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BOISEWEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

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“Here, [the police] can talk to you nicely. You feel safe. In Africa, they just kill.”

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Brexit casts Ripples

How the UK’s decision to leave the EU might affect Gem State exporters

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Funny Ladies

Both Ghostbusters and Absolutely Fabulous deliver big-budget laughs from their female-led casts

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NEWS 8

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Have a Slice North End Pizza delivers a pitch-perfect pie FREE TAKE ONE!


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BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Greta Gardner, Taryn Hadfield, Taylor Turney Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Ryan Johnson, Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Bill Hagler, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE HEAVY NEWS FOLLOWED BY HEAVENLY PIZZA With no shortage of big issues and fraught political news, we cast a wide net in this week’s edition of Boise Weekly. On Page 8, staff writer Harrison Berry addresses the ongoing rise in tensions surrounding law enforcement and people of color, following a month of tragedies: First, the deaths of two black men in Baton Rouge, La. and Falcon Heights, Minn., killed a day apart in early July by police in circumstances many have labeled excessive use of force. Second, the mass murder of police in Dallas by a gunman who allegedly stated his goal was to kill white people in general and white officers in particular. As the furor over law enforcement reform has reached a fever pitch, another mass shooting of police occurred in Baton Rouge on July 17—marking yet one more tragedy in a city already grappling with police-related violence. Amid this seemingly ceaseless bloodletting, Berry wondered what the newest of Americans make of the state of relations between police and the communities of color they serve. What he found was the Boise Police Department’s commitment to engaging with refugee populations, and a sense that while there is some worry over violence, Boise remains a place of safety. We turn to economics and workplace safety, with a report on the death of a dairy worker and what is being done to ensure casualties such as this aren’t repeated. On Page 9, BW intern Taryn Hadfield checks in with Idaho industry leaders on what the UK’s decision to leave the EU could mean for Gem State exporters. As the Ghostbusters reboot hit theaters, the handwringing among (mostly male) fans that the female-led cast had hijacked the franchise continued to generate headlines. BW screen guru George Prentice sat for back-to-back screenings of Ghostbusters and Absolutely Fabulous, and was thrilled to see big-budget comedy gold coming from two films with women-led casts. Nonetheless, structural gender inequality in Hollywood scriptwriting and critics’ circles remains an institutional problem. Get more on Page 19. Finally, we figured it was a good time to grab a slice, so we headed to North End Pizza, a new addition to Hyde Park. Check out our review on Page 20. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Bob Neal (1961 – 2015) TITLE: “Morning Constitutional” MEDIUM: Acrylic on paper ARTIST STATEMENT: Take a load off during this political season and you will feel super. Oh, and remember to vote.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016c3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

BACK IN THE POOL FOR JIM EVERETT THROUGH NE ARLY FOUR DECADES, TRE ASURE VALLE Y YMCA CEO JIM E VERE T T RO SE TO BECOME THE NONPROFIT’S E XECUTIVE DIRECTO R, GROWING IT TO MORE THAN 53,000 MEMBERS. HE RE TIRED IN 2015 BUT, ON JULY 19, THE COLLEGE OF IDAHO ANNOUNCED E VERE T T WOULD BE THE NE W HE AD COAC H OF THE MEN’S AND WOMEN’S SWIM PROGR AM. MORE ON NE WS/CIT YDESK.

BLM RALLY Citizens took to the steps of the Idaho Statehouse July 16, condemning the killings of African-American men by police, but one man wasn’t having it. Details on News/ Citydesk.

AUCTION BLOCK Idaho is preparing to auction 30 state-owned parcels along Payette Lake near McCall. The Friday, Aug. 19 auction in Boise will be held at Boise State’s Stueckle Sky Center. More on News/Citydesk.

SHORTCHANGE A first-of-its-kind study reveals the Gem State’s median hourly wages for child care workers and pre-school educators rank last in the nation. See the report and get more details on News/Citydesk.

OPINION

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BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION FROM THE FAR MARGINS The good

NICOLE LEFAVOUR I. Adam had seen on the news how they were killing women and children; had seen images of bombs exploding, schools blackened and hollow. He’d seen the one photo of the naked child running down the street and he could not take it any more. He wanted to do something—to feel better than he did sitting there alone in the light of the TV—so he enlisted and went to war. II. Since Aayiz had been a child, at random moments, the sky would break open. In the midst of prayer or in the field out back of the police station, where dust blew as if hoofed animals were running back and forth across the red dirt, sound would suddenly erupt from a streak in the sky—knocking him back, leaving him deaf, leaving a circle of things smoking or charred, limbs in pieces, women wailing. So one day he took one of the folded fliers, went to a meeting and went to a camp where they trained him to help god cleanse the world of evil. III. After three tours, sleep would never be the same. It would always be half-sleep or like a sleep owned by someone else, occupied by a past that had become eternal. It was as if the mind would hold nothing but errors—as if it would chew on nothing but doubt and sorrow, self loathing and guilt. Sleep was no longer capable of conjuring up beauty and peace. It wouldn’t see that huge sun as it set into the ocher desert, dragging night behind it like a wave. It wouldn’t see the barefoot boys playing soccer behind the police station. Every dream, even that one he would have of his wife, would turn ugly, decay into blood and the smell of burning flesh. So he stockpiled pills, cleaned his gun, drank and watched TV to keep his mind from sleep. IV. All night it had been her own city on fire in the news; silhouettes of buildings she knew, figures against the flame, running; then there were the close-up images of black men turning over cars as hundreds of people walked in the streets with their fists in the air. Her car was new and her skin was white and she was afraid for her son and afraid they would mistake her for one of the racists, so she bought a gun. V. The radio host described the unfaithfulness of women, their cruel manipulation of men’s minds, their seduction for the sake of deception and their feigned helplessness for BOISE WEEKLY.COM

personal gain. His first divorce had taught him women could seem innocent but turn ruthless. They could be revealed, as the talk show host said, to want nothing but a man to take care of their needs and wants while they sat home doing nothing day after day. He would teach her a lesson, show her she could not do this to men. This is why he hit her the first time. VI. Her newsfeed was full of those who refused to call it what it was. They aided the evil with their delicate language, proposing comfortable steps that delayed radical change and only hastened the end that those with power wanted. Her group had waited so long for the world to see the lies and the evil hiding in plain sight; to see the ways the middle classes had become oppressors through polite inaction. She thought there was a chance— now that racial issues had raised tensions enough—that money and poverty could finally be revealed as the root cause. Revolution would come. She put on her black boots, filled her book bag with bricks and walked five blocks, west to the square. She stood on the concrete, pale skin glowing as the sun rose. She hurled stones and blocks at windows, listening to the glass shatter. It was like music. Others came. Protestors from the rally and the funeral, still angry, they joined. They set fire to a Dumpster. The fire spread. VII. The boy looked out at the sky filling with smoke. His mother was in the hospital. She’d shot their upstairs neighbor when he’d come home drunk, mistaking their door for his. The neighbor thought his key hadn’t worked and broke down their door. His mom saw the man’s face, so bewildered, eyes white in the blackness of his skin and she’d pulled the trigger. The boy’s dad had been gone ever since he went away to war against the bad people across the sea. The boy hoped he was one of the good people. He prayed to god he was one of the good people. He knew that all over the world the good people would kill the bad people. From the beginning of time good defeated evil. Everyone thinks they are the good people, he thought. And he looked around the room at the boys and girls in chairs in tidy rows out in front of the teacher’s desk, and he wondered which ones were sure they were the good people. Those were the ones he should fear. Those were the ones who did the killing. He looked at the sky outside and heard the principal on the loud speaker telling the children to stay calm, and he began to cry. BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016c5


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

LO CAL NE WSPAPERS CONTAIN THE HISTORY OF THE ARE AS THE Y SERVE, E VEN AS HI STORY IS BEING MADE. CHANGE IS HARD TO TAKE SO M E T I M ES .” —Nancy Grindstaff Comment via Facebook, “Idaho Press-Tribune to Drop Monday Print Edition,” boiseweekly.com

MAIL BIKINI BAN

hats for sale at the Boise Weekly Office. $12 + TAX benefitting the WCA.

In tomorrow’s news: “The City of McCall is debating the issue of allowing bikinis, shorts that go above the knees, shirtless males, exposed midriffs and cleavage during the 2017 Fourth of July weekend. “Touting a, ‘resounding’ success after the city banned alcohol in certain areas in and around the city, McCall now wants to pursue the banning of, ‘scantily clad’ persons who enjoy McCall during the holiday weekend. This ban is proposed to take place a couple of days before the Fourth until a couple of days after, and only in certain areas. However, there WILL be ambassadors patrolling all areas with tape measures to make certain no one violates this new measure. They will also have cloaks available to cover up individuals who insist on breaking the proposed ban. “McCall is hoping this will allow more people to enjoy the beauty of our fair city instead of having to deal with the eyesore of humans prancing around dressed in small amounts of clothing. “‘Locals will now feel they have their town back, instead

of feeling it is being overrun with nudity,’” stated one official. ‘We are tired of having persons disrespect the values of our town; people shouldn’t have to wear less than half a yard of material in order to have fun.’ “The city will be holding a meeting to discuss this issue in the near future.” (Not really, but with the archaic attitudes of our city council and mayor I wouldn’t be surprised!) —Sandra Davis McCall

BERNIE ON THE BLUE Bernie’s followers are like an army that has lost its general. They are still eager to do battle with Hillary, but they have no direction. Why don’t we write letters to Bernie’s Senate office in Burlington, New Hampshire inviting him to speak “On The Blue” before the Democratic Presidential Convention? The Ada County Democratic Caucus on March 22 was the largest in U.S. history. Bernie beat Hillary like a gong with nearly 80 percent of the vote. Bernie swept 43 of Idaho’s 44 counties. We did not go through all

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6cJULY 20–26, 2016cBOISEweekly

this to hear a lousy concession speech. Bernie needs a game-changer and “Bernie on the Blue” could be it. —Pete Peterson Boise

WHY I WEAR ORANGE The violence of hate is the denial of the image of God in all human beings. In the fall of last year I gathered with clergy friends in Arizona for a time of study, prayer, support and learning. We were meeting just a few miles from where Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords (D-Arizona) was shot on Jan. 8, 2011, while holding a public meeting in front of a local supermarket. During our meeting we were presented with new orange clergy stoles. Clergy often wear stoles during traditional worship services as a sign of ordination and as a reminder to the liturgical calendar marking the Christian year. Orange is not a liturgical color. Rather, it is the color hunters wear to say, “I am here, don’t shoot!” Orange is a color of safety. Orange is the color that represents gun violence awareness. I wear my orange stole not as a political statement. I wear orange as a moral choice to love and not to hate. I wear orange not in opposition to guns but rather in contrast to gun violence. Last year, 12,942 people were killed in the United BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MAIL States by gun violence. In that same year, more than 50,000 additional people in our country were victims of gun violence. One year ago, hate led a young, white man to a Bible study at Mother Emmanuel Africa Methodist Episcopal Church where he gunned down nine people in attendance, hoping that his hatred would ignite a race war. Recently, hatred led another young man to attend a different safe haven, The Pulse Night Club in Orlando, Fla. Forty nine LGBTQIA people were murdered through gun violence. Love reveals the face of God. As a disciple of Jesus, I follow the way of radical forgiveness. “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you”, Matthew 5:44b (NIV). The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” Love looks like acceptance. Love stands together even among differences. Love becomes an ally. Love is like the congregation of the Orthodox Synagogue Ohev Shalom, in Washington D.C., where all traveled to a gay bar after services to stand in support, to meet people and to be present together. Love lives in the tension and beauty of our differences. Love works for an end to assault weapons. On 9/11, terrorists didn’t use guns; they used planes to kill thousands of people. As soon as we understood that planes could become weapons, we worked together to keep this from ever happening again. We changed cabin doors. We created a “no fly” list. We increased scanning security at every airport. We changed the air travel industry. The one thing we did not do is to say, “This has nothing to do with airplanes.” We must again work for change. We must find new ways to end gun violence. Together we must seek solutions to end BOISE WEEKLY.COM

gun violence. I wear my orange stole as a reminder that ending gun violence must be a priority. To not take action is a denial that all are created in the image of God. Love wears orange. —Rev. Dr. Duane Anders Lead pastor, Cathedral of the Rockies, Boise

MEA CULPA On July 17, we filed a report online about the Black Lives Matter Rally that took place July 16 at the Idaho Statehouse (“Video: Solidarity and Disruption at Second Boise Black Lives Matter Rally,” News/Citydesk). In the course of editing and posting the story, we made missteps on which we were rightfully called by members of the community. Just reading some more “black-lash” from yesterday and this morning. I would like to propose our group not supporting Boise Weekly. I say this due to their post this morning regarding the horrible police shooting that occurred in Baton Rouge early this morning. They had the audacity to attach a picture taken at our rally yesterday to the article written about a completely different issue (that has nothing to do with BLM at all). Also the article they went on to write had wrong information about Alton Sterling’s murder and they were mixing the facts with Philando Castile’s awful story. Just trying to make us all aware of local businesses that do not support our cause and in fact are trying to include us in a situation we had absolutely nothing to do with nor agree with in anyway. —Bailey Pina via Facebook I am the editor of Boise Weekly and want to address your well founded comments. First, I take full responsi-

bility for the problems with our report this morning; they are mine alone, and did not originate with the reporter, Harrison Berry. As I was editing the dispatch from yesterday’s event, this morning’s shooting in Baton Rouge was breaking. As with every other news outlet reporting on that tragedy, it was incumbent on us to put it in context of the undeniable rise in tensions surrounding law enforcement and the recent, tragic killing of officers in Dallas. We do not yet know the motive behind the acts in Baton Rouge, but the fact that police were targeted in a city already reeling from violence bore inclusion. The factual mistakes regarding the killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile were, again, my mistake and the result of haste. Immediately upon realizing my error, I appended a correction to the article. I am deeply sorry for the error. As for highlighting the Baton Rouge shootings in the Facebook post text related to the Black Lives Matter demonstration in Boise, it was judged—wrongly, I admit—to highlight the breaking news element that was—rightfully, I’ll maintain—included in the piece, though certainly not its focus. I’ll conclude with my sincere apologies to the community for my lapses in editorial judgment and rigor. In no way does Boise Weekly harbor ill will toward Black Lives Matter or law enforcement personnel. As with everyone in Boise and the nation in general, we are horrified and saddened by the seemingly constant occurrence of violence. We are people, thus flawed, and in this instance were not at our best. Please take this as a heartfelt promise to do better. —Zach Hagadone Boise

BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016c7


CITYDESK

RYAN J OH NSON

RYAN J OH NSON

NEWS MANY NATIONS, ONE FEAR

Ten Idaho men and women were killed on the job between June 2015 and March 2016.

IDAHO DAIRY CITED FOR SERIOUS VIOLATION IN MANURE PIT DROWNING There is much to read in the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration Inspection No. 1125964 (none of it good), but the underlying theme throughout the July 12 report is that what happened to Ruperto Vazquez-Carrera on Feb. 16 could have, and should have, been prevented. Sometime in the pre-dawn hours, Vazquez-Carrera drowned after being trapped in a manure pit by farm machinery at the Sunrise Organic Dairy in Jerome County. The 37-year-old from Hazelton, Idaho, lay in the manure pit for 10 hours before his body was pulled from the muck. “The one thing in common with nearly every tragedy we investigate is they are all preventable,” said OSHA Area Director David Kearns. The investigation report details Sunrise Organic Dairy owners “did not furnish employment and a place of employment which were free from recognized hazards that were causing or like to cause death or serious physical harm to employees in that employees were exposed to immersion drowning hazards in an earthen holding pond [manure pit].” The manure pit drowning at Sunrise triggered a federal investigation—it also drew attention from the United Farm Workers of America. “That quickly came on our radar because a year ago, another dairy worker drowned in a manure pit at the Riverview Ranch Dairy in Mabton, Wash.,” said Indira Trejo, UFW global impact coordinator, adding that she has traveled to Idaho on numerous occasions to meet with Magic Valley-area workers to talk about conditions at Gem State dairies. “I heard about a lot of on-the-job accidents, reported and unreported,” she said, but was quick to many of those same workers have been reluctant to step forward because if they or any of their family members are undocumented, they live in a shadow of fear despite being the backbone of one of Idaho’s largest and most profitable industries. That’s something Kearns and his investigators know all too well. “We have vulnerable workers out there— specifically Latino workers—and it’s challenging for us to contact them,” Kearns said. “In this particular investigation, I 9 attempted to contact some of them, but they didn’t return the phone calls. We 8cJULY 20–26, 2016cBOISEweekly

A refugee’s take on police violence against people of color HARRISON BERRY Rita Thara couldn’t have missed the violence if she tried. It was Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, La. on July5; July 6, it was Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minn. Both were black men who had been shot and killed by police. The killings had been captured on video and widely disseminated through traditional, alternative and social media. “I saw it on television, on Facebook, everywhere,” she said. Thara came to the United States as a refugee from the Democratic Republic of the Congo in February 2012, hoping to escape state violence. What she found instead were reports of police violence against people of color—people like her. Though the mounting national controversy has Thara worried, when it comes to law enforcement in Boise, she sees things differently. “[The Congo] is very different from what I saw here. Here, [the police] can talk to you nicely. You feel safe. In Africa, they just kill,” she said. The City of Trees has become a hub for incoming refugees to the United States. According to The Washington Post, Idaho takes in more refugees per capita than most states, accepting more than 68 per 100,000 residents between 2013 and 2014. In 2006, the Boise Police Department created the office of Refugee Liaison—a job currently held by officer Justin Robinson—to address the growing community of new Americans. Now, Robinson said, he receives invitations to speak at police conferences about the Boise’s cuttingedge program that brings refugees, community resources and the police together. “We are by far one of the most successful cities in this model of having a refugee liaison,” he said. Many refugees come to the United States with the violence and turmoil of their home countries fresh in mind. Often, they have limited English language skills, are unaccustomed to American manners and can be mistrustful of police, whom they may have had to bribe during routine encounters in their home countries. Seeing police violence against people of color in the media can make the transition to living in America more difficult.

Boise Police Department Refugee Liaison Officer Justin Robinson: “ When [refugees] see trauma on television, that can spark trauma they have faced in previous locations where they’ve lived.”

“When [refugees] see trauma on television, that can spark trauma they have faced in previous locations where they’ve lived,” Robinson said. BPD makes early and frequent contact with refugees, connecting them with community resources, partnering with third-party organizations and businesses, and educating them about law enforcement and the criminal justice system. He also organizes community events like police ridealongs and meet-and-greets. Thara attended one such event, where she ate ice cream with officers while children were given tours of police cruisers. “Anything we can do to show what Boise is really like—how open and inviting and safe it is—that’s what we do,” Robinson said. Another of Robinson’s responsibilities is training beat cops in best practices for responding to situations where refugees are involved. Since English language skills can be a challenge for refugees and new Americans, he said initial contact can frequently involves interpreters, the help of family, friends and neighbors—and when all else fails, “charades”—to communicate. These strategies enculturate refugees into their new environment. They also counter negative messages they receive about police in the media. “Giving them resources within their community, we can lower that level of trauma they’re feeling,” Robinson said. The officer-involved shootings of Sterling and Castile speak to deep tensions between police and the communities of color they serve. According to a report by The Washington Post, 522 people have been shot and killed by police officers in 2016. Of those deaths, 241 were white, 128 were black and 80 were Hispanic. A later analysis by The Post reported African-Americans are 2.5

times as likely to be shot dead by the police as white people. The BPD has its own track record of violence: In June, just as BPD was rolling out its first wave of body cameras, officers were involved in two fatal shootings. In addition to the deaths of Sterling and Castile, these circumstances have lent force to the Black Lives Matter movement, which has organized two rallies so far in Boise, demanding police reform. “We’re here to let this police force known we will tolerate no violence,” said Black Lives Matter organizer Eve Garden. The deaths of people of color at the hands of police have, however, spawned violence directed at the police. Five officers were killed by sniper fire during a July 7 Black Lives Matter rally in Dallas, Texas. Tragedy struck again July 17, when three officers in Baton Rouge—a city rocked by demonstrations in the wake of the death of Anton Sterling—were targeted and ambushed by a lone gunman whose motives remain unclear. Speaking at a Black Lives Matter rally July 9, demonstrator Matthew Darcy said the killing of officers in Dallas was tragic, it has little to do with the change he and others are trying to effect on law enforcement. “Although Dallas is wrong, that isn’t changing the conversation,” he said. The violence has affected Thara deeply, and she said she could become a victim during visits to other cities, but Boise remains a safe place for her because of the relationship she feels she has with the BPD. “I have experience with Boise police,” she said. “I imagine if I go to a big city, I worry something can happen to me, too.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITYDESK

NEWS THE INS AND OUTS OF IDAHO-UK TRADE

Sunrise Organic Dairy has 15 days to respond to OSHA’s investigation into the February drowning.

How Brexit might affect Gem State exporters TARYN HADFIELD

Idaho exported more than $107 million worth of semiconductors and other industrial commodities to the United Kingdom last year. At the same time, the Gem State sent $2.9 million in food and agriculture products, and $2.9 million worth of fabricated metal products to the UK. While Britain is almost half a world away from the state of Idaho, the recent vote there to leave the European Union—so-called “Brexit”—has created an economic aftershock that some say will reach the Intermountain West. “Many people forget that Idaho’s economy is global, interconnected and far-reaching,” said Jay Larsen, president and founder of the Idaho Tech Council. “Brexit could very well have ripple effects into Idaho. The world is much flatter than it used to be.” Larsen spends his days working closely with Idaho tech companies, and knows just how far those ripples may reach. When asked what Idaho companies could be particularly affected, Larsen immediately went to Boisebased Cradlepoint, which specializes in wireless network solutions. “It’s a relatively young company,” said Larsen. “But Cradlepoint supplies wireless services to Redboxes, electronic signboards and offices all around the world.” Larsen also pointed Glanbia Foods, an international cheese manufacturer and distributor. Larsen referred to Glanbia as a “major player” in the Magic Valley, home to its U.S. headquarters. Considering Glanbia’s overseas headquarters is in Ireland, Larsen said Brexit might present the company with new challenges. Likewise with Boise-based Micron, whose European operations may feel a “significant impact,” he said. “While the UK is not a significant trading partner to Idaho on its own, the UK does take on a larger role in the cattle industry when we consider Idaho as a collective piece of state partnerships,” said Laurie Lickley, president of BOISE WEEKLY.COM

sent them letters by mail. Hopefully, they have someone to help them translate it.” Kearns said approximately half of the fatalities the OSHA Idaho office investigated in 2015 were workers for whom English was not their first language. “They may fear deportation; they’re open to exploitation,” he said. “They’re afraid of the federal government and they don’t know the difference between OSHA and ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement].” For violating the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Sunrise Organic Dairy was ordered to install appropriate barriers and warning signs identifying the location of the manure pit. Additionally, the violation—technically deemed “serious”—carries a fine of $4,900. “The fines were mandated by the U.S. Congress,” said Kearns. When asked about the low fine for such a grisly fatality, Kearns said fine amounts were last updated by Congress in 1990, with a maximum of $7,000 for a serious violation. He also said, in 2015, Congress passed a new law mandating OSHA update those fines to bring them in line with inflation. Effective Monday, Aug. 1, fine amounts will increase about 78 percent. OSHA also cited Sunrise Organic Dairy for an “other-than-serious” violation for not keeping logs of work-related injuries or illnesses at the dairy. The violation triggered a $700 fine; owners have 15 working days to respond and may ask for a negotiating session with OSHA or an appeal hearing before a federal judge. Kearns said Sunrise owners have been “very professional” and cooperative with the probe. “After a tragedy, these people almost always say, ‘I never wanted to get anybody hurt.’ They wish they had done more. It’s one of those terrible hindsight things,” said Kearns. “Good people want to do the right thing. Unfortunately, most employers haven’t done enough to look at how workers should be protected.” This is a particularly busy time for Kearns and his team of investigators. In a few weeks, they’ll release their findings of another highprofile tragedy at an Idaho job site. On May 3, two workers were killed and another was seriously injured when a trench collapsed in a northwest Boise neighborhood. “And you should expect that report in the next 30 days,” Kearns said. “That’s our goal.” 8

Idaho Tech Council President Jay Larsen: “Brexit could very well have ripple effects in Idaho. The world is much flatter than it used to be.”

the Idaho Cattle Association. The U.S. exported about 3.6 million pounds of beef product to the UK in 2015, up from 913,000 pounds in 2014. Lickley said the increase was largely a result of loosened trade restrictions, after the UK eliminated decades old EU regulations dealing with animal identification and limits to additional hormones. Lickley said Brexit may usher in further deregulation of the beef trade, presenting trade opportunities for Idaho—where cattle and calves are the state’s second most valuable commodities—by, “freeing up the market.” But these potential opportunities may be accompanied by challenges. Bill Smith, chair of the International Studies program at the University of Idaho, said the fallout from Brexit on Idaho’s economy will be dependent on the UK’s decision on borders with the EU: open or closed. If the UK chooses to close those borders, Idaho companies with hubs and/or headquarters in the UK might not be able to ship to the rest of Europe without facing additional customs, duties and inspections. For companies like Glanbia, that could present a shift in how it does its UK business. “Until we know what sort of deal will be

worked out between the UK and the EU, we won’t know what impact will be felt locally,” said Smith. “Though I personally think it unlikely, they may negotiate a way to maintain the open borders that makes it easier to trade with Europe. If they do, there’s minimal additional impact. If they don’t, you bet it will.” In the midst of the uncertainty presented by Brexit, Larsen doesn’t foresee any major negative effects—at least in the immediate future. Meanwhile, Larsen said, Idaho tech exporters will be maintaining a positive stance. “When companies look at Idaho, they see a predictable and stable environment to do business,” he said. “Despite what challenges may happen, Idaho will stay in a solid place financially.” Still, change is in the wind, as the UK welcomes its new prime minister, Theresa May. May has made it clear she is serious about Brexit, refusing a second referendum on the issue. Having taken office on June 13, May must take on the responsibility to start Brexit negotiations with the EU. The decision for the UK to keep its borders open to trade with the EU rests in her hands, and that decision will be watched eagerly by industry around the world—including in Idaho.

—George Prentice BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016c9


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JULY 20

live entertainment. Wednesdays through Sept. 21. 3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell. caldwellidfarmersmarket.com.

Festivals & Events

SAWTOOTH MOUNTAIN MAMAS ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR—The 40th annual fair will feature handcrafted products by artists and craftsmen from across the West. Plus a great selection of food and country music. The fair will take place on the grassy lot next to Mountain Village Merc. (No dogs or bicycles allowed.) 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Stanley, 1-800878-7950.

BEST OF BOISE 2016 ROUND 1: NOMINATE—It’s once again time to hand out accolades to your favorite local people, places and things. Nominations for Best of Boise 2016 close today, so text “BOISEWEEKLY” to 77948 or visit boiseweekly.com. Round 2: Voting is open Aug. 10-Aug. 31, with the winners revealed in the Sept. 28 edition. FREE. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com. CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—The Caldwell Farmers Market features a variety of vendors with plants, produce, baked goods, specialty foods such as local honey, mustard, barbecue sauce and seasoning salts, and a wide variety of local crafters. Plus hot food and snacks, and

On Stage ALIVE AFTER FIVE: THE SMITES: A SMITHS EXPERIENCE—The Bernie Reilly Band. 5 p.m. FREE. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, downtownboise.org.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20

Those who can, make great judges.

BOISE COMMUNITY BAND: BROADWAY AND SHOW TUNES SPECTACULAR—Enjoy an oldfashioned outdoor family band concert featuring 65 of Boise’s finest musicians. Take the whole family (and your lawn chairs). 7 p.m. FREE. Idaho Law and Justice Learning Center, Old Ada County Courthouse, 514 W. Jefferson St., boisecommunityband.com. COF: GREY GARDENS—Through July 20. 7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter. org/companyoffools. COMEDY OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ISF: MY FAIR LADY—Called “the perfect musical,” My Fair Lady will sweep your heart away. Through Aug. 26. 8 p.m. $22$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

JAMES TAYLOR—Don’t miss your chance to hear the legendary singer-songwriter performs classics like “Sweet Baby James” and “Shower The People” live. 8 p.m. $67-$87. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1900. tacobellarena.com/2016/jamestaylor-taco-bell-arena-boise. MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2016— Join the McCall Music Society for the annual weeklong festival of classical chamber music and pops concerts held at various venues around the community; visit the event website for a complete schedule. 5 p.m. FREE-$79. McCall, Hwy. 55, McCall, mccallmusicsociety.org/summerfest. STARLIGHT: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS— Through Aug. 13. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208462-5523, starlightmt.com.

FRIDAY, JULY 22

“No matter how fast you are, there are some things you can’t outrun. Some things always catch up to you.”—The Flash

BURCHFIELD BOTANICALS—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Workshops & Classes FINALLY HOME HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASS—Take the Finally Home! home buyer education class to learn how to save thousands, get a better rate, find the right property and lender, navigate the home-buying process, avoid costly mistakes, and maybe even qualify for down payment assistance. Preregistration required. 6-9 p.m. $20. NeighborWorks Boise, 3380 W. Americana Terrace, 208-2586225, finallyhomeidaho.com.

CRATERS OF THE MOON—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center, 191 Fifth St. E., 208-7269491, sunvalleycenter.org. GAY BAWA ODMARK: PARIS WINDOWS—10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., 208726-3493, comlib.org.

Art

HUNG LUI: DRIFTERS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208726-5079, gailseverngallery.com.

ALEXANDRA GRANT: SHADOWS—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

JANE ROSEN: H IS FOR...—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com.

ART SOURCE 14TH ANNUAL JURIED ART SHOW—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

JOHN TAYE: RECENT PAINTINGS AND SCULPTURE—7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-1242, finearts. boisestate.edu.

MONDAY, JULY 25

If you can think it, you can make it.

14TH ANNUAL JURIED ART SHOW

FLASH POETRY COMPETITION

IDAHO DAY OF 3-D DESIGN

What can make a group art exhibit good is that it reflects the world through the eyes of different artists. What can make it great is when an expert is tasked with choosing the work. For its 14th annual Juried Art Show, Art Source Gallery tapped local artist and Boise State professor emeritus John Taye as juror, and out of 123 submissions from throughout the western United States, Taye chose 33 for the show—which ends Wednesday, July 27. Taye was an excellent choice for juror: he taught art at Boise State for more than 30 years, his work has been published in renowned art magazines, he has shown in galleries and museums across the country, and a solo exhibit of his work is currently up at Boise State (reception is Tuesday, Aug. 23). If anyone understands what it takes to make an exhibit, it’s Taye. Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

Coming faster than the speed of light is Rediscovered Books’ first ever Flash Poetry Competition. The rules are simple: competitors get one prompt, 20 minutes, a limit of 400 words and three judges. Inspired by the success of 2015’s Flash Fiction event, hosted in conjunction with the Idaho Horror Film Festival, this competition is in search of poetry lovers—or literary types who love a challenge. Kim Ellsworth, marketing coordinator at Rediscovered, wouldn’t reveal the judges’ names but hinted that participants shouldn’t be surprised to see an English professor or published poet at the judges’ table. Based on last year’s wildly successful turnout for Flash Poetry, Ellsworth said she anticipates a pretty great evening. And no need to sign-up—just drop in and be prepared to ready, set, write—in a flash. 7 p.m., FREE, Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

Less than three years ago, 3-D printers were introduced to select Gem State schoolrooms and libraries and, since then, public maker-space workshops have given everyone from gradeschoolers to grandparents the tools and training needed to make their own 3-D creations. Now, 3-D printing is so popular in the Treasure Valley that the Boise and Meridian libraries and the Office of the Governor are hosting an all-day 3-D design workshop at the Boise Centre on the Grove, Monday, July 25. Tinkercad, one of the nation’s premier developers of 3-D software, will be on site providing 3-D design and printing tools at no cost, so you can create toys, prototypes, home decor, Minecraft models, jewelry—basically, anything you can imagine. The design workshop is free to attend, and you’re encouraged to take your laptop or tablet so you can share designs. 9 a.m-4:30 p.m., FREE, Boise Centre on the Grove, 850 W. Front St., bit.ly/IdahoDayOfDesign

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BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. LISA KOKIN: LOSS FOR WORDS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-7265079, gailseverngallery.com. PAT O’HARA: SCENES OF IDAHO AND BEYOND—11 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Crossings Winery, 1289 W. Madison Ave., Glenns Ferry, 208-366-2313, crossingswinery.com. ROB REYNOLDS: MOST PAINTED MOUNTAIN—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746. ROBB PUTNAM SOLO EXHIBITION—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com.

STEWART GALLERY ANNUAL WORKS ON PAPER EXHIBITION: LINE—Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com. TVAA: IN CELEBRATION OF EDGES—Continuing their celebration of Boise State Public Radio’s 40th anniversary, TVAA’s newest exhibition pays tribute to one of the station’s longest running local shows, EDGES. Described as “other worldly,” ethereal and nebulous, this mind-altering music block has long been the playground of local spin doc Arthur Balinger. You’ll see how members of the city’s largest alliance of visual artists expand the edges of this New Age concept. Through Sept. 23. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, boisestatepublicradio.org.

MONDAY, JULY 25

Literature AUTHOR DAN FLORES—Hear author Dan Flores speak about his book. Coyote America, which is both an environmental and a deep natural history of the coyote. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208376-4229. LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION— The Library at Hillcrest invites readers to explore other countries through its monthly Literature in Translation book discussions. Participants will read and discuss an English translation of literature first published in the author’s native language. July 20: Doves Disappeared, a work of historical fiction takes the reader through the era of Nazi and Soviet-occupied Estonia prior to its reclaimed status as an independent nation. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-972-8340, boisepubliclibrary.org. NPL BOOKWORMS BOOK CLUB—Join the Nampa Bookworms Book Club for a discussion of The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman. All are welcome. 10:15 a.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800, nampalibrary.org/ calendar.

Sports & Fitness SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE 2016—Don’t miss the 101st edition of the Snake River Stampede, one of the top 10 regular season professional rodeos in the nation with a $400,000 payoff. 6:45 p.m. $8.50-$40. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000. snakeriverstampede.com.

Citizen

It’s rochambeau for your soul.

STORY STORY LATE NIGHT It’s intriguing and it’s revealing: It’s Story Story Late Night, the self-described black sheep of the popular Story Story Night. In this adults-only extension of the series, local storytellers brave the deep recesses of their experience to share tales of sex, love, death, pain, fear—the human condition. Along with the stories, the rowdy Late Nights are hosted by Story Story Night founder Jessica Holmes and include an open story slam; rock, paper, scissor battles; and music from DJ Stardust Lounge. The summer 2016 Story Story Late Night theme is Rock (June), Paper (July) and Scissors (August) and at the Monday, July 25 iteration, you’ll hear tales of Paper: Stories of Pulp, Paydays and Pulling One Over. As is the way of Late Night, stories are rated R to XXX, so if you have a delicate constitution, you might want to sit this one out. 8 p.m., $12, tickets available online. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, storystorynight.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

JASON BOURNE BENEFIT SCREENING—Fugitive action hero Jason Bourne takes over the Village Cinema for the latest in the series of premiere fundraisers hosted by producer Frank Marshall and star Matt Damon. Proceeds benefit the Treasure Valley Family YMCA. 6 p.m. SOLD OUT. Village Cinema, The Village at Meridian, 3600 E. Fairview Ave., Meridian, 208-9952942. ymcatvidaho.org.

Kids & Teens COMMUNITY COLLEGE 101— College-bound students and their parents learn how to apply to a community college, how financial aid works, and how to make school affordable. Presenters from the College of Western Idaho Enrollment Team will explain admissions and financial aid processes and how to pay for college. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016 c11


CALENDAR THURSDAY JULY 21 Festivals & Events 2016 SUN VALLEY CENTER WINE AUCTION—Sun Valley Center for the Arts will host the 35th Annual Sun Valley Center Wine Auction, a charity event unfolding over three glorious days, July 21-23. This year’s lineup of top vintners, chefs, sponsors, live entertainment, and silent and live auction lots will once again deliver on the auction’s reputation as one of the 10 best charity wine auctions in the country and one of the premier events of the Sun Valley summer season. Visit the website for details and tickets. July 21-23. $95-$2,800. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-7269491, sunvalleycenter.org.

On Stage COMEDIAN IRIS BENSON—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ENCORE THEATRE: SHAKESPEARE’S MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR—7:30 p.m. FREE. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-861-8839, home.encoreetc.org. HIGH DESERT SWING DANCE CLUB—Join the High Desert Swing Dance Club for several popular swing dances followed by a short instructional session, giving audience members an opportunity to join in. 7 p.m. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-8884451, mld.org.

Workshops & Classes

Sports & Fitness

NONPROFIT RESOURCE THURSDAYS—Nonprofit leaders, staff members and volunteers are invited to learn about free and low-cost resources available to nonprofits. Eric Wise, area manager for BBSI, will talk about the most effective means for engaging your employees and strengthening your organization. 4-6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200. boisepubliclibrary.org/calendar.

BOISE HAWKS VS. SPOKANE INDIANS—7:15 p.m. $7-$24. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208322-5000, boisehawks.com.

Talks & Lectures BOISE RIVER ENHANCEMENT NETWORK: BOISE RIVER FISH SURVEY—Join Art Butts of Idaho Fish and Game to learn about the findings from the 2015 Boise River fish survey, which collected information to answer questions about brown trout stocking success, trout migration patterns, angler catch and harvest rates, trout population numbers and fish size range. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Washington Group Plaza, 720 Park Blvd., Boise, boiseriverenhancement.net.

SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE 2016—6:45 p.m. $8.50-$40. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-4681000, snakeriverstampede.com.

Odds & Ends ADA COMMUNITY LIBRARY COLOR RUN—Enjoy this untimed event in which participants will be showered with colored powder and colored water at stations along the run. To make the colors show up, wear as much white as possible. The event ends with a cool treat. For all ages. 11 a.m. FREE. Hidden Springs Village Green, Hidden Springs Drive, adalib.org/hiddensprings.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

HOMEGROWN THEATRE: EVERY MAN SHIFT (FOR ALL THE REST)—8 p.m. $5-$10. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365. ISF: AND THEN THERE WERE NONE—8 p.m. $20-$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org. MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2016—7:30 p.m. FREE-$79. McCall, Hwy. 55, McCall. mccallmusicsociety.org/summerfest. SECOND SHIFT COMEDY OPEN MIC—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. STAGE COACH: DEADLY MURDER—7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. STARLIGHT: SCARLET PIMPERNEL—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208462-5523, starlightmt.com.

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CALENDAR FRIDAY JULY 22

On Stage

Festivals & Events

COMEDIAN IRIS BENSON—10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

2016 SUN VALLEY CENTER WINE AUCTION—Through July 23. $95-$2,800. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org/wineauction.

COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy. com.

DOWNTOWN NAMPA FOURTH FRIDAYS—Enjoy live music, dancing, food trucks, vendors, raffles, craft beer and wine tastings every fourth Friday through Sept. 23. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Downtown Nampa.

ENCORE THEATRE: SHAKESPEARE’S MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR—7:30 p.m. FREE. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-861-8839, home.encoreetc.org.

HOT SUMMER NIGHTS IN RIGGINS—Enjoy great entertainment and good old-fashioned summer fun for the entire family at the Salmon River Chamber of Commerce’s annual Hot Summer Nights celebration. There will be a talent show, ‘50s-’70s dance and car show along the banks of the Salmon River. The Fabulous Chancellors close out the weekend at 9 p.m. Saturday. 4-11 p.m. FREE-$5. Riggins City Park, 208-628-3778, rigginshotsummernights.com.

HOMEGROWN THEATRE: EVERY MAN SHIFT (FOR ALL THE REST)—8 p.m. $5-$10. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365. IMPROV COMEDY EXTRAVAGANZA—8 p.m. $7. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ISF: AND THEN THERE WERE NONE—8 p.m. $20-$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org. STAGE COACH: DEADLY MURDER—8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. STARLIGHT: SUGAR—8 p.m. $9$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Literature BIG TREE ART’S REGIONAL POETRY SLAM—Recommended for guests 16 and older. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-4675533, boisepoetry.com. FLASH POETRY COMPETITION—Head down to Rediscovered Books to write your piece of flash poetry, no longer than 400 words. They’ll have three guest judges who’ll provide a writing prompt, and participants will get 15-20 minutes to write. The winners will receive gift cards and other bookish prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Talks & Lectures SAWTOOTH ASSOCIATION FORUM AND LECTURE SERIES— Join the Sawtooth Interpretive and Historical Association for the 2016 Forum and Lecture Series, exploring the theme of “Water in Idaho.” Held every Friday through Aug. 26. July 22: Chad Colter, “Shoshone-Bannock fisheries.” 5 p.m. FREE. Stanley Museum, Hwy. 75, site of Old Forest Service Ranger Station, Stanley, 208-993-1210.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS VS. SPOKANE INDIANS— 7:15 p.m. $7-$24. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208322-5000, boisehawks.com. SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE 2016—6:45 p.m. $8.50-$40. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-4681000, snakeriverstampede.com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

SATURDAY JULY 23 Festivals & Events 2016 SUN VALLEY CENTER WINE AUCTION—$95-$2,800. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org/ wineauction.

SUN VALLEY’S ICE HEATS UP AT NIGHT!

july 23 johnny weir World Bronze Medalist 3x US Gold Medalist

july 30 madison chock & evan bates

2016 World bronze Medalists US Gold Medalists 3x US Silver Medalists

august 6ryan bradley US Gold Medalist

august 13 ashley wagner 2016 World Silver Medalist 2014 Olympic Bronze Medalist 3x US Gold Medalist

Adam Rippon 2016 US Gold Medalist 2x US Silver Medalist

BUY ONLINE SUNVALLEY.COM/ICESHOWS IN-PERSON AT THE RECREATION OFFICE PHONE 208.622.2135

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016 c13


CALENDAR BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287, facebook.com/ TheBoiseFarmersMarket. CANYON COUNTY CO-OP 2016 SUMMER COMMUNITY MARKET—9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Canyon County Co-op, 1415 First St. S., Nampa, 208-960-0328, canyoncounty.coop. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and State streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. 208-489-8789, cityofeagle.org. HISTORIC NORTHEAST OREGON MINING FIELD TRIP—Join retired Oregon State Geologist Mark Ferns for a field trip through the mining areas of Northeast Oregon. Meet at the WinCo parking lot on Meridian Road at 7:30 a.m. for an 8 a.m. departure. You’ll meet in Baker City on Grove across from the Heritage Museum at 9 a.m. (Pacific Time). You’ll then visit the restored Sumpter Dredge, loop through Granite to Greenhorn and down the Burnt River to Dooley Mountain. Dress for the weather; take lunch and water. Return to Boise by 7 p.m. No preregistration. Hosted by the Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology. 8 a.m.-7 p.m. $10-$15. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-368-9876, idahomuseum.org. HOT SUMMER NIGHTS—Noonmidnight. FREE-$5. Riggins City Park, 208-628-3778, rigginshotsummernights.com. MERIDIAN YOUTH FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-8884433, epiqueeventsandgifts.com. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Nampa Farmers’ Market, Longbranch parking lot, Front and 13th, Nampa, 208412-3814. WALK ABOUT BOISE HISTORIC DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR—Join Preservation Idaho for a 1.5-hour guided walking tour through 150 years of history and architecture. You’ll get an up-close-and-personal introduction to the built environment that makes downtown Boise like no other place. Get starting location and additional details when you register or call 208-409-8282. 11 a.m. $10. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, 208-4098282, preservationidaho.org/ boise-walking-tours-historic-boise. WEST BOISE SATURDAY MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise. 208-322-9464, facebook. com/artzone208.

On Stage BOISE’S FUNNIEST PERSON—Everyone’s a comedian in this monthlong stand-up comedy competition. Twenty contestants will perform before a live audience and three distinguished judges until only one remains. Each of the top 10 contestants will be paired with one of Boise’s best working stand-up comedians to hone their skills all the way to the July 30 finals... and to $1,000 cold, hard cash. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDIAN IRIS BENSON—10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com. ENCORE THEATRE: SHAKESPEARE’S MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR—7:30 p.m. FREE. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa. 208-861-8839, home.encoreetc.org/. HOMEGROWN THEATRE: EVERY MAN SHIFT (FOR ALL THE REST)—8 p.m. $5-$10. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365. ISF: MY FAIR LADY—8 p.m. $22$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2016—11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. FREE-$79. McCall, Hwy. 55, McCall. mccallmusicsociety.org. STAGE COACH: DEADLY MURDER—8 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. STARLIGHT: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Literature AUTHOR MICHAEL WEITZ—Join Michael Weitz, author of Even Dead Men Play Chess, during the Saturday Morning Market for a morning of mystery and chess. Weitz will be joined by the Idaho Chess Association, who’ll have three chessboards ready for customers who want to challenge them. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org. SCOTT BROWN: CREATING A CULTURE OF PEACE—Join Scott Brown, author of Active Peace, a Mindful Path to a Nonviolent World, as he makes his way around the country inspiring new paths to peace. This experiential

workshop is designed to replace the belief in separateness with the lived experience of interrelatedness and the big picture context of social and environmental justice work. 2-5 p.m. $15 suggested donation. Eyes of the World Imports, 1576 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-1212. 4activepeace.com.

Sports & Fitness 2016 TVDSA TRISOMY 21 OPEN—Join the Treasure Valley Down Syndrome Association for the inaugural TVDSA charity golf tournament, with proceeds going to fund TVDSA programs to raise awareness about Down syndrome and support the Down syndrome community and their families. Players must be at least 14 years of age. All abilities welcome; players with Down syndrome get free registration. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $75. Eagle Hills Golf Course, 605 N. Edgewood Lane, Eagle. 208-863-0796, birdeasepro.com/tvdsagolf16.

Animals & Pets COMMUNITY DOG WASH FUNDRAISER— Get your pooch washed for a donation benefiting The Idaho Food Bank and Fuzzy Pawz Rescue. Noon-3 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Broadway Veterinary Hospital, 350 E. Linden Ave., Boise, 208-344-5592, broadwayvethosp.net.

SUNDAY JULY 24 On Stage COMEDIAN IRIS BENSON—8 p.m. $10-$12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208941-2459, liquidboise.com. ISF: MY FAIR LADY—7 p.m. $22$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

BOISE HAWKS VS. SPOKANE INDIANS—7:15 p.m. $7-$24. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208322-5000, boisehawks.com.

MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2016—7:30 p.m. FREE-$79. McCall, Hwy. 55, McCall, mccallmusicsociety.org/summerfest.

MCCALL MILE HIGH MILE OPEN WATER SWIM 2016—Hit the water at McCall’s annual Mile High Mile open water swim race in stunning Payette Lake. Take the whole family for this allages event in both wet suit and non-wet suit divisions. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. $20-$40. Legacy Park, East Lake St., McCall, 208-634-6594, mccall.id.us.

Sports & Fitness

RUN WILD AT ZOO BOISE—Enjoy a fun run through the zoo, designed for kids ages 2-11. There will be two races: ages 2-5 (quarter-mile) and ages 6-11 (1 mile). Registration includes breakfast at Zoo Boise, afterparty, and participant (plus one parent or guardian) admission to the zoo. 8-10 a.m. $20-25. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-608-7760, zooboise. org. SNAKE RIVER STAMPEDE 2016—11:15 a.m. and 6:45 p.m. $8.50-$40. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, snakeriverstampede.com. YMCA GAR HACKNEY Y NOT TRI TRIATHLON—Enjoy a new and spectator-friendly course. The swim starts at Quinns Pond, with biking on the newly paved Whitewater Boulevard, then all finish on the Greenbelt. Plus, there will also be a Y Not Paddle SUP race on Quinns Pond. For ages 6 and older. 9 a.m. $30$80. Quinn’s Pond, 3100 Pleasanton Ave., Boise, ymcatvidaho. org/runs/y-not-triathlon.

BOISE HAWKS VS. SPOKANE INDIANS—7:15 p.m. $7-$24. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208322-5000, boisehawks.com. YOGA AT THE ZOO—Join Shine Yoga for a unique experience. You’ll enjoy the sights and sounds of the animals around you, while trying to tame the monkeys in your head. All skill levels welcome; for ages 12 and older. 9:45-11 a.m. $15-$20. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, 208-608-7760, zooboise.org.

MONDAY JULY 25 Festivals & Events IDAHO DAY OF DESIGN: 3-D DESIGN WITH TINKERCAD— Learn about the simple, online 3-D design and printing tool for the masses at this special event featuring four free workshops: Intro to Tinkercad, Tinkercrafting (Tinkercad + Minecraft), Tinkercad 2.0, and Fusion 360. Plus previews of 3-D technology, products, designs and services from the Idaho maker community and awesome giveaways. 8 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, stem.idaho.gov/idaho-dayof-design.

On Stage STARLIGHT: SUGAR—8 p.m. $9$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com. STORY STORY LATENIGHT SUMMER 2016: ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORS—Rated R to XXX, LateNight’s the time to turn down the inhibitions and turn up the spotlight. With featured storytellers intermixed with an open story slam—plus spontaneous rock, paper, scissors battles—watch real raucous entertainment unfold in the heat of the night. Hosted by Jessica Holmes and Co., with DJ

Stardust Lounge. Full bar, 21+ only. July 25, PAPER: Stories of Pulp, Paydays and Pulling One Over. Aug. 29, SCISSORS: HardEdged Slice of Life Stories. 8 p.m. $12. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, storystorynight.org/shows/ late-night.

Workshops & Classes PROTECT YOURSELF: IDENTITY THEFT AND CYBER SECURITY— Join Susan Mahoney of Legal Shield and Everett Cussins of Cussins Enterprises to learn how to protect yourself from identity theft and improve your cyber-security. 4-5:30 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800, nampalibrary.org/calendar.

Literature POETRY SLAM—7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe, 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-429-1911, thehighnotecafe.com.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS VS. SPOKANE INDIANS—7:15 p.m. $7-$24. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208322-5000, boisehawks.com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Odds & Ends TREASURE VALLEY SINGLES DANCE—Join the Treasure Valley Singles Club at their new venue in Nampa for weekly social dancing to live bands. Couples welcome, too. For 21 and older. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $6-$7. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa. 208-887-8870, treasurevalleysingles.weebly.com.

Food MERIWETHER FOOTHILLS SEMI-DRY FOR THE FOOTHILLS—Get a glass, growler or bottle of Foothills Semi-Dry Cider, and $1 goes to the Boise Foothills to maintain and care for this community resource. 2-6 p.m. FREE. Meriwether Cider Co., 5242 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-972-6725, meriwethercider.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

14cJULY 20–26, 2016cBOISEweekly

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CALENDAR TUESDAY JULY 26 Festivals & Events ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL TOURS—Join docents for free 45-minute guided tours of the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial every Tuesday, through October. Meet at the

statue of Anne Frank in the Memorial. No reservation required. For all ages. 12:15 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise. 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter. org/events.

On Stage COMEDY OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S.

Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

208-424-8297. facebook.com/ comiccinemaremix.

COMIC CINEMA REMIX: TANGO AND CASH—That’s right, True Believers, Comic Cinema Remix is back with it’s summer edition. This July, they’ll take you on the most powerful cop duo to ever grace the silver screen. With special remixer Jason Ward. 7 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City,

HOMEGROWN THEATRE: BLIP READING SERIES—Homegrown Theatre presents this monthly reading series that features work by local playwrights. A talk back with the playwright and actors will follow the reading. July 26: SHOUT, SHOW, SHOVE, SHOOT by Evan Sesek, 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St.,

Boise, 208-376-4229. rdbooks. org/event/blip-reading-series-0. ISF: MY FAIR LADY—8 p.m. $22$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. OUTLAW FIELD: WILLIE NELSON AND FAMILY—The country legend puts the “outlaw” in

Outlaw Field. With Don McLean. 7 p.m. $60-$65. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. STARLIGHT: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523. www. starlightmt.com/seven-brides-forseven-brothers.html.

KEEP YOUR CAR HAPPY! All of the work done on your VW or Audi at Jeff’s Import Auto is GUARANTEED! We are your local experts offering great service at competitive prices.

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BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016 c15


CALENDAR Workshops & Classes HEALTHY LIVING FOR YOUR BODY AND BRAIN—Learn how to make lifestyle choices that may help you keep your brain and body healthy as you age. A presenter from the Greater Idaho Alzheimer’s Association will share about research in the areas of diet and nutrition, exercise, cognitive activity and social engagement, and use hands-on tools to help you incorporate these recommendations into a plan for healthy aging. In the third floor board room. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208468-5800. nampalibrary.org/ calendar.

Calls to Artists 2017 IDAHO TRIENNIAL CALL FOR ENTRIES—The 2017 Idaho Triennial is open to all artists currently residing in Idaho. Artworks must be original, produced in the last three years, and not have been previously exhibited at the Boise Art Museum. Work in all media is eligible. More information and the application are available on BAM’s website. Submission deadline: Aug. 1. Accepted artwork will be in an exhibition at BAM opening February 2017. $25-$65. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330. boiseartmuseum.org/triennial. BOB’S ART FARM FLASH SHOW CALL FOR ENTRIES—This call is for proposals paying homage to Bob Neal and is open to work in all media: visual, performance, music, poetry, literary, short film or video. Works can be individually or collaboratively produced. Artwork may be traditional or experimental. Submit electronically by Monday, Aug. 15, at midnight. Show dates: Sept. 30-Oct. 2. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-407-7529, surelsplace.org/bobsartfarm. BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY COMIC CON DRAWING CONTEST—Boise Public Library wants you to enter their Comic Con Drawing Contest. Draw or paint your favorite comic book, television or movie character, or even invent a character of your own. Then fill out an entry form and take your art and the form to the checkout desk at any Boise Public Library location by 4 p.m. on Sunday, July 31. Winning entries will be on display at Library Comic Con on Saturday, Aug. 27, at the Main Library. Visit the website for details and entry forms. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200. boisepubliclibrary.org/ DrawingContest. NAMPA LIBRARY SPANISH AREA MURAL—Visual artists with Treasure Valley ties are invited to submit applications detailing qualifications and past experience for the painting of

a mural in the Nampa Public Library’s Spanish Area. No design concepts need be presented at this time. A jury will select two finalists, who will be paid $100 to create site-specific proposals. Deadline to apply is 2 p.m. Aug. 2. For more information, visit the NPL website or contact Claire Connley at connleyc@nampalibrary.org or 208-468-5806. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4685800, nampalibrary.org. WHY I LOVE A RIVER PHOTO CONTEST—Calling all photographers: Show off the splendor, excitement or serenity of Idaho’s waterways by sending Idaho Rivers United your best shot of why you love a particular Idaho river, creek, natural lake, water view, plant or animal along or in an Idaho river. Visit idahorivers.org/ photocontest for complete details and entry. Deadline is Sept. 1. FREE. Idaho Rivers United, 2600 Rose Hill St., 208-343-7481, idahorivers.org/photocontest.

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. Tuesdays, 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., 208-344-3011.

Kids & Teens

PUPPET SHOW—Enjoy hilarious puppet renditions of popular children’s stories. For all ages. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208297-6700, adalib.org/lakehazel.

Odds & Ends DANCE PARTY—Dance to old favorites and learn some new moves in an exciting show of music and lights. For all ages. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Star Branch, 10706 W. State St., Star, 208-286-9755, adalib.org. FLYING M TRIVIA NIGHT—Enjoy a spirited competition filled with your favorite music between questions. Prizes include a $30 Flying M gift card for first place, $20 for second, and $10 for third. Produced by Last Call USA. 7 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533. MARBLE WALL—Hands-on physics using everyday objects on a giant pegboard wall. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib. org/victory/events.

Food

AFTERNOON STORYTIME—Looking for an after-lunch activity? Enjoy a few stories, songs and rhymes. 1:30-2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181. adalib.org. LITERACY IN COMBA PARK— You don’t have to choose between spending time outdoors and going to storytime. Join library staff for stories and activities Tuesday afternoons. 12:30-1 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181. adalib.org. LITERACY IN REDWOOD PARK—You don’t have to choose between spending time outdoors and going to a storytime. Join library staff for stories and activities Tuesday afternoons. 11:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181. adalib.org. NPL SUMMER MOVIE: ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: ROAD CHIP—The Nampa Public Library will be showing a different movie every Tuesday during the Summer Reading Program. This week, the movie will be Alvin and the Chipmunks: Road Chip, rated PG. Freshly popped popcorn will

E VENT S

be provided. For all ages. 2 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4685800, nampalibrary.org.

IDAHO FOODBANK’S SUMMER MEALS FOR CHILDREN—When school is out for summer vacation, many children lose access to the free and reduced-price meals they rely on during the school year. The Idaho Foodbank’s Picnic in the Park Program fills this nutritional gap. Visit the website to find one of their 25 meal sites, where free lunches for children ages 1-18 are served every Monday-Friday through Aug. 12. Adults may purchase a lunch. FREE. Idaho Foodbank, 3562 S. TK Ave., Boise, 208-336-9643. idahofoodbank.org. TASTY TALES WITH REDISCOVERED BOOKS—Join Rediscovered Books every Tuesday morning for stories, donuts and fun. The booksellers will be down at Guru Donuts reading their favorite picture books. 10 a.m. FREE. Guru Donuts, 204 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-3764229, rdbooks.org/tasty-talesstorytime-guru-donuts.

visit our boiseweekly.com for a more complete list of

calendar events.

16cJULY 20–26, 2016cBOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY JULY 20 ADDAM CHAVARRIA—8 p.m. FREE. Reef ALIVE AFTER FIVE: THE SMITES—With The Bernie Reilly Band. 5 p.m. FREE. Basque Block BEN BURDICK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 BLAZE AND KELLY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill BOISE COMMUNITY BAND: BROADWAY AND SHOW TUNES SPECTACULAR—7 p.m. FREE. Old Ada County Courthouse. THE INVADERS—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s ISAAC ROTHER AND THE PHANTOMS—With Thom Simon and new local Damnit Randy. 7 p.m. FREE. The Olympic

KLEINER PARK LIVE: THE COME TOGETHER BAND—5:30 p.m. FREE. Kleiner Park MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2016— 7:30 p.m. FREE-$79. McCall NEW MADRID—With Harrison Fjord and Foul Weather. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. The Olympic PRISM TATS—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux ROB HARDING—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar TOM TAYLOR—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity

FRIDAY JULY 22 ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s BLACK BOLT—With Machine, Vections, and Pop Overkill. 8 p.m. $5. The Shredder BLAZE AND KELLY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 COBERLY, TOWN AND DAY—7 p.m. Backstage Bistro, Village Cinema DAN COSTELLO—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

James Taylor

We’re More Than Just A Market…

JAMES TAYLOR—8 p.m. $67$87. Taco Bell Arena JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2016— Join the McCall Music Society for the annual weeklong festival of classical chamber music and pops concerts at various venues around the community. 5 p.m. FREE-$79. McCall

COME DINE WITH US Friday Night Dinners

NED EVETT’S MUSIC BOX—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow ROB HARDING—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar RYAN WISSINGER—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity SAM OUTLAW—With Molly Pardon and Reverend Baron. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux SPENCER BATT—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

THURSDAY JULY 21 ANDREW HOVE—6 p.m. FREE. Meriwether Cider DOUGLAS CAMERON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 DUSTY RUST—8:30 p.m. FREE. Reef FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES—With Poke. 5:30 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

THE SMITES, JULY 20 A family-related emergency forced Australian blues singersongwriter C.W. Stoneking to back out of Alive After Five. Instead, watch as The Smiths cover band (and Boise locals), The Smites: A Smiths Experience, return to the Basque Block stage. For five years in the 1980s, Manchester band The Smiths were the brightest flash in the pan of British rock, a mix of jangly guitars, sardonic lyrics and Morrissey’s hair. It fell apart in 1987 when guitarist Johnny Marr walked away. The Smites—Steven, Roddy, Scot and Peter—have staying power and put on a rocking show. If you caught The Smites at Alive After Five in June, you were probably put off by the rain. This time, the forecast is sunny, with a 100 percent chance of awesomeness.

3 COURSE ECLECTIC DINNER Choose a starter, entrée and dessert from weekly seasonal and locally sourced Chef’s menu. RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED.

Each Friday beginning at 5:30 pm

$25 per person

—Harrison Berry With The Bernie Reilly Band, 5 p.m. FREE. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, downtownboise.org.

608 w. grove st. • 208.433.1208 Open Mon.-Sat. 10 am-6 pm, open extended hours on Tues., Thurs. & Fri., closed Sun.

www.thebasquemarket.com BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016c17


DAVID MCCLISTER

LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE D.I.—With Krugan Hypothesis, Dogs in the Fight, and Nude Oil. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Eclypse DUELING PIANOS ON THE PATIO—6 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s

SATURDAY JULY 23

REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill SUMMER SALSA WITH DJ GIOVANNI—9 p.m. $6-$12. Knitting Factory

LIKE A STORM—With Righteous Vendetta, Cover Your Tracks, and Vault7. 7 p.m. $12-$25. Knitting Factory

TAMARACK SUNSET CONCERT SERIES—With New Transit. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Tamarack TOM TAYLOR—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

MATTHEW FRANZ—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

ZACH FORSMAN—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar

MIMICKING BIRDS—With Tisper and Aphorist. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. The Olympic K-Spar

MOJO GREEN—10 p.m. $5. Reef REBECCA SCOTT TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

MILITARY VETERANS BENEFIT: BERDOO—With locals Cap Gun Suicide, K-Spar, Peace Be Steel and Bet On Red. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Eclypse ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE BACKUPS—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage BREAD AND CIRCUS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Fairview

WILLIE NELSON, JULY 26, OUTLAW FIELD He has a guitar named after Roy Rogers’ horse. He broke the Nashville Sound barrier. He has received pretty much every major award that can be bestowed on a musician. He is an activist, philanthropist and has braids for days. His name is Willie Nelson and he’s one of the biggest names in country music—hell, in any genre of American music. Ever. The father of Outlaw Country will live up to his moniker Tuesday, July 26 when he takes the stage at the Idaho Botanical Garden as part of the Outlaw Field Concert Series. Nelson, who reportedly smoked pot on the White House roof during the Carter administration, will play songs that have been stuck in America’s collective head for more than 40 years. In an iconic twofer, he’ll be joined by none other than Don McLean, the man best known for that other perennial radio staple, “American Pie.” Let’s be honest, we’d get “On the Road Again” and drive our Chevy much farther than the levee to see these living legends. —Harrison Berry With Don McLean, 7 p.m., $60-$65. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

18cJULY 20–26, 2016cBOISEweekly

The Long Run ROCK THE VILLAGE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES—The Long Run (Eagles Tribute Band), with The Sensitives. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Village at Meridian RYAN WISSINGER—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper SMOOTH AVENUE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar STE. CHAPELLE AFTERHOURS—With Ellie Shaw. 6 p.m. $10. Ste. Chapelle SUBLIME WITH ROME—With Dirty Heads, Tribal Seeds, and Bleeker. 6 p.m. $20-$750. Merrill Park A TASTY JAMM—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

SUNDAY JULY 24 AUDIO MOONSHINE—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar CHILLED SUNDAYS—With DJs Effy K and Maksym. 10 p.m. FREE. Crowbar FIONA LURAY—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar JGRUB BAND—6:30 p.m. FREE. PreFunk-Meridian

MONDAY JULY 25 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE AVETT BROTHERS—8 p.m. $30-$55 adv., $35-$60 door. Idaho Center Amphitheater FRANK MARRA—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 THEE COMMONS—With Good Friends Great Enemies and Camacho. 7 p.m. $7. Neurolux WILLISON ROOS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

TUESDAY JULY 26 ALEX CUTHBERT—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole DR. DELICIOUS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

DOUGLAS CAMERON—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

JOHN AND JEN—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

DUELING PIANOS ON THE PATIO—6 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s

KANSAS—8 p.m. $20-$65. Revolution

HECKTOR PECKTOR—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

KORN AND ROB ZOMBIE—With In This Moment. 6:30 p.m. $30$50. Idaho Center

IDYL TIME—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s JGRUBB BAND—7 p.m. FREE. County Line Brewing

Korn and Rob Zombie

THE LIKE ITS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2016— 7:30 p.m. FREE-$79. McCall

LUCKY TONGUE—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

THE MYSTERY LIGHTS—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

MCCALL SUMMERFEST 2016—11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. FREE-$79. McCall

NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid

MISS ABAGAIL—7 p.m. FREE. High Note NIKKI PRESTON—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue PINEGROVE—With Sports, Half Waif and Western Daughter. 7:30 p.m. $10. El Korah

OUTLAW FIELD: WILLIE NELSON AND FAMILY—With Don McLean. 7 p.m. $60-$65. Idaho Botanical Garden RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: PLUM—With Tango Alpha Tango and guests. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE RENEWING—6:30 p.m. FREE. Awakenings Coffee House STE. CHAPELLE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES—With The Blues Brothers. 1 p.m. FREE-$12. Ste. Chapelle SWINGIN WITH ELLIE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


SCREEN FUNNY, FEMININE, FEARLESS

Absolutely Fabulous and Ghostbusters put female protagonists front and center GEORGE PRENTICE Two distinctly different big-screen films now showing—a raucous reboot of a male-dominated comedy classic (Ghostbusters) and a hot mess based on a British sitcom (Absolutely Fabulous)—have one thing in common: fearlessness. Neither is a perfect movie, but both are significantly better than much of the testosterone-driven drivel filling cineplexes of late. Ghostbusters is the much-anticipated reimagining of the 1984 blockbuster, and it suffered, even before its official release, from derision by fanboys. Soon after its release, Ghostbusters was ripped, sad to say, by a number of male critics. According to Salon, 77 percent of critics who gave the film a thumbs down on Rotten Tomatoes are male. David Rooney, writing for The Hollywood Reporter, panned the movie as “a bust,” while Time Magazine’s Stephanie Zacharek countered that it “glows with vitality.” For every negative review from a male critic, there might be a positive review from a female critic; but, a closer examination reveals things are far from equal when it comes to film criticism in America. A new study by San Diego State University’s Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film reveals “in every type of U.S. publication, male reviewers dramatically outnumber female reviewers,” usually by a 3-1 ratio. Additionally, the study reveals, the vast majority of “top critics” on Rotten Tomatoes—the popular aggregate of U.S. critic and audience reviews—are men (again by a 3-1 margin). Another interesting finding: editors tend to assign a larger proportion of films featuring female protagonists to female critics but, because the overall number of the nation’s “top” critics on Rotten Tomatoes are male, many positive reviews written by women about female-centric films have been diluted in the website aggregate score. As examples, Salon reports last summer’s Spy—starring Melissa McCarthy, who also stars in Ghostbusters—received all of its top-critic negative reviews on Rotten Tomatoes from men; and last fall’s female-centric Suffragette (starring Meryl Streep) garnered nearly 80 percent of its negative reviews on Rotten Tomatoes from men. Streep, speaking at an April 2015 panel discussion on women in film, BOISE WEEKLY.COM

It’s a rarity for two female-centric big-budget movies—Ghostbusters , starring Leslie Jones, Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig and Kate McKinnon (top) and Absolutely Fabulous, starring Joanna Lumley and Jennifer Saunders (bottom)—to be playing simultaneously.

said, “The hardest thing for me, as an actor, is to have a story that men in the audience feel like they know what I feel like. That’s a really hard thing. It’s very hard for them to put themselves in the shoes of a female protagonist.” That wasn’t always the case in Hollywood. Through much of the 1940s and 1950s, scores of films were released featuring strong female protagonists portrayed by Bette Davis, Katharine Hepburn, Barbara Stanwyck, Irene Dunne… the list goes on and on. But, for nearly 50 years, female roles in American movies have diminished to those of a girlfriend, mother or wife, who looks on adoringly from the sidelines. In a Variety story, Dr. Martha Lauzen, coauthor of the San Diego State analysis, wrote, “There is a growing disconnect or gap between what we might perceive as being the current status of women in film and their actual status.” Following back-to-back screenings of Absolutely Fabulous and Ghostbusters, I was struck by how rare an experience it was to watch two different but equally funny films featuring empowered female protagonists. I was also struck by how much I would like to see a steady stream of female-centric films. As for the expensive but entertaining Ghostbusters, the gigglefest won’t solve our problems with ISIS or the possibility that Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump could be our next commander

in chief. But watching McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Leslie Jones and, especially, Kate McKinnon was 110 minutes well spent and worth the price of full admission. As for McCarthy, She isn’t given nearly enough credit for delivering joyous entertainment and nearly single-handedly rescuing the comedy genre. Yet, somehow, it’s still a hard slog to get female-centric films produced. Another study by San Diego State, this one in September 2015, revealed only 12 percent of the top grossing U.S. films featured female lead protagonists and during the 2014-2015 television season, women made up only 27 percent of creators, directors, writers and producers of prime-time TV shows. To be clear, film and television criticism written by men or women should be uncompromised when it comes to quality, no matter the subject—but the system that determines which stories get told is rigged. Way too many men are driving the product a select group of other men, as critics, have become the arbiters of. For years, Hollywood has stoked the embers of racial inequality by not showcasing minority storytelling—particularly African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans—and it is abundantly clear Hollywood’s lack of opportunity for women storytellers has been sustained by an influential group of male critics with their ongoing, measurable derision for female-driven films. BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016 c19


BEERGUZZLER DOUBLE MOUNTAIN SOURS

2015 DEVIL’S KRIEK, $9-$11 Bing cherries give this one a deep garnet color topped with a pink, cotton candy head. The aromas are fairly subtle, offering hints of clove and grass. The Kriek is the most aggressively sour of the three, with tart flavors up front that tame down just a bit on the mellower finish. This is not for the neophyte sour drinker. 2015 PECHE MODE, $9-$11 A crystal clear amber in the glass, it throws a thin head that leaves some lacing. There’s a bit of clove on the nose, along with soft peach and dark citrus notes. You get big peach on the palate tha is lightly tart with a nice spice component. The smooth, refreshing finish plays sweet against sour. 2015 TAHOMA KRIEK, $9-$11 Brewed with local Rainier cherries, it pours a hazy straw with a porous head that collapses quickly. The aromas are fairly sour with just a touch of cherry, along with some spice and fresh grain. Bright lemon flavors up front with a beautiful bit of Brett, yield to reserved tangy cherry on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick 20cJULY 20–26, 2016cBOISEweekly

FOOD

KE L S E Y HAWES

Full disclosure: Hood River’s Double Mountain Brewery is one of my all-time favorites. It has only four year-round beers but offers an intriguing collection of seasonals, including their take on Belgian sours. Brewed when the fruit is freshly harvested, they’re cellared for about nine months before release. They make for a great counterpoint to IPAs, substituting tart flavors for hop bitterness. As refreshing as these three outstanding beers are, with high alcohol you can’t really taste (pushing 10 percent), caution is advised.

SAY ‘AYE’ TO THESE PIES

North End Pizza offers top notch ’za in the perfect Hyde Park digs Z ACH HAGADONE About midway down the 13th Street business district, which serves as the bustling core of the Hyde Park neighborhood in Boise’s North End, is the Navarra Building—a facade of high windows; rough-hewn block; and cool, modern colors. Inside is aptly named North End Pizza, a new addition to the block that has quickly carved out a niche in the community. On a recent visit, about two weeks after the place opened, North End Pizza was humming with a mix of families and weekday lunch hour traffic. The Sun Ray at North End Pizza is a delicate blend of zesty richness. Diners sat at a mix of high- and lowtop tables, booths and seats along the large wraparound bar. The interior aesthetic is spare artichoke heart, roasted garlic and goat cheese, olive, red onion and roasted garlic), The 13th but comfortable—ample natural light fills topped with sun dried tomato on an olive oil Street Pub (barbecue chicken, red onion the front of the house, while a skylight gives base. North End Pizza serves its pies perched and jalapeno) and Vince’s (breakfast bacon, the booths in the back an airy feel. The walls on a wire stand, armed with a hefty metal Canadian bacon, Italian sausage, pepperoni, are painted a warm, understated orange and pizza cutter. salami and Mama Lil’s peppers). Likewise, handful of flatscreen TVs hang unobtrusively The ingredients were well apportioned, the sandwich options draw their names from around the space. with big hunks of artichoke and sun-dried favorite Boise Foothills trails. The semi-industrial feel lent by concrete tomato covering all eight slices. The all-imporThe bar has 15 beers on tap, including a floors and mix of Steampunk-y light fixtures mix of locals, micros and, charmingly, Rainier; tant crust was browned to perfection and took is lessened by the lovingly shellacked blonde along with a selection of three draft wines and up just the right amount of real estate. wood table tops and slats of light-colored Underpinning the artichokes and tonine available by the glass. distressed timber that make up the back wall matoes—the latter which appeared to have An order of house made turkey meatballs of the bar. actually be dried by the sun, rather than fried with marinara ($7) comes North End Pizza seems to by it—was a buttery layer of goat cheese and presented on an herb-dusted have come into being with a NORTH END PIZZA plate, the orbs perfectly coated garlic. It would be easy for that combination fully formed menu, featuring 1513 N. 13th St., with sauce and a cap of melted to become overpowering, but the zest of the hand-tossed pizzas, sandwichartichoke cut the richness, and the olive oil mozzarella. es and calzones ($10-$11) a 208-345-5669, Eschewing beef or pork, the notes made both the crust light and airy while range of salads, starters and northendpizzaboise.com lending a bit of its own zing. finely ground turkey was rich lunch menu items ($3-$9) As with the meatballs, the Sun Ray’s deliand savory without the heavicreate-your-own pizza options cate balance of portion and flavor made for a ness commonly associated in 12-inch ($13) and 18-inch with the dish. The sauce was chunky and fresh deeply satisfying meal that was clearly crafted ($17) sizes; and three “charity case” pizzas, a with more than the usual amount of attention but far from overapplied—a much appreciportion of proceeds from which go to local to detail. ated nod to restraint shared by the mozarella. nonprofits Washington Elementary PTA, The While a trip to North End Pizza could get Foothills Learning Center and the North End When finished, the plate was clean, unlike at many pizza joints where a serving of meatballs spendy in a hurry—the least expensive hand Neighborhood Association. Dessert items tossed pies on the menu go for $17 while the ends in an archipelago of uneaten blobs of include cannoli ($6) and spumoni ($4). most expensive, like the 18-inch NENA (North sauce floating in a sea of oil. In a nod to its community bent—and End Neighborhood Association) “charity case,” The portions were spot on for an appetizer Hyde Park’s historic neighborhood pride—the costs $27—you’re paying for high quality ’za in hand tossed pizzas are named for surrounding and the warming, soul satisfying flavor was a well tailored space that feels like it has always well worth the price. businesses, including the Parrilla (featuring had a place in Hyde Park. A 12-inch Sun Ray ($17) came with Roma tomato, mushroom, spinach, black BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN STEVE GRANADO

Loving baseball, win or lose (but winning is better) GEORGE PRENTICE

Steve Granado is a “boy of summer.” Yes, the 23-year-old is a young professional, but he has had his eye on fields of dreams since childhood. This summer, Granado is beginning to live those dreams—not on the baseball diamond, but in the broadcast booth as the voice of the Boise Hawks. This year marks the first of Granado’s professional broadcast career. He’s had plenty of offers to work for other sports franchises, but said his goal has always been to get behind the microphone. In the middle of a 19-day stretch of baseball—13 home games, six on the road and no days off—Granado took a break from the bustle to talk about the Hawks, his broadcast idol and being his own toughest critic.

Do you prefer broadcasting a pitchers’ duel where no one has scored, or a slugfest where everybody is knocking it out of the park? I love a mano a mano pitchers’ duel but, when there’s a slugfest, man oh man—it’s a chore just keeping up with the scoring.

You work for the Hawks but, as a broadcast journalist, you have a responsibility to the public. Can you speak to the delicate balance between your employer and your ethical compass? My No. 1 priority at all times is to explain what’s happening. That’s not always going to make people happy. Look, I’m not going to trash someone; that’s not my goal. But if someone makes a mistake, it has to be said.

It’s pretty incredible that, in a heartbeat, one of those guys could go from the meager living of a minor league baseball player to jaw-dropping salaries in the majors. Their lives change in a second. But I must tell you, there’s a lot of talent in this league [Class AShort Season Northwest League].

Have you experienced pushback before? Not in baseball, but I was calling a hockey game once and said that one of the players was acting like a jerk. I heard from his mom. I’m presuming that was a defining moment. I realized I had to tell it like it is. Athletes put their hearts and souls into their performances. I’m doing them an injustice if I’m babying them. How can you tell if you’ve done a good broadcast? I have a pretty high standard that I rarely live up to.

Drop some names for us from the Hawks’ roster of players who we might see in the major leagues some day. Jacob Bosiokovic [first base], Willie Abreu [outfielder] and Garrett Hampson [short stop]. All three of those guys are great and this is their first year here.

I know that you, the players and coaches spend a lot of time on the bus, traveling to road games. When I was your age, I used to spend a lot of time on a bus, covering politics, and it... It sucks. Tell me about getting on that bus after a loss. It really sucks. Dead silent. Unfortunately, the Hawks have had more than a few losses so far this season. What’s missing? Right now, it’s pitching. But our starting pitchers are pretty young.

If you don’t cut yourself some slack, impossible goals might eat you alive. Every night I want to be better than the night before.

Can you see a path where the Hawks turn this season around and make a run for the playoffs? The second half of the season is a complete toss-up. We’re really only a couple of games out of second or third place.

What’s a common mistake in baseball broadcasts? Mispronunciation. That’s huge. You’ve got to come prepared.

I’m presuming that you love all of this. You have to love it, win or lose. I love baseball. But winning is better.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycJULY 20–26, 2016c21


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NYT CROSSWORD | DOUBLE FEATURES ACROSS

25 “____ sow, so shall …” 26 French for “square” 27 Museumgoer, e.g. 29 Upholstery problem 30 Sealy rival 31 Some Korean-made TVs 34 City hard hit by the Zika virus 35 Didn’t play in the game 36 Actor who was lionized in the 1930s?

1 Really tiny 7 Deli fixture 15 Over yonder 19 First N.F.L. QB to pass for 5,000 yards in a season 20 Cathedral-music maker 21 Best hand value in baccarat 22 Double feature about the Arctic Ocean? 24 Kardashian matriarch 1

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75 Like much of Namibia 77 “Within ____ a hell”: Shak. 80 Number on un orologio 81 About 85 Kitchen counters? 87 … about attending a funeral? 93 Watchdog org., in two senses? 94 Occupant of a 52-Across 95 Stein relative 96 … about an insomniac? 100 Optimistic 101 Floor 103 Wide shoe spec 104 U.S.N. rank 105 Marked, as a ballot 107 Cap-and-trade org. 110 Basis of a political scandal, maybe 113 They lose their heads over time 114 Promising exchange 115 Really tiny 116 … about Pablo Escobar? 121 Manual component 122 Longtime “All My Children” role 123 Turn on 124 ____ Park (Chicago neighborhood once home to Obama) 125 Most geeky 126 Yak, yak, yak

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57 Additional, in adspeak 58 Got room service 64 Dope 66 Forget to carry the one, e.g. 67 … about Lee Harvey Oswald not being the lone gunman? 72 When doubled, something to beat 73 Bow 74 Bandleader who popularized the conga line

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BY JERRY MICCOLIS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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38 … about the search for extraterrestrial life? 42 Chump change 45 Mustang rival 46 Unfair treatment, with “the” 49 … about baseball-size hail? 52 First home? 53 Like a neat freak 54 Suffix with project 55 Actress Amanda of “Togetherness”

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1 H.I.V. research org. 2 Foot bones 3 Only U.S. state motto in Spanish 4 Hall-of-Fame slugger Johnny 5 Chemical suffix 6 Liszt wrote three for piano 7 Kind of heart valve 8 Tool for a duel 9 ____ Lingus 10 What may follow a breakdown 11 ____-Magnon 12 Tourist destination SSE of Delhi 13 Amalfi Coast city 14 Breaks up 15 Cross with a loop 16 Stephen King novel with a pyrokinetic character

17 Hill in Hill hearings 18 Change to all zeros, say 20 First section 23 “This means ____!” 28 Done for 30 Avoid 31 Canadian flag symbol 32 Fed. lending agency 33 Where your roots are 37 Kind of watch 39 Standoffish 40 Heraldic border 41 Cereal used in party mix 42 Open-house org. 43 A, on the Aare 44 It “never solves a problem without raising 10 more,” per George Bernard Shaw 47 Like stuffed animals 48 Leader issuing a ukase 50 Some cameras, for short 51 Castle part 52 Pioneer Day celebrant 56 Address of the Boss’s band 59 ____ Victor 60 Sides of a quadrangle, maybe 61 “____ not!” 62 High dudgeon 63 Nasty ____ (rap nickname) 65 Shade of green 67 ____ Johnson, former mayor of London 68 “Well, you’ve dazzled me!” 69 Commend 70 It has three feet 71 Range that’s home to the Mark Twain National Forest 72 “Buh-bye!” 76 Art ____ 78 Beliefs 79 Black 82 Didn’t budge 83 Thrice, in Rx’s

84 “Huh”-inducing, say 86 One going around in circles? 88 Small songbird 89 Sailing ropes 90 Short flight 91 Monet or Sartre, by birth 92 In due course 94 Blight 97 One of the Wayans brothers 98 Old-fashioned stage direction 99 Candy man 101 Electricity-eschewing group 102 Swift, in a way 106 Nickname for baseball’s Dwight Gooden 108 Cool 109 “Roots” Emmy winner L A S T S P I C Y

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111 Info for a dating profile 112 Ado 113 Drag queen’s collection 114 “____ Plenty o’ Nuttin’” (“Porgy and Bess” song) 117 Condition for a neat freak, in brief 118 Thor Heyerdahl craft 119 1950s pol 120 Body with many arms, for short Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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A Y E P O N E R T I I O C C K K E S P E H E N M R I O O D S T P A S H C A D M M E E M H I L E A A R T Y E A

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COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS CALL TO ARTISTS Global Lounge is hosting their first annual art show at Evermoore Gallery and is seeks artists for their upcoming art exhibit November 3rd. Two-dimensional art ONLY. Theme is landscape: as a constantly transforming and defining force in nature and in communities. Application online: evermoreprints.com/calltoartists/. PHOTOGRAPHY CALL TO ARTISTS Calling all photographers: Show off the splendor, excitement or serenity of Idaho’s waterways by sending Idaho Rivers United your best shot of why you love a particular Idaho river, creek, natural lake, water view, plant or animal along or in an Idaho river. Visit idahorivers.org/photocontest for complete details and entry. Deadline is Sept. 1. FREE.

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ART IN THE BAR 12 Come see the 12th installment of Art in the Bar Saturday, July 30th at the Knitting Factory in Boise. We pack the house with all sorts of edgy, urban, clever and curious art pieces, sculptures and other works. Find many AITB favorites and tons of newcomers! This event is FREE !! All ages are welcome. Full bar with I.Dcome and shop- hang out- have a drink. COLLECTOR’S SALE AND ESTATE LIQUIDATION Join us Thursday, July 28th for a special reception, Evelyne Brigeois: Small Glories of Greece a half-off Collector’s Sale and inventory liquidation by the estate of Evelyne Brigeois paintings. The Gallery at Finer Frames 164 E State Street Eagle, ID. The exhibition continues through August. For information on purchasing a painting, please contact Gallery@ finerframes.com or call 888-9898.

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TRAVIS: THE TRUE STORY OF TRAVIS WALTON This documentary recounts one of the most well-documented UFO cases of all time. The event took place in Arizona Nov. 5, 1975 when a logging crew of 7 men encounters a craft of unknown origin. Travis disappeared for five days, igniting a firestorm of controversy aimed at the logging crew who were the last to see him in the forest. The film documents how these men struggle to make sense of the event enduring humiliation, job losses and lifelong ridicule. Come watch the film and participate in an audience Q&A after the show with Travis himself! Sept. 18th at the Egyptian Theatre downtown. On Sale Friday, July 8th at: egyptiantheatre.net.

HELP CHANGE ID’S POLITICAL LANDSCAPE One candidate at a time! Come meet Jake Ellis, retired Boise Fire Battalion Chief and Democratic Candidate for ID House Seat 15B. The Evening will feature live music by Steve Eaton, artwork donated by local artists, great food and cold drinks! Thursday, July 21, 7-9 p.m. 5800 Wellspring Way in Boise. You can read up on Jake at: ellisforidaho.com & RSVP at: cleanchiclets@mac.com.

BW LOST & FOUND 7/18 around 4pm at the Family $1 on State near 28th. I found your valuable something. You’ll know if it’s missing call #853-0980.

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com SWEETIE: My name fits my demeanor perfectly, and I’d love a human to shower with affection.

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RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. OLIVE: 6-year-old, female, boxer mix. Loves people. Has a stubborn streak but likes other dogs and cats. Should be OK in a home with older children. (Kennel 301 – #14528040)

MARLEY: 7-year-old, male, Labrador retriever mix. Strong and energetic. Needs work on his leash manners. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31531096)

ZEPLIN: 6-year-old, male, rat terrier mix. Can be a bit leery of men, but bonds easily. Has a bad habit of grabbing food off the table. (Kennel 305 – #17925546)

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PAYMENT EBONY: 1-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Has come through the shelter twice through no fault of her own. Curious, loves to be petted. (Kennel 108 – #30557217)

SHEBA: 1-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Curious, would love to roam around her forever home. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31571124)

TART: 7-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Sweet and sassy. Soft head rubs are her favorite. Has been waiting a long time to find her forever home. (Kennel 104 – #31232392)

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BW KISSES HA...HAAAA! I’m in Costa Rica, where the temperature this week is 75-84 degrees. Enjoy the high 90’s Boise peeps! OLD CHICAGO..... Your house made jalapeno pretzels and cheese sauce BLOW MY MIND. Hands Down the best in town!!!! Don’t ever remove them from your menu. I’m too young to die.

BW CAMPS/WORKSHOPS ART OF THE MATTER Sign up for a week long art camp between June 20th and August 5th. Each week offers something new! Classes for kids and adults. Email: gizwins@msn.com for registration and details. DO YOU KNOW THE NEXT BUDDING BROADWAY STAR? Starlight Mountain Theatre is hosting Star Search, their 10th annual youth theatre camp. Choose from two sessions: July 18-23 or July 25-30. Ages 6-18. Cost is only $87 for the entire week! (sibling discounts available). Call 208462-3622 for more info or: www. starlightmt.com. PAINTING WORKSHOPS Retired Boise art teacher and professional artist Anne Peterson MFA is offering painting workshops this Summer. Adult classes and children’s classes are available July 26th & 27th as well as August 2nd and 3rd. To learn more and to reserve your spot, please email: annepetersonart@ icloud.com or call 867-6590.

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LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS Case No. CV IE 1605098 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN under Idaho Code 15-3-801, that Janie WardEngelking, has been appointed Personal Representative of the probate estate of ELOISE RUTH WARD, deceased. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to he Personal Representative’s attorney: Rodney R. Saetrum, Saetrum Law Offices, P.O. Box 7425, Boise, Idaho 83707; 208-336-0484; fax: 208-336-0448, and filed with the Clerk of the Ada County Court. Pub. June 29, and July 6, 13, 20, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Hunter William Smith. Legal name of child

FOR SALE BW SHOP HERE BRITE SIGNS Sign Rental 208-866-6843.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): You now have more luxuriant access to divine luck than you’ve had in a long time. For the foreseeable future, you could be able to induce semi-miraculous twists of fate that might normally be beyond your capacities. But here’s a caveat: The good fortune swirling in your vicinity may be odd or irregular or hard-to-understand. To harvest it, you will have to expand your ideas about what constitutes good fortune. It may bestow powers you didn’t even realize it was possible to have. For example, what if you temporarily have an acute talent for gravitating toward situations where smart love is in full play? TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A directory published by the U.S. Department of Labor says that my gig as an astrologer shares a category with jugglers, rodeo clowns, acrobats, carnival barkers and stuntpersons. Am I, therefore, just a charming buffoon? An amusing goofball who provides diversion from life’s serious matters? I’m fine with that. I may prefer to regard myself as a sly oracle inflamed with holy madness, but the service I provide is probably more effective if my ego doesn’t get the specific glory it yearns for. In this way, I have certain resemblances to the Taurus tribe during the next four weeks. Is it OK if you achieve success without receiving all of the credit you think you deserve?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Over the course of a 57-year career, Japanese movie director Akira Kurosawa won 78 major awards for his work, including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oscars. Among the filmmakers who’ve named him as an inspirational influence are heavyweights like Ingmar Bergman, Werner Herzog, Bernardo Bertolucci, Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese. But Kurosawa wasn’t too haughty to create lighter fare. At age 86, he departed from his epic dramas to create a 30-second commercial for a yogurt drink. Did that compromise his artistic integrity? I say no. Even a genius can’t be expected to create non-stop masterpieces. Be inspired by Kurosawa, Gemini. In the coming weeks, give your best to even the most modest projects. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Capricorns may be the hardest workers of the zodiac and Tauruses the most dogged. But in the coming weeks, I suspect you Cancerians will be the smartest workers. You will efficiently surmise the precise nature of the tasks at hand, and do what’s necessary to accomplish them. There’ll be no false starts or reliance on iffy data or slapdash trial-and-error experiments. You’ll have a light touch as you find innovative short cuts that produce better results than would be possible via the grind-it-out approach.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): My friend’s 12-year-old daughter Brianna got a “B” on her summer school math test. She might have earned an “A” if it weren’t for a problem her teacher had with some of her work. “You got the right answer by making two mistakes that happened to cancel each other out,” he wrote on her paper next to question No. 7. I suspect you will soon have a similar experience. Leo. But the difference between you and Brianna is that I’m giving you an “A.” All that matters in the end is that you succeed. I don’t care if your strategy is a bit funky. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Have you ever fantasized about being a different gender or race or astrological sign? Do you suspect it might be fun and liberating to completely change your wardrobe or your hairstyle or your body language? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to experiment with these variables, and with any others that would enable you to play with your identity and mutate your self-image. You have a cosmic exemption from imitating what you have done in the past. In this spirit, feel free to read all the other signs’ horoscopes, and act on the one you like best. Your word of power is “shapeshifter.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Golden Goose Award is given annually to “scientists whose work

may have been considered silly, odd or obscure when first conducted,” but which ultimately produced dramatic advances. Entomologists Raymond Bushland and Edward Knipling were this year’s winners. More than 60 years ago they started tinkering with the sex life of the screwworm fly in an effort to stop the pest from killing livestock and wildlife throughout the American South. At first their ideas were laughed at, even ridiculed. In time they were lauded for their pioneering breakthroughs. I suspect you’ll be blessed with a vindication of your own in the coming weeks, Libra. It may not be as monumental as Bushland’s and Knipling’s, but I bet it’ll be deeply meaningful for you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I hope it doesn’t sound too paradoxical when I urge you to intensify your commitment to relaxation. I will love it and, more important, your guardian angel will love it, if you become a fierce devotee of slowing down and chilling out. Get looser and cozier and more spacious, damn it! Snuggle more. Cut back on overthinking and trying too hard. Vow to become a high master of the mystic art of I-don’tgive-a-f*ck. It’s your sacred duty to steal more slack from the soulanesthetizing grind.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I regularly travel back through time from the year 2036 so as to be here with you. It’s tough to be away from the thrilling transformations that are under way there. But it’s in a good cause. The bedraggled era that you live in needs frequent doses of the vigorous optimism that’s so widespread in 2036, and I’m happy to disseminate it. Why am I confessing this? Because I suspect you now have an extra talent for gazing into the unknown and exploring undiscovered possibilities. You also have an unprecedented power to set definite intentions about the life you want to be living in the future. Who will you be five years from today? Ten years? Twenty years? Be brave. Be visionary. Be precise. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Here’s one strategy you could pursue, I guess: You could spank the Devil with a feather duster as you try to coax him to promise that he will never again trick you with a bogus temptation. But I don’t think that would work, frankly. It may have minor shock value, in which case the Devil might leave you in peace for a short time. Here’s what I suggest instead: Work at raising your discernment so high that you can quickly identify, in the future, which temptations will deliver you unto evil confusion, and which will feed and hone your most noble desires.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): After a cool, dry period, you’ll soon be slipping into a hot, wet phase. The reasonable explanations that generated so much apathy are about to get turned inside-out. The seemingly good excuses that provided cover for your timidity will be exposed as impractical lies. Are you ready for your passion to roar back into fashion? Will you know what to do when suppressed yearnings erupt and the chemicals of love start rampaging through your soft, warm animal body? I hereby warn you about the oncoming surge of weird delight—and sing “Hallelujah!” for the revelatory fun it will bring. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m composing your horoscope on my iPhone after midnight on a crowded bus that’s crammed with sweaty revelers. We’re being transported back to civilization from a rural hideaway where we spent the last 12 hours at a raging party. I still feel ecstatic from the recent bacchanal, but the ride is uncomfortable. I’m pinned against a window by a sleepy, drunken dude who’s not in full control of his body. But do I allow my predicament to interfere with my holy meditation on your destiny? I do not—just as I trust you will keep stoking the fires of your own inspiration in the face of comparable irritations. You have been on a hot streak, my dear. Don’t let anything tamp it down!

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Case No. CV NC 1606316 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Hunter William Smith, a minor, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Hunter William Rudd. The reason for the change in name is: match legal custodian’s last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on August 30, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: June 21, 2016. Christopher D. Rich CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB July 6,13, 20 and 27, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Joan Elaine Anderson Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1610526 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Joan Elaine Anderson, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Joan Elaine McCarron. The reason for the change in name is: because I divorced my spouse. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Aug 16, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Jun 23, 2016. Christopher D Rich CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB July 6,13,20,27, 2016.

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Lucas Christopher Anderson Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1610528 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Lucas Christopher Anderson, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Lucas Christopher McCarron. The reason for the change in name is: because my step-parent raised me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Aug 16, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Jun 23, 2016. Christopher D. Rich CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB July 6,13,20,27, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: AVA MAE SHOEMAKER. Petitioner Case No. CV NC 1606313 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Ava Mae Shoemaker, a minor, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Ava Mae Hobbs. The reason for the change in name is: the child wishes to have the same name as her other siblings and family members. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on August 18, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse located at 200 W. Front St. Boise, ID 83702, (208) 287-6900. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good

reason against the name change. Respectfully submitted this 1st day of July, 2016. Manweiler, Breen, Ball & Davis, PLCC. By : M Sean Breen, Esq. of the Firm Attorneys for Petitioner. PUB July 6,13, 20,27, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Chelsea Anne Henson. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1610217 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Chelsea Anne Henson, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Chelsea Anne Cox. The reason for the change in name is: I want to go back to my maiden name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on AUG 16, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: JUN 23, 2016. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB July 13, 20, 27 and Aug 3, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: JASON BELTMAN. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 2016-10937 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Jason Alan Beltman, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Arianna Nicole Beltman. The reason for the change

in name is: that her legal name no longer coincides with who she is. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on AUG 30, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: JUN 25, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB July 13, 20,27, Aug 3, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Shelly Lynne Spear. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1611577 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Shelly Lynne Spear, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Shelly Lynne Bauer. The reason for the change in name is: I want to resume my maiden name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on September 1, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: July 6, 2016. DEBBIE NAGELE CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deputy Clerk. PUB July 13, 20, 27 and Aug 3, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Justin Gabriel Kobbe. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1610881 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Justin Gabriel Kobbe, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the Dis-

JEN SORENSEN

trict Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Justin Kobbe Solace. The reason for the change in name is: because new family name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on AUG 23, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: June 23, 2016. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk. PUB July 13, 20, 27 and Aug 3, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Catherine Ann Sporleder. Legal Name

NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Catherine Ann Sporleder, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Caty Ann Solace. The reason for the change in name is: because new family name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on AUG 18, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: June 28, 2016. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBBIE NAGELE Deputy Clerk. PUB July 13, 20, 27 and Aug 3, 2016.

Case No. CV NC 1610879

ADULT

HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

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FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

POLITICAL PUNCH Might you prefer Trump Tonic or Hillary Hooch? Frankly, we prefer the soda with a blank label on which we can write in our own presidential choice because we are “sodasgusted.” Connecticut-based Avery Soda, which began bottling when Teddy Roosevelt was in the White House (1904), is out with its annual presidential specialty sodas. The tonic with the Trumpster’s mug on the label is grape-flavored because the Donald, of course, “wants to make America grape

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

DEAR MINERVA, What does one do with a vibrator that was won in a recent raffle? Asking for a friend. —BOB

DEAR BOB, It is a great day and age to be alive, isn’t it? We live in a world that has vibrators aplenty! What does one do with a vibrator? Well, here’s the buzz: 1. Buy some batteries. Have some fun by your lonesome. 2. Buy some batteries. Have some fun with your lover. 3. Is your tortoise constipated? Tape a vibrator to the underside of its shell. Google it. It is a thing. 4. Send it anonymously to your least favorite person or politician. Tell them you think they need to lighten up a bit. 5. Gather glue, glitter, googly eyes and pompoms. Create your very own buzzing character. Give it a cute name. Put on puppet shows. Make YouTube videos. #LifeGoals 6. Three words: White Elephant Gift. 7. Sneak it into various family members’ houses and hide it in weird places. When they go to unload the dishwasher—SURPRISE! When they go to get a bath towel—SURPRISE! 8. Misplaced your rolling pin? Flour it up and roll that dough. Pound out those biscuits. Tenderize that tough piece of meat. 9. Hide it inside a pinata at an adult party! Better yet, use it to WHACK the pinata and unleash the sweet goodies within. Vibrators are the gift that keeps giving. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

again.” Mrs. Clinton’s Hooch is berry-flavored but Avery $12 plus shipping for 15 bottles, Soda said “the ingredients are Avery’s Beverages, 860-224-0830, averysoda.com classified.” Avery Soda will again be tracking sales between now and November, and its track record is pretty reliable. Barrack O’Berry outsold Cream de Mitt in 2012 and John McCream in 2008. Taken by instagram user harrisonberry0725.

—George Prentice

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2.  3.  4.  5. 

“BNL ROCKS RED ROCKS,” BARENAKED LADIES

“FALLING INTO PLACE,” REBELUTION “CHEETAH,” APHEX TWIN “ALONG THE SHADOW,” SAOSIN “THE GETAWAY,” RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS

6. 7.  8.  9.  10.

“A MOON SHAPED POOL,” RADIOHEAD

“WILDFLOWER,” THE AVALANCHES

How you gonna vote? Hilary Clinton: 31.82% Ghostbusters: 24.68% Donald Trump: 43.51%

“CALIFORNIA,” BLINK-182

“THE NORTH CORRIDOR,” CHEVELLE “MAGMA,” GOJIRA

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to be a s c i e n ti f i c s a mp l e o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

14,000

4,821

804

38;13

5%

65,110,000

$4.5 BILLION

$45 MILLION

Number of annual workplace deaths before the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration was created 43 years ago

Number of workers killed on the job in 2014 (osha.gov)

Number of Hispanic or Latino workers killed from work-related injuries in 2014—more than 15 per week or two each day of the year (osha.gov)

Average number of workplace deaths per day before and after OSHA’s creation

U.K. unemployment rate February-April 2016

Estimated U.K. population as of mid-2015

Donald Trump’s estimated net worth as of July 2016

Hillary Clinton’s estimated net worth as of July 2016

(ons.gov.uk)

(ons.gov.uk)

(forbes.com)

(forbes.com)

(osha.gov)

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(osha.gov)

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Boise Weekly Vol.25 Issue 05  

Funny Ladies

Boise Weekly Vol.25 Issue 05  

Funny Ladies