 Orchestra section 65 “… ____ he drove out of sight” 66 Blouse, e.g. 701 /, 2/, 3/, etc. 71 “Da ____ G Show” 72 Retirement- community restriction 73 Give a heads-up

101 Turn inside out 102 “Goody!” 104 Ornamentation 107 Part of D.A.: Abbr. 108 Swamp 109 Nov. honorees 110 Covert “Hey!” 113 Torque symbol 114 Like “alumna”: Abbr. 115 49-Down, with each letter shifted one place later in the alphabet (coincidence?) 116 Thrice, in prescriptions

74 Neighbor of Den. 75 Equals 78 Was humiliated 80 Place to buy handmade goods online 82 Ecological role 84 What Artemis is the goddess of 85 ____ Taylor (apparel store) 86 Pet food brand 87 Nutrition amts. 89 Model for an artist, maybe 90 For free 92 Bleak assessment of a situation 93 Optimistic 94 Temperature unit 96 “God Bless America” composer 97 Term of address with a tilde 100 Partner in crime L A S T C L A S P

L A M A R

A L E R O

A A M C O

B L O O D

J I B E

O R Y X

H O M M E A L O N E

F R A N

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P E G A C R R I C A A C E N S E D T H E O R R E H A S M Y Z E S T O H O U T O T I N J N A G E E S S A S R A V I E Z E I T A G E G N C A

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

G O I S I N S N S U D E L A T N T A E R E D S V O T P J O S O E

S O P H I S M

A D E L P H I

A S I G U R S I E N I S E T S S R I S N O T I O T I T S Q S

G N U

S T O P S I N

G A L A H A D

T R I T O N S

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I M P A L E D

N I O B E N U T

Y E R

Z A P S P R E A O W T S O P H R E E E D I T S A D O O I M B S I O R N L A O P T T H E I D E S

O R E A D

R Y A N

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O N E S

A S I N

P H A T

D V D S

S A L E M S L O O T

S E I N E

A D D E R

R I D E S

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M E M O

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Enjoy a relaxing massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492.

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SACRED BODY CARE For Relaxation Call Ami at 208-6976231. ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377.

HOUSING BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!

CLASSIFIEDS BW FREE FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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BW PETS CONSIDER HAPPY JACK CATS Happy Jack Cats, Inc. was founded in 2015 by individuals concerned for the welfare of “throw away” kittens and cats in the Treasure Valley. With a strong foster program made up of skilled volunteers in homes throughout the area, all funding for HJC is out-of-pocket or has come from small donations and re-homing fees. Kittens are fixed, vaccinated, micro-chipped and ready to go! For more info please visit our website: www. happyjackcats.org. GENTLE GOODBYES Our goal at Gentle Goodbyes is to allow you to peacefully say goodbye to your pet in the privacy, comfort and familiarity of your own home. All euthanasia’s are performed at your home by a licensed veterinarian who is accompanied by a veterinary assistant. Our home euthanasia services are by appointment only. For more information: www.gentlegoodbyes.com or call 297-3990.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

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ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

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E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com FAWN: I’m the sweetest old lady kitty you’ll ever meet and I can out-purr all of the youngsters.

BELLATRIX: I’m a quiet, beautiful queen, looking for a new kingdom to rule.

GARVER: I am an independent guy but I also love to be pet and snuggled.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. LEANNE: 3-year-old, female, border collie/ Siberian husky mix. Easy-going, appears sociable with people and other dogs. (Kennel 410 – #33629658)

TANGERINE: 9-year-old, female, Chihuahua. Bonds easily and is happy to be a snuggle buddy. Could learn some commands. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #4746869)

WALTER: 10-year-old, male, Labrador retriever mix. Easy-going and loving. Still needs more training. Gets along well with other dogs. (Kennel 406 – #33504092)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT MOMMA: 2-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Calm and gentle. Still young and playful. Needs to spend the night to be spayed. (Cage 106 – #33658645)

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RAMI QUAZI: 4-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Content to curl up on your lap and relax. Loves head scratches. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #33373602)

SHIRLEY: 1½-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Loves to be petted, held and even carried. Needs to spend the night to be spayed. (Cage 108 – #33536157)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

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Publish your Legal Notices in the Boise Weekly Boise Weekly offers a flat rate as determined by the state of Idaho, which includes the Affidavit of Publication that will be mailed to you upon the last date of publication of your notice. If more convenient for you, the affidavit can also be available for you to pick up at our office on the last date of publication. *No Charge for Notarized Affidavit • *No Charge for Tear Sheets or Mailing

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WILL YOUR REALTOR GIVE YOU 30% OF THEIR COMMISSION? HOMEBUYER REBATES AVAILABLE. BROKER WITH 25 YEARS EXPERIENCE. BBB ACCREDITED. TRACT REALTY INC. CALL MICHAEL (208)401-5949

For more information or to post your legal notice, contact Classifieds at Boise Weekly.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the 1980s, two performance artists did a project entitled A Year Tied Together at the Waist. For 12 months, Linda Montano and Tehching Hsieh were never farther than eight feet away from each other, bound by a rope. Hsieh said he tried this experiment because he felt very comfortable doing solo work, but wanted to upgrade his abilities as a collaborator. Montano testified that the piece “dislodged a deep hiddenness” in her. It sharpened her intuition and gave her a “heightened passion for living and relating.” If you were ever going to engage in a comparable effort to deepen your intimacy skills, Aries, the coming weeks would be a favorable time to attempt it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the coming weeks would you prefer that we refer to you as “voracious”? Or do you like the word “ravenous” better? I have a feeling that you will be extra eager to consume vast quantities of just about everything: food, information, beauty, sensory stimulation, novelty, pleasure and who knows what else. Please keep this in mind: Your hunger could be a torment or a gift. Which way it goes may depend on your determination to actually enjoy what you devour. In other words, don’t get so enchanted by the hypnotic power of your longing that you neglect to exult in the gratification when your longing is satisfied.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When the wind blows at ten miles per hour, a windmill generates eight times more power than when the breeze is five miles per hour. Judging from the astrological omens, I suspect there will be a similar principle at work in your life during the coming weeks. A modest increase in effort and intensity will make a huge difference in the results you produce. Are you willing to push yourself a bit beyond your comfort level in order to harvest a wave of abundance? CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cuthbert Collingwood (1748-1810) had a distinguished career as an admiral in the British navy, leading the sailors under his command to numerous wartime victories. He was also a good-natured softie whose men regarded him as generous and kind. Between battles, while enjoying his downtime, he hiked through the English countryside carrying acorns, which he planted here and there so the “Navy would never want for oaks to build the fighting ships upon which the country’s safety depended.” (Quoted in Life in Nelson’s Navy, by Dudley Pope.) I propose that we make him your role model for the coming weeks. May his example inspire you to be both an effective warrior and a tender soul who takes practical actions to plan for the future.

24 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Eighteenth-century musician Giuseppe Tartini has been called “the godfather of modern violin playing.” He was also an innovative composer who specialized in poignant and poetic melodies. One of his most famous works is the Sonata in G Minor, also known as the Devil’s Trill. Tartini said it was inspired by a dream in which he made a pact with the Devil to provide him with new material. The Infernal One picked up a violin and played the amazing piece that Tartini transcribed when he woke up. Here’s the lesson for you: He didn’t actually sell his soul to the Devil. Simply engaging in this rebellious, taboo act in the realm of fantasy had the alchemical effect of unleashing a burst of creative energy. Try it! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The planets have aligned in a curious pattern. I interpret it as meaning that you have cosmic permission to indulge in more self-interest and self-seeking than usual. So it won’t be taboo for you to unabashedly say, “What exactly is in it for me?” or “Prove your love, my dear” or “Gimmeee gimmeee gimmee what I want.” If someone makes a big promise, you shouldn’t be shy about saying, “Will you put that in writing?” If you get a sudden urge to snag the biggest piece of the pie, obey that urge.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the course of her long career, Libran actress Helen Hayes won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy and a Tony. Years before all that glory poured down on her, she met playwright Charles MacArthur at a party in a posh Manhattan salon. Hayes was sitting shyly in a dark corner. MacArthur glided over to her and slipped a few salted peanuts into her hand. “I wish they were emeralds,” he told her. It was love at first sight. A few years after they got married, MacArthur bought Hayes an emerald necklace. I foresee a metaphorically comparable event in your near future, Libra: peanuts serving as a promise of emeralds. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Welcome to the Painkiller Phase of your cycle. It’s time to relieve your twinges, dissolve your troubles, and banish your torments. You can’t sweep away the whole mess in one quick heroic purge, of course. But I bet you can pare it down by at least 33 percent. (More is quite possible.) To get started, make the following declaration five times a day for the next three days: “I am grateful for all the fascinating revelations and indispensable lessons that my pain has taught me.” On each of the three days after that, affirm this truth five times: “I have learned all I can from my pain, and therefore no longer need its reminders. Goodbye, pain.” On the three days

after that, say these words, even if you can’t bring yourself to mean them with complete sincerity: “I forgive everybody of everything.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For the foreseeable future, you possess the following powers: to make sensible that which has been unintelligible... to find amusement in situations that had been tedious... to create fertile meaning where before there had been sterile chaos. Congratulations, Sagittarius! You are a first-class transformer. But that’s not all. I suspect you will also have the ability to distract people from concerns that aren’t important... to deepen any quest that has been too superficial or careless to succeed... and to ask the good questions that will render the bad questions irrelevant. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the past 11 months, did you ever withhold your love on purpose? Have there been times when you “punished” those you cared about by acting cold and aloof? Can you remember a few occasions when you could have been more generous or compassionate, but chose not to be? If you answered yes to any of those questions, the next three weeks will be an excellent time to atone. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you can reap maximum benefit from correcting stingy mistakes. I suggest that you make

gleeful efforts to express your most charitable impulses. Be a tower of bountiful power. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1415, a smaller English army defeated French forces at the Battle of Agincourt in northern France. Essential to England’s victory were its 7,000 longbowmen—archers who shot big arrows using bows that were six feet long. So fast and skilled were these warriors that they typically had three arrows flying through the air at any one time. That’s the kind of highpowered proficiency I recommend that you summon during your upcoming campaign. If you need more training to reach that level of effectiveness, get it immediately. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let’s imagine your life as a novel. The most recent chapter, which you’ll soon be drawing to a close, might be called “The Redemption of Loneliness.” Other apt titles: “Intimacy with the Holy Darkness” or “The Superpower of Surrender” or “The End Is Secretly the Beginning.” Soon you will start a new chapter, which I’ve tentatively dubbed “Escape from Escapism,” or perhaps “Liberation from False Concepts of Freedom” or “Where the Wild Things Are.” And the expansive adventures of this next phase will have been made possible by the sweet-and-sour enigmas of the past four weeks.

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Legal Name Lora Dawn Ireland Case No. CV 01 1617234 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Lora Dawn Ireland, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Yiska Forest Hugo. The reason for the change in name is personal. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Nov. 3, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Sept. 19, 2016 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEBBIE NAGELE PUB Sept. 28, Oct. 5, 12 & 19 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Legal Name Tiffany Lynn Pharr Case No. CV 01 1616982

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NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Tiffany Lynn Pharr, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Zoie Rose Pharr. The reason for the change in name is: my previous name no longer reflects who I am. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Nov. 15, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Sept. 14, 2016 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Sept. 28, Oct. 5, 12 & 19 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Kyle Mackenzie Jack Derow Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1618468 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Kyle Mackenzie Derow, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Kira Mackenzie Derow. The reason for the change in name is: to make my chosen name my legal name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Dec. 13, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Oct. 3, 2016 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Oct. 12, 19, 26 & Nov. 2 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Joshua Edward Pecchia

Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1618327 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Joshua Edward Pecchia, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Jamie Caprice Minette. The reason for the change in name is: they are transgender. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Dec. 1, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Oct. 4, 2016 DEBBIE NAGELE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Oct. 19, 26 Nov. 2, & 9 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Indica Callahan Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1617079 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(minor) A Petition to change the name of Indica Callahan, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Andica Callahan. The reason for the change in name is: “Indica” is becoming a popular term for marijuana. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Nov. 15, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Sept. 14, 2016 DEBBIE NAGELE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Oct. 19, 26 Nov. 2, & 9

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Russell Lee Hansen Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1618390 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(adult) A Petition to change the name of Russell Lee Hansen, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Renee Leeann Hansen. The reason for the change in name is: personal reasons. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Dec. 13, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Oct. 03, 2016 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Oct. 19, 26 Nov. 2, & 9

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | 25


PAGE BREAK THE MORAL MACHINE

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

While self-driving vehicle technology is still being refined, one crucial task is developing “machine intelligence”—a fancy way of describing the kinds of decisions a driverless car will have to make as it navigates complicated infrastructure. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a method for “gathering a human perspective on moral decisions made by machine intelligence,” by presenting a series of choices that could potentially face a driverless car whose brakes have failed. Which is preferable? A driverless vehicle plows into a crowd of jaywalking moralmachine.mit.edu runners or avoids the pedestrians and kills a family with three children? Characters in the scenarios go beyond age and gender to include weight, profession and socioeconomic status—even throwing in animals. At the conclusion of the battery of choices, users are given their results: how important was it to save a larger number of lives, protect passengers or uphold the law? They’re tough choices, but if we can’t face them, should we really be asking machines to make them for us? —Zach Hagadone

“TRUSTY SIDEKICK”

DEAR MINERVA, I recently got out of a long-term, same-sex relationship. I’m back on the dating scene and looking for a new lady friend. During my last relationship, I got used to using a specific toy. It worked well for me to get the job done and I want to know: Do I retire my trusty sidekick or can he come along for the ride? Sincerely, —The Dynamic Duo

DEAR DYNAMIC DUO, So you want to jump back in the saddle with your trusty comrade. I think there are a couple of ways to approach this. If money isn’t a concern, perhaps buy the same model. Doing this will let you still work your magic with the same tool you are used to but one without so much “herstory.” This will keep your mattress mojo consistent. If money is an issue, sterilize your old standby. I’m sure you know the BUZZ regarding sex toy maintenance and sterilization. For those who don’t, a quick Google search should tell you what you need to know. Of course, the fun route might be to go on a shopping expedition with your new special someone and you can pick something out that not only works for you but for her body, too. This will also give you a fresh start with something that doesn’t have so many emotional and sexual memories associated with it. Don’t start things off toying with her emotions. There is a whole world of gadgetry at your fingertips. Wishing you good vibrations! SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

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FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

Taken by instagram user patticus12.

FROM THE POLL VAULT

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2.  3.  4.  5. 

“FOR ALL KINGS,” ANTHRAX

“EPONYM,” SFM-STEVE FULTON MUSIC

“TRANSCENDENCE,” DEVIN TOWNSEND PROJECT “REVOLUTION RADIO,” GREEN DAY “22 A MILLION,” BON IVER

6. 7.  8.  9.  10.

Should Hillary Clinton be the subject of an investigation by the U.S. attorney general?

“THE REVEALER,” JESSE DAYTON

“REDEMPTION AND RUIN,” THE DEVIL MAKES THREE “DAY BREAKS,” NORAH JONES

Yes: 37.88% No: 60.67% I don’t know: 1.45%

“BLUE MOUNTAIN,” BOB WEIR “THE VIOLENT SLEEP OF REASON,” MESHUGGAH

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to be a scientif ic s a mp l e o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

162 MILLION

43%

21

49

54%

30%

74.4%

$106 MILLION

Number of females in the United States in 2014, compared to 157 million males.

Percentage of eligible female U.S. voters who cast ballots in the 2014 election, compared to 40.8 percent of eligible male voters.

Number of Fortune 500 companies with women serving as chief executive officer in 2016.

Number of women who have been awarded a Nobel Prize since 1901 out of a total of 881 individual honorees.

Percentage of women in a 2008 survey who reported experiencing some form of workplace sexual harassment.

Percentage of sexual harassment claims filed to EEOC by women.

Amount of damages recovered on behalf of claimants who filed sexual harassment charges with EEOC in FY 2014.

(nobelprize.org)

(Association of Women for Action and Research)

Percentage of charges filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission related to sexual harassment in fiscal year 2014.

(U.S. Census)

(infoplease.com)

26 | OCTOBER 19–25, 2016 | BOISEweekly

(fortune.com)

(eeoc.gov)

(eeoc.gov)

(eeoc.gov)

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Profile for Boise Weekly

Boise Weekly Vol.25 Issue 18  

Cover Art Auction: See a Catalog of All the Art Going on the Block at the 15th Annual BW Cover Art Auction.

Boise Weekly Vol.25 Issue 18  

Cover Art Auction: See a Catalog of All the Art Going on the Block at the 15th Annual BW Cover Art Auction.