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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

OCTOBER 12–18, 2016

VO L U M E 2 5 , I S S U E 1 7

“Zombies were so last-year. This year, it’s children in peril.”

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Participación

This election may bring more Idaho Latino voters to the polls

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Frankentrees

A new art exhibit uses burned trees from the Pioneer wildfire to illustrate the fragility of forests

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SCREEN 19

Workout, Dine Out

Housed in an Eagle gym, a new Korean restaurant is earning fans of both fitness and food

FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Sami Edge, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Nicole LeFavour Interns: Annelise Eagleton, Alexandra Nelson Advertising Account Executives: Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Ryan Johnson, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Bill Hagler, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE CHECK OUT OUR NEW BEER MAGAZINE, PLUS A PASSEL OF NEWS, SCREEN AND ARTS COVERAGE We covered a lot of ground in this edition of Boise Weekly. First, open to the center of the paper and you’ll find a brand-new glossy magazine we’re launching this week devoted to the ambrosia of the fields: beer. In our inaugural Brew Times publication, we aim to provide insight into the local brewing industry, explore beer trends, offer profiles of the folks who make the beer scene thrive and otherwise celebrate the sudsy tipple, which has enjoyed a much-deserved (and fortunate) renaissance both here and across the nation. We hope you crack a cold one, cool your heels, and enjoy a fine craft brew along with our newest offering. Elsewhere in the paper, BW freelancer Sami Edge delves into the issue of low voter turnout among Idaho Latinos. That might change this year, with a particularly heated presidential race that has included outrageous comments from the GOP nominee about immigration in general and Latinos in particular. Still, members of the large and growing population of Idaho Latinos struggle to find candidates at the state and local levels who will address their issues, much less represent them. Learn more about what’s being done to energize the voting base on Page 6. On Page 7, BW Staff Writer Harrison Berry outlines the longstanding feud between a Canyon County Highway District commissioner and his neighbors, who contend he has been illegally trashing his property for decades. On Page 18, Berry also profiles a provocative art exhibit coming to Ming Studios that explores humans’ impact on forests by bringing the Pioneer fire into the gallery—literally. We also spoke with the organizers of the Idaho Horror Film Festival on Page 19, visited a Korean restaurant inside a gym in Eagle on Page 20 and talked immigration with a local lawyer on Page 24. Finally, in a nod to future events, save the date for Wednesday, Oct. 19, when BW will host its 15th annual Cover Art Auction at Jack’s Urban Meeting Place. Get more details at boiseweekly.com or in next week’s paper. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Ellen DeAngelis TITLE: “Kelsey’s Fox” MEDIUM: Watercolor ARTIST STATEMENT: I wear many, many hats... but the artist hat gets the least wear. I’m working to fix that. 

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

FAITH AND CONSEQUENCES SO - CALLED “FAITH HE ALING” WAS BACK IN THE NE WS, WITH A STATEHOUSE PANEL TAKING UP E XEMPTIONS THAT PROTECT PARENTS FROM PROSECUTION SHOULD THEIR C HI L D D I E F RO M L AC K O F M E D I C A L CARE BASED ON RELIGIOUS BELIEFS. TESTIMONY WAS SPLIT BUT ALL OF IT WAS EMOTIONALLY CHARGED. GE T MORE AT NE WS/CIT YDESK.

ANIMAL WRONGS The University of Idaho is still dealing with the fallout from a program to euthanize stray animals on the Moscow campus. Get the latest details on the controversy at News/Citydesk.

WRITE STUFF The third annual Death Rattle Writers Festival celebrated its third annual installment, with speakers, workshops, readings and other events in Nampa. See how it went down at Arts/Lit.

STATE OF TRANSIT Valley Regional Transit was awarded $279,000 from the feds Oct. 11 to pursue public transportation changes on State Street. Find more details on the grant at News/ Citydesk.

OPINION

4 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION FROM THE FAR MARGINS You people are a threat to us NICOLE LEFAVOUR Let’s say your people were being shot in the streets. By “your people” I mean people of Polish descent, Irish people, northern Idahoans, those born in Chicago or Mountain Home; people with brown hair and blue eyes; fathers with three children; people who served in Vietnam; members of the LDS church or Catholics—your people, whomever they are, are being shot in the streets of Boise and other cities on an oddly frequent basis. What would you do? Your people are 10 percent of the population and they make up 40 percent of those shot dead. For whatever reason, Americans spent their childhoods steeped in television portraying your people as slackers, welfare-mooching drug dealers, murderers and criminals. Your people were always the bad guys in the movies or the expendable ones who got shot or somehow died before the film was over. When there were heroes in movies and cartoons, they never looked like your people; never sounded like you, never had your address, hair color, pictures of the pope in a locket or wore your sacramental underwear. They were the bad guys. So as anyone would do, some Americans— including those who would become police officers—came into adolescence with the idea that you aren’t quite human the same way they are. It’s true a few of your people made it onto the police force. They came to see themselves as exceptions to the rule. They were, like everyone else, doing their job; following through on calls from respectable neighborhoods when your people showed up to a party or to visit a friend and someone was afraid an evildoer was there to rob, rape, pillage or sell drugs to their children. It was a tragedy. Everyone was afraid of your people. It became harder for your people to get jobs or rent houses in nice places. Schools where your people lived decayed because the others were afraid to teach there. Your youth lost hope when the college entrance exams reflected others’ lives, not yours. Your kids began believing they were worth nothing. Some did like downtrodden teens everywhere do—they did drugs and grew angry. Every time they did and were caught doing something wrong, they were held up as examples of the truth behind the stereotypes surrounding your people. Ten times as many kids of other groups could be breaking into homes and stealing stereos to support meth habits, but your kids were the ones who made news. The media likes to have a bogeyman for us to fear because we watch more television when we’re afraid. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Anchors loved the close-ups of your angry faces and your fists in the air when you protested. If one car was set on fire, it was broadcast nationwide. Every time one of your people was shot, your people grew more angry. It was bad enough the way you were portrayed in the media. It was bad enough how much everyone was growing to hate you. But we—the others—said the shootings, violence and hostility wasn’t our fault—and that made you more angry. More of your people began to march and gather in the streets after shootings. Even the old and respectable, the movie stars and sports figures who looked like you took up symbolic acts of protest to say, peacefully, this is unjust. So we called you terrorists. In little towns, your children painted murals in parking lots calling out the injustice but they, too, were seen as engaging in acts of unpatriotic dissension. Their murals were erased and groups formed to oppose you. They secretly talked about lynching your people. They joked privately about violence and eradication. Because we, too, had slowly grown to fear you, we said nothing. We let the mobs of those who hated you roam the streets with flags symbolizing your death. We let them fly. We let the mobs roam, armed and open. We defended their First Amendment right to say you deserved death. We let schools and police curtail your First Amendment rights. It all spiraled down. Mobs fought mobs and more people were shot “defending themselves” from those not like them. We hungered for news of our safety. If your people were protesting in our communities or if your people lived in our neighborhoods, we wanted to know who was policing you. Some advocated that your people be rounded up. After all, budding terrorism cannot be allowed to exist anywhere. Your people could not be allowed to exist free to roam—because who knew what you might do, you people of Polish descent, you Irish, northern Idahoans, Chicagoans, people with brown hair and blue eyes, fathers, Vietnam vets, members of that church. You people. We believed we were not safe around you. We believed the world would be better without you. It was a lie. All you wanted was to live in peace, but we are a fearful people. We love guns when they’re in our hands less when they are in your hands. We love our First Amendment when it protects our speech and right to address our government with grievances—not so much when it’s used to say we’re guilty of some kind of travesty or mistake. And we are guilty of a mistake. We’re guilty. Listen to what you hear. BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 5


CITYDESK

SAMI EDGE

NEWS

SU VOTO CUENTA (YOUR VOTE COUNTS)

Step right up and participate in democracy.

HERE’S THE ‘FOOD TRUCK VOTING’ SCHEDULE When Boise Weekly first reported in August on something called “food truck voting,” the concept grabbed quite a bit of attention, with scores of U.S. blogs and even Food and Wine Magazine repeating the news. No food will be served, but Ada County officials are hoping more than a few voters will take their lunch hours to visit the latest innovation to gin up voter participation. If trends hold, Ada County Chief Deputy Clerk Phil McGrane said, “There’s every reason to believe that we’ll see a record number of early voters.” Now, officials have rolled out the schedule for the custom-designed mobile voting precinct, which will visit no fewer than 11 locations, beginning with the Ada County Courthouse on Monday, Oct. 17. The rest of the schedule is: Tuesday, Oct. 18—Blue Cross of Idaho; Wednesday, Oct. 19 and Thursday, Oct. 20—Micron; Friday, Oct. 2—Saint Alphonsus Hospital in the morning and the Veterans Administration campus in the afternoon; Monday, Oct. 24—Star Library; Tuesday, Oct. 25—Hewlett Packard; Wednesday, Oct. 26—Idaho Power; Thursday, Oct. 27—Albertsons in Kuna; Friday, Oct. 28—Boise State University; and Monday, Oct. 31-Friday, Nov. 4—the corner of Eighth and Bannock streets in downtown Boise. The mobile polling location will be in addition to “fixed’ early voting sites at the Ada County Elections Office, Boise City Hall, Meridian City Hall and Eagle Senior Center from Monday, Oct. 17 through Friday, Nov. 4. The best time to vote? Believe it or not, it’s the lunch hour. McGrane said he “never would have thought that was true,” but statistics indicate noon-1 p.m. is when the fewest number of people vote in Ada County. “I guess a lot of people were thinking the polls were busy when, in fact, they weren’t,” McGrane said. —George Prentice 6 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Latinos in Idaho grapple with election rhetoric, little representation SAMI EDGE Ruby Mendez has been politically inclined for as long as she can remember. Growing up in Boise, she remembers watching marches, protests and rallies on Spanish-language TV networks with a sort of reverence. As a child, she learned about the importance of voting from her grandfather, who still works as a poll watcher in Mexico. Even so, when representatives of Idaho Latino Vote spoke in Mendez’s classroom during her freshman year at the College of Western Idaho, she recalls being nervous and wondering if she should tell them she wasn’t registered to vote. “It was all just so new to me,” she said. Mendez decided to tell them the truth and discovered a passion for political engagement. Throughout college, she volunteered her time helping others register to vote and has spent the past three years conducting Latino voter outreach with the Idaho Community Action Network, a nonprofit social justice organization. Mendez has lost count of the days she’s spent at cultural festivals, citizenship ceremonies or—clipboard in hand—standing on sidewalks registering voters. She’s armed with a wide smile and a bilingual message: “Your Vote Counts. Su Voto Cuenta.” “If our legislators and state representatives don’t know what our concerns are, then we’re doing a disservice to others and to ourselves,” said Mendez. “We cannot make change if we don’t express our vote.” There are approximately 80,000 eligible Latino voters in Idaho, but turnout has been historically low. National statistics say only 48 percent of Latinos voted in the last presidential election. “There’s a huge power gap when it comes to voting in Idaho,” explains Terri Sterling, executive director of ICAN. “There are many more eligible Latinos than actually register.” In the U.S., a record 27.3 million Latinos are eligible to vote this year, and there’s speculation that both harsh anti-immigration rhetoric by

Ruby Mendez: “If our legislators and state representatives don’t know what our concerns are, then we’re doing a disservice to others and to ourselves. We cannot make change if we don’t express our vote.”

GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump and voter registration campaigns by groups like Spanish media conglomerate Univision Communications might prompt a higher-than-typical Latino voter turnout in 2016. In Idaho, nonpartisan groups like ICAN and the Community Council of Idaho are working to help Latinos register and show up at the polls, but some political scientists and community leaders say it can be difficult to encourage Latinos to vote if they don’t feel their concerns are being taken up at the statehouse. “I don’t see the Latino community being motivated to come out until there are issues [and] candidates that are really going to get them interested in politics and make a difference in their lives,” said Dr. Jasper LiCalzi, chair of the College of Idaho Department of Political Economy. But Humberto Fuentes, president of the Hispanic Cultural Center in Nampa, said there is a particularly high interest in this year’s presidential election. He said citizenship classes are more popular than ever, which he chalks up to people wanting to vote. Fuentes knows a number of Latinos are motivated by the possibility of Trump in the White House, but it’s in local elections he thinks Latinos need more encouragement to vote. “We don’t have a lot of role models at the state level,” Fuentes said. “A lot of folks have given up. That is very bad for us.” Fuentes points to the recent election in Wilder, where the Canyon County community voted in its first all-Latino city council. He sees this as evidence of what can happen when Latinos show up at the polls in substantial numbers. He said he’s particularly hopeful Latino children will be politically active when they’re old enough to vote—according to the most recent census, there are 75,000 Latinos in Idaho under the age of 18,

nearly as many as there are eligible voters. “We keep going forward,” Fuentes said. Maria Mabbutt, a candidate for the Idaho House of Representatives in District 12 A, who is challenging incumbent Rep. Robert Anderst (RNampa), said she thinks it is “quite tragic” Latinos are 12 percent of Idaho’s population yet hold only a few seats in the Legislature—two lawmakers, Sen. Michelle Stennett (D-Ketchum) and Sen. Roy Lacey (D-Pocatello) claim Hispanic heritage, according to Mabbutt. Having worked for other campaigns and nonprofits, Mabbutt said “there is a human tendency of apathy” if people feel their voice isn’t heard.” Mabbutt also believes the most important thing for Latino voters is providing whatever assistance they need to cast well-informed votes. “The numbers show that turnout is not very high in local elections,” she said. “It is really sad that a low percentage of voters decide who governs here in Idaho. That’s why we must be engaged.” Engagement is one objective of the Community Council of Idaho, a “rural-centered, multi-service” nonprofit serving Latinos. The organization educates its membership about civic commitment and offers incentives for assisting with voter registration, helps with absentee ballot sign ups and provides transportation and translation services for voters. “It is so essential for our community to understand the power and the strength we have,” said CCI Communications Specialist Leticia Ruiz. “There is potential that’s there for greatness if we empower ourselves by voting.” On a recent blustery day in September, 7 ICAN Director Terri Sterling and volunteer Kathryn McNary stood outside the BOISE WEEKLY.COM


KE L S E Y HAWES

TRASH PILE OF TROUBLE

NEWS

Caldwell official at the center of an illegal heap

City and hospital officials have been wrangling for more than a year about the status of Bannock.

HARRISON BERRY The rusted-out cars, derelict buildings, run-down trailers and decaying oil drums on the Caldwell property of John McEvoy can be seen from KCID Road in central Canyon County. The land is shielded from prying eyes by a row of bluffs, but they can’t conceal the eyesore of decrepit machinery or used tires. According to neighbor Randy Wood, the area has become an illegal junkyard. “One of the things that really bothers me about it is the lawlessness,” Wood said. “Everybody else obeys the law and you have a neighbor who puts septic tanks 100 feet from standing water; runs a junkyard out of an agricultural area.” In 1994, neighbor Debbie Hribik said she observed McEvoy burying oil in a pit on the property. In the years that followed, the 120-acre plot of farmland slowly transformed into a rubbish heap. Frustrated with decades of declining home values and hazardous materials—coupled with a lack of action on the part of local officials— Wood, Hribik and several other neighbors filed suit against McEvoy, who also happens to serve as a Canyon Highway District commissioner. It won’t be the first time McEvoy and his land have run afoul of neighbors. In 2005, two misdemeanor nuisance charges—one for storing two or more non-operational vehicles and another for open debris storage—were dismissed. Abused and free-roaming animals have also been a problem: McEvoy was found guilty in 1999 and 2000 of two charges of misdemeanor livestock at large, for which he was fined, and in 2003 he was found guilty of cruelty to animals. McEvoy is also on the radar of the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, which has conducted two inspections of his property since 2014. The most recent, in July, stemmed from

ST. LUKE’S, CITY DON’T AGREE ON BANNOCK STREET FUTURE

It was 1994 when Canyon County resident Debbie Hribik said she first observed oil being burried on the property of John McEvoy.

a complaint regarding the unmarked storage of used oil and uncleaned oil spills. As a result, McEvoy will have to excavate oil-stained land, properly label his stores of used oil containers and submit evidence of cleanup to DEQ. “Some of these were maybe a couple fivegallon buckets of oil that needed to be excavated,” said DEQ Remediation Manager Dean Ehlert. Canyon County officials, however, were less forgiving. In 2012, an inspector from Canyon County Development Services went to McEvoy’s property, finding abandoned structures, exposed waste and partially dismantled vehicles. The Canyon County sheriff charged McEvoy with misdemeanor counts of public nuisance and violations for not obtaining appropriate permits for structures. For more than two years, the case was mired in the court system until McEvoy pleaded guilty to the charges in March, 2015. Two days later, neighbors filed a civil suit against McEvoy. “You’re surrounded by junk houses, old abandoned vehicles,” Wood said. Pleading guilty to the criminal charges meant McEvoy would face the possibility of almost a

Caldwell DMV, inquiring of passersby if they were registered to vote. They selected the location specifically to reach Latinos but offered to 6 register anyone who walked by. They had mixed results. About half of the people Sterling and McNary spoke to said they were already registered. Some, like Latina millennial Nieves Valdez, said they’d prefer not to register. Valdez said she doesn’t like to vote because she never knows much about the candidates. She said she wished there was more bilingual explanation of who was running and even how to vote. “A lot of us don’t know,” Valdez said. “I hope it gets better.” In the course of two hours, the ICAN representatives stopped about 40 people. Among them were Rosario Rico, from Caldwell, and her father Saul BOISE WEEKLY.COM

CITYDESK

year in prison; but, for his neighbors, it was a crucial link between his growing pile of waste and their sagging property values—an admission that the collection of unsalvageable structures, rusting equipment and fields of tires on McEvoy’s land had extended into the lives of other people. “We were waiting for a guilty plea in the criminal suit before filing our civil suit,” Hribik said. On the advice of his attorney, McEvoy said he wouldn’t comment on the current case, but on March 19, 2015, he asked the court to withdraw his initial guilty plea to the criminal charges. Two courts have so far denied his requests to change that plea, and the criminal case is awaiting review by the Idaho Supreme Court. “Our office has continued to set and vacate hearings for when the [ruling on the] appeal comes through,” said Canyon County Public Information Officer Joe Decker. Even if McEvoy’s conviction is upheld, it could be years before the debris on his land is cleared. “I am not going to give up until someone digs up that oil I saw [McEvoy] dump 20 years ago,” said Hribik.

Rico Gutierrez, who is originally from Mexico. “A lot of people don’t vote because it doesn’t help them,” said Gutierrez. “If they vote, it doesn’t do anything for Latinos.” Still, Gutierrez said he plans to cast a ballot this year. “It’s important to vote,” he said. “But later, when [politicians] are in power, they don’t do anything. They forget about the people who need them most.” Rico, voting in her second presidential election, was a bit more optimistic. “I just hope to make a difference,” she said.

The silence was awkward at best, grim at worst. When Boise Mayor Dave Bieter stared daggers across the Boise City Council chambers at St. Luke’s representatives Oct. 4, the team tasked with selling lawmakers on the hospital’s master plan braced for what would be some ringing criticism from hizzoner. “Boy, this is not what I had hoped for or consistent with our previous discussions. I expected to see more than this,” said Bieter. “I’m disappointed in this piece.” Bieter was particularly disappointed in what St. Luke’s officials proposed for Bannock Street, the vital element in a compromise that eventually won enough support from the council for the hospital to embark on a $400 million expansion of its downtown campus. At the height of the 2015 debate over the expansion, St. Luke’s agreed to surrender a 28-foot-wide easement on a stretch of Bannock Street—the same stretch that had been closed to the public during a previous expansion. “The trade-off was that Bannock would come back for public use,” said Bieter, who roundly criticized St. Luke’s for proposing Bannock Street not change much at all from its current configuration. “That’s my biggest problem, my biggest disappointment,” he said. “We worked so hard for this easement, hoping that it would be a different space—a whole lot more like the Basque Block and a whole lot less than a courtyard, which is what it is now.” Councilwoman Lauren McLean was more succinct. “I was also hoping to see more. It’s underwhelming,” she deadpanned. St. Luke’s Project Manager Mark Bowen kept arguing for what the hospital’s team was proposing. “It’s a straighter path. It’s wider, more inviting,” said Bowen. Bieter was having none of it. “Please bring us some other alternatives. You’ve worked hard and done well in other areas. I fundamentally believe in fairness to this whole process and this is not it,” said Bieter. With that, the St. Luke’s Master Plan team promised to hold another workshop with Boise city leaders, scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 1. —George Prentice BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 7


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY OCT. 12 Festivals & Events BOISE STATE HOMECOMING—Through Oct. 15. For a complete schedule of events, visit homecoming.boisestate.edu. Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1000. IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN SCARECROW STROLL—Guests of all ages can find scarecrows peeping out around the trees and shrubs throughout the Garden, then join in the fun by voting for their favorite. Scarecrow Stroll takes place during regular Garden hours throughout the month of October with regular price of admission. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$7. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

On Stage

Art

BCT: HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH—John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s landmark Hedwig and the Angry Inch puts you in the front row for a rollicking performance of Hedwig Robinson’s band The Angry Inch. During the show, Hedwig steps out to tell her story about growing up in East Berlin, her botched sex change, and her life in America. It’s a funny and cathartic journey of self-realization. 8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

ALAN MACDONALD SOLO EXHIBITION—Through Nov. 4. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com.

COMEDY OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COF: GROUNDED—This gripping drama by award-winning playwright George Brant is a heartbreaking beautiful story of courage, motherhood and modern warfare. Through Oct. 13. 7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org/companyoffools.

FRIDAY-FRIDAY, OCT. 14-28

BOSCO’S OPENING DOORS: A GLIMPSE INTO THE ARTIST’S MIND III—Through Oct. 28. 7 a.m.-11:45 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4261242, finearts.boisestate.edu. DANIEL DIAZ-TAI: ABSTRACT PAINTINGS—Through Oct. 26. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com. DAZZLE CAMOUFLAGE: HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT—Through Oct. 14. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. EXCHANGE: ISU MFA STUDENT EXHIBITION AT BOISE STATE— Through Oct. 26, 7 a.m.-midnight

FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art. boisestate.edu/visualartscenter.

LAURA HEIT: EARTH AND SKY— Through Nov. 1. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330. boiseartmuseum.org.

FOTOFILMIC: THE NEW FACE OF FILM—Through Oct. 31. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, Campus Lane (NE of Liberal Arts building), Boise, 208-426-3994, fotofilmic.com/ the-new-face-of-film.

MICHAEL GREGORY: LIGHT YEARS—Through Oct. 26. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208726-5079, gailseverngallery.com.

JIM BRITT: MATADOR, DEATH IN THE AFTERNOON—Through Nov. 1. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, comlib.org. JUDITH KINDLER: DESIRE— Through Oct. 26. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-7265079, gailseverngallery.com. KAY COUGHRAN: CLOSE TO MY HEART—Through Oct. 28, 10 a.m.6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3313374, artsourcegallery.com.

SATURDAY, OCT. 15

MINIDOKA: ARTIST AS WITNESS—Through Jan. 15. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. PHOTOGRAPHER SCOTTY PERKINS: AMERICA’S WILDERNESS BEAUTY—Through Oct. 23. 7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, finearts.boisestate.edu. SUZANNE HAZLETT: SOUTHERN EXPOSURE—Through Oct. 26. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com.

NARRATIVES FROM TVAA: CELEBRATING PRIVATE IDAHO— Through Dec. 2. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

THURSDAY OCT. 13 Festivals & Events 20TH ANNUAL DISTINGUISHED HUMANITIES LECTURE AND DINNER WITH JON MEACHAM—Pulitzer Prize-winning presidential historian Jon Meacham will talk about “America Then and Now: What History Tells Us about the Future.” 6 p.m. $60-$125. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3455346, idahohumanities.org.

MONDAY, OCT. 17 CARLY ROMEO

Totally topical.

ALLEY REPERTORY THEATER: THE TOTALITARIANS From failed artists to primetime television personalities, totalitarians come in the strangest shapes and sizes. Meet Penny, a former roller derby champ who has been falling up the ladder of her bid for state office. When a disjointed but well-received speech bumps her campaign to the next level, ambitious speechwriter Francine sees a chance to pull her career out of the doldrums. That’s the setup for Alley Repertory Theater’s production of The Totalitarians, a raucous political play that would feel more comedic if it were less topical. Playing at the height of election season, it’s also distinguished for being at the center of a lawsuit over an Idaho law tying beer, wine and liquor licenses to the Gem State’s obscenity laws. 7 p.m., $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. 8 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Parker Schmidt putting the “aaaaahhhh!” in gravity.

Want to see one of the true icons of feminism? Now’s your chance.

GRAVITY GAMES 2016

THE CABIN PRESENTS GLORIA STEINEM

Cool local company Sibbz Longboards is rolling out its second annual Gravity Games on Saturday, Oct. 15 at Bogus Basin, with events in longboarding, skateboarding, luge and drift trike racing. Competitors will strut their stuff while engaging with and educating people who may have misconceptions about these sports. For example, local downhill longboarder Parker Schmidt is an excellent ambassador: He practices only where permitted and is versed in everything from how board concavity affects riding to high-tech gear—his passion and skill earned him an Omen Longboards sponsorship. The high-school senior also started Longboard Idaho (on Facebook), to gain a stronger sense of community, which is what Gravity Games are sure to do, as well. Fun for participants and with races, demos, vendors, food, live music and free admission, fun for spectators, too. 9 a.m., $40-$55 to enter, FREE to watch. Pioneer Lodge, Bogus Basin, 2600 N. Bogus Basin Road, gravitygames.com.

Some things (and people) are definitely worth waiting for. Originally slated for Sept. 19, the Boise appearance of feminist icon Gloria Steinem was rescheduled to Monday, Oct. 17. Considering Steinem’s lecture, sponsored by The Cabin, is that much closer to Election Day, the evening should be super-charged with commentary on the Clinton vs. Trump showdown. It has been nearly 45 years since Steinem launched Ms. Magazine, propelling her and feminism into the national consciousness and, in 2013, Steinem was lauded with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Tickets purchased for the original date will be honored at the Oct. 17 appearance. 8 p.m., $22.50-$32. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1110, morrisoncenter.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR On Stage ALLEY REP: THE TOTALITARIANS—Alley Repertory Theater’s 2016-17 series, Kill the Darlings, will confront the idols of politics, mythology, and pop in hopes of rediscovering our shared humanity. The series opens with a twisted political satire with absurd relevance to present-day America. Tickets available at alleyrep.org. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208424-8297, alleyrep.org. BCT: HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. COMEDIAN DAVE WAITE—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: GROUNDED—7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter. org/companyoffools.

IDAHO HORROR FILM FESTIVAL—The Idaho Horror Film Festival comes screaming back into Downtown Boise for it’s third year. Through the mediums of independent film, food, music, literature and art, the IHFF strives to expand the cultural experience within the community while highlighting local filmmakers. Oct. 13-15. $5-$75. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-3871273, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org. IHFF: CULT HORROR NIGHT WITH NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET—For adults only. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-283-7065, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org/events. IDAHO HORROR FILM FESTIVAL 2016: HORROR FILM SOUNDTRACKS AND BREWS—6 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org/events.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19

IHFF: SHORT SCORES FOR SILENT CLASSICS—Enjoy classic silent films set to live original scores by composer Sean Dahlman. 7 p.m. FREE. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-283-7065, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org/events. IHFF: THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW—9 p.m. FREE-$5. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-283-7065, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org/events. JACKSON BROWNE— Jackson Browne has written and performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music and has defined a genre of songwriting charged with honesty, emotion and personal politics. 7 p.m. $55-$80. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110, morrisoncenter.com. STAGE COACH: THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—Back by popular demand, this rock icon returns to Boise with a bold new look, sweet alien transvestites, killer rock music and outrageous humor. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Art THE ART OF ANIMATION: BRINGING BACK MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD—This new exhibit focuses on early animation and features production cels and drawings from 1950s Disney cartoon Donald Duck’s Birthday, Bugs Bunny from a Nike ad with Michael Jordan, cel and drawings from The Simpsons, and others. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., 208726-3493, comlib.org. ARTIST MARK MCGINNIS—Local artist Mark McGinnis speaks about his work as a landscape artist and illustrator of children’s books. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org.

We bid you come bid for fine original works of art.

BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART AUCTION Each week since 2001, Boise Weekly has published a piece by a local artist on the front cover—a practice unique among alternative weeklies—and, every October, we gather up the original works that appeared over the previous 12 months and put them up for auction. It’s always a kickass party and for a kickass cause: a portion of proceeds goes to the artists, a portion supports BW’s Cover Auction Art grant program and a piece of the pie is set aside to support BW’s investigative journalistic mission. This year’s auction takes place Wednesday, Oct. 19 at JUMP, where attendees will enjoy a no-host bar, food and awesome auction action. The event is made possible by sponsors D.L. Evans Bank, Evermore Prints, Van Dycke Frame Design, Highlands Hollow Brewhouse and JUMP, but it’s also made possible by you. Doors 5 p.m., auction 6 p.m., $20. JUMP Room, JUMP, 1000 W. Myrtle St., 208-639-6610, jacksurbanmeetingplace.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Talks & Lectures THE CENTER LECTURE: CRATERS OF THE MOON ARTIST JOHN GRADE—The Sun Valley Center for the Arts hosts a free lecture by John Grade, whose outdoor sculpture Spur has been on view since May at Craters of the Moon National Monument in Arco, as part of The Center’s Craters of the Moon project. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-7269491, sunvalleycenter.org. SHUTTING DOWN THE HUMAN HIGHWAY—Join Tessa Dysart, Regent Law School assistant professor, and Assistant U.S. Attorney Wendy Olson, to learn about the difficulties in identification and prosecution of human trafficking. A dinner of Tangos Empanadas and

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 9


CALENDAR salad provided. Open to the public. 5 p.m. By donation. Concordia University School of Law, 501 W. Front St., Boise, 208-955-1001, concordialaw.com.

Animals & Pets TREASURE VALLEY DOG SHOWS—Watch your favorite breed compete in Agility, Rally, Conformation and Obedience events all four days. Special events include National Owner Handled Series on Friday and Saturday; CGC and Advanced CGC Tests, Puppy Competition and Western Attire Day on Saturday; and Bred by Exhibitor competition on Sunday. Through Oct. 16. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-388-1514, icckc.org.

Food

We’re More Than Just A Market… COME LUNCH WITH US

Pinxtos

Traditional Tapas bar available on Wednesdays and Fridays. Tapas menu available daily.

BACKYARD GARDENERS UNITE PRODUCE SWAP AND SALE—Trade your garden produce with other gardeners or buy locally grown produce. All proceeds benefit the Idaho Foodbank and leftover produce is given to the Boise Rescue Mission. 7-8 p.m. FREE. Cole Community Church, 8775 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-375-3565. facebook.com/ backyardgardenersunite.

FRIDAY OCT. 14

of Asian. For all ages. 6 p.m. $40. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3671212, bo.knittingfactory.com. TREE CITY BLUES—Check out this three-day blues-inspired dance festival, packed with professional instruction, live music, social dancing and lots more. While workshops will be blues- and jazzbased dances, the bands will play music perfect for blues dancing, Lindy Hop, Balboa, or whatever your style. Or just go for the bands. 8 p.m. $25-$90. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571, treecityblues.com.

On Stage ALLEY REP: THE TOTALITARIANS—8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. ANI DIFRANCO: VOTE DAMMIT TOUR—The singer-songwriter and feminist icon is using her tour and music to encourage fans to vote on Election Day and have their voices heard. She’ll be performing new songs such as “Play God,” which stresses the importance of a woman’s right to choose. 8 p.m. $20-$55. Revolution Concert House, 4983 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-938-2933, cttouringid.com.

BARE-BONES SHAKESPEARE: AS YOU LIKE IT—Take your picnic baskets, blankets and lawn chairs for an afternoon of Shakespearean comedy. And if you want to stick around after the show, some food trucks will be stopping by on select nights. 3 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-344-0011. BCT: HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: DRACULA—This new adaptation of Bram Stoker’s classic novel brings suspense and seduction to the stage. 8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN DAVE WAITE—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208991-4746, boisecomedy.com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: GROUNDED—8 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org/companyoffools/ current-season.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

Festivals & Events 2016 IMMERSE-A-THON AR/ VR HACKATHON—Show off your hacking skills at the Idaho Virtual Reality Council’s inaugural Immerse-a-thon, a virtual and augmented reality hackathon hosted at Boise State’s GIMM Lab. This is a great way to learn about virtual and augmented realities, and to interact with amazingly interesting individuals. 8 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1204, idahovirtualreality. com/events. 38TH HANNAHVERSARY—Enjoy classic rock ‘n’ roll and country with Switcher from 7-9 p.m., then close out the night with The Rocci Johnson Band from 9:15-close. Enjoy happy hour prices all day. 3 p.m.-2 a.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557. BOISE STATE HOMECOMING— Through Oct. 15. Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1000, homecoming.boisestate.edu.

608 w. grove st. • 208.433.1208 Open Mon.-Sat. 10am-6pm, open extended hours on Tues., Thurs. & Fri, closed Sun.

COMMUNITY UNBOUND PROJECT ASIAN WORLD IN IDAHO GALA—Join the fun to promote understanding, healing and community celebrating the diversity

www.thebasquemarket.com 10 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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KEEP YOUR CAR HAPPY! All of the work done on your VW or Audi at Jeff’s Import Auto is GUARANTEED! We are your local experts offering great service at competitive prices.

Jeff’s Import Auto 4433 Adams Street Garden City • 376-4686 jeffsimportautowerks.com

CALENDAR DOLLS AND DEVILS COSTUME BALL—Inner Diva Studios presents this sexy, sin-sational dance show features sassy street dancers, sensual belly dancers, seductive burlesque dance and tease, and perfect pole performers. Get VIP seating for the best seats in the house, a free raffle ticket, chances to win free drinks, and goodie bags from POSH for the ladies. Wear a costume for a chance to win prizes. 8 p.m. $10-$25. Eclypse Bar, 5467 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-957-0322.

GIUSEPPE LICARI: CONTRAPPUNTO—Rotterdam-based Sicilian artist Giuseppe Licari addresses the aftereffects of forest fires. Taken from the forests of Idaho, Licari’s charred forest of trees conjures contemplation of current events by placing visitors within a situation that is at once natural and imitation, beautiful and confronting. 7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org/ exhibitions.html.

IHFF: THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT WITH WRITER/DIRECTOR DANIEL MYRICK—Spend an unforgettable evening with the writer and director of The Blair Witch Project. Q&A session to follow screening. Free for IHFF passholders. 8 p.m. FREE$20. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-283-7065, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org/events.

Literature

LIPSINC’S HALLOWEEN EXTRAVAGANZA: OLD BATS—It’s time to get out of your belfry and get ready for LipsInc’s Halloween extravaganza, Old Bats. Victoria, Roxy V and Martini have been hangin’ around getting ready to give you laughs and rabies. And special guest Brenda Starr will simply drive you batty. As always, costumes or regular dress are welcome. Fly to the phone and make your reservations at 208368-0405 before these shows sell out. 8:30 p.m. $20. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise. 208-368-0405, lipsinc.net. THE MCMANUS COMEDIES: A FINE AND PLEASANT MISERY— Described by one reviewer as “a wonderful cross between Mark Twain and Bill Cosby.” 7 p.m. $30-$36. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com. STAGE COACH: THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—8 p.m. $12$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

MFA READING SERIES: POET JOHN BEER—Poet John Beer is the author of the poetry collection The Waste Land and Other Poems (2010), and the winner of the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the chapbook Lucinda (2013). His work has been praised for its “passionate and watchful” moods. He currently teaches at Portland State University. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Hemingway Center, 1819 Campus Lane (NE of Liberal Arts building), Boise, 208-4263023, english.boisestate.edu/ mfa/visiting-writers.

Kids & Teens GRAND FINALE AMERICAN GIRL FASHION SHOW—Learn how clothing has changed over the years to reflect history, culture and girls’ individual styles while helping continue Ballet Idaho’s outreach and community programs, providing accessible and diverse arts

programming in schools and for residents throughout the Treasure Valley. 6 p.m. $20-$55. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3459116, balletidaho.org/events/ american-girl-fashion-show.

Odds & Ends HAUNTED HALLOWEEN TROLLEY TOURS—Join the fun aboard the decorated 8-9:30 p.m. $18$35. Joe’s Crab Shack, 2288 N. Garden St., Garden City, 208-4330849, boisetrolleytours.com. VAMPIRE PARTY AND BOOK SIGNING—Join Re-POP Gifts after dark for a vampire celebration. Local author Shannon Foy will be signing copies of her debut novel, In Between. There’ll be refreshments, prizes and special vampireinspired merchandise 7 p.m. FREE. Re-POP Gifts, 3107 W. State St., Boise, 208-577-8921, facebook. com/repopgifts.

Animals & Pets BIRDS OF PREY FALL FLIGHTS— The Peregrine Fund will be hosting their popular Fall Flights every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday in October, weather permitting. 3-4 p.m. FREE with regular admission. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org. ZOO BOISE SPOOKTACULAR— Join Zoo Boise for their annual Spooktacular, the merry-not-scary Halloween fun-fest. This walking tour will feature a variety of fun

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

STEVE FULTON MUSIC: EPONYM ALBUM RELEASE CONCERT—Celebrate the release of the first new album in 11 years from the Idaho musician and producer. Joining Fulton will be Sean Hatton and Bernie Reilly from New Transit. 6:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com. TAIKOPROJECT—TAIKOPROJECT is an ensemble of premiere taiko drummers dedicated to promoting and advancing the JapaneseAmerican art of taiko. TAIKOPROJECT seeks not only to entertain audiences, but also to inform them about the history and integrity of taiko as an evolving art form. 7 p.m. $10-$20. Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum, 676 S.W. Fifth Ave., Ontario, 541-889-8191, 4rcc.com/event/taikoproject.

Art 12 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

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CALENDAR Halloween displays, activities, and a few animal encounters, all designed for younger children. Plus a black light dance party, mascot meet-and-greets, professional magic, obstacle course, the Bone Yard, mini hay bale maze, a chance to hang out in the Bat House at night, and much more 6-9 p.m. FREE-$10. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise.org.

Food LIFE’S KITCHEN ANNUAL SPARKLING WINE SPECTACULAR—Enjoy one of the swankiest galas in town, benefiting one of the best youth programs around. Don’t miss this incredible night of celebration and recognition, food and drinks, and live and silent auction items benefiting Life’s Kitchen. 6 p.m. $65 adv., $80 door. Barber Park Education and Event Center, 4049 S. Eckert Road, Boise, 208-3310199, ext. 303, adaweb.net.

SATURDAY OCT. 15 Festivals & Events 2016 IMMERSE-A-THON AR/ VR HACKATHON—10 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Albertsons Library, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1204, idahovirtualreality. com/events. BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287. facebook.com/ TheBoiseFarmersMarket. BOISE STATE HOMECOMING— Through Oct. 15. Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1000, homecoming.boisestate.edu. CANYON COUNTY CO-OP 2016 SUMMER COMMUNITY MARKET—9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Canyon County Co-op, 1415 First St. S., Nampa, 208-960-0328, canyoncounty.coop. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle, 208-489-8789, cityofeagle.org. FALLAPALOOZA 2016—Celebrate Boise’s Women’s and Children’s Alliance and get the message out about domestic violence in Idaho. In addition to a silent auction and donation drive for the WCA, this year’s event will feature two pieeating contests, live entertainment and guest speakers, kids area complete with games, bounce houses, hay, pumpkin painting and more. Plus food, beer/wine garden with County Line Brewing, and A Very Purple Marketplace. 10 a.m.-

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5 p.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 N. Americana Blvd., Boise.

com/artzone208.

HARVEST FESTIVAL—Head over to Old State Street to celebrate fall with free kids and family activities such as pumpkin decorating, crafts, games, balloon characters, pumpkin tasting, a photo booth, and the last Eagle Saturday Market of the season. Activities will take place at Heritage Park and the Eagle Historical Museum. 10 a.m.2 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. 208-489-8763.

On Stage

MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER TREASURE VALLEY—Join the Third Annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Charity 5K, an uplifting family event where the community can come together to show our strength and support in the fight against breast cancer. The race begins at 9:30 a.m. by the bandshell. Participants can either join a leisureVisit the website for details. 8:30-11 a.m. $25-$35. Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, 1900 N. Records Ave., Meridian. cancer.org. NAMI BOISE 3RD ANNUAL MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS MARCH— Join NAMI Boise to show support and generate funds for vital community programs that help transform lives. Gather in Julia Davis Park at the Boise Pavilion for the march to the Capitol steps. Wear green for mental health. Register your team and/or donate at razoo.com. All donations stay local to support education and advocacy in the Treasure Valley. 9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-376-4304, namiboise. org/3rd-annual-march-for-mentalhealth-awareness. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Nampa Farmers’ Market, Longbranch parking lot, Front and 13th, Nampa, 208-4123814. TINY HOUSE TOUR—This tour features North End houses of no more than 1,000 square feet. Tickets available at Goody’s on the day of the event, or in advance by email at laurel.talley@boiseschools.org. Proceeds benefit the Boise High Orchestra and Choir. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $10-$50. Goody’s Soda Fountain, 1502 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-367-0020, sites.google. com/a/boiseschools.org/boisehigh-orchestra/tiny-house-tour. TREE CITY BLUES—10 a.m.-11:45 p.m. $25-$90. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571, treecityblues.com. WALKABOUT BOISE HISTORIC DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR— Get starting location and additional details when you register or call 208-409-8282. 11 a.m. $10. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, 208-409-8282, preservationidaho.org. WEST BOISE SATURDAY MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise. 208-322-9464, facebook.

ALLEY REP: THE TOTALITARIANS—8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. BCT: HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224. bctheater.org. BLT: DRACULA—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN DAVE WAITE— 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10-$12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208991-4746, boisecomedy.com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: GROUNDED—8 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter. org/companyoffools. DOLLS AND DEVILS COSTUME BALL—8 p.m. $10-$25. Eclypse Bar, 5467 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-957-0322.

Kendall Ford of Meridian Thursday, October 13th, 9am - 7pm Test drive a new Ford vehicle and earn $ 20 for the Women’s & Children’s Alliance Plus, live music and raffle prizes all day long! **Limit one donation per household. Participants must be 18 years or older with valid driver’s license. Maximum dealership donation of $6,000.**

IHFF: THE HILLS HAVE EYES WITH HORROR ICON MICHAEL BERRYMAN—Join IHFF for a special screening of the Wes Craven classic. Michael Berryman will answer questions and sign autographs after the screening. Free for IHFF passholders. 7 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-283-7065, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org. LIPSINC’S HALLOWEEN EXTRAVAGANZA: OLD BATS—8:30 p.m. $20. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208368-0405, lipsinc.net. MERIDIAN SYMPHONY: ALLAMERICAN SPECTACULAR— Featuring music by Gershwin, Ellington, Bernstein, Copland and more. With pianist Del Parkinson and guest conductor Craig Purdy. 7:30 p.m. $4-$11. Centennial High School Performing Arts Center, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-939-1404. meridiansymphony.org. ODD SATURDAYS ALL IN IMPROV COMEDY—Enjoy a highstakes game of hilarity as players take on the challenge of taking on whatever the audience deals out. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Treasure Valley Children’s Theater, 703 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-287-8828.,oddsaturdays.com. STAGE COACH: THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—8 p.m. & 12 a.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 13


CALENDAR Workshops & Classes

Sports & Fitness

Animals & Pets

DESIGNING THE EXPERIMENT POETRY WORKSHOP—Taught by Surel’s Place poet-in-residence Kristina Marie Darling, this workshop will focus on expanding orms and techniques. 1-3 p.m. $10. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-407-7529, surelsplace.org.

BOISE STATE FOOTBALL VS. COLORADO STATE—TV: ESPN NETWORKS; time TBA. Boise State Broncos Albertsons Stadium, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-4737, boisestate.edu.

BIRDS OF PREY FALL FLIGHTS—3-4 p.m. FREE with regular admission. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-3628687, peregrinefund.org.

IHFF: FILMMAKING BOOT CAMP—Join the San Francisco School of Digital Filmmaking for a special Idaho Horror Film Festival workshop. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $75-$95. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise. 208-2837065, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org/ events.

Literature AUTHOR LYNN SCHMIDT: SHIFT INTO THRIVE BOOK LAUNCH— Join author Lynn Schmidt, who’ll read from and talk about her new book, Shift Into Thrive: Six Strategies for Women to Unlock the Power of Resiliency. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Citizen MAD HATTER HAT AND WIG PROJECT—Help women and children suffering the visible effects of cancer hair loss by donating new and gently used hats, wigs and scarves for the seventh annual Mad Hatter Project during Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Donation period Oct. 15-31 at SHIFT boutique, DL Evans Banks, Idaho Independent Banks, among other sites. Find additional donation sites on Mad Hatter website. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. SHIFT Boutique, 807 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-331-7806, idahomadhatter. com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

SOUTH WEST IDAHO PUG RESCUE FUNDRAISER—Check out this fun fundraiser to help rescue pugs and pug mixes. Proceeds will help South West Idaho Pug Rescue provide medical care, food, spaying and neutering, gas to transport, and foster care. SWIPR will be doing microchips for $25 each, and Pups Best Munchables will be selling All Natural Dog Treats. Plus vendors, food and more. At Maple Grove Park across from Lakeview Park in Nampa. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Lakeview Park, Garrity Boulevard at 16th Avenue North, Nampa, 208-353-2678. ZOO BOISE SPOOKTACULAR— Join Zoo Boise for this merrynot-scary Halloween fun-fest. This walking tour will feature fun Halloween displays, activities and animal encounters designed for younger children, plus a black light dance party, mascot meetand-greets, magic an obstacle course, the Bone Yard, a hay bale maze, a chance to hang out in the Bat House at night, and more 6-9 p.m. FREE-$10. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-6087760, zooboise.org.

Food BARBARIAN BREWING ANNIVERSARY PARTY—Help Barbarian Brewing celebrate its first birthday. Enjoy 20 beers on tap, live music by Alturas and First Chair, and Wetos Locos and Mister BBQ food trucks. 3-10 p.m. FREE. Barbarian Brewing, 5270 E. Chinden Blvd., Garden City. MAD SWEDE BREWING COMPANY GRAND OPENING PARTY—Stop by Mad Swede Brewing for raffles, games, prizes, food trucks, live music and more. 4 p.m.-midnight. FREE. Mad Swede Brewing Company, 2772 S. Cole Road, Ste. 140, Boise. 208-922-6883, madswedebrewing.com.

SUNDAY OCT. 16 Festivals & Events Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

TREE CITY BLUES—10 a.m.-11 p.m. $25-$90. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571, treecityblues. com.

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

14 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR On Stage BARE-BONES SHAKESPEARE: AS YOU LIKE IT—3 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-344-0011. COMEDIAN DAVE WAITE—8 p.m. $10-$12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. THE RUSS MARTIN FUNDRAISER—Support Russ Martin, a local legend. Your ticket price goes to support Martin’ medical care and, in the meantime, enjoy some great company and some great Boise blues. 4-8 p.m. $12-$15 adv., $15-$18 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

Sports & Fitness SHARON’S RIDE.RUN. WALK—Ride.Run.Walk to raise awareness and funds for Epilepsy education and advocacy in the Treasure Valley. 8:30 a.m.-noon. FREE-$15. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sharonsride. org/idaho.

Animals & Pets BIRDS OF PREY FALL FLIGHTS—3-4 p.m. FREE with regular admission. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org. ZOO BOISE SPOOKTACULAR—5:30-8 p.m. FREE-$10. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise.org.

MONDAY OCT. 17 Festivals & Events THE CABIN’S ANNUAL FUNDRAISER: DINNER ON STAGE WITH GLORIA STEINEM— Meet this incredible icon of women’s rights at a unique dinner party on the stage at the Morrison Center. 5 p.m. $150. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261110. thecabinidaho.org.

SUN VALLEY JAZZ AND MUSIC FESTIVAL KICKOFF—The Sun Valley Jazz and Music Festival has partnered with the Nampa Civic Center to host two nights of exceptional music and food: Creole Zydeco served up with Cajun food on Oct. 17, and classic swing jazz, wine and hors d’oeuvres on Oct. 18. 5-10 p.m. $25-$40. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555.

Citizen BOISE SCHOOL DISTRICT NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS PLANNING MEETING—The BSD wants your help making choices about school facilities. You’ll learn how results from a recent public questionnaire affected the draft Facility Master Plan and be given an opportunity to weigh in on the draft plan that will guide the district for the next 10-20 years. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Capital High School Auditorium, 8055 Goddard Road, Boise, boiseschools.org/our_district/ facility_master_planning.

TUESDAY OCT. 18 Festivals & Events ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL TOURS—Join docents for free 45-minute guided tours of the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial every Tuesday, through October. Meet at the statue of Anne Frank in the Memorial. No reservation required. For all ages. 12:15 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter.org/events.

On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: SHAUN OF THE DEAD—Costume contest with prizes, and free popcorn if you take a carved pumpkin. 7 p.m. $9 online; $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-387-1273, boiseclassicmovies.com/deals. SUN VALLEY JAZZ AND MUSIC FESTIVAL KICKOFF—5-10 p.m. $25-$40. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., 208-468-5555.

your business. 7:30-9 a.m. & 5:45-7 p.m. $19. College of Idaho, 2112 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5011, collegeofidaho. edu/community-learning.

Art GIUSEPPE LICARI: CONTRAPPUNTO—3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org.

Literature IDAHO AUTHOR AWARDS—The Idaho Author Awards Reception honors Idaho authors and publishers for books published between 2013-2016. 5:30-8 p.m. $25. PowerHouse Event Center, 621 S. 17th St., Boise, 208-331-4005, idahoauthorawards.com.

Sports & Fitness RAINBOW BOWLING LEAGUE— The Treasure Valley’s only gay and gay-friendly bowling league is always looking for fun new people and bowlers of all skill levels. Whether you bowl an 80 or a 280, you’re welcome to join the fun. Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Continues through Nov. 1. $9. 20th Century Lanes, 4712 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-8695, facebook. com/rainbowbowlingleague.

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. Tuesdays, 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-3443011.

Kids & Teens BOISE NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR—Make plans now to “Go On” to college at the Boise National College Fair. Nearly 200 colleges, universities and military service academy representatives will be on hand. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. FREE. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City. 703299-6856, nacacnet.org/collegefairs.

On Stage THE CABIN’S READINGS AND CONVERSATIONS: GLORIA STEINEM—8 p.m. $20-$35. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, thecabinidaho.org.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Workshops & Classes 7 DEADLY SOCIAL MEDIA SINS— So you (or your boss) wants to create a Facebook page, Twitter account or social media page. Before you launch, learn about “deadly sins” of social media that your fans and followers won’t forget (or forgive) and could hurt

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 15


TR AVIS SHINN

LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY OCT. 12

THURSDAY OCT. 13

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BRIAN DOLZANI—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

BISHOP KELLY FALL CONCERT—7 p.m. FREE-$5. Bishop Kelly High

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ANTHRAX, OCT. 15, REVOLUTION In the 1980s, if your thrash metal band’s name didn’t conjure images of over-the-top fatality, it wasn’t a real thrash band. Anthrax fit the bill. Its name invokes a disease so nasty it has been pegged for development as a bioweapon—and its music is hardly less menacing. With relentless rhythms and guts-shredding solos, it’s one of the most influential metal groups out there and a member of the Big Four: Anthrax, Megadeth, Metallica and Slayer. Unlike its compatriots, however, Anthrax made forays into rap and punk, presaging nu metal and rap metal acts of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Now in its 35th year, Anthrax is still melting faces. Catch it Saturday, Oct. 15 at Revolution Concert House and Event Center Saturday. —Harrison Berry With Death Angel and Vault7, 8 p.m., $25-$50. Revolution Concert House & Event Center, 4983 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-938-2933, cttouringid.com.

16 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

THE DEVIL MAKES THREE—With Lost Dog Street Band. 8 p.m. $20$45. Knitting Factory

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CUTE IS WHAT WE AIM FOR—7 p.m. $15 adv., $16 door. Neurolux

STEVE AND GRACE WALL BAND— 6 p.m. FREE. Breakaway Cafe

FRIDAY OCT. 14 38TH HANNAHVERSARY—With Switcher and The Rocci Johnson Band. 7 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ANI DIFRANCO: VOTE DAMMIT TOUR—8 p.m. $20-$55. Revolution

EMILY TIPTON—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

EX-CULT—7:30 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE GO ROUNDS—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—7 p.m. $10-$12 adv., $13-$15 door. Sapphire

CALDWELL FINE ARTS: MOLLY IN THE MINESHAFT SPECIAL NEEDS CONCERT—Noon. $6. Langroise Center, College of Idaho

JACKSON BROWNE—7 p.m. $55$80. Morrison Center

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

OKTOBERFEST: THE EDELWEISS BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

GARRETT KLAHN—With Teach Me Equals. 8 p.m. $6 adv., $8 door. The Shredder

OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

HECKTOR PECKTOR—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

SEAX—With Hessian and Vanlade. 8 p.m. $8. The Shredder

THE INTERRUPTERS—With Bad Cop Bad Cop. 7 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. The Olympic

KARAOKE—8:30 p.m. FREE. High Note MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE NAUGHTY SWEETHEARTS—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow RINGWORM—With Exalt, The Drip and Gutliner. 8 p.m. $15. The Shredder STEVE EASTON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SPENCER BATT—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity

BRET WELTY BAND—10 p.m. $5. Reef

LIP SYNC BATTLE—8 p.m. FREE. Oak Barrel MUSIC BOX—10 p.m. FREE. Juniper QUINN VAN PAEPEGHEM TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers RYAN WISSINGER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SHON SANDERS—7 p.m. FREE. Homestead STEEP CREEK—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole STEVE FULTON MUSIC: EPONYM ALBUM RELEASE CONCERT—6:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Sapphire SUNSET GOAT—9 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny TAIKOPROJECT—7 p.m. $10-$20. Four Rivers Cultural Center TREE CITY BLUES—8-11:45 p.m. $25-$90. El Korah

SATURDAY OCT. 15 AAN—With J&L Defer, LVL UP and Crosss. 7:30 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

JESSICA LYNNE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE ANTHRAX—With Death Angel, and Vault7. 8 p.m. $25-$55. Revolution BARBARIAN BREWING 1-YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY—With Alturas and First Chair. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Barbarian Brewing BRIAR BOOTS—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue

MOODIE BLACK—With The Maldroids, Oso Negro and Weighn Beats. 8 p.m. $5. The Shredder OPEN MIC NIGHT—6 p.m. FREE. Breakaway Cafe OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CALDWELL FINE ARTS: MOLLY IN THE MINESHAFT—7 p.m. $5$20. Jewett Auditorium, College of Idaho

SUN VALLEY JAZZ AND MUSIC FESTIVAL KICKOFF—5 p.m. $25$40. Nampa Civic Center

CHRIS YOUNG—With Dan and Shay, and Cassadee Pope. 7:30 p.m. $39.50-$55. Idaho Center

TUESDAY OCT. 18

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH MISTY DAWN TAYLOR—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DANNY NEWCOMB AND THE SUGARMAKERS—10 p.m. $5. Reef HOPSIN SAVAGEVILLE TOUR—8:30 p.m. $20-$100. Knitting Factory IDAHO SONGWRITERS CLUBHOUSE CONCERT: RYAN DOCKINS AND FRIENDS—6:30 p.m. $10. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall JIM LEWIS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 MERIDIAN SYMPHONY: ALLAMERICAN SPECTACULAR—7:30 p.m. $4-$11. Centennial High

ELWOOD—7 p.m. FREE. SockeyeCole JOHNNY AND JEN—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers NED EVETT AND MUSIC BOX— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—With Jerkwadz and Caedus. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux SUN VALLEY JAZZ AND MUSIC FESTIVAL KICKOFF—5 p.m. $25$40. Nampa Civic Center

BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar BRETT REID—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers OLD DEATH WHISPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s OLD DOGS NEW TRICKS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s THE OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND MOSQUITOS—7 p.m. FREE. High Note TREE CITY BLUES—10 a.m.-11:45 p.m. $25-$90. El Korah

SUNDAY OCT. 16 BLUES AND JAZZ OPEN JAM—3-6 p.m. Oak Barrel CROWBAR CHILLED SUNDAYS—10 p.m. FREE. Crowbar THE RUSS MARTIN FUNDRAISER—4-8 p.m. $12-$15 adv., $15-$18 door. Sapphire THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TREE CITY BLUES—10 a.m.-11 p.m. $25-$90. El Korah

MONDAY OCT. 17 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid CHUCK SMITH AND AMY ROSE— 7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOHNNY SHOES—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

THE MONKEES, OCT. 19, MORRISON CENTER Anyone who asks, “How are these guys still alive?” may want to check their own vital signs before ripping into the Monkees 50th Anniversary Tour, starring Micky Dolenz (71 years old) and Peter Tork (74). They’re still getting it done with 50 North American tour dates this year, including Wednesday, Oct. 19 at the Morrison Center in Boise. Davy Jones passed away in 2012 and Michael Nesmith has sat out most of the tour, but when Dolenz starts singing “I’m a Believer” or “Last Train to Clarksville,” you can bet your Monkees fan club decoder ring that audience members will stretch their achy bones, jump to their feet and relive the days when the Monkees were not only the hottest recording artists on the planet but the No. 1 comedy on primetime television. The surviving Monkees recently released their first album in 20 years, Good Times! (Rhino Entertainment, May 2016), featuring new music from Rivers Cuomo of Weezer and Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard. It’s the band’s highest-charting U.S. release since 1967, but for most of the fans of the pre-Fab Four (yes, that’s what they were called) it’s still about the soundtrack of their youth. —George Prentice 7:30 p.m., $19.50, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609, morrisoncenter.com. BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 17


ARTS & CULTURE

HARRISON BERRY

COURTESY BCT

ARTS NEWS

FEELING THE BURN Adam Enright shines as the titular character in BCT’s production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch.

BCT GOES BIG WITH HEDWIG Aside from the wig, miniskirt and cape made from covers of Time magazine, the titular character of Hedwig and the Angry Inch is all of us. Admittedly, Hedwig is one-of-a-kind: a washed-up, genderqueer rockstar born on the wrong side of the Berlin Wall and the victim of a botched sex change. The forces that created her—love, rejection and disappointment—should be familiar to anyone fortunate enough to see the musical during its run at Boise Contemporary Theater that opened Oct. 8. Hedwig’s given name is Hansel Schmidt, a boy searching for his other half and convinced his true love is waiting for him on the western side of the Berlin Wall. A disastrous sex reassignment to get him over the wall and a failed marriage later, Hansel—now Hedwig (Adam Enright)—enters into a traumatic relationship with a young boy. The soulful, wry, rocking tale, directed by Tracy Sunderland, is relayed to the audience through song and monologue by Hedwig and her band, and the BCT stage has been retooled by designer Sue Latta as a bandstand. The rock score and Hedwig’s oversized personality propel the play’s first HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH half. By the Wednesdays-Saturdays, Oct. second half, 12-22; 8 p.m.; 2 p.m. matinees the audience on the final two Saturdays; $16-$50. Boise Contemporary is hooked Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208and ready 331-9224, bctheater.org for Hedwig to reveal herself as someone whose extravagant persona belies the familiarity of her struggle. Enright captured Hedwig’s many agonies and ecstasies, and Tess Worstell’s Yitzhak (Hedwig’s unappreciated lover) is the perfect counterpoint to the main character’s antics. The tunes are courtesy of Hedwig’s band, The Angry Inch: Thomas Paul on guitar, Melanie Radford on bass, Riley Anne Johnson on keyboard and percussionist Louis McFarland. Hedwig premiered off-Broadway in 1998, won a 2014 Tony Award for Best Musical Revival and has aged well. Its most enduring quality may be how it allows its main character to tell her story on her own terms—a stroke that stresses Hedwig’s humanity and challenges our narrative expectations. —Harrison Berry 18 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Sparks fly at Ming Studios in exhibit created with timber from Pioneer fire burn zone HARRISON BERRY

Artist Giuseppe Licari looked relaxed as the torch he held belched fire on the already scorched remains of a pine tree. Laying on a nearby tarp spread out in the courtyard of Ming Studios were the twisted remains of more burned timber waiting to be brushed clean of soot, blasted with Licari’s torch, treated and reconstructed. In Ming’s whitewashed, angular showspace, Licari will bolt the trees back together and anchor them to the gallery’s concrete floor Sicilian-born, Rotterdam, Netherlands-based artist Giuseppe Licari opens his latest installation, Contrapfor his exhibit, Contrappunto, which opens punto, at Ming Studios Friday, Oct. 14. Friday, Oct. 14. The exhibition of work by the Sicilian-born, Rotterdam, Netherlands-based artist will comprise a ghostly grove of gnarled rich soil that supports plant growth in forests. illuminated for him the kinds of choices that limbs and caddywhompus trunks. Opening In Humus, TENT visitors strolled in the can have broad impacts on nature. Despite the two weeks before Halloween, Contrappunto— space where soil growth should have been. apparent ill health of the trees Licari found, Italian for “counterpoint”—is appropriately In Contrappunto at Ming, the soil has been the Pioneer fire only grew to its tremendous spooky but, at its heart, it is about contrasts replaced by cement, specially ground for size when resources were diverted from conthat challenge viewers’ assumptions about nature, themselves and mankind’s footprint on taining it to address another fire thought to be Licari’s installation. At the Boise show, the overlaps and contrasts between nature and more dangerous to people and property (the the natural world. human development are on full display. The Mile Marker 14 fire). When Licari went into “The landscape functions as a mirror and a charred remains of once-living trees will rise the forest to collect timber for the exhibit, he lens,” Licari said. from a plain field of concrete, trapped inside said his main obstacle wasn’t steep terrain or Looming over Contrappunto is the Pioneer Ming’s interior. They’ve been bolted back fire, which burned more than 188,000 acres in still-glowing coals left behind by the fire. It together—“Frankentrees,” Licari called them— was red tape. the Boise National Forest and anchored to the ground, both for ease of “There’s so much bureaucracy in July, August, September CONTRAPPUNTO in America,” Licari said. “The for- installation and to illustrate the inadvertent and October, to become Opening reception Friday, Oct. fragmentation and destruction of forests that est is such a political entity.” the largest blaze on public 14, 7 p.m.; show runs Tuesdaytakes place even as humans manage them. Licari has long been fascinated lands in the U.S. this year. Thursday through Saturday, Dec. “I like to confront the architecture of setby the intersection of nature and Because of rugged terrain 3, 3-7 p.m.; FREE. Ming Studios, politics. In 2007, forest fires alleg- ting,” Licari said. “It becomes a perfect metaand inclement conditions, 420 S. Sixth St., 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org phor to talk about society and humanity.” edly caused by arson (and exacerfire crews couldn’t get After an afternoon of cleaning and rebated by negligence) burned across the upper hand until the burning timber for Contrappunto, Licari Greece. Simultaneously, Greece cooler weather of autumn nursed a can of Sockeye beer and talked about was in the infancy of what would become slowed the fire’s spread. the Greek financial crisis, lost pensions and an economic crisis exacerbated by the Great In late September, Licari and a handful of how the southern European country’s debt has smokejumpers visited the burn zone, gathering Recession that would jeopardize its relationship with the European Union. For Licari, the complicated its relationship with its neightimber for the exhibit. Licari said the trees he bors. For many people, nature is a place where found there had been ravaged by beetles, mites result would be an exhibit in which he comhumans can escape the pressures of civilization. pared the areas of a single tree and a house to and cancers. The forest as a whole appeared Licari’s work is a reminder of man’s roots in the show how forest managers determine what is unhealthy. “These trees were already dead, so the fire is allowed to burn and what is spared. Next came forest, but also that when people go there, they good,” he said. “The problem was when private his exhibition at TENT Rotterdam, Humus, in bring civilization with them. “Humanity is part of nature, but with culwhich he suspended trees’ root systems from homes were threatened.” ture, we’re something else,” he said. the ceiling. The title came from the nutrientLicari’s foray in the Boise National Forest BOISE WEEKLY.COM


THINGS THAT GO BUMP… AND SPLAT

RYAN J OH NSON

SCREEN

The 2016 Idaho Horror Film Festival promises legends, filmmaking school and killer poop GEORGE PRENTICE

The pool of submissions for the 2016 Idaho Horror Film Festival was deep—and icky and ghoulish. “Zombies? Zombies were so last-year,” said Molly Deckart, IHFF founder and director. “This year, it’s children in peril. Creepy clowns? Oh, yeah. And…” she said, “how can Some of Hollywood’s best filmmakers—J.J. Abrams, Kathryn Bigelo, James Cameron, the Coen Brothers, Peter JackI put this? Well, we saw a lot of killer toilets son, Steven Spielberg and Oliver Stone—have all cut their professional teeth on horror films. and killer poop. One of the local films submitted is actually called—wait for it—DIEarrhea. And, of course, there’s a film that has a tian Lybrook, whose film Carbon won him the the exclusive opportunity. The educators will killer vagina.” use the digital studios at Boise’s newest landOne Potato screenplay prize at the Sun Valley Those gag-inducing gems will be folded mark, Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, and lead Film Festival. into the 10 blocks of movies spread over two Idaho movie directors-in-the-making through The stars come out again at The Egyptian nights, certain to give viewers nightmares well screenwriting, project development editing and on Saturday, Oct. 15 with a screening of the past Halloween. This year’s entries include even how to expertly light a film set. 1977 Wes Craven cult classic The Hills Have scores of feature-length and short films from The boot camp, which is limited to 40 Eyes, which will include an appearance by horfilmmakers across the U.S. and many Idahoror film legend Michael Berryman, who played attendees, is sponsored by the Boise City based entries, dubbed “Spuds and Guts.” Department of Arts and History, Boise State The fest is bringing in some real star power, mutant cannibal Pluto in THHE and the University and JUMP. 1985 sequel The Hills Have too, including an appearance “JUMP is new. IHFF is still relatively new. Eyes Part 2. Berryman also by Daniel Myrick, a filmmaker It’s a natural fit,” said Deckart. “I’m a huge fan haunted Weird Science, Star who redefined the horror genre 2016 IDAHO HORROR FILM of the education piece of the festival. That’s Trek IV and The X-Files. in 1999. Myrick was a littleFESTIVAL truly why I do all this.” Now in its third year, known editor/cinematographer Thursday, Oct. 13-Saturday, Deckart is the first to admit a lot of IHFF the success of IHFF isn’t of music videos and commerOct. 15 revelers don’t go anywhere near a movie theatre due only to the slate of cials when he and his writing Full Schedule and pricing at during the festival, which is why she fills the horror films screened at partner, Eduardo Sanchez, put idahohorroffilmfestival.org opening night of IHFF, Thursday, Oct. 13, The Egyptian—the festival together a 35-page outline and with events across the city. For example, The is, primarily, a celebration eight-day shooting schedule that Mode will host a horror poetry slam while of filmmaking in general. ultimately became one of the Humpin’ Hannah’s will present a live producDeckart is quick to remind most successful independent films of all time, grossing more than $250 mil- anyone who’ll listen that some of Hollywood’s tion of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. There’s even something for the kids, with a 10 a.m. best filmmakers—J.J. Abrams, Kathryn lion worldwide: The Blair Witch Project. free screening of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Bigelow, James Cameron, the Coen Brothers, “What did I have to lose?” said Deckart. Stone on Saturday, Oct. 15 at The Egyptian. Peter Jackson, Steven Spielberg and Oliver “I called and called and called and begged “I can’t tell you how many times people Stone—cut their teeth on horror films. Daniel to come to Boise. I told him what a ask if we do more family friendly things,” “It’s the one common thread of up-andunique showcase IHFF could offer to embrace how his filmmaking forever broke the mold of coming filmmakers,” said Deckart. “And that’s Deckart said. “I agree; I’m a mom. Who knows? Maybe we’ve grown big enough to why the centerpiece of IHFF this year is our horror films.” hold two separate IHFF events in 2017: one Filmmaking Boot Camp.” A screening of The Blair Witch Project on for hard-core horror fans and one that’s more The day-long symposium comes via the Friday, Oct. 14 at 6 p.m. at The Egyptian about families, fun and film,” said Deckart. Theatre will include an audience Q&A session San Francisco School of Digital Filmmaking, with Myrick hosted by Idaho filmmaker Chris- which is flying some of its faculty to Idaho for “Something to think about.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 19


BEERGUZZLER HOP HARVEST FRESH

FORT GEORGE FRESH IPA, $3.50-$4 A fresh, wet hop pounder from this Astoria, Ore. brewery, it pours a hazy straw color with a thin but persistent head. Opens with earthy hops, herb, caramel and apricot. The palate is a perfect mix of lightly bitter, floral hops; creamy tropical fruit (mango, papaya, Meyer lemon); and subtle caramel malt. Finishes smooth and dry with a light hit of pine. FREMONT FIELD TO FERMENT FRESH HOP PALE ALE, $1.60-$1.90 A tan, two finger head tops this hazy, tangerine colored brew—it fades quickly but leaves a sticky lacing. Hops dominate the nose, fresh and fruity with a resiny backbone. Though it’s billed as a pale ale, the hop bite in this Seattlebased entry is predominant, much more so than with the Fort George IPA. Those hops blend well with sweet grapefruit and soft malt flavors. Nice bite to the finish. SOCKEYE FRESH HOP DOUBLE DAGGER IMPERIAL IPA, $3.50-$4 Our own local stalwart has given us this amber ale topped by a thick froth that fades quickly. Its big hop aromas live up to the Imperial IPA moniker. Starts out with more big, but not overly bitter, hops on the palate as well, yielding to ripe grapefruit, pear and pineapple flavors in the middle, and finishing with deliciously gritty hops on the creamy finish.

FOOD

A L E X A N D R A N E L SON

October is the traditional time for end-of-theseason harvesting and hops are no exception. That’s good news for beer lovers, as several breweries take advantage of this fact, creating beers flavored by hops sourced from nearby farms. For Idaho’s entry, it’s Wilder; for Washington, Yakama; and for Oregon, Linn County.

FROM KICKBOXING TO KIMCHI

Eagle’s Idaho Athletic Club has it all ALE X ANDRA NEL SON The lobby of the Idaho Athletic Club in Eagle looks like the entrance to any other gym: the lighting is fluorescent, the front desk is prominent, and the faint smells of sweat and chlorine fill the air. Visit at lunch time or during the dinner hour and you might get a whiff of something else: kimchi. Off to the right in the gym lobby is what looks like a concessions stand, with a tiny kitchen fronted by a few round tables. It’s actually a month-old restaurant—Kim’s Taste of Korea— which offers everything from sushi and smoothies to a full menu of authentic Korean dishes. Busy behind the counter is the restaurant’s creator and only employee, Stacy Yoo, a Korean woman in her mid-50s whose path to operating an eatery inside a gym in Eagle has been a winding one. Yoo was born to poor working family in South Korea in the 1960s. One of five children, she was told from a young age that dreams were a commodity they couldn’t afford. After she and her mother immigrated to U.S. when Yoo was 20, she continued to put family and practicality first. It wasn’t until recently that Yoo decided it was time to chase her secret dream: sharing the Korean food she loves with people who have never had the real thing. “Many people say I’m good at cooking, but my husband didn’t support me, my mom when I was 20 years old didn’t support me,” Yoo said, “It was just my dream. I didn’t go to any culinary school, but when I taste something I know whether it’s good or not.” Searching Craigslist from her home in San Antonio, Texas, she came across an ad for restaurant equipment and a kitchen for rent in Eagle. After a quick flight to Idaho to inspect the space, Yoo packed her car and made the 25-hour drive from San Antonio to Eagle in three days— leaving her husband behind. “I only have so much money so I had to have my own business where the rent is reasonable and there is a lot of traffic,” Yoo said. During her 35 years living in the U.S., Yoo worked all over the country as a cosmetologist, a seamstress, a grocery store sushi-roller and a dry-cleaner, but her heart never left the kitchen.

Build up an appetite while working out? Kim’s Taste of Korea is there for you.

“Even Korean wives don’t want to make this. Now, she puts her culinary instinct to use to produce an array of made-to-order Korean dishes You have to sautee each item separate lots of time, lots of work.” for hungry patrons walking through the Idaho The method is lengthy but rewarding. AccordAthletic Club’s front doors. ing to Yoo, preparing each ingredient separately The menu at Kim’s Taste of Korea—adapted ensures their individual flavors will shine through from the original name Kimbap’s, after the in the final dish. She’s not wrong. The bell Korean roll made with cooked beef rather than peppers crunch just enough to release a burst of fish—includes such offerings like kimchi fried mildly spicy juice, the noodles are sweet and al rice, pot stickers, the aforementioned kimdente, and the tender slices of beef contain both bap, sweet and spicy pork, sweet potato starch the depth of soy sauce and the palate pleasing noodles with beef and seaweed salad all priced touch of sugar. between $4.99 and $7.99. The food has been so well received that, on With such affordable prices it’s tempting to some days, it feels like the gym is beginning to order a bit of everything, though it’s hard to turn into a restaurant. Staff members, who can go wrong with the kimchi fried rice. Each bite often be seen ordering from Yoo’s counter, don’t is spicy but not searing, the pleasant heat of fermented cabbage complemented by an umami seem to mind. “I’m literally having sushi rolls and pot punch from melt-in-your-mouth cubes of Spam stickers every day,” said Idaho (a well-loved staple in Korean Athletic Club General Manager cooking). Adding even more texAndy Heinz. “We’ve had a few tural interest, the rice is sauteed KIM’S TASTE OF KOREA other restaurants in the space, with broccoli and julienned vegIdaho Athletic Club lobby, but I think this is probably the etables, then topped with an egg 875 E. Plaza Drive, Eagle best response one has gotten. It’s sunny side up. bringing in people who aren’t Like many of Yoo’s dishes, even working out, just to eat.” which feature a traditional combiSo far, Kim’s Taste of Korea has delivered exnation of meat and egg, the fried rice provides a actly what Yoo was hoping for when she took the serious dose of post-workout protein. risk to pursue her dream. Running a restaurant Each dish is made to order and some are all by herself for the past month hasn’t been easy, time intensive, so Yoo recommends gym pabut she has taken the complications in stride, trons place their orders before they exercise for laughing as she recalls times she’s had to saute pickup on their way out the door, leaving her the ingredients for her kimchi fried rice with one about an hour to cook. Customers who aren’t members of the gym are encouraged to call and hand while making a smoothie with the other. “My family never appreciated my cooking,” order their meals in advance. Yoo said, glowing, “I needed someone to ap“This dish,” said Yoo, pointing to a glistenpreciate it.” ing pile of marinated beef and glass noodles,

—David Kirkpatrick 20 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN JORDAN MOODY Immigration law, executive actions and trusting the police HARRISON BERRY

It didn’t take long after Republicans retook the U.S. Senate in late 2014 for Idaho agribusinesses to call on Congress to enact immigration reform. The lobbying efforts were in vain: Congress never agreed on a reform package and executive actions by President Barack Obama were challenged so vociferously in court they may never touch the millions of undocumented people they were designed to shield from deportation. Jordan Moody sees it up close every day. A managing associate attorney at Boise-based Wilner & O’Reilly, APLC, he specializes in immigration law, and particularly family based, transactional and removal defense. What are your insights on immigration reform from a voter’s standpoint? I’ve seen a sad lack of understanding of immigration law. Most people really seek to oversimplify it, and that’s unfair. There are people saying, “It’s really simple: They’re here, and we just ask them to leave,” and that takes out the entire human element. If people understood the issues as fully as they could, viewpoints would be drastically different from what they are currently. How do executive actions on immigration affect attorneys like you on the ground? [Immigration] forms ask for not only your information, but your family’s information. People rightfully are apprehensive of an executivelevel action. People would rather have Congress do something. They want to be able to receive a benefit and the outcome will be more predictable.

for them. The laws are essentially prohibiting employers from getting the employees they need a lot of the time. How would you characterize the disposition of immigration law toward immigrants? Immigration law is notoriously about 20 years behind. We’re stuck in our efforts of evolving out of our unfortunately racist past. Some of the questions immigration officials ask people in their interviews include whether they’ll practice polygamy or are associated with the Communist Party. How does that manifest here in Idaho? You’ll see things like people who have a U.S. citizen spouse here and children who have been here for 25 years or more, who by some emergency had to go to their home country. The person I just described, they have no option right now. I have the unfortunate job sometimes of having to break the bad news [that they can’t return to the U.S.]. What are some of the moving parts of immigration law in Idaho versus other parts of the U.S.? What comes up a lot of the time is driver’s license accessibility. Most people need to drive, and when people find themselves without licenses, they end up with multiple tickets for driving without a license, and that’s strictly based on immigration status.

Some call for closer scrutiny of immigrants coming from the Muslim world. An entire religion is not what we need to be careful of. It’s people in that religion, and those can be vetted in less harsh and in more sympathetic ways. Seeing these people as humans with their own back story instead of putting a stamp on them.

What’s the U-Visa program? It’s designed for victims of qualifying crimes that are helpful to law enforcement. If they work with police, they can receive a temporary visa. You can imagine the sort of incentive this creates. A lot of the time, they’ll carry around a lot of cash, making them more vulnerable to being robbed. If you’re robbed but undocumented, do you call the police? That’s why the U-Visa was created.

Are some employers forced to circumvent immigration law in order to get access to labor in Idaho? Employers have told me they have dozens of jobs they cannot fill with willing and able U.S. workers, and that they have immigrant labor that is ready and willing but not able, legally, to work

How do you break the ice with people coming into your office seeking help? If you’re the victim of a crime, be sure to work with the police. People are being educated by the legal community to work with police because of the U-Visa program. It’s been fulfilling the intent of that law and it’s a beautiful thing.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 21


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section of our website (www.cuportland.edu) for more detail and specific requirements. All education, training, experience may be gained concurrently. Applicants must pass pre-employment background check Applicants must be U.S. workers. Please apply online at: https://cu-portland. csod.com/ats/careersite/search. aspx?site=1&c=cu-portland. AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 ANDERSON TALENT People needed for acting, extra work and modeling projects! Seeking all ages/skill levels for paid gigs! Flexible schedules/ great pay! Call/txt 208-971-8010!

NYT CROSSWORD | MOVIE DOUBLES BY MICHAEL ASHLEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS

26 Crusader’s foe 27 Longtime “60 Minutes” reporter 28 Beats handily 29 “Always be a poet, even in ____”: Baudelaire 30 Bro 33 See what one is saying? 35 Barista’s big reveal? 38 Fall guy 41 Awful

1 Loud sound in a storm 5 Brand in the freezer aisle 9 “Well, blimey!” 13 Masked hero 18 ____ land 19 Emergency state 22 Indo-____ 23 One working for Supercuts? 25 “Later” 1

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81 Child in Chile 84 Humpty Dumpty-shaped 85 Post-Neolithic period 86 Astrobiologists’ org. 87 “That’s it for me” 88 Actress Amanda of “She’s the Man” 89 Army E-6s: Abbr. 93 Writer who specializes in sentimental stories 95 Program file suffix 96 Declaration at Ringo’s birth? 98 Chef Boyardee offering 100 ’Tis the season 101 ____ football 106 Parthenon feature 109 Singer LaBelle 111 Best: Lat. 113 Send, as payment 114 Photographer’s impossible task? 117 “Poor Richard’s Almanack” offering 118 Menace in “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” 119 Other than that 120 “This I Promise You” band, 2000 121 Added details 122 Divisions of office bldgs. 123 Whole bunch

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1 Hug 2 University in Beaumont, Tex. 3 Old Olds 4 Law-office staffers, informally 5 “Look!” to Livy 6 Spanish nobleman 7 Cry at a card table 8 W.W. II org. 9 Stuck through 10 Specious reasoning 11 University in Garden City, Long Island 12 “____ out!” (ump’s cry) 13 Frank who was called the “Electric Don Quixote” 14 Mountain nymph 15 Politico Paul 16 Billiards need

17 Till compartment 20 Smaller picture 21 Canine command 24 Freezer items 28 Darn, e.g. 31 Radii partners 32 Saw 34 Part of an ignition system 36 Timecard measure: Abbr. 37 Philosophical lead-in to -ism 38 Money in Oregon state coffers? 39 A ____ apple 40 Cool, in old slang 41 Company near the start of the telephone book listings 42 Relatives 43 French bachelor? 44 “Goodness!” 46 Spade holder 47 It might start “Attn.” 50 Gets back (to), in a way 52 Katniss’s love in “The Hunger Games” 54 Morning ____ 55 D.O.J. figures 56 Serengeti roamer 58 Slim beachwear 60 ____ generis 61 Cara of “Fame” 65 Eye: Sp. 66 Part of a boot 67 Prefix with -therm 69 River spanned by the Pont Neuf 70 Member of the genus Vipera 72 Magazine founder Eric 73 Members of la familia 76 Own, so to speak 77 Redbox offerings 78 Be in harmony

79 Serengeti roamer 80 Country music’s Colter 82 “Truly” 83 Daughter of Tantalus 86 Cold War land: Abbr. 87 Mediterranean land: Abbr. 90 Pays a short visit 91 Son of Sir Lancelot 92 Large sea snails 94 Bit of attire for Roy Rogers 96 Forum greeting 97 Quick signature: Abbr. 98 Rule 99 San Diego State athlete 102 Coasters, e.g. 103 Online shoppers’ destination 104 Sip 105 Slightly off L A S T

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106 Football Hall-of-Famer Tarkenton 107 Cold War side 108 “____ as well” 110 Little ’un 112 Many tenured profs 114 Old Turkish commander 115 Some test results, for short 116 Crank Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

S T E I A L D O M O S A U D S B E R E E T E S R E D C O L A T A T O S E W T A H I S A N A I T P R I S T E N A C T N L A H D L E L L WORLD

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H O E S W A N S O N G G O A L POST

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HABILITATIVE INTERVENTION SPECIALIST Do you love working with children and want to make a difference in the lives of disabled kids? All Seasons Mental Health in Boise is seeking to hire a Habilitative Intervention Specialist to provide direct therapy to children with developmental disabilities, teach life skills, modify problem behaviors in home, community and school settings, and educate families. Applicants must hold a Bachelor’s degree in a human services ďŹ eld from a nationally accredited university or college, have one year of documented supervised work experience with children with disabilities, and have a Habilitative Intervention CertiďŹ cate to apply. Please include the words “Boise Weekly adâ€? in the subject line of your email and submit cover sheet, resume and references when applying. sblock@asmh. org PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStation.net PART TIME ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Come be a part of a rewarding

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team at All Seasons Mental Health in Boise. We are seeking applicants with excellent phone skills who are able to follow written and verbal instructions, and have experience writing professional letters and messages. The person who will join our team must be detail oriented. Please include the words “Boise Weekly Adâ€? in the subject line of your email and submit cover sheet, resume and references when applying. sblock@asmh.org PART TIME MEDICAL ASSISTANT Are you personable, hardworking and a team player? Our Medical Clinic is interviewing Medical Assistants to ďŹ nd the right person to join our team. This person will have a minimum of 3 year’s experience in a doctor’s ofďŹ ce setting and have experience with phlebotomy. Please include the words “Boise Weekly adâ€? in the subject line of your email and submit cover sheet, resume and references when applying. sblock@ asmh.org SEEKING REGISTERED NURSE Divinity Healthcare is seeking a RN to provide weekly assessments for clients in Boise valley. This is NOT regular home health. Much easier! Hours are exible 7 days

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Boise Weekly’s ofďŹ ce is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

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E-MAIL classiďŹ ed@boiseweekly.com SUNFLOWER: I am a beautiful, sprightly gal, but need a human to get me back in shape.

CAREER TRAINING

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SCARLETT: You’ll never meet another cat as playful as me. I love anything that will play with me.

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These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

ALRIC: 3-year-old, male, Chihuahua. Cuddles and sits on your lap once acquainted. Good with other small dogs. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #33578161)

Our programs are: • Fast 20 months for an associate’s degree • Flexible Study on campus or online* • Personal Small class sizes

PLUTO: 4-year-old, male, golden retriever/shepherd mix. Sweet, smart and willing to please. Best with older kids. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #33525318)

TIGGER: 5-year-old, female, American pit bull/ terrier mix. Loyal and loving. Needs a home with kids over 10 and no other dogs. (Kennel 412 – #17530096)

Financial aid and scholarships†are available for those who qualify.

* Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s ďŹ rst insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

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*Online programs are offered by our affiliated institution, Independence University. †Scholarship awards are limited. See scholarshipshc.com for details. Stevens-Henager College admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. For graduation rates, the median debt of students, and other data, see www.stevenshenager.edu/student-information.

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HARLEY: 3-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Came to the shelter as a stray with her kittens. Will need to spend the night to be spayed. (Cage 103 – #32127728)

JOHN CENA: 5-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Loves exploring. Wants attention on his own terms. Needs to be an only pet. (Shelter cattery – #33140601)

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA MAGISTRATE DIVISION IN RE: Sophia Enriquez. A Developmentally Disabled Person. Case No. CV-IG -2015-15312 NOTICE OF HEARING RE: PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF

GUARDIAN OF A DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED PERSON 1. Notice is hereby given specifically including to the father of Sophia Enriquez that on September 2, 2015, Rebecca Leib filed a petition for appointment of guardian of Sophia Enriquez. 2. That on April 13, 2016, the Department of Health and Welfare filed their Guardianship Report. 3. The petition is hereby set for hearing before the Honorable Christopher Bieter at the Ada County Courthouse, 200 W. Front Street, Boise, Idaho, on October 21, 2016 at 11:00 am. DATED this 6th day of September 2016. PUB Sept. 21, 28 and Oct. 5, 12, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Rita F. Desjarlais. Legal Name Case No. CV 011616296 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Rita F. Desjarlais, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): A study published in peerreviewed Communications Research suggests only 28 percent of us realize when someone is flirting with us. I hope that figure won’t apply to you Aries in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological situation, you will be on the receiving end of more invitations, inquiries, and allurements than usual. The percentage of these that might be worth responding to will also be higher than normal. Not all of them will be obvious, however. So be extra vigilant. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The ancient Greek sage Socrates was a founder of Western philosophy and a seminal champion of critical thinking. Yet he relied on his dreams for crucial information. He was initiated into the esoteric mysteries of love by the prophetess Diotima, and had an intimate relationship with a daimonion, a divine spirit. I propose we make Socrates your patron saint for the next three weeks. Without abandoning your reliance on logic, make a playful effort to draw helpful clues from non-rational sources, too. (P.S.: Socrates drew oracular revelations from sneezes. Please consider that outlandish possibility yourself. Be alert, too, for the secret meanings of coughs, burps, grunts, mumbles, and yawns.)

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Helper Experiment, Part One: Close your eyes and imagine that you are in the company of a kind, attentive helper—a person, animal, ancestral spirit or angel that you either know well or haven’t met yet. Spend at least five minutes visualizing a scene in which this ally aids you in fulfilling a particular goal. The Helper Experiment, Part Two: Repeat this exercise every day for the next seven days. Each time, visualize your helper making your life better in some specific way. Now here’s my prediction: Carrying out The Helper Experiment will attract actual support into your real life. CANCER (June 21-July 22): New rules: 1. It’s unimaginable and impossible for you to be obsessed with anything or anyone that’s no good for you. 2. It’s unimaginable and impossible for you to sabotage your stability by indulging in unwarranted fear. 3. It’s imaginable and possible for you to remember the most crucial thing you have forgotten. 4. It’s imaginable and possible for you to replace debilitating self-pity with invigorating self-love and healthy self-care. 5. It’s imaginable and possible for you to discover a new mother lode of emotional strength. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It’s swing-swirl-spiral time, Leo. It’s ripple-sway-flutter time and flow-

24 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

gush-gyrate time and jive-jigglejuggle time. So I trust you will not indulge in fruitless yearnings for unswerving progress and rock-solid evidence. If your path is not twisty and tricky, it’s probably the wrong path. If your heart isn’t teased and tickled into shedding its dependable formulas, it might be an overly hard heart. Be an improvisational curiosity-seeker. Be a principled player of unpredictable games. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Some English-speaking astronomers use the humorous slang term “meteor-wrong.” It refers to a rock that is at first thought to have fallen from the heavens as a meteorite (“meteor-right”), but that is ultimately proved to be of terrestrial origin. I suspect there may currently be the metaphorical equivalent of a meteor-wrong in your life. The source of some new arrival or fresh influence is not what it had initially seemed. But that doesn’t have to be a problem. On the contrary. Once you have identified the true nature of the new arrival or fresh influence, it’s likely to be useful and interesting. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Most of us can’t tickle ourselves. Since we have conscious control of our fingers, we know we can stop any time. Without the element of uncertainty, our squirm reflex doesn’t kick in. But I’m wondering if you might get a temporary

exemption from this rule in the coming weeks. I say this because the astrological omens suggest you will have an extraordinary capacity to surprise yourself. Novel impulses will be rising up in you on a regular basis. Unpredictability and spontaneity will be your specialties. Have fun doing what you don’t usually do! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): During the final ten weeks of 2016, your physical and mental health will flourish in direct proportion to how much outworn and unnecessary stuff you flush out of your life between now and October 25. Here are some suggested tasks: 1. Perform a homemade ritual that will enable you to magically shed at least half of your guilt, remorse, and regret. 2. Put on a festive party hat, gather up all the clutter and junk from your home, and drop it off at a thrift store or the dump. 3. Take a vow that you will do everything in your power to kick your attachment to an influence that’s no damn good for you. 4. Scream nonsense curses at the night sky for as long as it takes to purge your sadness and anger about pain that no longer matters. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A Buddhist monk named Matthieu Ricard had his brain scanned while he meditated. The experiment revealed that the

positive emotions whirling around in his gray matter were superabundant. Various publications thereafter dubbed him “the happiest person in the world.” Since he’s neither egotistical nor fond of the media’s simplistic sound bites, he’s not happy about that title. I hope you won’t have a similar reaction when I predict that you Sagittarians will be the happiest tribe of the zodiac during the next two weeks. For best results, I suggest you cultivate Ricard’s definitions of happiness: “altruism and compassion, inner freedom (so that you are not the slave of your own thoughts), senses of serenity and fulfillment, resilience, as well as a clear and stable mind that does not distort reality too much.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now is a perfect moment to launch or refine a project that will generate truth, beauty and justice. Amazingly enough, now is also an excellent time to lunch or refine a long-term master plan that will make you healthy, wealthy, and wise. Is this a coincidence? Not at all. The astrological omens suggest that your drive to be of noble service dovetails well with your drive for personal success. For the foreseeable future, unselfish goals are well-aligned with selfish goals. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Has your world become at least 20 percent larger since Sept. 1?

Has your generosity grown to nearheroic proportions? Have your eyes beheld healing sights that were previously invisible to you? Have you lost at least two of your excuses for tolerating scrawny expectations? Are you awash in the desire to grant forgiveness and amnesty? If you can’t answer yes to at least two of those questions, Aquarius, it means you’re not fully in harmony with your best possible destiny. So get to work! Attune yourself to the cosmic tendencies! And if you are indeed reaping the benefits I mentioned, congratulations—and prepare for even further expansions and liberations. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Some astrologers dwell on your tribe’s phobias. They assume that you Pisceans are perversely drawn to fear; that you are addicted to the strong feelings it generates. In an effort to correct this distorted view, and in accordance with current astrological omens, I hereby declare the coming weeks to be a Golden Age for Your Trust in Life. It will be prime time to exult in everything that evokes your joy and excitement. I suggest you make a list of these glories, and keep adding new items to the list every day. Here’s another way to celebrate the Golden Age: Discover and explore previously unknown sources of joy and excitement.

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change to Rita F. Salwey. The reason for the change in name is: divorce. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Nov. 01, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be

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filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Sep. 07, 2016. Christopher D. Rich, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk. PUB Sept. 21,28, Oct. 5, 12, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Jennifer Claire Berry and Natalie Marie Berry Legal Names of family Case No. CV 01 1616909 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Family) A Petition to change the name of (1) Jennifer Claire Berry, and the name of (2) Natalie Marie Berry, mother and daughter, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to (1) Jennifer Claire LeBlanc; (2) Natalie Marie LeBlanc. The reason for the change in name is: mother recently divorced. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Nov 1, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Sep 07, 2016 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deidre Price, Deputy Clerk. PUB Sept 21, 28 Oct 5, 12, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Legal Name Lora Dawn Ireland Case No. CV 01 1617234 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Lora Dawn Ireland, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Yiska Forest Hugo. The reason for the change in name is personal. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Nov. 3, 2016 at the Ada

County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Sept. 19, 2016 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEBBIE NAGELE PUB Sept. 28, Oct. 5, 12 & 19 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Legal Name Tiffany Lynn Pharr Case No. CV 01 1616982 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Tiffany Lynn Pharr, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Zoie Rose Pharr. The reason for the change in name is: my previous name no longer reflects who I am. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Nov. 15, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Sept. 14, 2016 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Sept. 28, Oct. 5, 12 & 19 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Kyle Mackenzie Jack Derow Legal Name Case No. CV 01 1618468 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Kyle Mackenzie Derow, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Kira Mackenzie Derow. The reason for the change in name is: to make my

chosen name my legal name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Dec. 13, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Oct. 3, 2016 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Oct. 12, 19, 26 & Nov. 2

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PAGE BREAK $GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH “HALLOWEEN COSTUMES”

DEAR MINERVA, Halloween is almost here and I can already see the parade of skanky costumes. Will you please try to tell these women that they don’t have to dress like sluts in order to celebrate? I mean, really, they need some class. I don’t want my children seeing that kind of thing and thinking it’s OK to wear stuff like that. —Disgusted

DEAR DISGUSTED, Sugar, you are barking up the wrong blonde bombshell if you think I’m about to tell someone how to dress on Halloween (or any other day for that matter). Let me break it on down for you, OK? 1. Halloween is a chance for people to live out a fantasy they might not be able to express any other time. I ain’t gonna rain on that parade. 2. While I think there should be some restrictions, such as costumes that are insensitive or offensive to different cultures, for the most part I encourage people to let their freak flag fly. 3. It is nobody’s—I repeat—nobody’s place to tell a woman what to wear. How dare you participate in and perpetuate “slut shaming.” Whatever costume or clothing that makes a woman feel confident, sexy and comfortable is fine by me. It is none of your business what she wears. Her body. Her choice. 4. Don’t give me the kid B.S. You are the one responsible for raising your child. The human body is not a source of shame. Get with the program. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

$10.8 MILLION Purchase amount for a painting by Dutch Old Master Frans Hals that was reported by as a fake Oct. 6 by Sotheby’s auction experts.

$200 MILLION Value of Old Master works now under suspicion of being forgeries following the discovery of the Hals fake. (thedailybeast.com)

(bbc.com)

26 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | BOISEweekly

THE DEFINITIVE MAP OF AMERICA’S CREEPY CLOWN EPIDEMIC Why did it have to be clowns? For the past few weeks, cities across the U.S. (more recently, the U.K.) have been plagued by a creepy craze: clown sightings. Some of the mincing harlequins appear to be harmless pranksters, others are far more frightening but, whatever the case, creepy clown sightings have become so prevalent, even the White House addressed the issue. In Idaho, numerous sightings had the Nampa atlasobscura.com Police Department warning people against resorting to vigilantism. If you can choke down your coulrophobia and are interested in knowing more about sightings of these shambling sideshow menaces, keep up with Atlas Obscura’s Definitive Map of America’s Creepy Clown Epidemic. The interactive cartograph lets readers revel in details of the scores of incidents nationwide, from the transparent attempts of high schoolers to get out of taking a test to the outright bizarre. Or you can follow the advice of author Stephen King, who tweeted, “Hey, guys, time to cool the clown hysteria—most of em are good, cheer up the kiddies, make people laugh.” This from the guy who wrote It… which has been adapted for a movie scheduled for a 2017 release. Hmmm… —BW Staff

Taken by instagram user schroeder_allan.

FROM THE POLL VAULT

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS SFM-STEVE “CLARKE AND THE HIMSELFS AND FRIENDS,” FULTON MUSIC 1. “EPONYM,” 6. CLARKE AND THE HIMSELFS A MILLION,” AND FRIENDS BON IVER 2. “22 “BLUE MOUNTAIN,” “HOKA,” NAHKO AND MED- 7. BOB WEIR 3. ICINE FOR THE PEOPLE 8. “SORCERESS,” OPETH “REDEMPTION AND RUIN,” “KEEP ME SINGING,” VAN 4. THE DEVIL MAKES THREE 9. MORRISON BAND,” BETTER OR DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS WORSE,” JOHN PRINE 5. “AMERICAN 10.“FOR

$179.3 MILLION Amount paid by Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al Thani for Picasso’s “Les femmes d’Alger (Version ‘O’),” making it the priciest art ever sold at auction. (artsy.net)

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FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

Should Daylight Saving Time be abolished? Yes: 87.07%

No: 11.35%

I don’t know: 1.58%

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to be a scientif ic s a mp l e o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

15

$250 MILLION

175

20

650

Number of paintings in the Les femmes d’Alger series that Picasso painted from Dec. 13, 1954-Feb. 14, 1955 as an homage to Eugene Delacroix, who died in November 1954.

Amount spent by Al Thani’s daughter, who heads the Qatari Museums Authority, for works of Cezanne.

Number of Art Dealers Association of America member galleries in 25 U.S. cities (none are in Idaho).

Number of works by Northwest artists included in BAM’s permanent collection.

(vulture.com)

(artdealers.org)

Number of exhibitions hosted each year at the Boise Art Museum, in addition to its permanent collection and community events.

(boiseartmuseum.org)

(boiseartmuseum.org)

(vulture.com)

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2016 | 27


Boise Weekly Vol.25 Issue 17  

Participacion: This election may bring more Idaho Latino voters to the polls.

Boise Weekly Vol.25 Issue 17  

Participacion: This election may bring more Idaho Latino voters to the polls.