Page 1

BOISEWEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

SEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016

VO L U M E 2 5 , I S S U E 1 2

“I like to sit in a place where nobody can attack me from the back.”

5

Hard Time

As contract prisons face trouble nationwide, Idaho’s last private lockup fills its niche

15

Class Act

At 66, iconic singer-songwriter Bonnie Raitt is still in a league of her own

18

CULTURE 18

Art Imitates Life

Chris Hunt’s recently published graphic series is set in a ’20s Paris, but its roots are in the City of Trees FREE TAKE ONE!


2cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Samantha Edge, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Jeffrey C. Lowe Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Marisa Johnson, marisa@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Bill Hagler, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE

THE FUTURE OF PRIVATE PRISONS

Last month, Mother Jones published a devastating investigation of a private prison in Louisiana run by Corrections Corporation of America—the nation’s largest for-profit prison operator and a corporation that has a troubled history in Idaho, as well. Titled “My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard,” journalist Shane Bauer embedded himself in the day-to-day operations of Winn Correctional Center. He underwent the CCA training program, wore the CCA uniform and spent his days with fellow CCA employees. In five harrowing chapters, Bauer painted the picture of not only an institution run amok—with slipshod policies, abusive treatment, understaffing and criminal behavior on both sides of the bars—but a system on the verge of failure. Idahoans should be familiar with this story. A version of it happened here when CCA ran the Idaho State Correctional Institution—that is, until 2013, after a series of scandals related to prison staffing and inmate treatment finally led to a parting of the ways (and a hefty settlement) between the state and its erstwhile contractor. Less than a month after the Mother Jones story, a federal report showed privately run prisons are more costly to operate, more violent and function with less oversight than their government-run counterparts. Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Justice issued a directive that all facilities operated by the Bureau of Prisons but managed by private vendors should be transferred back to state and federal authorities as their contracts run out. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which operates the nation’s network of immigration detention facilities, announced Sept. 5 it, too, would review its use of contract prisons. In the shadow of the continuing controversy over for-profit incarceration, the last private lockup in Idaho has been quietly doing its work in the desert outside Kuna. Boise Weekly staff writer Harrison Berry toured the facility and spoke to its warden to find out how it operates, what makes it different from prisons like the one exposed by Mother Jones and what its future might be. Find his report on Page 5. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST

Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Tracie McBride TITLE: “Unwavering Brilliance” MEDIUM: Mixed Media Glass Mosaic ARTIST STATEMENT: Love glass, anything glass! My work consists of re-purposed window glass, metal, wood, glass gems, millefiori, beads, colored glass and other intriguing objects. Come see me at Art in the Park, Sept. 9-11, booth No. 252. traciemcbridearts.com

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016c3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

DISCRIMINATION BY DESIGN? AN OVERPAS S SO LOW IT BLOCKS PUBLIC TR ANSIT FROM A PARTICUL AR NEIGHBORHOOD. BENCHES DESIGNED WITH PROMINENT ARM RESTS OR S H A L LOW S E AT S TO D I SC O U R AGE HOMELES S PEOPLE FROM SLEEPING ON THEM. BUILDINGS WITH ENTR ANCES FOR “AFFORDABLE HOUSING” TENANTS. ARE THESE E X AMPLES OF “DISCRIMINATION BY DESIGN” ? MORE AT NE WS/NATIONAL.

Come learn more about the new Main Street Station KƉĞŶŚŽƵƐĞƐŚĂƐďĞĞŶƐĐŚĞĚƵůĞĚĨŽƌϭϭĂ͘ŵ͘ƚŽ ϲƉ͘ŵ͘ŽŶtĞĚŶĞƐĚĂLJ͕^ĞƉƚ͘ϭϰƚŚĂŶĚtĞĚŶĞƐĚĂLJ͕ ^ĞƉƚ͘ϮϭƐƚ͘dŚĞƐƚĂƟŽŶŝƐůŽĐĂƚĞĚĂƚϳϳϳt͘DĂŝŶ^ƚ͘ ŽŵĞƚĂŬĞĂƚŽƵƌŽĨƚŚĞŶĞǁŵƵůƟƵƐĞƚƌĂŶƐŝƚ ĐĞŶƚĞƌ͕ǁŚŝĐŚŽƉĞŶƐĨŽƌďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐŽŶDŽŶĚĂLJ͕^ĞƉƚ͘ ϮϲƚŚ͘zŽƵĐĂŶĂůƐŽůĞĂƌŶŵŽƌĞĂďŽƵƚsĂůůĞLJZŝĚĞďƵƐ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞĐŚĂŶŐĞƐƐĐŚĞĚƵůĞĚƚŽďĞŝŵƉůĞŵĞŶƚĞĚƚŚĂƚ ƐĂŵĞĚĂLJ͘

BOISE BOUND College of Western Idaho trustees are preparing to put a bond before voters this November, expanding the Nampa site and creating a new campus in West Boise. Details at News/Citydesk.

HAUNTING While pushing back against reporting about “American Redoubters” moving to North Idaho, the Coeur d’Alene Press conceded the “Aryan ghost haunts us still.” See News/Citydesk.

SCHOOL’S OUT After 50 years, national for-profit education provider ITT Tech is closing its campuses nationwide, including in Boise, after feds pulled the plug on financial aid. More at News/Citydesk.

OPINION

4cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


ACHD says this crosswalk at State and 36th streets is “fully ADA compliant.”

One Idaho facility has survived hard times for the contract prison industry

A CROSS(ING) TO BEAR

HARRISON BERRY Pleasant Valley Road east of Kuna is desolate. On either side are huge gravel pits and vast reaches of high desert specked with hardy shrubs and dry grass. It’s also prison row. Dotted across the otherwise barren landscape are signs for the Idaho State Correctional Center, the South Boise Women’s Correctional Center and the Correctional Alternative Placement Program—the only remaining private lockup in the state of Idaho. Opened in 2010, CAPP is a minimum security facility owned and operated by Management and Training Corporation that houses about 430 low- to medium-risk male inmates undergoing treatment for substance abuse or cognitive issues. It’s one of four minimum security prisons in Idaho and boasts a 93 percent “graduation” rate, meaning it releases its inmates after they have completed a rigorous regimen. “Believe it or not, I care,” said CAPP Warden Brian Finn, pointing to a brass pin affixed to his lanyard, bearing the acronym BIONIC—a motto of sorts for MTC. In mid August, the Department of Justice issued a directive to the federal Bureau of Prisons to begin phasing out contracts with private prison companies, following a report that showed their facilities were more violent than their public counterparts. Following the announcement of the DOJ’s directive, the fallout was swift and severe. Corrections Corporation of America, the largest private prison company in America, saw its stock fall 40 percent within hours of the opening bell on Wall Street. For its part, MTC—the third largest prison contractor in the country behind CCA and Geo Group—pushed back at the directive: “bas[ing] this decision on cost, safety, security, and programming is wrong,” the company stated in a release. “The majority of inmates in contract prisons are from one country which brings inherent increased risk of violence.” Prison industry watchers, meanwhile, were quick to declare private prisons a failure. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Opened in 2010, the Correctional Alternative Placement Program—Idaho’s only remaining private lockup— houses about 430 low- to medium-risk male inmates and boasts a 93 percent “graduation” rate.

“That type of model hasn’t worked. We don’t believe it’s a model that leads to the protection of the civil rights people have,” said ACLU-Idaho Executive Director Leo Morales.

RIDERS ON THE STORM The inside of CAPP looks like a middle school. Polished concrete floors radiate from a central security booth toward communal living areas, classrooms, restrooms, medical, segregation and the kitchen. Inmates spend their days in classrooms decorated with murals featuring nature scenes and pop culture images alongside encouraging slogans, including one attributed to Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter: “They need love the most when they appear to deserve it the least.” Much of the criticism surrounding the private prison system has been focused on violence and lack of oversight. Finn said violence and incarceration-related problems at prisons aren’t a matter of if, but when. “Bad things are going to happen in this business,” he said. “That’s what we measure ourselves on: How we respond to issues.” Because CAPP is a minimum security lockup for those undergoing substance abuse and behavioral programs, however, it’s in a different class of prison with a different set of problems. When asked about a relatively high number of complaints regarding food service at CAPP, Finn explained that a good number of them were related to offenders’ displeasure with the water-tojuice mixture served with meals. The matter was resolved only after extensive tweaking of the ratio. “I spent more time on juice... you have no idea,” Finn said. Of a more serious nature, in the past 24 months there have been 175 incidents of violence

requiring disciplinary action at CAPP, compared to 155 at the North Idaho Correctional Institution (pop. 414), 140 at the South Idaho Correctional Institution (pop. 565) and 36 at the Saint Anthony Work Camp (pop. 242)—all of which are all-male, minimum security facilities. The number of violent incidents requiring disciplinary action at the facility ranged from four to 14 incidents per month between August 2014 and December 2015. In January 2016, CAPP began accepting parole violators transferred from crowded county jails, and there was a spike of disciplinary actions clustered in sexual activity, “bodily fluids” and harassment categories. The new group, which Finn said is not required to take part in programming, disrupted the other offenders participating in rider programs, which make up the bulk of CAPP’s population. The situation is far from ideal, Finn said, but he doesn’t foresee it being permanent. CAPP has a wholly different atmosphere from a general population facility. There are 351 rider inmates at the facility, and the classes they take part in range from substance abuse avoidance training to life skills. Programming lasts from 6:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. almost daily and class sizes were recently reduced from 20 inmates to 10, allowing them more time with instructors and therapists. Since CAPP opened in 2010, 5,573 people have been through the program—1,727 in the past two years. “There’s a lot of busy days, a lot of programming,” said Finn, who cruised the halls like a school principal during a recent visit, ducking his head into various classrooms to say hello. “The more busy they are, the 6 less they get in trouble—more recreation, more activity, stuff like that.”

Sometimes it takes a fire alarm to get attention. When an alarm rang through City Council Chambers at Boise City Hall on Aug. 30, one citizen took the opportunity to bend the ear of Council President Elaine Clegg as everyone exited the building. For the record, there was no fire, but what the citizen told Clegg was alarming nonetheless. He recounted to her a scene in which he spotted a woman using a wheelchair unable to reach a crosswalk button at State Street and Veterans Parkway/36th Street. The timing couldn’t have been more ironic. At the moment the fire alarm went off, the City Council was getting an update on pending transportation projects—near the top of the wish list the city would soon send to the Ada County Highway District were improved street crossings on State Street. After everyone was allowed back in City Hall and Clegg gaveled the council workshop back into session, she shared what she had just heard from the citizen who approached her. “He told me that he spotted a woman in a wheelchair that was unable to reach the button and was unable to get the crosswalk turned for her. The man watched her quite a while and when he was finally able to get out of traffic, he circled around to help her,” Clegg told the audience. “We’ve got to be looking at all of the crosswalk buttons to make sure that they’re meeting accessibility standards and that they’re indeed accessible. We have to prioritize that.” City of Boise Transportation Planner Karen Gallagher looked at ACHD Project Manager Ryan Head, whose agency is responsible for crosswalks and streets throughout the county. “I would ask that you go out and immediately look at that button at State Street and Veterans Parkway, and make sure those buttons are accessible for folks in wheelchairs,” Clegg said. “We’ll go take a look,” Head assured Clegg. Later in the week, officials at ACHD were insistent walkways and crosswalk buttons were compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, a federal law since 1990. “It’s fully ADA compliant,” said ACHD Chief Information Officer Craig Quintana. “All of the buttons have good access to them, no curbing or any other obstructions.” It’s true there is access but reaching 6 those crosswalk buttons is awkward at BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016c5

GEORGE PRENTICE

KE L S E Y HAWES

IDAHO’S LAST PRIVATE PRISON

NEWS

CITYDESK


NEWS

KE L S E Y HAWES

PATRICK SWEENE Y

CITYDESK

DOJ VS. PRIVATE PRISONS The DOJ directive against contract renewal for private prisons came on the heels of a damning report by the Office of the Inspector General that concluded contract prisons under the auspices of the Federal Bureau of Prisons were less safe and subject to less oversight than their BoP counterparts. It found contract prisons to be comparatively poorly staffed, a contributing factor to numerous prison riots between 2008 and 2015, resulting in extensive property damage, injury and, in one case, the death of a corrections officer. After a riot at the Willacy County Correctional Center in Texas, BOP declared the facility “uninhabitable” and terminated its contract with its operator, MTC. Private prisons were initially billed as a way to save money, but BoP contracts don’t require the companies operating them to itemize expenses. Between 2011 and 2014, expenditures from contract BoP facilities increased from $562 million to $639 million—approximately 13.7 percent—and the DoJ’s report was “not able to analyze and compare costs incurred … between the contract prisons and BoP institutions.” On a per-inmate basis, contract prisons are cheaper. In the four years of the DOJ study, the per-capita annual cost of detaining a BOP prisoner rose from $23,780 to $25,251. During the same period, the cost at private prisons decreased from $22,951 to $22,159. At the time, 14 BOP facilities run by three private corporations housed approximately 27,000 inmates. For Morales, with ACLU-Idaho, the rising cost of operating contract prisons and the decreasing cost of housing prisoners in them is a red flag. “I think the reality of what we have seen is that [contract prisons] have been more costly,” he said. The review boiled down to two recommendations: 1. convene a group of experts to analyze contract prisons’ safety records; 2. improve oversight and monitoring of them. Instead, the DOJ announced it would begin phasing out private contracts at 14 BOP sites after a nearly 30-year, multi-billion dollar partnership. By 2017, three such lockups could close, reducing the number of federal inmates at the remaining facilities to fewer than 14,200—less than half the high of nearly 30,000 inmates in privately run prisons in 2013. “It’s been a long time coming,” said Brett Burkhardt, a sociology professor at Oregon State University. The DOJ announcement was a blow to the contract prison industry, but not a fatal one. The directive to phase out private BOP prisons didn’t include the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) lockups—a prison system for illegal immigrants overseen by the DOJ but subject to a different set of rules from BOP facilities. According to the Government Accountability Office, ICE 5

Nearly 30,000 vehicles speed through State Street on any given weekday.

best and could be nearly unreachable for someone who uses a wheelchair. In 5 addition, the buttons at the northeast corner of State and 36th streets are mounted on an elevated pole (shared by streetlights and traffic lights) on the far side of an additional curb. The U.S. Department of Transportation Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, section 4E.08, states pedestrian pushbuttons should be “unobstructed and adjacent to a level, all-weather surface to provide access from a wheelchair.” Clegg later told Boise Weekly she left another phone message with ACHD, suggesting an extender or “mast arm” be affixed to the crosswalk button for better access. The intersection at 36th Street isn’t the only section of State Street Clegg says warrants more attention. She said a new pedestrian crosswalk at State and 34th streets is long overdue. “Given the tragedy at that intersection, we should expedite that,” Clegg told Gallagher and Head at the Boise Council workshop session. Clegg was referring to the April 14 incident when 31-year-old Dwayne Poulton, disabled after a long childhood battle with brain cancer, was struck by a car heading eastbound on State Street near 34th Street, where there is no crosswalk. Poulton, a lifelong Boise resident who lived on a small disability income and was a well-liked volunteer for Camp Rainbow Gold and the American Cancer Society, died a short time later. The cause of death was blunt force trauma. Bike/pedestrian advocates argued the area desperately needs options for safely crossing of State Street, where more than 30,000 vehicles speed by on a daily basis. During the Aug. 30 workshop, the Boise Council heard ACHD had plans for a pedestrian crossing at State and 34th streets. “But we need to get that done ASAP,” said Clegg. “We’ve been requesting this for years. Is there any way to expedite this?” The proposed crossing could get final ACHD approval as soon as Wednesday, Sept. 8. The plan has already been included in ACHD’s FY 2017 budget, which goes into effect Saturday, Oct. 1. —George Prentice 6cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

Since Idaho’s Correctional Alternative Placement Program opened in 2010, 5,573 people have been through the program—1,727 in the past two years.

housed nearly 400,000 people every year by 2014 but owned 11 percent of prison beds. Another 18 percent of those beds are in six for-profit prisons. However, DHS signaled on Sept. 5 that it would review its private-contracted facilities. “The Department of Justice announced that the Bureau of Prisons will reduce and ultimately end its use of private prisons,” Homeland Security Chief Jeh Johnson announced in a department news release. “I directed our Homeland Security Advisory Council … to evaluate whether the immigration detention operations conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement should move in the same direction.”

‘BUDDIES’ Private prisons have long been features of Idaho’s political landscape. According to campaign finance records, Otter received $10,500 from Corrections Corporation of America between 2009 and 2012. Those contributions haunted the governor during his 2014 re-election campaign, when his opponents, Democrat A.J. Balukoff and Libertarian John Bujak, accused the incumbent of appointing “his buddies” to oversee the collapse of the Gem State’s relationship with CCA. In 2013, CCA handed over the Idaho Correctional Center and a $1 million settlement to the state of Idaho for understaffing the state lockup to the tune of 4,800 hours during a seven-month period. Months before, eight inmates at the facility filed suit against CCA, alleging it had colluded with prison gangs to control the facility. The string of controversies eventually landed CCA in the crosshairs of the FBI and the U.S. attorney for the state of Idaho, but no charges were ever filed. The fiasco ended CCA’s relationships with the state, but Idaho politicians still have financial relationships with the contract prison industry. Otter received $10,000 from MTC between 2010 and

2014. Other recipients of MTC contributions include House Judiciary Rules and Administration Committee Chairman Rep. Rich Wills (R-Glenns Ferry) ($250) and fellow committee member Rep. Luke Malek (R-Coeur d’Alene) ($250). Though the governor’s office had no comment on the DOJ’s directive regarding private prisons, Otter Press Secretary Jon Hanian wrote in an email, “The point is campaign contributions play no part in operational decisions.” Beyond campaign contributions, Utah-based MTC has a lobbying arm in Idaho: Martin Bilbao and Mckinsey Lyon of Gallatin Public Affairs. The private prison industry has also been linked to the American Legislative Exchange Council, which helped draft Arizona’s controversial SB 1070, one of the toughest anti-illegal immigration laws in the country and a feeder for ICE prisons. Morales and Burkhardt said contract prison corporations have sophisticated, well-placed means for affecting policy both nationally and locally. “The reality is, [private prison corporations] have a sophisticated lobbying arm that makes a difference to policy,” Morales said. “If it didn’t, why else would they continue to invest?”

JAILHOUSE BLUES No matter what, changes are coming for private prisons—whether it’s moving to a payfor-performance model to better align costs with expenditures, as Burkhardt said, or closing shop. The relationship between CAPP and IDOC has been described as “shoulder-to-shoulder,” but when asked if the DOJ directive could be a factor in whether MTC’s Idaho contract is renewed in 2020, IDOC spokesman Jeff Ray said it’s possible. “Yes, we’ll consider the DOJ’s action—in the same way we try to take into account all information that’s relevant to this matter,” he wrote in an email. “That goes for any decision the department makes.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


PRESTEN NORTON - SB NATION

NEWS

Save energy. Save money.

State Board of Ed before nixing The Huddle: “We felt that we substantially increased and changed the availability of alcohol at football games in situations where minors and students were a part of the area.”

Live comfortably.

ONE AND DONE Why Boise State’s tailgate alternative, The Huddle, won’t be around this football season HARRISON BERRY Boise State University football fans will have one less watering hole available when the Broncos face off against the Washington State University Cougars on Saturday, Sept. 10. The Huddle, which was inside the Caven-Williams Sports Complex, was a pre-game tailgate party alternative with alcoholic beverages, food, big-screen TVs and even children’s activities. It has gone dark following the reversal of an Idaho State Board of Education decision to allow universities to serve alcohol at sporting events. “I and other members of the board agree that it’s never good policy to have a policy, then waive it repeatedly,” said board member Dr. David Hill, referring to a Board of Ed policy prohibiting public colleges and universities from serving alcohol at sporting events except in a “clearly marked, secure area,” where those being served have a “written invitation” from the university. The board voted in 2015 to provide an exception to the policy as part of a pilot program that allowed Boise State and the University of Idaho to serve alcohol at The Huddle and The Fan Zone, respectively. During its June 16 meeting, however, the board voted 7-1 against extending the exception for a second year, effectively shutting down The Huddle and the U of I’s Fan Zone. When asked if any incidents at or complaints against The Huddle prompted the board’s decision, Boise BOISE WEEKLY.COM

State Assistant Athletic Director Max Corbet said, “No, not that I’m aware of anything, no.” The board made a point of acknowledging The Huddle’s short but clean track record. Board President Emma Atchley said rather than game-day incidents, the hypothetical problem of a minor being served alcohol drove the board’s decision. “We felt that we substantially increased and changed the availability of alcohol at football games in situations where minors and students were a part of the whole area,” Atchley said before voting to nix the exception. Hill pushed back, arguing the exception was being taken away capriciously. “There are metrics, parameters, expectations that ask, ‘Did it work? Were there any issues?’ And on that basis, ‘Should we change policy?’ I felt that we had not gone through the appropriate process,” Hill later said. The Huddle was conceived as a way for Bronco fans to gear up for game-day inside the Caven-Williams Sports Complex but, in its first year, The Huddle’s expenses—including security, setup and utilities—ran into the red to the tune of approximately $12,000. “We were trying it out and seeing how it would go,” said Corbet. “We wanted to help our fans out; to make it a first-class experience. We were hoping one day our crowds would grow, and it would become profitable.”

You have the power to save energy, save money and live more comfortably. It’s easy! Even small changes can mean big results.

Start here.

idahopower.com/save

Program continuation, eligibility requirements and terms and conditions apply.

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016c7


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY SEPT. 7 Festivals & Events AUTUMN EASY STARGAZING— Join near space evangelist Paul Verhage to get acquainted with the night sky. Easy Stargazing is an introduction to stargazing with your eyes or a pair of binoculars. You’ll learn how to look for star clusters, satellites, meteors, lunar features and planets. Sky maps for the next three months will be available for your use. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-9728340, boisepubliclibrary.org/ calendar. CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com. IDAHO JOB AND CAREER FAIR—Check out the jobs at the free Idaho

Job and Career Fair. Positions include salaried, hourly, commission and own-your-own-business opportunities. Plus free workshops on resumes and interviews for job seekers. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Grand Ballroom, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-343-1871, ibleventsinc.com.

Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org.

On Stage

ERIN MORRISON: OBJECT DECORUM—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

JUDITH KINDLER: DESIRE—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com.

FOTOFILMIC: THE NEW FACE OF FILM—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, fotofilmic.com/ the-new-face-of-film.

KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

ISF: FOREVER PLAID—7:30 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Art DANIEL DIAZ-TAI: ABSTRACT PAINTINGS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. DAZZLE CAMOUFLAGE: HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7

Across borders, across cultures.

DOG HEAD STEW: THE SECOND COURSE—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate. edu/visualartscenter.

GAY BAWA ODMARK: PARIS WINDOWS PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT—10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, comlib.org.

GLASS ARTISTS OF IDAHO: REFLECTIONS—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. MadDog Gallery, 632 Main St., Challis, 208-879-2745, challisartscouncil.org. JERRY KENCKE: ILFOCHROME IN RETROSPECT—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

LAURA HEIT: EARTH AND SKY—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. MERIDIAN ART WEEK—Festivities include the Meridian Art Drop, the unveiling and dedication of public art piece “Out on the Town”

FRIDAY, SEPT. 9

by artist Daniel Borup at City Hall Plaza, and an Art Walk highlighting public art pieces in Downtown Meridian. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-4433, meridiancity.org/ artsevents. MICHAEL GREGORY: LIGHT YEARS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. NEITHER HERE NOR THERE: CONTEMPORARY MEXICAN PRINTMAKING ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BORDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter. PINXIT COLLECTIVE: DEUX PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION—8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Initial Point Gallery, Merdian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway St., Meridian, 208-8884433, pinxitcollective.com.

PLEIN AIR PAINTERS OF IDAHO PAINT-OUT AND EXHIBIT—FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge, Hwy. 75 to Redfish Lake Road, Stanley, 208-774-3536, pleinairpaintersofidaho.org. SUZANNE HAZLETT: SOUTHERN EXPOSURE—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. THOM ROSS AND JEAN RICHARDSON: HEROES AND ICONS—10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5512, kneelandgallery.com. TVAA: IN CELEBRATION OF EDGES—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-4263663, boisestatepublicradio.org. VELIA DE IULIIS: AS THE CROW FLIES—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, SEPT. 9-11

Eat, drink and be merry, and do some good while you’re at it.

Artsy parksy.

NEITHER HERE NOR THERE

SHINE: AN EVENING OF AWE AND DELIGHT

ART IN THE PARK

When Boise State University Visual Arts Center Director Kirsten Furlong came across Ni De Aqui Ni De Alla (Neither Here Nor There), a 22-piece exhibition on cultural identity and border tensions from Mexican printmakers, she was intrigued. “It’s pretty rare that you see a group exhibition like that by a lot of really distinguished artists talking about these issues at the border,” said Furlong. With the help of Arizona State University Professor Rogelio Gutierrez, who compiled the series, she brought the series to Boise, and the prints—ranging from lithographs to screenprints to woodcuts—offer a journey through printing style and emotional turmoil. Through Sept. 14. Mondays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Fridays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, 1874 University Drive, 208-426-3994, art. boisestate.edu/visualartscenter.

The mission of Camp Rainbow Gold is to help kids and teens with cancer, but it does more than that. With its yearly series of camps in the Wood River Valley, the 25-year-old nonprofit gives the gift of fun to families that sometimes struggle to find much to celebrate. “If you have a child who is diagnosed with cancer, the entire family is diagnosed with cancer,” said CRG volunteer Lonni LeavittBarker, whose son has been in treatment for more than three years. The camps cover everything from bike rides to rock climbing, rafting and costume parties. But they come with a price: It costs about $2,000 to take a kid to camp. To help fund the program, CRG is hosting SHINE: An Evening of Awe and Delight. Featuring dancers from Cirque du Soleil, the event tacks on dinner, dancing and music from We Are The Strike, black-tie cocktails and a live auction. 5:30 p.m.; $200, $2,000 table. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St. 208-350-6435, shineforcamp.org.

Follow a few rules and Art in the Park—the annual au-naturel Boise Art Museum festival that packs Julia Davis Park—will rule. No. 1: No public parking anywhere near the park. The best way to get to the event is to park in a downtown Boise garage ($5 all day) or even at the Boise Towne Square Mall and take a free shuttle to and from the park. No. 2: For the love of all that’s holy, leave your dog at home. No one wants a portrait of pet poo or pottery with pee. No. 3: Take an empty stomach. More than 40 beverage and food vendors—slinging everything from barbecue to gyros—will be parked near the art. No. 4: Take your checkbook (or credit card or cash). The deals might be steals at the 62nd BAM Art in the Park. Sept. 9 -10: 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sept. 11: 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum. org/art-in-the-park.

8cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR Talks & Lectures BITCOIN 101—Join Idaho Bitcoin Group founder Ronnie B. for an introductory discussion about bitcoin that’s perfect for newcomers or for current bitcoiners who want to become a little more knowledgeable on the subject. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, meetup.com/Boise-BitcoinMeetup.

Citizen SUICIDE HOTLINE SEMICOLON TATTOO FUNDRAISER—Help the Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline continue providing life-saving services at its second annual Semicolon Tattoo Fundraiser. In writing, a semicolon represents a place where one could stop, but chooses to continue. As such, the semicolon has become a powerful symbol of mental health aware-

ness, perseverance and antistigma. Artists from Resurrected will do semicolon tattoos in the size and location preferred by the customer. A food truck will be onsite in the evening so participants can buy a meal and celebrate their new tattoos. Noon-9 p.m. $40. Resurrected Tattoo and Piercing, 610 N. Orchard, Boise, 208-9947810, idahosuicideprevention.org.

Animals & Pets WILD IDAHO: BIRD MIGRATION—Intermountain Bird Observatory presents a special program on bird migration. You’ll learn about the amazing distances birds travel to find food and to raise their young, Idaho’s special place on bird migration routes and IBO’s programs to track migratory birds locally. No registration required. 6 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 11

THURSDAY SEPT. 8 Festivals & Events 2 MUSTARD SEEDS WOMEN’S UPSCALE RESALE EVENT—Shop for a Cause at this one-of-a-kind three-day shopping event that allows women to recycle their gently used clothes, accessories and home decor; shop fabulous deals on thousands of brand name items and help raise money for the 2 Mustard Seeds scholarship program that helps Kenyan children receive a high school education. All sizes and ages will find fabulous items at a fraction of retail. It’s a fun and unique shopping experience where you know your dollars make a difference. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Eagle Nazarene Church, 1001 W. State St., Eagle, 208-939-0661, 2mustardseeds. org. MERIDIAN SENIOR CENTER FALL FLING BAKE SALE AND RAFFLE—Join the Meridian Senior Center for their annual bake sale and raffle fundraiser. Raffle tickets are $1 each or six for $5. Raffle drawings will be held at the Center on Sept. 9 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (need not be present to win). Bingo starts at 6 p.m. All proceeds go to support Center programs. 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Senior Center at the Park, Julius M. Kleiner Park, 1920 N. Records Way, Meridian, 208-888-5555. RECOVERY AWARENESS MONTH KICKOFF—Join Lt. Gov. Brad Little to help kick off Idaho Recovery Awareness Month. Little will be issuing a proclamation declaring September as recovery awareness month, and there will be a recovery-oriented art display and people speaking about recovery. Plus Idaho’s very first Champion of Recovery and seven Advocates for Recovery from across the state will be recognized. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-4339705, sud.dhw.idaho.gov.

Pick a cord, any cord

DRIVE ELECTRIC WEEK CAR SHOW The concept of the electric vehicle dates as far back as the 1880s, and there were as many as 30,000 battery-powered vehicles operating, primarily in Europe, at the turn of the 20th century—about as many electric cars sold worldwide in 2011. But it wasn’t until Audi, BMW, Chevrolet, Ford, Nissan, Tesla, Toyota and Volkswagen began mass-marketing battery-powered autos, that we began seeing more EV’s in our neighbors’ driveways. On Sunday, Sept. 11, hundreds of Idaho EV drivers are expected to park their clean-air vehicles in the parking lot of Idaho Power headquarters in downtown Boise. The clean energy showcase, part of the sixth annual National Drive Electric Week, will be the largest EV show in Idaho and will also show off solar installations and electric bicycles. 1-4 p.m., FREE, 1221 W. Idaho Street, Boise, 208-388-2200, driveelectricweek.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: THE GODFATHER— Here’s an offer you can’t refuse: The Godfather at the Egyptian. If you’ve never seen it on the big screen, this is the way to do it. No commercials, no household interruptions, just three hours of pure mafia goodness. 7 p.m. $9 online, $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-387-1273, boiseclassicmovies.com. COMEDIAN ALVIN WILLIAMS—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 c9


CALENDAR ISF: FOREVER PLAID—7:30 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

LAURA HEIT: EARTH AND SKY—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

pleinairpaintersofidaho.org. 5 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge, Hwy. 75 to Redfish Lake Road, Stanley, 208-774-3536, pleinairpaintersofidaho.org.

NEIL SIMON’S THE ODD COUPLE (FEMALE VERSION)—7:30 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208342-5104. boiselittletheater.org.

MICHAEL GREGORY: LIGHT YEARS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com.

STAGE COACH: WHEN DID YOU LAST SEE YOUR TROUSERS?—7:30 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

NEITHER HERE NOR THERE: CONTEMPORARY MEXICAN PRINTMAKING ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BORDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/visualartscenter.

SAFETY ZONE: DAZZLE WORKS BY ANGELA TSAI—Tsai’s dazzleinspired works will be on view Thursdays through Sept. 29. 2-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts-Hailey, 314 Second Ave. S., Hailey, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Art DANIEL DIAZ-TAI: ABSTRACT PAINTINGS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. DAZZLE CAMOUFLAGE: HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org. DOG HEAD STEW: THE SECOND COURSE—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate. edu/visualartscenter. ERIN MORRISON: OBJECT DECORUM—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

PINXIT COLLECTIVE: DEUX PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION—8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Initial Point Gallery, Merdian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway St., Meridian, 208-8884433, pinxitcollective.com. PLEIN AIR PAINTERS OF IDAHO PAINT-OUT AND EXHIBIT—Watch some of Idaho’s top artists create beautiful paintings of the Redfish Lake and Sawtooth area right before your eyes Sept. 6-8. The exhibit of plein air paintings can be enjoyed and purchased at Redfish Lake Lodge. Closing reception is Thursday, Sept. 8, at the lodge; appetizers and wine will be served. For more info, visit

SUZANNE HAZLETT: SOUTHERN EXPOSURE—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. THOM ROSS AND JEAN RICHARDSON: HEROES AND ICONS—10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5512, kneelandgallery.com. TVAA: IN CELEBRATION OF EDGES—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-4263663, boisestatepublicradio.org. VELIA DE IULIIS: AS THE CROW FLIES—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

FOTOFILMIC: THE NEW FACE OF FILM—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, fotofilmic.com/ the-new-face-of-film. GAY BAWA ODMARK: PARIS WINDOWS PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT—10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, comlib.org. GLASS ARTISTS OF IDAHO: REFLECTIONS—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. MadDog Gallery, 632 Main St., Challis, 208-879-2745, challisartscouncil.org. JERRY KENCKE: ILFOCHROME IN RETROSPECT—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. JUDITH KINDLER: DESIRE—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com. KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

10cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR Literature 2016 ERNEST HEMINGWAY FESTIVAL—Celebrate the writers, cultural and literary heritage in Sun Valley at this three-day festival featuring speakers, Hemingway Haunts tours, receptions and visit to the museum. For more info and a complete schedule, visit the event website. $50-$60. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum. 208-7263493, ext. 123, comlib.org/the2016-ernest-hemingway-festival.

Food BACKYARD GARDENERS UNITE PRODUCE SWAP AND SALE—Trade your garden produce with other gardeners or buy locally grown produce. All proceeds benefit the Idaho Foodbank and leftover produce is given to the Boise Rescue Mission. Find out more on Facebook. 7-8 p.m. FREE. Cole Community Church, 8775 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-3753565, facebook.com/backyardgardenersunite.

10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum. org/art-in-the-park.

COMEDY OPEN MIC—Midnight. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

MERIDIAN SENIOR CENTER FALL FLING BAKE SALE AND RAFFLE—10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Senior Center at the Park, Julius M. Kleiner Park, 1920 N. Records Way, Meridian, 208888-5555.

COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy. com.

SHINE: AN EVENING OF AWE AND DELIGHT— Performers from the world famous Cirque du Soleil will dazzle and create an evening of awe and delight. Proceeds benefit Camp Rainbow Gold, which gives children and teens with cancer (and siblings and families) an escape into the mountains. You’ll enjoy black tie cocktails, dinner and dancing to a live band. 5:30 p.m. $200. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise. 208-350-6435, shineforcamp.org.

DREAMWEAVER MUSICAL THEATRE: WIZARD OF OZ—7 p.m. $5-$12. Jewett Auditorium, The College of Idaho, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208283-2391, dreamweavermusicaltheatre.org.

FRIDAY SEPT. 9

SQUAWKYFEST—Head over to the Old Idaho Penitentiary for SquawkyFest. “Squawky” was potent, inmate-made alcohol. The event will highlight the history of Boise brewing, inmate brewing stories, Prohibition crimes, taste competitions, costume contests, music, and more. Participating breweries: Crooked Fence, Powderhaus Brewing, Payette Brewing, and Edge Brewing. Last admission at 9 p.m. For ages 21 and older; valid I.D. required. 6-10 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-334-2844, history.idaho.gov/ events/squawkyfest.

Festivals & Events

On Stage

2 MUSTARD SEEDS WOMEN’S UPSCALE RESALE EVENT—10 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Eagle Nazarene Church, 1001 W. State St., Eagle, 208-939-0661, 2mustardseeds. org.

CATHEDRAL CONCERT SERIES: ON BROADWAY—Enjoy music from some of the most popular musicals of the ‘80s and ‘90s. Performers include Bea Eichmann Allen, Paul Aitken, Jordan Bowman, David Carlson, Keith McCauley, Michelle Pedersen, Warren Bodily, Alyssa Grasso, and visiting artists Matthew Woolsey, Jeff Witt and Jon Stuber. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-7511.

PLUMAPALOOZA BEER RELEASE—Celebrate the release of the Rocky Point Plum Saison, paired with eats by B-Town Bistro Food Truck. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing Co., 521 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-342-7655, boisebrewing.com.

ALL ADA COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL REUNION—Join host Boise High grad Denis Smith for the All Ada County High School Reunion. The benefit for the Idaho Foodbank is being held in honor of Smith’s late friend and classmate Doug Haight and late Idaho Statesman sports writer Jim Poore. It’s for anyone who graduated from any high school in the Treasure Valley during the 1960s. Featuring classic rock ’n’ roll by the Mystics and blues by the Blues Directors. Get your tickets online at brownpapertickets.com. 6 p.m. $15. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-342-5553, mccall60sreunion.com. ART IN THE PARK—Now celebrating its 62nd year, this open-air festival presented by the Boise Art Museum offers a variety of contemporary arts and crafts, along with an exceptional array of live entertainment, wonderful food and hands-on activities for children. Daily through Aug. 11.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

COMEDIAN ALVIN WILLIAMS—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDIAN RODNEY CARRINGTON: HERE COMES THE TRUTH TOUR—Rodney Carrington has been making audiences laugh for almost 20 years with his unique brand of stand-up comedy. The country singer-songwriter has recorded eight major label comedy albums that have sold more than two million copies, two of which have been certified gold. His most recent special Laughter’s Good is now available on Netflix. 7 p.m. $44.75. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261110, morrisoncenter.com.

ISF: FOREVER PLAID—7:30 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. NEIL SIMON’S THE ODD COUPLE (FEMALE VERSION)—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104. boiselittletheater. org/current-season. STAGE COACH: WHEN DID YOU LAST SEE YOUR TROUSERS?—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. STARLIGHT: SUGAR—8 p.m. $9$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Art DANIEL DIAZ-TAI: ABSTRACT PAINTINGS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. DAZZLE CAMOUFLAGE: HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org. DOG HEAD STEW: THE SECOND COURSE—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate. edu/visualartscenter. ERIN MORRISON: OBJECT DECORUM—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com. FOTOFILMIC: THE NEW FACE OF FILM—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994. fotofilmic.com/ the-new-face-of-film. GAY BAWA ODMARK: PARIS WINDOWS PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, comlib.org.

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 c11


CALENDAR GLASS ARTISTS OF IDAHO: REFLECTIONS—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. MadDog Gallery, 632 Main St., Challis, 208-879-2745, challisartscouncil.org. JERRY KENCKE: ILFOCHROME IN RETROSPECT—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. JUDITH KINDLER: DESIRE—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com. KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. LAURA HEIT: EARTH AND SKY—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. MERIDIAN ART WEEK— Both artists and patrons are invited to take part in Meridian Art Week, set for Sept. 5-9. Festivities include the Meridian Art Drop, the unveiling and dedication of public art Out on the Town by artist Daniel Borup at City Hall Plaza, and an Art Walk highlighting public art pieces in Downtown Meridian. For a complete schedule of events, visit meridiancity.org/artsevents. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-4433, meridiancity.org/artsevents. MICHAEL GREGORY: LIGHT YEARS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. NEITHER HERE NOR THERE: CONTEMPORARY MEXICAN PRINTMAKING ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BORDER—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, 1874 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art. boisestate.edu/visualartscenter. PINXIT COLLECTIVE: DEUX PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION— Deux is a fine-art photography group exhibition of a collaborative new series created by The Pinxit Collective (emerging Idaho artists Liz Flores, Maria Garth and Karl Henke). An opening reception with the artists will be held Friday, Sept. 9, from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. Signed limited-edition prints will be available for sale. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fri., Sept. 9, 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Initial Point Gallery, Merdian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway St., Meridian, 208-888-4433. SUZANNE HAZLETT: SOUTHERN EXPOSURE—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. THOM ROSS AND JEAN RICHARDSON: HEROES AND ICONS—10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5512, kneelandgallery.com.

TVAA: IN CELEBRATION OF EDGES—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-4263663, boisestatepublicradio.org. VELIA DE IULIIS: AS THE CROW FLIES—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

Literature 2016 ERNEST HEMINGWAY FESTIVAL—The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum. 208-726-3493, ext. 123, comlib.org/the-2016-ernesthemingway-festival. BPL CLEARANCE BOOK SALE—Boise Public Library has been clearing its shelves to make room for new materials, and that’s good news for readers of all ages. You’ll find books, music and movies, and everything at the two-day sale will be priced at just 50 cents, tax included. Payment by cash or check is preferred. Hosted by the Friends of the Boise Public Library on the porch of the Main Library. 10 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org/ Friends.

SATURDAY SEPT. 10 Festivals & Events 2 MUSTARD SEEDS WOMEN’S UPSCALE RESALE EVENT—8 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Eagle Nazarene Church, 1001 W. State St., Eagle, 208-939-0661, 2mustardseeds. org. 2016 IDAHO NF WALK AND FUN RUN—One in 3,000 people worldwide are living with neurofibromatosis (NF), a disorder that can cause tumors to grow on nerves throughout the body causing a whole host of maladies. There is no cure and no effective treatments—yet. You can help by joining the Idaho NF Walk and Run. This fun day includes a Mighty Mile Fun Run and a Family Walk, as well as a Kids’ Hero Flash Dash, interactive superhero characters, super dog tricks, activities and hero training. 10 a.m. $10$20. Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, 1900 N. Records Ave., near Fairview Avenue and Eagle Road, Meridian, join.ctf.org. ART IN THE PARK—10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org/ art-in-the-park. BALIHOO’S HEART OF IDAHO BENEFIT: IDAHO YOUTH RANCH—Balihoo’s Fourth Annual Fundraiser will benefit the Idaho Youth Ranch. Join the Boise-based software company for a fun night out,

12cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

complete with live music, line dancing, bar service, heavy hors d’oeuvres, silent and live auctions, and great raffle giveaways. 7-11 p.m. $45. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-639-6610, heart-of-idaho. squarespace.com. BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287, facebook.com/ TheBoiseFarmersMarket. CANYON COUNTY CO-OP 2016 SUMMER COMMUNITY MARKET—9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Canyon County Co-op, 1415 First St. S., Nampa, 208-960-0328, canyoncounty.coop. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. CURVY GIRL FASHION SHOW— Check out Curvy Girl Kate’s Resale Fashions Size 12 and Up Curvy Girl Fashion Show, and enjoy music, prizes and games. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Curvy Girl Kate’s, 10368 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3228789, curvygirlkates.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. 208-489-8789, cityofeagle.org. GRANDPARENTS DAY CELEBRATION—Calling all grandparents looking for a way to spend time giving back with your grandchildren. Celebrate Grandparents Day by taking them to the Family Christian Store and joining A Million Thanks’ nationwide campaign thanking U.S. military personnel serving domestically and abroad. Send a letter of encouragement; and grandparents receive a free gift while supplies last. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Family Christian Store, 8085 W. Fairview Ave., 208-3758180, familychristian.com. INTERFAITH ALLIANCE OF IDAHO ANNUAL PAM BALDWIN CONFERENCE—The theme of the conference is “The Many Faces of Religious Freedom: Where’s the Balance?” Registration (with refreshments) starts at 9:15 a.m., with forums beginning at 10 a.m. Featuring the keynote, “Government Under God,” by nationally acclaimed independent journalist Jody May-Chang; “What are the Religious Exemption Clauses?” with Shaakirrah Sanders, University of Idaho Law School associate professor; Interactive Panel: Refugee Crisis, Muslim Discrimination; plus forums on Religious Exemption for Parental Medical Neglect, LGBTQ Issues and Audience Q&A with the presenters and Idaho Sen. Cherie BucknerWebb. Lunch is included. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $40. Idaho Law and Justice Learning Center, Old Ada County Courthouse, 514 W. Jefferson St., Boise.

MERIDIAN YOUTH FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-4433, epiqueeventsandgifts.com. MISS AFRICA IDAHO 2016— Enjoy a night filled with African culture, fashion, dance and talent, brought to us by beautiful young African women from all over the state of Idaho representing their individual countries. Advance tickets available online, at Christa’s Dress Shoppe, CSI Box Office or any of the contestants. 7 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. CSI Fine Arts Auditorium, 315 Falls Ave., Twin Falls, 208-733-9554. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Nampa Farmers’ Market, Longbranch parking lot, Front and 13th, Nampa, 208412-3814. PURPLESTRIDE BOISE—Join this 5K run and family-friendly walk to wage hope, and raise funds and awareness for pancreatic cancer. 10-11:30 a.m. FREE-$25. Ann Morrison Park, 1000 N. Americana Blvd., Boise, purplestride. org/boise. TREKKIE CELEBRATION MONTH—Get your away team together and celebrate 50 years of Star Trek. Your four-week mission: to explore strange old films, seek out new crafts and foods, and boldly go where many fans have gone before. Enjoy the movies on the first three Saturdays in September, then go for the Final Frontier party on Sept. 24. Appropriate for all ages. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-972-8340, boisepubliclibrary. org/calendar. WEST BOISE SATURDAY MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise. 208-322-9464, facebook. com/artzone208.

On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: BLAZING SADDLES—Mark actor Gene Wilder’s passing with laughter, even if your tears of laughter come with a lump in the throat. It’s how best send off one of Hollywood’s best comic actors. 7:30 p.m. $9 online, $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net. BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY—Thank you, Gene Wilder, and rest well. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory presents Wilder in his essence. He’s funny, melancholy, maniacal, eccentric, and dry as a desert bone. It may not be his absolute funniest role, but it’s likely his most recognizable. 3:30 p.m. $9 online, $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre. net.

COMEDIAN ALVIN WILLIAMS—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy. com. DREAMWEAVER MUSICAL THEATRE: WIZARD OF OZ—7 p.m. $5-$12. Jewett Auditorium, The College of Idaho, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell. 208283-2391, dreamweavermusicaltheatre.org. HORROR ON THE LAWN: NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD—Join the Idaho Horror Film Festival for the Second Annual Horror on the Lawn. Take a blanket or low-back chair and snuggle in for a special screening of George A. Romero’s 1968 classic. Ticket price includes a horrifically beautiful buffet by Angell’s and screening of Night of the Living Dead. 7-11 p.m. $25. Angell’s Bar and Grill Renato, 999 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3424900, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org. ISF: FOREVER PLAID—7:30 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. NEIL SIMON’S THE ODD COUPLE (FEMALE VERSION)—8 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104. boiselittletheater. org/current-season. STAGE COACH: WHEN DID YOU LAST SEE YOUR TROUSERS?—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. STARLIGHT: SUGAR—8 p.m. $9$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Art DANIEL DIAZ-TAI: ABSTRACT PAINTINGS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. ERIN MORRISON: OBJECT DECORUM—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746. GAY BAWA ODMARK: PARIS WINDOWS PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, comlib.org. JERRY KENCKE: ILFOCHROME IN RETROSPECT—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

JUDITH KINDLER: DESIRE—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com. KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. LAURA HEIT: EARTH AND SKY—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. MICHAEL GREGORY: LIGHT YEARS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. SUZANNE HAZLETT: SOUTHERN EXPOSURE—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. THOM ROSS AND JEAN RICHARDSON: HEROES AND ICONS—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5512, kneelandgallery.com. VELIA DE IULIIS: AS THE CROW FLIES—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

Literature 2016 ERNEST HEMINGWAY FESTIVAL—The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum. 208-726-3493, ext. 123, comlib.org/the-2016-ernesthemingway-festival. BPL CLEARANCE BOOK SALE—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org/Friends.

Sports & Fitness BIKE THE WEISER RIVER TRAIL WITH ICL—Join the Idaho Conservation League for a biking adventure You’ll follow the path of the old rail line that ran from Weiser to New Meadows. Even though the total trail is 84 miles in length, you’ll only tackle a small section, stopping along the way to check out highlights and hear stories from locals. You must have a bike that can ride on a gravel bed and be in good physical condition. Space is limited and RSVP required; contact ICL’s Lana Weber at 208-345-6933, ext. 16. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Weiser River Trail Head, Off Hwy. 95, Weiser. 208-345-6933, idahoconservation.org/events/events/rideweiser-river-trail-icl. BOISE STATE CLUB BASEBALL VS, WASHINGTON STATE— 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. FREE. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR BOISE STATE FOOTBALL VS. WASHINGTON STATE—TV: ESPN2. 8:15 p.m. Boise State Broncos Albertsons Stadium, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-4737, boisestate.edu. CITY OF ROCKS CLIMBING FIELD TRIP—The Nampa Recreation Department has teamed up with The City of Rocks National Reserve climbing instructors for a full-day field trip. You’ll travel to the City of the Rocks, participate in a three-hour climbing lesson, practice your new skills and explore the geological beauty of the canyons. Trip includes transportation, lesson, equipment, lunch and snacks along the way. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. $60. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858.

Kids & Teens COURAGEOUS KIDS CLIMBING EVENT—Children with special needs are invited to participate in this special climbing event. The first 15 courageous climbers to sign up will receive a special T-shirt. To reserve a spot for your child, email event coordinator Jeff

Riechmann at jeffriechmann@ cs.com. 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-5501. facebook.com/ CourageousKidsClimbing. TV CHILDREN’S THEATER: CINDERELLA CONFIDENTIAL—11 a.m. and 3 p.m. $5-$12. Treasure Valley Children’s Theater, 703 N. Main St., Meridian. 208-2878828, treasurevalleychildrenstheater.com/see.

SUNDAY SEPT. 11 Festivals & Events ART IN THE PARK—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org/ art-in-the-park. THE BOISE FLEA—Vintage and handmade outdoor market held the second Sunday through October. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. The Boise Flea, 3017 W. State St., Boise, 208-420-7311, facebook. com/boiseflea.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

NATIONAL DRIVE ELECTRIC WEEK CAR SHOW 2016—Check out Idaho’s annual largest display of plug-in vehicles at the National Drive Electric Week Car Show 2016. All types of cars and bikes will be on display. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Idaho Power Company, 1221 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-388-2200, driveelectricweek.org.

On Stage ANDY BYRON’S AMERICANA MUSIC SERIES: WILL HOGE—One of America’s keenest, most honest modern storytellers is touring in support of his 10th studio album, Small Town Dreams. 8 p.m. $20$28. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, americanamusicseries.net. COMEDIAN ALVIN WILLIAMS—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ISF: FOREVER PLAID—7 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. NEIL SIMON’S THE ODD COUPLE (FEMALE VERSION)—2 p.m. $11-$14. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104. boiselittletheater. org/current-season. RED GREEN: I’M NOT OLD, I’M RIPE—Yuck it up with the funny man famous around the world for his The Red Green Show on PBS and four best-selling books. He’s back in town with a whole new show focusing on “Red’s life” at the infamous Possum Lodge, with a few side-splitting side trips thrown in for good measure. As Red is fond of saying, “Remember you may have to grow old, but you don’t have to mature.” And this is the night to put that wisdom into practice. 7 p.m. $49.50. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-387-1273, redgreen.com/on-tour.html.

Sports & Fitness BOISE STATE CLUB BASEBALL VS, WASHINGTON STATE—11 a.m. FREE. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks. com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

JORDAN’S RIDE—Jordan’s Ride is an annual charity bicycle ride benefiting SIDS/SUDC research and support for the families affected by the tragic loss of their child. This ride was created in honor of Jordan Michael Zappia who passed away at 16 months to SUDC. This supported ride with four routes appeals to riders at all levels. Distances include 10, 30, 50 and 100 miles. 7 a.m.-4 p.m. $35. Eagle Sports Complex, 11800 Horseshoe Bend Way, Eagle, jordansride.org.

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 c13


CALENDAR KONA FALL 2016 MOUNTAIN BIKE DEMO—Join McU Sports to try out demo bikes by KONA, featuring aluminum full suspension and carbon/titanium hard tails. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Camel’s Back Park, 1200 W. Heron St., Boise. 208-342-7734, mcusports.com.

Animals & Pets TRIVIA NIGHT WITH IDAHO HUMANE SOCIETY—Check out this extra special trivia night to promote the Idaho Humane Society’s See Spot Walk fundraiser. You’ll compete for prize bags of dog toys and treats. You can also sign up for See Spot Walk ($30), and those who register will get a T-shirt and event swag bag. 7-10 p.m. FREE. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-918-0597.

Food SUNDAY BRUNCH WITH URBAN SMOKE—Enjoy Sunday Brunch with some killer grub by Urban Smoke, cidermosas and local tunes. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Meriwether Cider Co., 5242 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208972-6725, meriwethercider.com.

MONDAY SEPT. 12 Sports & Fitness KONA FALL 2016 MOUNTAIN BIKE DEMO—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Camel’s Back Park, 1200 W. Heron St., Boise. 208-3427734, mcusports.com.

On Stage DR. HAAS’ 10 MINUTE SHOWCASE—Hey there, True Believers. It’s time for the September edition of The Dr. Haas’ 10 Minutein Showcase. Join special guests Olek Szewczyk and Kaz Gable, who’ll perform a bit of their favorite stand-up and then engage in a bit of one-on-one therapy with Dr. Dylan Haas, live and on stage for your entertainment. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459. ISF: FOREVER PLAID—7:30 p.m. $13-$45. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. OUTLAW FIELD: BONNIE RAITT DIG IN DEEP TOUR—The Grammy-winning rocker brings her signature sound to town in support of her latest album, Dig in Deep. 7 p.m. $55-$60. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Perspective, a compilations of true stories about aviation in Idaho’s backcountry. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Sports & Fitness ZEITGEIST HALF MARATHON SIGN-UP PARTY—Don’t miss the Zeitgeist Half Marathon Sign-Up Party, where you can save $9 off the online entry fee. Slated for Nov. 5, the Zeitgeist is a fundraising event for Racing Unlimited, Inc., which is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that funds research to find treatments and a cure for Polycystic Kidney Disease. Drop by at 6:30 p.m. for a training run/walk hosted by Boise Area Runners (BAR) club. Visit zhalfmarathon.com or call 208-853-1221 for more info. 3-9 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow Brewhouse, 2455 N. Harrison Hollow Lane, Boise, 208-853-1221, zhalfmarathon.com.

Literature FRANK CHURCH READING SERIES: DICK WILLIAMS—Join the Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation (SBFC) and Rediscovered Books for a reading series featuring local and regional authors that specialize in Idaho outdoors and conservation. This month’s speaker will be Dick Williams, author of Notes from the Cockpit: A Mountain Pilot’s

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Food UNPLUGGED HAPPY HOUR— With Rusty Dog Food Truck. Noon10 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing Co., 521 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-3427655, boisebrewing.com.

TUESDAY SEPT. 13 Festivals & Events ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL TOURS—Join docents for free 45-minute guided tours of the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial every Tuesday, through October. Meet at the statue of Anne Frank in the Memorial. No reservation required. For all ages. Tuesdays, 12:15 p.m. Continues through Oct. 25. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter.org/events. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

14cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MARINA CHAVE Z

DOWN TO THE ROOTS

NOISE

With Dig in Deep, Bonnie Raitt proves she has nothing to prove AMY ATKINS In her early 20s, Bonnie Raitt began carving out a trail she would follow for the next 40-plus years. Along the way, she opened for blues icons John Lee Hooker, Son House and Muddy Waters; landed a spot on Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Guitarists” and “100 Greatest Singers” of all time lists; collaborated with an impossibly impressive (and long) slate of stars, including, Tony Bennett, Jackson Browne, Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, Bruce Hornsby, Bonnie Raitt on her “legendary” status: “I mean, I’m honored that somebody would find that to be the case, B.B. King, Willie Nelson and Stevie Wonder. but I’m just a working musician.” Off the stage, she has advocated for environmental protections, civil rights and music Even though she’s a multi-award winning ing [myself ]. It’s more like I’m already estabeducation. As for accolades, she was inducted artist, Raitt also doesn’t assume the honors will lished. I don’t have to show people who I am into the Hollywood Bowl and Rock and Roll halls of fame and earned a shelf full of awards, because, 20 albums in, I’m blessed with a loyal keep coming—but they do. She is nominated for Artist of the Year by the Americana Music including 10 Grammys—several of which were audience who pretty much understands by Awards (the awards event is in Nashville, Tenn. now the range of music that I’m going to do.” for her 1989 breakout album Nick of Time on Wednesday, Sept. 21), and she will be Raitt’s approach to her work reflects a (Capitol), which went to No. 1, went multiinducted into the Austin City Limits Hall of platinum and featured hits “Something to Talk passion for what she does, as well as that Fame (of course, in Austin, Texas) along with confidence in her audience to embrace it. About” and “I Can’t Make You Love Me.” B.B. King and Kris Kristofferson on WednesShe produced Dig In Deep and has writing At 66, Raitt is now at an age when many day, Oct. 12. Raitt is genuinely humbled by credits on five of its tracks—according to her Americans retire, but she is still recording, the nods. bio, the “most original compositions she has releasing Dig in Deep—her 20th album—in “I don’t get nominated for more maincontributed to a record since 1998’s FundaFebruary on her own Redwing Records label. She’s also logging thousands of miles on a tour mental” (Capitol)—and a couple of covers that stream [awards]. … It’s wonderful to be validated by your peers,” Raitt said. “Austin City bus: When Raitt performs at the Idaho Botani- highlight her ability to interpret well-known Limits has been recognizing non-mainstream cal Garden on Tuesday, Sept. 13, she will have songs in such a way they slide right into her performed about 50 shows and have nearly 20 own canon but don’t detract from the original. artists for many, many years and kept a lot of us on the map.” She doesn’t appropriate tunes, she adds to stops left on her 2016 tour. From the beginning, Raitt stayed on the them. Her sultry roots/blues/ Raitt doesn’t have to work so BONNIE RAITT rock/Americana arrangement map by staying true to her roots, whether hard—as she says, she gets to. With Richard Thompson Trio, of the 1987 INXS hit “Need she was covering a pop song, incorporating “I’m proud to still be doing Tuesday, Sept. 13 the music of South Africa and West Africa You Tonight” is the perfect this, this many decades in,” she Doors at 6 p.m., show at 7 p.m., she loves so much, or crafting original tunes. example—her unaffected said. $55-$60. While she probably could have had a more delivery and authentic love For a musician who has probIdaho Botanical Garden, 2355 lucrative career in another musical genre, Raitt of the pop tune putting it ably done as many interviews as Old Penitentiary Road, 208said she isn’t in it for the money, and she isn’t in a new light. It’s not surrecordings, Raitt is as engaging, 343-8649, in it for the stardom. prising, then, to see Raitt’s personable and grounded as her idahobotanicalgarden.org. Now, several decades in and, as she said, in name preceded by the word music would suggest. In one the “slipstream of what musical heroes I had,” “legend” interview, she said she had “a lot she’s honored when a fellow non-mainstream “No, no, no,” she said when asked if she less to prove,” but it was sans hubris. sees herself as legendary. “I mean, I’m honored artist comes up behind her, says she made “That was more in relation to what [I was] a difference and “found out about blues or that somebody would find that to be the case, talking about in that particular interview,” Sippie Wallace or Richard Thompson or John Raitt told Boise Weekly. “Someone asks, ‘At this but I’m just a working musician. ... If I’ve Prine” by listening to her records. reached a level of being respected—and that point in your life, what pushes your decisions “It’s a wonderful snowballing effect,” Raitt took a long time—that’s definitely a wonderful to record one thing or another?’ I mean, I’ve thing to have accomplished, and I don’t take it said. “As long as you’re doing great music, never really done any kind of music with the you’ve got an audience.” for granted.” idea of proving anything other than establishBOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 c15


LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY SEPT. 7

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GIRLPUKE, SEPT. 9, HIGH NOTE CAFE Girlpuke—sometimes referred to as the most punk punk band in Boise—fires emotion at its audience like a bloody snot rocket: with little aim but plenty of shrapnel. The ramshackle trio relishes in rage, gore and bodily fluids, and there are plenty of stomach turning motifs in its three-song 2015 release I Drink Spit (girlpuke666.bandcamp.com). Lyrics like “I want to drain all your blood” and “your vomit tastes like angel cake” feature in tracks about unrequited love, regular love and hate for a variety of things. Meanwhile, the song “Love Suicide” begins like a long lost cut from The Shaggs. The out-of-tune guitar and breathy vocals that open the track are barely held together by a simple 4-4 beat that sounds like it’s being played with a cinder block and a hatchet. The song does a quick 180, though, and the lullaby is replaced with anger, snarl and snot. You can brush them off as dumb, disgusting or juvenile—and you might be right—but you’d be missing the point. —Jeffrey C. Lowe With Dumb Luck and Deep Creeps, 7p.m., cover by donation. The High Note Cafe, 225 N. 5th St., 208-429-1911, locu.com.

16cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

EMILY TIPTON—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity GAYLE CHAPMAN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JODI JAMES AND CLAY PARKER—7 p.m. FREE. High Note THE MAVERICKS—8 p.m. $25$80. Morrison Center MICHAEL DEAN DAMRON AND THE DO BETTERS—With Like a Rocket and Camacho. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers OLIVER THOMPSON TRIO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill PIERCE THE VEIL—With Neck Deep and I Prevail. 7:30 p.m. $27.50-$59.50. Revolution STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar TOM TAYLOR—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

RAWLEY FRYE—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity

VOLBEAT—With Killswitch Engage and Black Wizard. 7 p.m. $44.50. Taco Bell Arena

THOSE WILLOWS—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

THURSDAY SEPT. 8 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FAUNA SHADE—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage FIRE AND ICE TOUR—Featuring Bryan Torch and Controversy. 9:30 p.m. $5. Liquid

TROYBOI: THE MANTRA TOUR—8 p.m. $15-$30. Knitting Factory

FRIDAY SEPT. 9 THE BIG WOW BAND—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s BREAD AND CIRCUS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole CAMILLE BLOOM—7:30 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Lucky Dog

ISKA DHAAF—With Fauna Shade and St. Terrible. 7:30 p.m. $8. Neurolux JOSH ABBOTT BAND—With Chicken Dinner Road. 8 p.m. $12$25. Knitting Factory LIFE IN COLOR KINGDOM TOUR—Featuring Borgeous, Zomboy and Kayzo. 5 p.m. $30-$45. Idaho Center Amphitheater THE LOST MEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District LUCKY TONGUE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar OPHEILA—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

QUINN VAN PAEPEGHEM TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DEAN JENNINGS AND CURT GONION—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

RYAN WISSINGER—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

DJ REVLOVE—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

THOSE WILLOWS—9 p.m. $5. The Bird Stop

EMILY TIPTON—7 p.m. FREE. Homestead

UNCLE CHRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Meriwether

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE—Great Bait. 5:30 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

GIGGLEBOMB—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

HEATERS—With Skinny the Kid and Hihazel. 7 p.m. $7. Neurolux

GIRLPUKE AND DEEP CREEPS—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

SATURDAY SEPT. 10

RANDOM ACX DUO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

HILLFOLK NOIR—10 p.m. FREE. Juniper

ALL IN YO FACE SHOWCASE— Fourteen talented hip-hop emcees

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s FUTURE THIEVES—With Nothing But Heros. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic GAYLE CHAPMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE from all over Idaho will be performing. 8 p.m. $8-$12. Knitting Factory

NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BLAZE AND KELLY—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

OCCUPY EAST MAGIC 2016— Noon-8 p.m. $25. East Magic Resort, Magic City

BREAD AND CIRCUS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s BRETT REID—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 BUCKSKIN—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

STE. CHAPELLE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES—Snake River Harvest Festival with The Big Wow Band. 1 p.m. FREE-$12. Ste. Chapelle

CASEY KRISTOFFERSON BAND—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Brewing-Fairview

MONDAY SEPT. 12

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH MISTY DAWN TAYLOR—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

DEAN JENNINGS AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill LIZZY ROSE—With 2X2. 6:30 p.m. $5-$10 suggested donation. Boise Hive MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers OCCUPY EAST MAGIC 2016— Enjoy a two-day musical, cultural and sociological experience unlike any other. Featuring multiple bands, artists, games, shenenigans and debauchery, all hosted by Wood River Valley band Old Death Whisper. With JP Whipple and Tycoon Machete, Hillfolk Noir, Like a Rocket, Poke, Triggers and Slips, Nekkid Rednecks, Tylor and the Trainrobbers, Jimmy Robb Band, Up a Creek, Barking Owls, Secuestrado, Spike Coggins and more. Noon-2 a.m. $25. East Magic Resort, Magic City

ANDREW HOVE—6 p.m. FREE. Bodovino OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s VICTORY! VICTORY! ONE-MAN TOURING BAND—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

TUESDAY SEPT. 13

BLAZE AND KELLY—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar DEREK SCHAIBLE AND ASHLEY ROSE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 GLEEWOOD—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole MICHAELA FRENCH—6 p.m. FREE. Capitol Bar OUTLAW FIELD: BONNIE RAITT DIG IN DEEP TOUR—7 p.m. $55$60. Idaho Botanical Garden RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: PEOPLE WITH BODIES—With Up Is The Down Is The. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s SHELL CORPORATION—With Meatballs, Matt Woods and Far From Giants. 8 p.m. $8. The Shredder WILLIE DALLAS—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

THE OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND MOSQUITOES—7 p.m. FREE. High Note PATRICIA FOLKNER—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar

Play On. It’s Your

SALSA AT THE OLYMPIC—9 p.m. $5. The Olympic

Last Chance!

SIMPLE RUCKUS—10 p.m. $5. Reef SMOOTH AVENUE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar TAMBALKA—10 p.m. FREE. Juniper TRANSISTOR SEND—With Dancing Plague of 1518 and Aged ExChampion. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux WHAT FUTURE?—Featuring Young Sick Bacchus. 11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

SUNDAY SEPT. 11 ANDY BYRON’S AMERICANA MUSIC SERIES: WILL HOGE—8 p.m. $20-$28. Sapphire CHUCK AND SANDON PROJECT—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar EISLEY—With Merriment. 7 p.m. $15. Neurolux GREAT BAIT—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar MOSS ROSES—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Get Your

EISLEY, SEPT. 11, NEUROLUX For those of us riding the rails of midlife, the moniker “family band” might evoke the sugary oft-conservative likes of The Osmonds or The Partridges (but if you immediately thought of Dr. Funke’s 100% Natural Good-Time Family-Band Solution, we should be friends). It’s unfortunate, because many talented musicians wouldn’t be where they are if they hadn’t started out as kids spending hours noodling around or jamming with siblings or cousins—some even carry on into adulthood, like Tyler, Texas-born Eisley. Because most of Eisley’s members share the last name DuPree, it might be easy to write it off as another feel-good family band but, if you’re a fan of rich, addictive, melodic indie-pop/rock, you don’t want to (dis)miss Eisley, whose young members managed to shine— in part because of the DuPree sisters’ sweet haunting vocals—despite the grip of new bands always popping up. The Eisleys might be tight-knit, but that doesn’t mean you can’t join their family of fans. —Amy Atkins With Merriment, 8 p.m., $15. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208343-0886, neurolux.com.

Tickets Online Forever Plaid Written and Originally Directed and Choreographed by Stuart Ross, Musical Continuity Supervision and Arrangements by James Raitt Sponsored by ArmgaSys and 107.1 K-Hits

September 2 – 25

Mack Shirilla*, Forever Plaid (2016). *Member Actors’ Equity. DKM Photography.

Season Sponsor

Season Partners

Season Media Partners

Albertsons Foerstel Design Hotel 43 Micron Foundation Scentsy Truckstop.com

94.9 FM the River KTVB–Idaho’s News Channel 7 Idaho Statesman

Check out our website att

idahoshakespeare.org or call 336-9221 M–F, 10 am to 5 pm

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016c17


KE L S E Y HAWES

ARTS & CULTURE HUNT: A BOISE STORY Local artist Chris Hunt celebrates publication of his graphic series Carver: A Paris Story Z ACH HAGADONE On a wall of Tenth Street Station hangs a piece of ephemera that literally outshines its dim-lit, subterranean surroundings—a framed comics page alive with fire. Look closer and it reveals a solitary man mulling tortured thoughts before a raging bonfire. The inscription at the bottom of the page reads, “For Tenth Street Station: The Official Home of Carver.” Seated a few feet to the right, in a particularly gloomy corner of the barroom, sits Chris Hunt— a pack of American Spirits and a glass of Bulleit Bourbon arrayed on the table before him. The Carver of the page is an avatar of Hunt at the table. The latter created the former as a Hemingway-inspired “gentleman of fortune” tormented by love and war and subject of the multi-part series Carver: A Paris Story, the final installment of which was recently published by Z2 Comics. Now, after more than five years of heartache, toil and a semi-nomadic existence between France, Florida, New York and Boise, the former is in the process of establishing the latter as an up-and-coming graphic artist. Inked in a black-and-white style that is both muscular and elegant, the story is set against the backdrop of a violent 1920s Paris filled with masked anarchists and mysterious plots. Into this dangerous world, deeply damaged World War I hero Francis Carver is called back the City of Light to help an old flame. When he arrives, however, he quickly realizes there is more to the summons—and more blood to spilled because of it—than he could ever imagine. It’s an exotic setup resplendent with Lost Generation literary references, First World War history and enough period touches to reward second and third readings. However, while Carver: A Paris Story is alive with a sweeping sense of place and time, it all started at that table at Tenth Street. “What came to be Carver: A Paris Story was the result of relationships that were built here,” Hunt said, sitting in his customary corner seat— chosen because he “likes to sit in a place where nobody can attack me from the back.” Hunt was half joking, but things do have a way of attacking from behind. Tracing Carver’s evolution, Hunt goes back to 18c SEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

From France to Florida to New York, wherever Chris Hunt goes, there’s a table for him at Tenth Street.

early 2010, when he traveled to France to visit his then-girlfriend—“the real Catherine,” he said, referring to the fictional lost lover who drives much of what transpires in Carver: A Paris Story. In a case of art imitating life, Hunt’s relationship fell apart in Paris. At the time, he was applying for a residency with renowned artist Paul Pope at the Atlantic Center for the Arts in Florida. As part of the process, he drew a 10-page comic, which turned out to be the first time he put the character of hard-charging adventurer Francis Carver on paper—then named Archer (prior to the FX cartoon series) and placed in an homage to Hemingway’s Death in the Tall Grass. “I always loved Hemingway, and my uncle lived in Alaska, so I grew up reading exaggerated adventure stories. … Tall tales told by hunters in a bar somewhere,” Hunt said. Jumping from Paris to Florida, where he forged a connection with Pope that would ultimately place him in New York and see Carver published, then back to Boise, Hunt again found himself in the corner at Tenth Street—this time talking to another former girlfriend, who was telling him of her impending marriage. “Between that experience and this other person, the kind of story I wanted to write was this jaded version of Before Sunrise,” he said. “So I sat down here in the most cliched manner possible and wrote the first draft of Carver: A Paris Story.” Again, things have a way of sneaking up and flipping the script. While Hunt’s first foray into Carver was “a little more sappy,” he said, the story took a darker turn when two of his close friends died in quick succession in 2011. “It ruined me and everybody else,” Hunt said. “I didn’t know what to do. I lost myself. That’s when I really started drinking, to be honest.”

In grieving for both his friends and romantic relationships, Hunt found himself shifting Carver into bleaker territory—away from the star-crossed lover drinking to forget and toward a man shattered by war, fighting to regain a sense of place and self. “What Carver has become and is, it’s definitely about addressing how someone can lose themselves because of pain and how they can associate that with a place,” he said. Hunt doesn’t disagree that his themes present a throughline to Lost Generation writers like Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald—the latter who makes a deeply funny yet unheralded cameo in the series—but it wasn’t intentional that they became so central to Carver. Rather, they were lived experiences that informed what he still regards as an adventure story, not the hard-boiled ’20s noir that some reviewers have labeled it. “This whole thing is predicated on me creating the story I wished people were creating,” Hunt said, noting that he took a lot of chances with obscure references and even foreign languages. “I love the kind of story that makes me have to work for it,” he added. As for the hard work of finding one’s own place, Hunt is still hustling for it. He’ll soon travel with Pope to a comics festival in Bilbao, Spain, where he hopes something sparks creatively— whether it’s a return to the world of Carver or something else. Perhaps as foreshadowing, Hunt acknowledged the scene depicted on the wall at Tenth Street, drawn long before Carver became a reality, was from an unrealized story set in northern Spain. “I think the search for place is more the search for some sort of peace,” he said. “I viewed this as kind of a pilot. This is where the story begins.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


SCREEN TEN DAYS, TEN NIGHTS, WAY TOO MANY FILMS

BW returns to the Toronto International Film Festival GEORGE PRENTICE Waiting for a good film—a really good one— can be like waiting for a bus. Plenty will pass before the right one comes along. Then there’s the bullet train that is the Toronto International Film Festival and, from the moment I arrive in that great Canadian city, the pace at TIFF is frantic. Nearly 300 feature films are wedged into TIFF’s 10 days of morning, noon and midnight madness. I wouldn’t miss it for the world. The reason is simple: during each festival visit I get to share with Boise Weekly readers the first glimpse of what undoubtedly will be the best films of the year and, nearly always, the big Oscar winners. This year, TIFF host 266 world or North American premieres—more than at any other festival in the world. Below is a list of just a few:

(A Simple Man), starring Amy Adams, Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Sheen. Jackie stars Natalie Portman as Jacqueline Kennedy in the days following the assassination of her husband, U.S. President John F. Kennedy.

THE BEST OF THE FEST

CONTROVERSY CORNER

Unless my radar is off, Loving will jump to the top of filmgoers’ must-see lists. It tells the true story of Richard and Mildred Loving, whose union in 1958 led to a landmark civil rights decision by the U.S. Supreme Court regarding interracial marriage. Manchester by the Sea stars Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams and Kyle Chandler in the much-anticipated return from writer/director Kenneth Lonergan (You Can Count on Me). The early buzz on La La Land, a full-out musical starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, is that it’s a visual wonder and heading to Oscar’s short list. The Walt Disney Studio strays a bit from its fantasy-driven projects to produce Queen of Katwe, is the true story of a girl who emerges from poverty in the streets of Uganda to become a world-class chess champion. Denial, based on the bestseller History on Trial, tells the riveting true-life drama of a historian going toe-to-toe with notorious Holocaust denier David Irving. Nocturnal Animals is the long-awaited thriller drama from writer/director Tom Ford

The Birth of a Nation, an epic tale of America’s tragic history of slavery, was tagged as the Best Picture Oscar front-runner—until its star, director and co-writer Nate Parker, was revealed to have been a co-defendant in a 1999 trial related to an alleged rape of a Penn State University student. Parker was acquitted, but it was also recently revealed the alleged victim committed suicide in 2012. In addition to its premiere at TIFF, Parker will take questions— his first opportunity to face the press since the controversy boiled over. Elle is controversial from the get-go, beginning with the fact that it’s directed by Paul Verhoeven, the man behind the lens for Basic Instinct, RoboCop and Showgirls. Elle may be his most provocative film yet, telling the story of a rape victim who seeks unorthodox revenge on her assailant. Its premiere at Cannes triggered as many laughs as gasps.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

(Clockwise, from top left) Natalie Portman in Jackie, Denzel Washington and Chris Pratt in The Magnificent Seven, Ruth Negga and Joel Edgerton in Loving, Joseph Gordon-Levitt in Snowden, Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in La La Land, a pair of characters from animated holiday musical Sing and Amy Adams in Arrival (center).

SOMETHING BIG Blockbusters abound at TIFF, including the world premiere of The Magnificent Seven, starring Denzel Washington and Chris Pratt; Deep-

water Horizon, which stars Mark Wahlberg and Kurt Russell in the big-budget telling of the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil rig explosion; Arrival, the sci-fi epic of an American linguist (Amy Adams) called in to communicate with aliens; and Snowden, director Oliver Stone’s much-buzzed biopic about Edward Snowden.

KID FRIENDLY Sing, an animated musical holiday release, will have its world premiere at TIFF; for Justin Timberlake + The Tennessee Kids, the eponymous pop star teamed with Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme to chronicle his world tour; and A Monster Calls is the story of a 12-year-old boy struggling with his mother’s illness with the help of a wild and relentless beast (Liam Neeson).

THINGS THAT GO BUMP TIFF’s Midnight Madness track never fails to thrill. This year’s lineup includes a re-booted Blair Witch film; Free Fire, a bloody gang shoot-’em-up; Raw, which sees something go horribly wrong when a teenager eats meat for the first time; and Rats, a horror documentary about the planet’s harbinger of disease and death. I’ll be sending daily dispatches from all of TIFF’s premieres Thursday, Sept. 8 through Sunday, Sept. 18. Find them at boiseweekly. com.

2x12 Camp A BW STARTS FRIDAY,

SEPT 9TH

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 c19


CITIZEN STEVE ‘RED GREEN’ SMITH Duct tape, favorite relatives and Old Man Sedgwick GEORGE PRENTICE Public television is the home of Austin City Limits, the Crawleys of Downton Abbey, Mr. Selfridge, Mr. Rogers and Curious George. It’s also home to one of the oddest ducks to appear on television: Red Green, Canada’s king of duct tape, bad inventions, and ill-fated hunting and fishing trips. The man behind Red Green, Steve Smith, had been donning plaid and camo for nearly four decades when he first introduced the character in a two-minute sketch on the Canadian TV variety series Smith and Smith, which he hosted with his wife (think a maple syrup-infused Sonny and Cher). After the variety series ended in the mid-1980s, Steve Smith revisited the Red Green character, which led to 15 years worth of programs that enjoyed success on both sides of the border. The show still airs in reruns on PBS stations across the U.S., including Idaho Public Television. In anticipation of his Sunday, Sept. 11 visit, when he’ll bring Red to the stage of Boise’s Egyptian Theatre, we talked to Smith about his iconic character.

Fifteen seasons in television is almost unheard of. At the end of the 13th season, I approached the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and told them I would be turning 60 in a couple of years. I know an exit ramp when I see one. They agreed to give me a two-year contract, which was great because I gave everybody two years notice and planned story arcs for full closure.

I grew up near the U.S./Canada border and watched a lot of Canadian television. I vividly remember some pretty fond memories of Smith and Smith in the ’70s and ’80s. Wow, you’re old. There’s not many of us left. I created Red for that show… a little two-minute bit. I actually fashioned Red after a real-life outdoor show that used to be on Canadian TV. The host would read poems over grainy, 16-millimeter films of him fishing and he would have entire shows where he wouldn’t catch any fish.

Does duct tape follow you everywhere? I sign a lot of duct tape. We probably used 100 rolls of duct tape for each of our episodes. It’s the physical representation of Red. He sort-of fixes things that sort-of work for sort-of a little while.

How did the character of Red Green break out as a stand-alone TV show? When my wife didn’t want to do TV anymore I thought I would pull Red out for a small summer TV show in 1990. And it just took off.

My favorite was his final invention. A perpetual motion machine that Red could never get started. That’s so Red.

Do you have a theory as to why Red is so popular in the States? Honestly, I think Red reminds people of a relative that they like. There’s one in every family. If you don’t think there’s somebody like that in your family, it’s probably you. When did you stop taping new episodes? 2005. I retired. We did 200 episodes. 20cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016cBOISEweekly

Yet Red Green still runs on PBS stations all across the U.S. 100 percent of our U.S. exposure is PBS. Without public television, Red Green never would have aired in America. Tell us about the Red Green “I’m Not Old, I’m Ripe,” tour. We did 25 cities across North America this past spring and they were really successful. The show is in the form of a meeting at the Possum Lodge, complete with the possum salute and oath.

And Red’s infamous inventions? Well, there was the Cadillac backhoe which is the Cadillac of backhoes or the backhoe of Cadillacs.

How long do you want to keep doing the stage show? I keep a careful eye on the demand from the public. This has already exceeded my wildest dreams. But things still make me laugh. I was talking to Old Man Sedgwick the other day [Sedgwick was an unseen fictional character on the Red Green Show] and he told me that he had just put two hearing aids in his dog’s ears. I asked him if the dog was deaf; and he said, “No but it makes him think twice about barking.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BEERGUZZLER AN OKTOBERFEST TRIBUTE Despite the name, Munich’s Oktoberfest begins Saturday, Sept. 17 and runs through Oct. 3. It started in 1810 as a celebration marking the marriage of Kronprinz Ludwig to Princess Therese. The festival beverage of choice is Marzen, a medium-bodied beer traditionally brewed in the spring then stored over the summer. While several German examples are available, I focused on three American tributes: FIRESTONE OAKTOBERFEST, $2.50-$2.90 This orange tinged, amber brew sports the most generous head of the three, showing good retention and leaving a nice lacing. It opens with heady herb aromas followed by sweet malt and a hint of hops. On the drier side, it offers wheat toast flavors with a dollop of honey. Beautifully balanced, the soft malt melds nicely with the smooth hops.

Save up to

40% OFF at local restaurants!

1. Text “smartcard” to 77948 for FREE app 2. Register app 3. Load $ to your smartcard app 4. Visit participating businesses 5. Repeat step 3 & 4 as often as you’d like!

NINKASI OKTOBERFEST, $1.70-$1.90 A slightly hazy, straw colored pour with a thin head, the aromas are a mix of sweet, fruity malt and grain. The palate features silky malt and bright fruit (ripe citrus and cherry) with a touch of honey. For a Marzen, there’s an uncharacteristic hit of hops—especially on the finish—but, hey, it seems appropriate for a Northwest take on the style. ODELL BREWING OKTOBERFEST, $2-$2.20 A bright amber in the glass, it’s topped by the thinnest of heads. The aromas are a muted mix of cereal grain and herb. You get lots of caramel malt and sweet biscuit on the palate, backed by a bit of citrus tang. A touch of mineral and nut comes through on the creamy finish. This smooth brew tastes great and, with very light carbonation, it’s less filling. —David Kirkpatrick BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016c21


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

SERVICES

COUNSELING

MASSAGE

CAREERS

Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.TheIncomeHub.com.

BW CAREERS

SERVICES Alpenglow Metalworks • Traditional hand forging • Welding & fabrication • Small repairs welcome • One on one instruction available • (208) 863-4699

NYT CROSSWORD | ONE BY ONE ACROSS

1

2

3

4

19

5

6

7

8

9

20

23 26

27

31

32

33

36 41

37

42

11

25 29

34

35 39

79

87

88

62

100

101 108

83 86

91 95

96 102

107

109

111

112

113

114

115

116

97

103

70 ____ Alamos 71 Targeted 74 Spanish prefix with líneas 75 Begin a voyage 77 ____ Fresh (Tex-Mex chain) 78 Airport posting, for short 79 Multicolored candy in a yellow package 81 Noted index 84 Grp. sponsoring of the Muzzle Loading Championship 85 Footnote material 86 Stemmed (from) 87 Transition 90 Go on 91 1997 film megahit 93 Site of the George Bush Presidential Library 94 Material in two states 96 Droop 97 The “e” of i.e. 100 Descend in a controlled fashion 101 Might be able to do it 104 Oscar-winning Berry 106 The “E” of HOMES 107 Like three men of rhyme 109 Beverage since 1922 111 Bareilles who sang “Love Song” 112 “Negotiations are off!” 113 Some fuel oils 114 Leave in 115 Gertrude ____, first woman to swim the English Channel 116 Meh 117 Lead-in to Victoria or Albert

DOWN

92

106

22cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 cBOISEweekly

73

78

82

90 94

72

77

85

93

52

71

81

89

51

66

76

80

50

57

70

84

49

65

75

18

45

61

69

17

30

56

64

16

40

44

60

74

15

48

59

68

14

24

55

63

13

22

38

54

58

12

55 Sources of mescaline 57 Prefix with parasite 58 School in Oxford, informally 60 ____-Atlantic 61 Burns’s refusal 62 Where bees be 63 Slithy one, to Carroll 64 Diamond head? 66 ____ salad 67 Shout made while pointing 69 Cops, with “the”

21

47

53

67

10

28

43

46

BY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

39 Like many a lad or lass 40 “Since you didn’t hear me the first time …” 41 Actor Reeves 43 Start of a time- capsule direction 45 Retired Steeler Taylor 46 Takes it easy 48 End-of-seminar feature 53 ____ letter (college app part) 54 Scads

25 Subordinate: Abbr. 26 “That ____ part of our agreement!” 27 Short dagger 29 Flattened at the poles 31 Concorde, e.g. 32 Ball in a socket 34 There are 24 in a caffeine molecule 35 Release from TLC or Alicia Keys 36 Tee seller

1 Flair 5 Indication of freshness 9 Weak 15 ____ bag (party giveaway) 19 Have a one-person apartment, say 21 “Old MacDonald” sounds 22 “Check and ____” 23 Neighbor of Illinois 24 Response to a flatterer

CAREERS

ENGINEER ON Semiconductor has a Test Development Engineer position (Job Code:TDESH-CA) available in Meridian, ID. Create and modify image sensor test jobs by adding additional tests, trends, or changes to the test jobs. Submit resume by mail to: ON Semiconductor Corporation, Attn: Human Resources, 2660 Zanker Road, San Jose, CA 95134. Must reference job title and job code (TDESH-CA). PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required.

104

105

110

117

98

99

1 Things aggressive people may throw 2 Turkish money 3 “Cease!” on the seas 4 Answer to “Is Bonn the capital of Deutschland?” 5 Kind of camera, for short 6 Releases 7 Bio course: Abbr. 8 Mani-____ 9 “Ready!”

10 “It’s all good” 11 They mind their manors 12 Foist (upon) 13 Most important piece in échecs 14 Relatives of scooters 15 One of two in the Adidas logo 16 Sushi go-with 17 Offered for breeding 18 “Don’t let those guys escape!” 20 Choice 28 A U.S. flag is a common one 30 Ammonia and lye 33 Calvin Coolidge’s reputed reply to a woman who bet she could get more than two words out of him 36 Old men 37 Red ____ 38 Go (for) 41 Ocean bottom? 42 And more 44 “Going somewhere?” 45 “That makes sense” 46 Miracle-____ 47 Electees 48 2022 World Cup host 49 Surrounder of la Grande Jatte 50 Martians, in “The War of the Worlds” 51 Wordsworth work 52 Negatives 56 Word often replaced with “your” 59 Ignoramus 60 Big mouths 62 United Nations concern 64 Tangles 65 Behemoths 66 City where Mexico’s routes 1 and 2 meet

67 Word that becomes its own synonym when spelled backward 68 Giggle syllable 69 Basic form of a word 71 Spa sound 72 Do to ____ 73 Bit 75 Simplify 76 Just like always 77 Big swig 80 Neglect 82 Number of hills in ancient Rome 83 Rx writer 85 Optometrist, at times 87 Pirate, in old slang 88 Breathe out L A S T S T R U T

C R A Z E

R A D O N

S E R M O N

E L A I N E

N U R S E S

A B S I N T H E

S A N T A H A T

S A L E D A Y S

A P M V E L O A R A N M O T S T H H A S A T E I D E N E S T D A T E S P R T S S H A R U M E D S R O V A P M O N E A L S N E A L S P A S P

89 View in awe 90 Slightly 92 Noted philanthropic family 93 Lock 95 Relative of a weasel 97 Justice Kagan 98 Smooth and glossy 99 Like Calvin Coolidge 102 Neocons, e.g. 103 Ice-cream flavor 105 Cain mutiny victim? 108 Positive sign 110 Game-winning line

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

E G G H E A D E D

A R A B

I T S A G O A L T O

S H U E E R B A T R E E A S S S H T E E E A R M E E R R E V E E N T I S E

H A D Y E E R A K H E E R A N D E P L I S N I B R Y E U S I G N

R E M Y

K N E E D S C E E Y E A R P R A A N A C O R E M P A S A N N S I O S B O L V A M E D I R L O S E

S A C H I A Y N A D E R S O A P S E T C E D E O R T I N N O G R A

T H E F O R A U L M U M P R E O U T L I O P G Y A L V E O U N T S E N T

S I S E N O R A

O P E R A M A N

A E R A T E

S A S H E D

Y E L P S

S A S S Y

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY

ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377.

MIND BODY SPIRIT BW MASSAGE THERAPY

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

Special $30. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 6am-6pm & by appt. I travel. 8805772. Male Only. Private Boise studio. MC/VISA. massagebyeric. com.

HOUSING BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Enjoy a relaxing massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492. SACRED BODY CARE For Relaxation Call Ami at 208-6976231.

OFFICE HOURS

BW FUNDRAISERS

ADOPT-A-PET

PLEASE HELP CAPITAL HIGH STUDENT IN RECOVERY Arthur Ferguson is a recent graduate of Capital High with honors. He was shot twice recently while protecting his mother in a domestic violence incident. If you can help with his medical bills, please donate to the Arthur Ferguson Hero Fund at any Idaho Central Credit Union or stop at the family fruit stand at 4030 W. State St. in Boise. Thank you.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

BW PROFESSIONAL COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE YOU AN ACTOR? Do you want to work onstage at BCT? Then you should audition for us on Sunday, Sept. 11. We want to see you. Come prepared with two monologues totaling 4 minutes or less, and let us know about you. Email Artistic Director Matthew Cameron Clark at mc@ bctheater to schedule an appointment from 3 - 7 pm. Lots of readings and some Mainstage roles yet to cast.

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 844-573-1317.

presents

FAX

AUTO

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com

BW 4 WHEELS CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com.

DUKE: I am sweet, friendly and wearing my finest tuxedo in anticipation of meeting you.

Meridian City Hall and Downtown Meridian BOISE WEEKLY.COM

KATNISS: I dream of a quiet home in which I can live peacefully with humans who love me.

BODHI: I am a flirty, young stud-muffin. Come run your fingers through my glorious black locks.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES

MERIDIAN ART WEEK PROCLAMATION

Friday, Sept. 9: 5:30 PM: Unveiling and dedication of public art Out on the Town featuring artist Daniel Borup 6:30 PM: Art Drop Week social. Bring in art you discovered during Meridian Art Drop Week at City Hall 5:30-7:30 PM: Chalk art competition, Idaho Ave. and Main Street Downtown. 5:30-8:30 PM: Reception for Pinxit collective at the Initial Point Gallery, 3rd floor of Meridian City Hall

DEADLINES*

We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

Sept. 5-9: All day!

Tuesday, Sept. 6: 6:00 PM: Mayor Tammy will read a proclamation declaring it Meridian Art Week.

September 5th - 9th

PHONE

(208) 342-4733

MERIDIAN ART DROP WEEK

ART WALK

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

(208) 344-2055

EVENTS

Meridian Arts Commission

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

BELLA: 7-year-old, female, Chihuahua mix. Charming and intuitive about emotions. Does not like to be held. May guard food. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #7236561)

LANEE: 10-year-old, female, American pit bull terrier mix. Young at heart. Loves walks. Can jump high and tries to climb trees. (Kennel 422 – #23161377)

SPOT: 3-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Playful and gentle. Loves treats. Walks well on a leash and doesn’t mind being held. (Kennel 420 – #22982931)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT CATHARINA: 8-year-old, female, domestic longhair. Came to the shelter as a stray. Mellow and gentle. Great cuddle buddy. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #6885472)

ROSS: 4-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Came in as a stray. Could lose some weight. Sweet and affectionate. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #32038420)

TOOTHLESS: 3-month-old, male, domestic shorthair. Loves to be loved. Gets along with kids of all ages. Will need to spend the night to be neutered. (Cage 19 – #33021394)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 c23


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

CLASSIFIEDS

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Two 7-year-old girls showed me three tricks I could use to avoid taking myself too seriously and getting too attached to my dignity. I’m offering these tricks to you just in time for the letting-go phase of your astrological cycle. Trick No. 1: Speak in a made-up language for at least 10 minutes. Example: “Groftyp hulbnu wivgeeri proot xud amasterulius. Quoshibojor frovid zemplissit.” Trick No. 2: Put a different kind of shoe and sock on each foot and pretend you’re two people stuck in a single body. Give each side of you a unique nickname. Trick No. 3: Place an unopened bag of barbecue-flavored potato chips on a table, then bash your fist down on it, detonating a loud popping sound and unleashing a spray of crumbs out the ends of the bag. Don’t clean up the mess for at least an hour. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In accordance with the astrological omens, I suggest you spend less energy dwelling in profane time so you expand your relationship with sacred time. If that’s of interest to you, consider the following definitions. PROFANE TIME happens when you’re engulfed in the daily grind. Swarmed by a relentless flurry of immediate concerns, you are held hostage by the chatter of your monkey mind. Being in SACRED TIME attunes you to the relaxing hum of eternity. It enables you to

be in intimate contact with your soul’s deeper agenda, and affords you extra power to transform yourself in harmony with your noble desires and beautiful intentions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): About 1.7 million years ago, our human ancestors began using primitive hand axes made from rocks. This technology remained in use for more than 60,000 generations before anyone invented more sophisticated tools and implements. Science writer Marcus Chown refers to this period as “the million years of boredom.” Its slow pace contrasts sharply with technology’s brisk evolution in the last 140 years. In 1880, there were no cars, planes, electric lights, telephones, TVs or Internet. I surmise that you’re leaving your own phase of relatively slow progress, Gemini. In the coming months, I expect your transformations will progress with increasing speed—starting soon. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Prediction No. 1: You will attract truckloads of good luck by working to upgrade and refine the way you communicate. Prediction No. 2: You will tickle the attention of interesting people who could ultimately provide you with clues you will need to thrive in 2017. Prediction No. 3: You will discover secrets of how to articulate complicated feelings and subtle ideas that have been locked inside you. Prediction No. 4:

24cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 cBOISEweekly

You’ll begin a vibrant conversation that will continue to evolve for a long time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You know you have a second brain in your gut, right? (If not, read this: http://bit.ly/secondbrain.) During the past three weeks, I have been beaming telepathic instructions toward this smart part of you. Here’s an edited version of the message I’ve been sending: “Cultivate your tenacity, darling. Build up your stamina, sweetheart. Feed your ability to follow through on what you’ve started, beautiful. Be persistent and spunky and gritty, my dear.” Alas, I’m not sure my psychic broadcasts have been as effective as I’d hoped. I think you need further encouragement. So please summon more fortitude and staying power, you gutsy stalwart. Be staunch and dogged and resolute, you stouthearted powerhouse. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Is “Big Bang” the best term we can come up with to reference the beginning of the universe? It sounds violent and messy—like a random, accidental splatter. I would much prefer a term that suggests sublime elegance and playful power—language that would capture the awe and reverence I feel as I contemplate the sacred mystery we are privileged to inhabit. What if we used a different name for the birth of creation, like the

“Primal Billow” or the “Blooming Ha Ha” or the “Majestic Bouquet”? By the way, I recommend that you consider those last three terms as being suitable titles for your own personal life story in the coming weeks. A great awakening and activation are imminent. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The last few weeks have been fraught with rich plot twists, naked dates with destiny and fertile turning points. I expect there will be further intrigue in the near future. A fierce and tender decision at a crossroads? The unexpected arrival of a hot link to the future? A karmic debt that’s canceled or forgiven? In light of the likelihood that the sweet-and-sour, confusing-andrevelatory drama will continue, I encourage you to keep your levels of relaxed intensity turned up high. More than I’ve seen in a long time, you have the magic and the opportunity to transform what needs to be transformed. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the coming days, you will have more than your usual access to help and guidance. Divine interventions are possible. Special dispensations and charmed coincidences, too. If you don’t believe in fairy dust, magic beans, and lucky potions, maybe you should set that prejudice aside for a while. Subtle miracles are more likely to bestow their gifts if your reasonable theo-

ries don’t get in the way. Here’s an additional tip: Don’t get greedy. Use the openings you’re offered with humility and gratitude. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When my daughter Zoe was growing up, I wanted her to be familiar with the origins of ordinary stuff that she benefited from. That’s why I took her to small farms where she could observe the growth and harvest of organic food crops. We visited manufacturing facilities where cars, furniture, toys, and kitchen sinks were built. She saw bootmakers creating boots and professional musicians producing songs in recording studios. And much more. I would love it if you would give yourself comparable experiences in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. It’s an excellent time to commune with the sources of things that nurture you and make your life better. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Unless you were brought up by a herd of feral donkeys, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to embark on your second childhood. Unless you’re allergic to new ideas, the foreseeable future will bring you strokes of curious luck that inspire you to change and change and change your mind. And unless you are addicted to your same old stale comforts, life will offer you chances to explore frontiers that could expose you to thrilling new comforts.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): These days, my dear, your eccentric beauty is even more unkempt than usual. I like it. It entertains and charms me. And as for your idiosyncratic intelligence: That, too, is messier and cuter and even more interesting than ever before. I’m inclined to encourage you to milk this unruly streak for all its potential. Maybe it will provoke you to experiment in situations where you’ve been too accepting of the stagnant status quo. And perhaps it will embolden you to look for love and money in more of the right places. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m giving you an ultimatum, Pisces: Within the next 144 hours, I demand that you become at least 33 percent happier. Fifty percent would be even better. Somehow you’ve got to figure out what you can do to enhance your sense of well-being and increase your enjoyment of life. I’m sort of joking, but on the other hand I’m completely serious. From my perspective, it’s essential that you feel really good in the coming days. Abundant pleasure is not merely a luxury, but rather a necessity. Do you have any ideas about how to make this happen? Start here: No. 1. Identify your four most delightful memories, and re-enact them in your imagination. No. 2. Go see the people whose influences most thoroughly animate your self-love.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY

or has come from small donations and re-homing fees. Kittens are fixed, vaccinated, micro-chipped and ready to go! For more info please visit our website: www. happyjackcats.org.

BW LIVE MUSIC THURSDAY NIGHT LIVE @ CINDER WINES Check us out Every Third Thursday of the month for our Thursday Night LIVE!!! Sept.15th is Shon Sanders & Daniel Jump, Oct 20thBernie Rielly Band, Nov 17thSteve Eaton, Dec 15th- BFD (Bud Gudmundson, Fonny Davidson, Devit Cardoza). These are FREE concerts, all ages are welcome and food trucks are available for eats.

BW MUSIC LESSONS GUITAR LESSONS Guitar Lessons If you want to have fun and learn to play the guitar from the heart let me know, emphasis not on this note or that chord but an emphasis on how to play from the soul! To hear some of my skill levels and creativity go to: dutchsupremacystudios.com, there are some song samples you can listen to! Let’s do this!!

PETS

FOR SALE

CONSIDER HAPPY JACK CATS Happy Jack Cats, Inc. was founded in 2015 by individuals concerned for the welfare of “throw away” kittens and cats in the Treasure Valley. With a strong foster program made up of skilled volunteers in homes through-out the area, all funding for HJC is out-of-pocket

BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Taye Deresa Kasa Legal Name

BW SHOP HERE

Case No. CV NC 1613637 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult)

CURVY GIRL KATE’S RESALE FASHIONS Curvy Girl Kate’s is a resale shop dedicated to all curvy girls size 12 and up. We carry Large through 5X fashions that fit every curve, at thrift shop prices. We accept up cycled clothing in good condition. Dresses, skirts, jackets, shoes, accessories, active wear and cute tops, just to name some of the treasures you will find at Curvy Girl Kate’s. Come in and mention Boise Weekly and get 10% off your entire purchase. 10366 West Overland- Boise 208-32curvy.

A Petition to change the name of Taye Deresa Kasa, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Gemedo Ambo Dube. The reason for the change in name is my current name is not show my tribe (ethics). A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) September 22, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date August 2, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEBBIE NAGELE By: DEPUTY CLERK. PUB Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Simale Taye Deresa Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1613636 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor)

BRITE SIGNS Sign Rental 208-866-6843.

BW YARD SALE

BW PETS

LEGAL

YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

A Petition to change the name of Simale Taye Deresa, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Simale Gemedo Ambo. The reason for

the change in name is the current name is not show my tribe from she born. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) Oct. 11, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Aug. 1, 2016 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK. PUB: Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Ian Sean Walsh. Legal Name

CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Jeanette Sedillo, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Jeanette Woodland. The reason for the change in name is: maiden name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on October 04, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: July 22, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk. PUB Sept. 7,14, 21, 28 2016.

ADULT BW FOR SALE Viagra!! 52 Pills for Only $99.00. Your #1 trusted provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed Delivery. Call today 1-877-6217013.

Case No. CV NC 1612794 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Ian Sean Walsh, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Sri Arjuna Sean Walsh. The reason for the change in name is: it is the first name I have used for most of my life, having grown up as a Hare Krishna. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on September 22, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: July 22, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Debbie Nagele, Deputy Clerk. PUB August 24, 31 and Sept. 7, 14, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Jeanette Sedillo. Legal Name

ADULT

Case No. CV NC 1613244 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME

JEN SORENSEN

HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 c25


PAGE BREAK

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN $GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH TITLE OF THE COLUMN THIS WEEK

DEAR MINERVA, I’m not sure what to do with friends on Facebook. More specifically, friends on Facebook who have died. I struggle with whether or not I can delete them from my friends list. Is it socially acceptable? Would I be a terrible person for doing so? What would Minerva do? Sincerely, —Dearly Departed

DEARLY DEPARTED, That is a tricky question when you start to take into consideration how it could be perceived by others and I, too, have dealt with this conundrum. A few years back a sweet friend of mine died. We had grown very close over time and our relationship was sometimes one of romantic interest. We cared about one another. His death was sudden and shocking. Because of that, there were certain friends on Facebook who wallowed in their grief, posting frequently and tagging this deceased young man in their posts. This constantly brought him to the top of my news feed. I found this a hindrance to my grief process. Because of that I made the decision to screenshot our correspondence, save important pictures and unfriend him on Facebook, but not unfriend him in my heart. Grief is different for everyone and it’s personal. How we grieve as individuals is no one’s business and, in my opinion, above reproach. Do what is right for yourself and your life. It doesn’t mean you don’t care or don’t love them. It just means you are trying to heal. No one can fault you for that. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

#boiseweeklypic

FIND WRITINGS FROM ANCIENT EGYPT It can be easy to think of the ancient Egyptians as great builders of monuments and leave it at that, but they were also some of history’s most prolific writers. On nearly every surface of their famous structures the Egyptians told stories, made declarations or issued prayers. However, the hieroglyphic style employed by these millennia-old scribes makes it indecipherable to all but a few readers. $10-$15, penguin.co.uk If you want to read like an Egyptian, pick up a copy of the aptly titled Writings from Ancient Egypt, compiled and translated into English by Cambridge scholar Toby Wilkinson. Published by Penguin and set for a January 2017 release in the United States, the book represents the first time non-academics will have the chance to, as Wilkinson told the Guardian, peer into ancient Egypt’s “life of the mind, as expressed in the written word.” Among the stories is “The Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor,” which involves a mariner washed ashore on a magical island ruled by a giant golden snake, but the book also includes other writings, such as letters from a farmer named Heqanakht and journalism of a sort, which recounts a storm that destroyed structures and crops.

Taken by instagram user dr_kelso.

—Zach Hagadone

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2.  3. 

“VESSEL,” TWENTY ONE PILOTS

“HOW TO BE A HUMAN BEING,” GLASS ANIMALS

“ENCORE: MOVIE PARTNERS SING BROADWAY,” BARBRA STREISAND

4. 5. 

“A/B,” KALEO “GIVE A GLIMPSE OF WHAT YER NOT,” DINOSAUR JR.

6.

“SUICIDE SQUAD SOUNDTRACK,” VARIOUS ARTISTS

7. 8.  9.  10.

FROM THE POLL VAULT What book formats have you read on in the past 12 months? Read only print books: 38%

“AND THEN LIKE LIONS,” BLIND PILOT

Read only digital books: 6%

“BEULAH,” JOHN PAUL WHITE

Read both print and digital books: 28%

“HOME OF THE STRANGE,” YOUNG THE GIANT “THE PARTY’S OVER,” PROPHETS OF RAGE

Read no books: 26%

Disclaimer: This online poll was taken from the Pew Re s earch Center. S u r vey c ond u c ted M arch 7- A p ri l 4,2016 .

$16,220,864,433

$1,519,557,910

$40 MILLION

$2.8 MILLION

985,976

71,517

$58 MILLION

25%

Total domestic box-office gross for movies based on a comic/graphic novel.

Worldwide box-office gross for Marvel’s The Avengers (2012), the highest grossing movie to date based on a comic/ graphic novel.

How much actor Robert Downey Jr. (Tony Stark/ Iron Man) was paid for his role in Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron.

How much Mark Ruffalo (Hulk) was paid for his role in Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron.

The number of Marvel Comics’ Star Wars No. 1 ordered from Diamond Comic Dist. in January 2015, making it the highest ordered comic book in a single month, 1997-now.

The number of DC’s Green Lantern No. 62 ordered from Diamond Comic Dist. in February 2011, making in the lowest ordered comic book in a single month, 1997-now.

The budget for Deadpool, the highest grossing rated R film in history—total gross is more than $783 million worldwide.

Critics’ rating for 2011’s Green Lantern, making it the lowest rated comic book movie on Rotten Tomatoes—the highest is 2005’s Batman Begins at 84%.

(comichron.com)

(comichron.com)

(the-numbers.com)

(boxofficemojo.com)

26cSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 cBOISEweekly

(comicbookmovie.com)

(comicbookmovie.com)

(boxofficemojo.com)

(rottentomatoes.com)

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


ON TAP

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY

CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS - LEGAL NOTICES

Publish your Legal Notices in the Boise Weekly Boise Weekly offers a flat rate as determined by the state of Idaho, which includes the Affidavit of Publication that will be mailed to you upon the last date of publication of your notice. If more convenient for you, the affidavit can also be available for you to pick up at our office on the last date of publication. *No Charge for Notarized Affidavit • *No Charge for Tear Sheets or Mailing For more information or to post your legal notice, contact Classifieds at Boise Weekly.

208-344-2055 FAX 208-342-4733 classifieds@boiseweekly.com Rates for legal notice are defined by Idaho legislature code 60 105-106 regardless of publication.

CALL TO ARTISTS

CAREER TRAINING

POURING

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycSEPTEMBER 7–13, 2016 c27


N O R T H E N D ’S

FO OT B A L L

H E A D QUA R T E R S PAC 12 Network BIG 10 Network NFL Sunday Ticket Last Call Trivia *FAMILY FRIENDLY* 1501 N. 13th St., Boise • 336-9260 • harryshydepark.com

Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 12  

Hard Time As contract prisons face trouble nationwide, Idaho’s last private lockup fills its niche

Boise Weekly Vol. 25 Issue 12  

Hard Time As contract prisons face trouble nationwide, Idaho’s last private lockup fills its niche