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BOISE WEEKLY J U N E 2 9 – J U LY 5 , 2 0 1 6

LOCA L A N D I N DE PE N DE N T

VO L U M E 2 5 , I S S U E 0 2

“Believe it or not, not everyone is going to love mint chocolate chip ice cream.”

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Fourth Goes Dry

McCall’s July 4 booze rules and what they mean for the city’s signature summer smash

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Brunch Market

Wandering around the Boise Farmers Market reveals an eclectic feast

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CITIZEN 19

Affording Summer

School’s out and the kids are happy, but parents are stressed about the cost of vacation FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | OCTOBER 7–13, 2015 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Minerva Jayne, Alex Kiesig, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Greta Gardner, Taryn Hadfield, Taylor Turney Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Ryan Johnson, Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Bill Hagler, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Fax: 208-342-4733 Phone: 208-344-2055 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

EDITOR’S NOTE DRINKERS, PARTIERS AND WINNERS In the days leading up to the signing of the U.S. Constitution in 1787, a group of 55 Founding Fathers huddled at a downtown Philadelphia tavern. There, they got unutterably smashed. According to the booze tab from that evening, they consumed 54 bottles of Madeira, 60 bottles of claret, eight bottles of whiskey, 22 bottles of porter, eight bottles of hard cider, 12 bottles of beer and seven bowls (actually tubs) of alcoholic punch. Now, it seems Americans have lost the ability to hold their liquor. As we prepare to celebrate the 240th anniversary of the U.S. Declaration of Independence on July 4, at least some Idahoans will be doing so without as ready access to liquid exuberance. After years of mounting incidents, McCall is 86-ing Fourth of July drinkers from public spaces around the resort community. While officials say it’s a matter of public safety, not everyone is pleased. Read more about this year’s dry Fourth of July on Page 6. Speaking of celebrations, Boise Weekly thanks the vendors, volunteers and visitors who packed the corner of Sixth and Broad streets on June 25 for The Big LeBoise, our 25th birthday party. Everyone who showed up to eat, drink and be merry with us was a winner, but some won more than others. One highlight of our party was announcing the winners of this year’s Passport to Patios drawing: those who visited a slate of local bars and restaurants with great patios had their passports stamped, returned them to BW and were entered to win some awesome prizes. The winners include Stephanie Bailey-White, who floated home with a three-person inflatable kayak; Karen Montoore, who will be getting away with a getaway package to Cactus Pete’s in Jackpot, Nev.; Robert White, who gets into Stanley Sawtooth Mountain Musicfest gratis; David Ferguson, who scored a $250 gift certificate to Lonecone.com; Jack Floyd, who’s headed to the 2016 Idaho Horror Film Festival with two VIP passes and some cool swag; and Tyler Bush, who now has reservations and a $100 bar tab for himself and up to 30 friends at Boise Brewing. Bonus: We also raised a goodly chunk of change for the Women’s and Children’s Alliance. We’ll count that as another win. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST

Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Frederick “Coyote” Choate TITLE: “Virtual World” MEDIUM: Oil on canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: This started as an intuitive scribble. I have no idea what I’m going to draw when I start. Once it evolves into finished drawing, then I do a painting based on the drawing. Prints available at artbytheartist.com

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each

week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 3


QUALITY ART

BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

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4 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

DAS UH-OH IF YOU OWN A VOLKSWAGEN, THE COMPANY MIGHT OWE YOU A PILE OF DOUGH. AF TER MONTHS OF CONTROVERSY SURROUNDING THE AUTOMAKER’S FUDGING OF EMISSIONS STANDARDS, COMPANY OFFICIALS ANNOUNCED THE Y’RE GOING TO SHELL OUT AS MUCH AS $15 BILLION TO CONSUMERS IN THE FORM OF BUY-BACKS OR RETROFITS. FIND OUT IF YOU’RE ONE THEM AT NEWS/CIT YDESK.

IKEA CULPA

In other recall news, furniture maker Ikea is pulling back 29 million dressers following a spate of child deaths stemming from tip-overs. Get the details on the model in question at News/Citydesk.

LEGAL EAGLE

Following a statement issued by U.S. Attorney for Idaho Wendy Olson calling for calm amid rumors surrounding a child assault in Twin Falls, a legal blogger is calling foul. More at News/Citydesk.

MALICIOUS

Three Boise men have been charged with felony malicious harassment after an incident in which they allegedly assaulted a juvenile based on race. Read more at News/Citydesk.

OPINION

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MAIL LOVE OVER VIOLENCE

What should we do when brutal violence happens in our communities? When something terrible happens, many of us turn away. This is a natural response to painful truths. But it will not help us change things for the better. No, to make change, we cannot turn away. We must turn towards the recent acts of violence in Idaho and see the connections—high-school football players racially abusing and raping their teammate with a disability, three football players sexually assaulting a young woman, four men targeting and killing a gay man and a young man committing a domestic violence-related homicide. These are not unrelated acts, but are connected by a truth that our society encourages us to take power from others based our gender, race, ability and sexual orientation. We need to look inward, to see who we are—a society that promotes hyper-masculinity and aggression; communities where power over others is used to oppress. We have a shared responsibility to ask what we must do differently to end domination and violence. We cannot keep girls and women and people who are gender oppressed silenced and afraid. We cannot risk the emotional and physical safety of our children in schools and college campuses and in our communities. We can do better. We must do better. This is not an invitation. This is not a plea. This is a simple statement of fact. We need to shine a light on hope and the possibility for change. We need to see our profound interconnectedness to one another as human beings, our own and each other’s humanity. We need to

listen—deeply listen—to girls and women and people who are gender oppressed, people of color, and people with disabilities about the truth connected to their histories and lived experiences. We need to engage in conversations—with your family, neighbors, colleagues and community—about the worth of every human being, why everyone should be valued and accepted for their authentic selves, and how differences should be celebrated. We need parents and schools to teach our children, from preschool through college, about anti-bias on gender, race and other identities, and that raises consciousness to make schools more just, equitable and safe. We need to re-imagine communities with social equity and collective liberation, where everyone has what they need and power is shared. We need to embrace our shared responsibility to interrupt harm and turn toward those most in need. We need to see our growing interdependence as an opportunity for cooperation, regeneration and sustainability. Whole people and whole communities are possible with love over violence. These are the stories we must tell; these are the stories we must live. We need to come together and inspire real change that gives us hope. Together, we can build our future now. —Kelly Miller, executive director, Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence

HOSPITALS PUT THE ‘PROFIT’ IN ‘NONPROFIT’

How can community hospitals aspire to become dominant regional medical centers

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

in a generation without relying on community fund drives, etc.? History (now of minimal importance in Idaho universities) might aid understanding. In 1982, TEFRA [Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act] was signed into law, attempting to balance the federal budget. That act substantially changed Medicare by allowing hospitals great leverage controlling (and redistributing to themselves) some physician incomes. These changes first applied to income for procedures’ billing, especially for those performed in hospitals or in their other owned facilities. This greatly increased hospital revenues. Surges followed in hospitals buying physician practices and leading to greatly increased incomes for these entities still deemed “nonprofit,” allowing them to morph into “medical centers.” To retain their “nonprofit” status, other expenses such as real estate acquisition for “growing service needs,” medical practice purchases, etc., were needed to balance their nonprofit bottom lines. Hospital administrations once led by active-informed/ retired religious and lay leaders then became aviaries of high degreed (and very well paid) administrators concerned with market share, control and (hopefully) quality. Corporate medicine and medical insurance corporations had arrived. Thereafter, local political and legal battles followed over their further controlling physician practices and their private property encroachment. For further health care politics and economics reading, the Harper’s July 2015 issue is recommended. More recent studies published in JAMA and elsewhere show health care costs to not be reduced nor health care insurance premium increases limited by America’s arrival of corporate medicine— especially in our smaller cities. Idaho should take note. —Frederick W. Bauer, MD Boise BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 5


UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

NEWS MCCALL’S BOOZE-FREE FOURTH Resort community wants ‘simple, wholesome, small-town’ fun GEORGE PRENTICE

Anti-abortion lawmakers have been put on notice.

IDAHO MULLS SUPREME COURT ABORTION RULING

—George Prentice 6 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

capacity of 750 people and an alcohol ban on the beach. A first-time offender will be cited and a second-time offender will be arrested and charged with trespassing, said Smith. Tom Grote, publisher and editor of the McCall Star-News, recalls July 4, 2015 well. “My family and I walked through Legacy Park, the big park in the middle of town where you can watch the fireworks, and the park was full of young adults having a great time: Hacky Sack, a

RYAN JOHNSON

Idaho advocates for women’s reproductive rights cheered the U.S. Supreme Court ruling June 27 that struck down abortion clinic restrictions in Texas. The 5-3 decision was considered by many to be the high court’s most sweeping statement on reproductive rights in 25 years. In the Gem State, however, abortion rights advocates still have their guard up. “This should be a loud and clear message to some of the Idaho Legislature’s most conservative lawmakers who use abortion access as one of their top issues,” said Hannah Brass Greer, Idaho legislative director for Planned Parenthood Votes Northwest. “Whether they’ll listen or not is another thing.” Soon after the Supreme Court ruling, constitutional scholars said similar restrictions in other states “are most likely unconstitutional, and it imperils many other kinds of restrictions on abortion,” according to The New York Times. When the Idaho Legislature is in session, Greer spends most of her days pushing back against legislation opposing abortion. Earlier this year, two abortion measures were passed by the Legislature. One bans the practice of harvesting tissue from aborted fetuses—no such thing occurs in Idaho anyway. The second measure requires the state to maintain a list of free ultrasound providers, many of whom are backed by anti-abortion groups. Both will go into effect Friday, July 1. A third bill, dubbed the “Idaho Unborn Child Protection from Dismemberment Abortion Act,” which would have banned many second trimester abortions, failed when it ran into a constitutional challenge. “Yes, we saw challenges last year and this at the Idaho Statehouse and we were able to beat many of them back,” said Greer. “We didn’t have a message from the Supreme Court at the time. Now we do, so that only strengthens our argument. Lawmakers should absolutely take note.”

McCall city officials would like to see more flags and fireworks this Fourth of July and fewer boobs and booze. After years of what they say was rowdy drunken behavior, with North Beach crowds swelling to as many as 2,000 revelers, the city, Valley County and the state of Idaho will clamp down on public consumption of alcohol and restricting the popular beach to a lot less partying. “We heard from too many McCall residents who said, ‘We don’t want to walk downtown, so we’re going to leave.’ We live in a beautiful, wonderful place where too many people wanted to leave because they didn’t feel safe,” said Erin Greaves, city of McCall communications manager. “We needed to protect the health and safety of our community.” To do that, McCall will ban public consumption of alcohol in or around Payette Lake’s shorelines—the only place to drink will be at a city-sponsored beer garden in McCall’s Depot Park about two blocks from the beach, or in one of the town’s restaurants or pubs. “We want you to come to McCall, but we want you to honor McCall,” said Greaves. “We want you to know that the Fourth of July is so much more than what it was in the past.” What it was in the past was a “powder keg waiting to happen,” according to Lieutenant Dan Smith, a 19-year veteran of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office. In particular, Smith pointed to North Beach, where booze-soaked revelry had gotten out of hand. “In 2008, we had partiers actually throwing beer bottles at sheriff’s deputies out on patrol boats,” said Smith. “Over the years, we had several sexual contact [issues] with guys groping girls, and we even had a rape in the woods. We saw vehicle burglaries and major medical situations where people ended up in the hospital with alcohol poisoning.” Smith said it came to a head in 2015 when McCall was packed with tipsy, scantily-clad teenagers. “Businesses told us they were losing money because the locals wouldn’t come into town to buy anything; and some of those business owners said they would start shutting down on the Fourth of July unless something changed,” said Smith. The new rules will include a parking ban on the roads leading to North Beach, a maximum

lot of beer and, yes, a lot of girls in bikinis. That’s what they wear in the summer, you know. And the young people were using some language that your mom and dad might not use,” said Grote. “No one bothered us, but we decided that’s not where we wanted to watch the fireworks,” he added. “We walked a little further down to Brown Park and sat down with a lot people just like us. We opened up a bottle of wine and had a wonderful evening. Everybody had their place. This year, I can’t do that.” That, Grote says, is the tipping point of

McCall’s dramatic shift away from alcohol this Fourth of July holiday. “That’s the debate: Whose rights are you infringing upon by doing this? Are you enhancing the right for citizens to have peace and tranquility in their town by banning alcohol? Or are you infringing on the rights of law-abiding citizens who had an equal right to a good time in their own way?” As for the city of McCall and law enforcement insisting some local businesses were threatening to close if something didn’t change, Grote said he has heard nothing of the sort. “That was anecdotal,” he said. “I didn’t hear that from anyone. Are those businesses saying they were overwhelmed by the wrong kind of people? Isn’t the money the same from a 25-year-old versus a 65-year-old?” Greaves, however, said the city of McCall did hear from more than 20 business owners who wanted some kind of change. The businesses were then invited to meet with local, county and state officials to craft what she called a “community response.” “It’s going to be so much better. We’re calling it the ‘Lakeside Liberty Fest,’” said Greaves. “It will be right in the middle of the main park on the shores of Payette Lake [with] face painting, a bouncy house, water slides, a shade tent and booths from more than 30 nonprofits and local businesses [as well as] plenty of live music and, of course, the best fireworks show in the state reflecting over Payette Lake. We’re creating a brand new Fourth of July for McCall.” Greaves said the city has begun a fullbore media blitz to let visitors—particularly those from the Treasure Valley—know about the changes, but Grote thinks most people heading to McCall for the holiday won’t have any clue. “Yes, the city may buy ads in your paper and mine but I think, by and large, a lot of people are going to think it’s business as usual and that’s where the conflict will come,” Grote said. “They’re going to head to the beach, crack open a beer and someone is going to tap them on the shoulder and say, ‘You can’t do that.’” To enforce the new rules, the city has created a team of 15 “ambassadors” who will be assigned to spot trouble over the Fourth of July weekend. 7 “Simple, wholesome, good-time, smalltown fun; that’s what we’re going to be B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


It’s illegal to text and drive in the Gem State, but statewide efforts to go hands-free are stuck in neutral

Skinny Dipper Hot Springs is officially off limits.

THE SKINNY ON SKINNY DIPPER

GRE TA GARDNER As Idaho approaches the fourth anniversary of a ban on texting while driving July 1, AAA Idaho said it wants to accelerate the conversation about going “hands-free.” “We’ve discovered that distracted driving has grown as a whole,” said Dave Carlson, AAA Idaho director of Public and Government Affairs. Carlson’s organization tried earlier this year to push a measure through the Idaho Legislature proposing an outright ban of manual use of cellphones while driving. “It’s a matter of deep concern,” AAA Idaho lobbyist Michael Kane told the Idaho Senate Transportation Committee in February. “It’s time to get the conversation going.” Carlson said lawmakers’ enthusiasm for such legislation was quashed by Committee Chairman Sen. Bert Brackett (R- Rogerson). “He told me, ‘My committee has problems with this bill,’” said Carlson. Another member of the committee, Sen. Steve Vick (R-Dalton Gardens), told fellow lawmakers he “probably would not support” such a measure, adding he thought the bill was introduced too late in the session. “I just think that it would be better … not get into the habit of allowing late introduction of so many bills,” Vick said. Since the bill was enacted in 2012, the percentage of accidents triggered by the use of electronic devices increased from 24 percent in its first year to 27 percent in its second year, according to Hands Free Idaho. “We still have a significant problem with dis-

Ketchum and Sandpoint have already enacted their own ordinances, limiting drivers to hands-free cellphone use. Hailey and Bellevue are considering similar measures.

tracted driving in Idaho,” said Teresa Baker, Idaho State Police public information officer. “The majority still revolves around mobile phones: texting, searching the web or using GPS.” In Idaho, being cited for inattentive driving is a misdemeanor and carries fines up to $300 and the possibility of a jail sentence. Separately, the fine for breaking Idaho’s texting-while-driving law is $85 and no jail time. The law defines “texting” as “engaging in the review of, or manual preparation transmission of, written communications via handheld wireless devices.” “We think it has made a difference in technical terms in that people know it’s illegal to text and drive,” Baker said. “But the way it can be enforced, we don’t see a lot of tickets written under that section of the code. The way the law is written by prohibiting written communications, it’s difficult to prove those sorts of things. It’s a matter of an officer’s word against the driver’s word.” Idaho Transportation Department reports an ever-growing concern with distracted driving as motorists manipulate music files and navigation apps on their smartphones. “In some cases, hands-free devices can be even more dangerous,” said Carlson. “It’s categorized as ‘cognitive distraction.’ Your brain is engaged even when you look away from devices.” The Idaho resort communities of Ketchum

about,” Greaves told the volunteers, according to the Star-News. “It’s not to keep people away. It’s to bring the right customers in.” 6 Grote said he’s skeptical about the specter of “untrained volunteers observing criminal activity and reporting to law enforcement,” and he even likens the tight restrictions at North Beach to the Cuban Missile Crisis. “They’re going to put buoys around the beach so that no boats will be able to come in there,” said Grote. “It reminds me of the Missile Crisis B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

and Sandpoint didn’t wait for a state law. Both cities have already enacted ordinances limiting drivers to hands-free cellphone use. Hailey and Bellevue officials recently announced they, too, are considering similar measures. But those ordinances vary from town to town. That can be confusing, according to AAA Idaho. “It’s a mixed bag with different rules, and the Legislature is not beholden,” Carlson said. Meanwhile, Idaho’s bordering states vary in hands-free legislation. Oregon, Washington, Nevada and Utah ban all hand-held devices, with hands-free attachments permissible for those over 18 years of age, except in Nevada. Drivers under 18 in Oregon, Washington and Utah are not allowed to use any devices while driving. Fines for texting and driving range from $750 in Utah to $250 in Nevada. In Wyoming, the law against texting and driving is similar to Idaho’s, with no explicit hands-free legislation. “For teenagers, six in 10 crashes are due to distracted driving,” Carlson said. “The problem is much greater than the general public probably believes. It’s difficult, but our thinking is: Let’s have a conversation about this and get at its core.” Carlson said until that conversation reaches critical mass, any chance for hands-free cellphone legislation at the Idaho Statehouse remains in neutral.

when we put submarines out, hoping that Russian cruisers would turn away. Remember that quarantine line? This is literally our quarantine line … this time around North Beach.” Anyone who thinks they can get a sip of the brew before Independence Day partying kicks into high gear should know McCall booze-on-the-beach restrictions stretch through the holiday weekend. “They’ll be in effect from Friday, July 1 through Tuesday, July 5,” said Greaves. “But this is a brand new way to celebrate.”

Since at least July 2004, Skinny Dipper Hot Springs near the Boise County community of Banks has been a problem for the Bureau of Land Management. According to Tate Fischer, who heads the BLM Four Rivers Field Office, the hot springs—illegally built in the early 1990s— have played host to hundreds of incidents. “Everywhere from assault, rape, underage consumption, drug use, you name it,” he said. Since 2008, 140 incidents have been reported—51 in the past two years. One fatality occurred when a visitor fell from a cliff face and, in 2012, a wildfire sparked at the site burned more than 6,000 acres and cost millions of dollars. The springs also present health risks in the form of human waste, needles, even diapers. “Any one of those chemicals or contaminants stick right there where people are soaking,” Fischer said. “Anything that trickles out is a point-source pollutant to the Payette River.” As popular as it is dangerous, Skinny Dipper will be closed for the next five years. BLM made the announcement June 21, stating the closure would be necessary to deconstruct the cement work and piping that created the artificial pooling and repair damage to surrounding vegetation. “In five years, it’s my intention and my hope that it looks like there was never a hot springs developed there,” Fischer said. The agency first made public plans to close Skinny Dipper in 2015, but the announcement triggered pushback from some users. Fischer said one group even petitioned for a stay of the action, but the request was denied. That cleared the way for the current move. “Our goal is always to make it accessible and usable by the most number of people for the most benefit,” said Erin Curtis, BLM deputy state director for communications. “Things like public health and safety and resource damage are a higher priority than recreation—unfortunately, but that’s the way it is.” Fischer said closure signs will be posted at the makeshift parking area along Highway 17, at trailheads and at the pools. Trespassers will be ticketed, but not forever. “It’s not our intent to keep people off their public lands,” he said. “We intend to open the area back up to dispersed, authorized recreation.” —Zach Hagadone BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 7

BURE AUOFL AND MANAG E MENT

BR AD CAL KINS

IDAHO’S NO-TEXTING ANNIVERSARY

NEWS

CITYDESK


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JUNE 29 Festivals & Events CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET— The Caldwell Farmers Market features a variety of vendors with plants, produce and baked goods, specialty foods such as local honey, mustard, barbecue sauce and seasoning salts, and a wide variety of local crafters. Plus hot food and snacks, and live entertainment. Wednesdays through Sept. 21. 3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com. EXPLORE CWI—This special event is for anyone who has started the admission process or is just thinking about starting college. In just one day, future students will be able to explore all the opportunities CWI offers, as well as complete the enrollment process, from applying to registering for classes. Anyone

applying to CWI at the Explore CWI event will have the $25 application fee waived. 2-7 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho Micron Center for Professional Technical Education, 5725 E. Franklin Road, Nampa, cwidaho.cc. 208-562-3000. GOD AND COUNTRY FESTIVAL— Enjoy Nampa’s annual night of family-friendly fun, including the Treasure Valley’s largest fireworks show, Christian bands, military appreciation, civic awards, food and fellowship. Headline artist is Danny Gokey joined by Andrew Palau. 6 p.m. FREE, $5 parking. Ford Idaho Center Amphitheater, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-4681000. godandcountryfestival.com.

On Stage ALIVE AFTER FIVE: SWAGGER—With Bread and Circus. 5 p.m. FREE. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, thebasqueblock.com.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 2-3

COMPANY OF FOOLS: GREY GARDENS—Grey Gardens is based on the 1975 Albert and David Maysles film about Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’s eccentric aunt and cousin. The touching and sometimes heart-wrenching musical adaptation explores the dysfunctional relationship between former socialite Edith Bouvier Beale and her daughter, Little Edie, as they languish in their derelict East Hampton manor. Through July 20. 7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org/companyoffools. COMEDY OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise. com. NPL MOVIE NIGHT: A BEAUTIFUL MIND—Enjoy the award-winning film starring Russel Crowe. The night begins with a special guest speaker and specialist in mathematics, Boise State Professor Randal Holmes. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800. nampalibrary.org/calendar.

SIERRA CLUB FILM SCREENING: TRIPLE DIVIDE—Triple Divide is a gripping documentary about the natural gas industry and the controversial subject of fracking, narrated by Academy Awardnominated actor Mark Ruffalo. The Boise Great Old Broads for Wilderness and CAIA will be on hand to join the discussion.6:30 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-3342225, fishandgame.idaho.gov. STARLIGHT: SCARLET PIMPERNEL—Called “A triumph of the human spirit,” The Scarlet Pimpernel embodies every romantic’s dream with an adventurous tale filled with undying love, swashbuckling aristocrats, undercover spies, fancy fops and a villain to die for. Through Aug. 20. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

MONDAY, JULY 4

THOMAS PAUL: SINGALONGS LIVE—The Boise-based composer, multi-instrumentalist, vocalist and songwriter performs his new album live. 7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org.

Art THE CENTER FIELD TRIP: CRATERS OF THE MOON NATIONAL MONUMENT TOUR—Enjoy visits to Jason Middlebrook’s and John Grade’s commissioned sculptures, as well as a tour of the park’s “weird and scenic landscape” with Ted Stout, Craters of the Moon’s Chief of Interpretation and Education. This tour will include walking with minimal hiking. Participants can meet at The Center, Ketchum at 9 a.m. or at The Center, Hailey at 9:30 a.m. 9 a.m. $30-$40. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. CUBA SIN FILTRO GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION—In 2015, a group of locals took a weeklong trip to the island of Cuba. Through this exhibition the group wanted to share memories and tell the story of the trip and the island life that they observed and learned about. Through July 1. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-3493, comlib.org. ELIZABETH HILTON: NEW WORKS—Showcase of new mixedmedia works by Elizabeth Hilton. Through June 30. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Cinder Winery and Tasting Room, 107 E. 44th St., Garden City, 208-376-4023, cinderwines.com.

Everybody cut footloose.

U.S. OPEN FREESTYLE FOOTBAG CHAMPIONSHIPS 2016

The 1990s were a time when wonky human tricks flourished, and youths with poi sticks, Frisbees, skateboards, slacklines and Hacky Sacks filled parks and sidewalks. They were amateurs; the next generation took it to the big leagues. Saturday and Sunday, join some of the top Hacky Sack jugglers in North America for the U.S. Open Freestyle Footbag Championships, going down at Boise State University’s Centennial Amphitheater. Hosted by the aptly named Boise Footclan, the two-day event will feature free Hacky Sack clinics and circle competitions. Check it out as a non-competitor for $15, register as an intermediate for $25, or go full bore in the open and women’s divisions for $40. Saturday: 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sunday: 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; $15-$40. Centennial Amphitheater, Boise State University, footbag.org. 8 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

Fast and furious, the dodgeball edition.

BOISE PARKS AND REC. CHARITY DODGEBALL TOURNAMENT

Shoshone Park in Boise will be filled with people throwing things at one another, and you can be one of them. On the Fourth of July, join Boise Parks and Recreation Department for its fourth annual charity dodgeball tournament. Winners get to choose where prize money will be go from a slate of Boise Parks and Rec beneficiaries: youth scholarships, the department’s AdVenture program for people with disabilities or the department’s play camps. Champions will receive a T-shirt along with permission to gloat. Registration is open to those 16 years or older. To register in advance, stop by or call Fort Boise or Whitney community centers at 208-608-768 or 208-854-6625. Practice is at 10:30 a.m., play is at 11 a.m.; $5. Shoshone Park, 2800 W. Canal St., 208-854-6625, parks.cityofboise.org.

IN APPRECIATION: NEW GIFTS TO THE BOISE ART MUSEUM— This exhibition highlights a selection of recent gifts, including quilts and a print by Gee’s Bend artists Louisiana Bendolph, Mary Lee Bendolph and Loretta Pettway; ceramic works by Val Cushing, Rupert Deese, Josh DeWeese, David Hicks and José Sierra; and a large sculpture by Paul Vexler. Through Aug. 28. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—Check out paintings of rain-soaked roads and highways that situate the viewer in the front seat of a car, making it possible to experience the beauty and disorientation of traveling through a storm. Through Sept. 11. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 11. FREE$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. SAMUEL PADEN: THE NARRATIVES—This solo exhibit focuses on the male figure as a catalyst for a conversation on the crossroads of sexual identity, patriarchy and gender representation. Through June 30. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Evermore Prints, 780 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-3837. facebook. com/SamuelLPaden.

STEWART GALLERY ANNUAL WORKS ON PAPER EXHIBITION: LINE—Stewart Gallery’s Annual Works on Paper Exhibition features works by Betty Merken, Christopher Powell, Charles Gill, Henry Jackson, Benjamin Jones, Seiko Tachibana, Chad Buck, Christel Dillbohner and Patrick Hughes. WednesdaysSaturdays, through July 29. Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com. TALL TALES: NARRATIVES FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION— This stunning arrangement of narrative works explores the ways in which artists—from today and yesterday—use a visual language to tell tales. Through April 9, 2017. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. TOMAS MONTANO: EVERYTHING NEEDN’T ALWAYS BE SOMETHING—Tomas Montano’s new solo exhibition is a case study in how riotous color and a graffiti-esque sense of line, run through a powerful sense of equilibrium, can radiate equanimity and warmth. Through June 30. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gallery Five18, 518 S. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-342-3773, galleryfive18.com. TVAA: CELEBRATING PIPEDREAMS—In celebration of National Public Radio’s season of shows, Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance members draw inspiration from the “King of Instruments” featured every Sunday on NPR’s pipe organ-centric program, Pipedreams. Through July 1. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org. WYTSKE VAN KEULEN: NOT SOMEWHERE ELSE, BUT HERE— Check out the recent photography projects by MING Studios’ current artist-in-residence Wytske van Keulen, plus works by Joost Conijn, Lucas Lenglet, Thomas Manneke and Tim Smith (Harp), whom Van Keulen invited to the exhibition. Tuesday-Thursday through July 7, with closing reception on July 9. 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org/exhibitions.html.

Talks & Lectures COACH ROY BENSON—Everyone is invited to hear Coach Roy Benson talk about training, life and how to get the most from your training. Benson is the creator of heart ratebased training programs and how you can benefit from that training style. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-6604, idahorunningcompany.com.

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CALENDAR Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS VS. EUGENE EMERALDS—7:15 p.m. $7-$20. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com. FLATWATER/REC KAYAKING— Check out this introductory course designed to acquaint new paddlers or be a refresher for people coming back to recreational and flatwater

kayaking. Fee includes use of boat, paddle, PFD and professional instruction, or $25 if you have your own boat, paddle and PFD. 6-7:30 p.m. $37. Idaho River Sports, 601 Whitewater Park Blvd., Boise, 208336-4844, idahoriversports.com. YOGA AND WINE IN THE COURTYARD—Join Body Calm Yoga, Massage and Wellness Studio of Meridian for an evening yoga session in the sunny courtyard.

After the class, relax by an outdoor fire pit and enjoy a glass of wine. In celebration of Idaho Wine Month, Courtyard by Marriott is offering 20 percent off local wines by the glass for yoga students. Full bar and dinner menu also available. Open to the public; take your own mat.6:30 p.m. FREE. Courtyard by Marriott Boise West-Meridian, 1789 S. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-8880800. facebook.com.

Kids & Teens

MONDAY, JULY 4

BOISE ROCK SCHOOL—Boise Rock School will demonstrate how a band works. You’ll be able to perform a gig at the end if you want to. For ages 11 and older. 3 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Hidden Springs Branch, 5849 W. Hidden Springs Drive, Boise, 208-2292665, adalib.org/hiddensprings.

Food

Rockets’ red glare.

FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATIONS

On July 4, 1776, colonists in New York were staring down 30 British battleships. On Monday, July 4, 2016—240 years later— you’ll be staring down less imposing but still impressive ways to celebrate U.S. independence. Join the Gem State Kiwanis for their annual Fourth of July Pancake Breakfast. The event runs 7-11 a.m. next to the Gene Harris Bandshell. The cost is $5-$25; active duty troops and their families get in free. Get tickets by calling 208-311-1456 or at the event. Then head head to Ann Morrison Park where food and drink vendors will be set up by 5 p.m.—the fireworks display kicks off at 10:15 p.m. For more info, visit parks.cityofboise.org/4thofjuly. Between breakfast and fireworks, catch local superstars Built to Spill at The Olympic for a Boise Hive benefit performance. The show starts at 7 p.m. and cover is $20. Openers include locals The Hand and Toy Zoo. Visit theduckclub.com for more info. If you’re looking for a bird’s-eye view of the fireworks, head to Brady Street Garage at Boise State University for a free stargazing event 10 p.m.-midnight. Go for the explosions, stay for a viewing of Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. Bonus: July 4 marks the date when NASA’s Juno Mission to explore Jupiter’s interior will arrive at the planet. Go to bit.ly/BSUJupiterEvent for more. Further from home, the city of Melba is launching its annual dawn-to-dusk Old Tyme Fourth of July celebration with tractor pulls, a parade, kids’ games, food, drink and one of the best fireworks displays in the Treasure Valley. Go to melbaoldetyme4thofjuly.com for details. Finally, there’s the McCall Lakeside Liberty Fest, beginning at 11 a.m. in Legacy Park. There will be bounce houses, water slides, competitions, face painting, artists, activities, music and more. This year’s Fourth of July will be decidedly more family friendly, as McCall has instituted stricter booze rules (see Page 6). Go to mccallparksandrec.com for all the particulars. Times, locations and prices vary. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

IDAHO WINE MONTH TASTING— Celebrate Idaho Wine Month with local winery Williamson Vineyards. They’ll be sampling four of their finest, so drop by for a sip of some award-winning wines to show your support for local producers. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Whole Foods Market, 401 S. Broadway Ave., Boise, 208287-4600. willorch.com.

THURSDAY JUNE 30 On Stage ANDY BYRON’S AMERICANA MUSIC SERIES: SUZY BOGGUSS—Join Grammy Award-winning and platinum-selling artist Suzy Bogguss to chase the muse wherever it may lead her.7:30 p.m. $28-$68. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871. americanamusicseries.net. COF: GREY GARDENS—7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org/companyoffools. GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES—Enjoy live music in the Garden Thursday evenings through September. Picnic baskets are welcome or purchase from on-site food and beverage vendors. June 30: Hoochie Coochie Men. 5:30 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649. idahobotanicalgarden.org/ great-garden-escape. OLYMPIC COMEDY 6: KRISTINE LEVINE AND FRIENDS—Comedian Kristine Levine (Portlandia, Doug Stanhope’s the Unbookables) will bring the funny to Olympic Comedy Night 6 for one night only. With special guests Narika Ott, Dan Webber and Wendy Weiss. 10 p.m. $TBA. The Olympic, 1009 Main St., Boise, 208-342-0176, facebook.com.

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CALENDAR Art THE CENTER ART HISTORY LECTURE: DEFINING THE NATION THROUGH LANDSCAPE—Join Dr. Courtney Gilbert to learn about the way artists have used landscape to define the American nation. 5:30 p.m. $10-$12. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org. CRATERS OF THE MOON—9 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org. CUBA SIN FILTRO GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-3493, comlib. org. ELIZABETH HILTON: NEW WORKS—11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Cinder Winery and Tasting Room, 107 E. 44th St., Garden City, 208376-4023, cinderwines.com. IN APPRECIATION: NEW GIFTS TO THE BOISE ART MUSEUM—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. SAMUEL PADEN: THE NARRATIVES—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Evermore Prints, 780 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-3837, facebook. com/SamuelLPaden.

covering a variety of topics, including underage drinking, dangers of social media, hints and tips for the outdoors, and debunking the stigma of STEM. Registration required; email Martha Snyder at msnyder@girlscouts-ssc.org. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Girl Scouts of Silver Sage Council, 1410 Etheridge Lane, Boise. 208-377-2011, ext.107, girlscouts-ssc.org/ th_event/strive-for-college.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS VS. EUGENE EMERALDS—7:15 p.m. $7-$20. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

Citizen CASTLE HILLS PARK COMMUNITY INPUT MEETING—Boise Parks and Rec. invites neighbors to provide input on the options for new playground equipment being planned at Castle Hills Park, 5350 N. Eugene St. Design options will be presented at the meeting. 6 p.m. FREE. Castle Hills Church of the Nazarene, 5707 Castle Drive, Boise, 208-345-9351, parks. cityofboise.org.

Odds & Ends GAZEBO CONCERT SERIES AND NIGHT MARKET—The Gazebo Concert Series and Night Market is brought to you by Eagle Parks and Recreation and the Eagle Art Commission on the last Thursday of the month through September. Take a chair, a blanket, a picnic or enjoy food from local businesses. June 30: Lounge on Fire, with Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats. 4-9 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle.

Animals & Pets TURTLES, LIZARDS, AND SNAKES-OH MY!—Want to look at some neat reptiles? Feeling brave enough to touch one? The Idaho Herpetological Society will be bringing a collection of scaly friends to the library for an open house showand-tell. Drop by any time between 2-4 p.m. to have some scaly fun. All ages welcome. 2-4 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800, nampalibrary.org/calendar.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

STEWART GALLERY ANNUAL WORKS ON PAPER EXHIBITION: LINE—Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208433-0593, stewartgallery.com. TALL TALES: NARRATIVES FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION— 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. TOMÁS MONTAÑO: EVERYTHING NEEDN’T ALWAYS BE SOMETHING—11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gallery Five18, 518 S. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-342-3773, galleryfive18.com. TVAA: CELEBRATING PIPEDREAMS—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-4263663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance. org. WYTSKE VAN KEULEN: NOT SOMEWHERE ELSE, BUT HERE— 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org/exhibitions.html.

Talks & Lectures GIRLS SCOUTS STRIVE FOR COLLEGE: RAISING AWESOME GIRLS— Check out this special information event for guardians/volunteers

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CALENDAR FRIDAY JULY 1

comics from Seattle to New York City. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $5-$7. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise. com.

Festivals & Events

COF: GREY GARDENS—8 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org/companyoffools.

2ND ANNUAL ART ZONE 208 CLASSIC CAR SHOW—Enjoy classic cars, art and barbecue from Big K’s Barbecue. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-322-9464, facebook. com/artzone208.

On Stage ANDY BYRON’S AMERICANA MUSIC SERIES: SUZY BOGGUSS—Join Grammy Award-winning and platinum-selling artist Suzy Bogguss to chase the muse wherever it may lead her. 8 p.m. $28-$68. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, americanamusicseries.net. THE ATHEIST COMEDY EXPERIENCE—Join host Mikey Pullman for a funny celebration of atheism, featuring

COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com. ISF: MY FAIR LADY— Called “the perfect musical,” My Fair Lady will sweep your heart away. Eliza Doolittle, a Cockney flower girl, takes speech lessons from professor Henry Higgins so that she can pass as a lady. Their studies produce a blossoming of the heart, as well as perfected diction and one very “loverly” lady indeed. Through Aug. 26. 8 p.m. $22-$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

STARLIGHT: FIDDLER ON THE ROOF—Join Tevye as he learns that humor can help the poorest man feel rich, family is more important than tradition and love is always where the heart is. Through July 14. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt. com/fiddler-on-the-roof.html.

Art CHERRY WOODBURY—St. Luke’s Meridian will feature the work of artist Cherry Woodbury during the month of July. FREE. St. Luke’s Meridian, 520 S. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-381-2592, stlukesonline.org. CRATERS OF THE MOON—9 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org. CUBA SIN FILTRO GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION—Ends July 1. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, comlib.org. IN APPRECIATION: NEW GIFTS TO THE BOISE ART MUSEUM—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. STEWART GALLERY ANNUAL WORKS ON PAPER EXHIBITION: LINE—Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208433-0593, stewartgallery.com. TALL TALES: NARRATIVES FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. TVAA: CELEBRATING PIPEDREAMS—Ends July 1. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS VS. HILLSBORO HOPS—7:15 p.m. $7-$20. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

A L S O

A P P E A R I N G

A M E R I C A N

I D O L

W I N N E R

TACO BELL ARENA J U LY 7

TICKETS AT THE TACO BELL ARENA BOX OFFICE, TACOBELLARENA.COM, OR 208.426.1766.

FRIDAY EVENING SUP INTRO— Get started in the exciting sport of Stand Up Paddleboarding with Idaho River Sports. Intro courses are held on Quinn’s Pond and no experience is necessary. Fee includes a complete SUP package: SUP board, paddle and PFD, instruction and loads of fun. 6-7:30 p.m. $37. Idaho River Sports, 601 Whitewater Park Blvd., Boise, 208336-4844, idahoriversports.com.

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CALENDAR INDEPENDENCE DAY MIXED COUPLES CHAPMAN—Start your Independence Day celebrations with nine holes of golf. The shotgun-start tourney includes cart, awards and dinner buffet. 4 p.m. $50-$80. BanBury Golf Course, 2626 N. Marypost Place, Eagle, 208-939-3600, banburygolf.com.

Kids & Teens MINECRAFTERS—Minecraft enthusiasts unite to complete challenges and build new worlds. For ages 8 and older. 4 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org/ victory/events.

SATURDAY JULY 2 Festivals & Events BOISE FARMERS MARKET— Boise Farmers Market is your source for fresh locally grown produce, herbs and flowers, eggs and artisan farm stand cheeses, award-winning Idaho wines and specialty foods, and fresh baked breads and pastries. Oregon’s Albeke Farms are back with their strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries and more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287, facebook.com/ TheBoiseFarmersMarket. CANYON COUNTY CO-OP 2016 SUMMER COMMUNITY MARKET— Visit this new outdoor market with your neighbors, and enjoy local vendors, food trucks, music, activities and more. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Canyon County Co-op, 1415 First St. S., Nampa, 208-960-0328, canyoncounty.coop.

Spangled Games and maybe win the grand prize of a four-man raft with oars or a Budweiser cooler with speaker system. Plus $1 watermelon shots and apple pie shots, and $2 PBRs. With tunes by the Rocci Johnson Band and DJ Jazzy Jim. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557. MERIDIAN YOUTH FARMERS MARKET—Find locally grown produce, homemade goodies and handmade arts and crafts. 9 a.m.noon. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-4433, epiqueeventsandgifts.com. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—Local farmers, producers, crafters and artisans provide a variety of fresh produce and locally crafted products directly to the consumer. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Nampa Farmers’ Market, Longbranch parking lot, Front and 13th, Nampa, 208412-3814. WALKABOUT BOISE HISTORIC DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR—Join Preservation Idaho for a 1.5-hour guided walking tour through 150 years of history and architecture. You’ll get an up-close-and-personal introduction to the built environment that makes downtown Boise like no other place. Get starting location and additional details when you register, or call 208409-8282. 11 a.m. $10. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, 208-409-8282, preservationidaho.org/boise-walking-tourshistoric-boise.

WEST BOISE SATURDAY MARKET—Meet vendors and artisans, and enjoy the day’s activities as you look through all the handmade items. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-322-9464.

On Stage COF: GREY GARDENS—8 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org/companyoffools. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy. com. FOLK FAMILY REVIVAL—Head to The Corner Bar in Yellow Pine for the Folk Family Revival, featuring the Lankford Brothers and Caleb Pace. 8 p.m. $15. Yellow Pine, Lick Creek Road, Yellow Pine, 208633-3325. ISF: MY FAIR LADY—8 p.m. $22$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. STANLEY SAWTOOTH MOUNTAIN MUSICFEST ROUND 2— Celebrate Independence Weekend with a day full of fantastic music by Suzy Bogguss, Carrie Rodriguez, Bri Bagwell, Eilen Jewell, Jeanne Jolly, Kimberly Dunn and Sweet Lillies. Dry tent and RV camping available by reservation. Noon-midnight. $30 adv., $40 door. Mountain Village Resort, 3

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET— Market goers will find booths full of locally made and grown foodstuffs, produce, household items and a variety of arts and crafts. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Idaho and Jefferson streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET— Find an array of arts and crafts, local produce, herbs and flowers, woodwork, specialty food items and freshly prepared food. For more info, call the Eagle Parks and Recreation Department. 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle, 208-4898789, cityofeagle.org. HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S STAR SPANGLED BASH 2016—Get patriotic with special tributes to our military throughout the night, and all military and military families receive one free drink per person, along with red, white and blue memorabilia. Play some Star Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

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CALENDAR Eva Falls Ave., Stanley, 208-7743661, mountainvillage.com. STARLIGHT: OKLAHOMA—For two performances only, Starlight reprises Rogers and Hammerstein’s immortal celebration of frontier life. No discount tickets available. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com. TAMARACK SUNSET CONCERT SERIES—Enjoy a free concert presented by the Tamarack Municipal Association Saturdays through Aug. 6. July 2: Rebecca Scott Band. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy. 55, Donnelly, 208-3251000, tamarackidaho.com.

Art BANK OF AMERICA’S MUSEUMS ON US—Bank of America and Merrill Lynch credit and debit cardholders get free admission to select museums across the country, including BAM, on the first full weekends of the month in 2016. Simply present your Bank of America or Merrill Lynch credit or debit card along with a photo ID to gain free general admission to any participating institution. Noon-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, museums. bankofamerica.com. IN APPRECIATION: NEW GIFTS TO THE BOISE ART MUSEUM—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. STEWART GALLERY ANNUAL WORKS ON PAPER EXHIBITION: LINE—Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com. TALL TALES: NARRATIVES FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Sports & Fitness 2016 U.S. OPEN FREESTYLE FOOTBAG CHAMPIONSHIPS— Check out this unique and fun event in the heart of the city. Hosted by the Boise Footbag and Circus Arts Juggling Club, the event will showcase the best of freestyle footbag (a.k.a. hacky sack), juggling, stilting, poi and other circus arts performers the area has to offer. Plus various workshops, performances and community activities. For all ages. Noon-8 p.m. FREE. Boise State Centennial Amphitheater, Cesar

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

Chavez Lane, behind library on Greenbelt, Boise. fourkast.com/ the-2016-freestyle-footbagchampionships. BOISE HAWKS VS. HILLSBORO HOPS—7:15 p.m. $7-$20. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com. TAMARACK BIKE PARK OPEN—Check out the newly improved Tamarack Bike Park, with refurbished trails and new man-made features. For the first time since 2007, the resort will offer lift service to mountain bikers Saturdays and Sunday through Sept. 4. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $15-$39, $99-$129 season pass. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy. 55, Donnelly, 208-325-1000, tamarackidaho.com.

Food HOT DOG/BAKE SALE—Join Shu’s Idaho Running Co. for a hot dog/bake sale fundraiser in support of Team Idaho, who will be walking in several Susan G. Komen three-day 60-mile walks. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-6604, idahorunningcompany.com.

SUNDAY JULY 3 Festivals & Events VALLEY SHEPHERD CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 100 YEAR CELEBRATION—The party begins with a special service and dedication of a picnic pavilion, followed by a catered luncheon. The day will be capped off with a concert by the Liberty Quartet at 6 p.m. Call the church office for details or to RSVP for the lunch. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. By donation. Valley Shepherd Church of the Nazarene, 150 W. Maestra St., Meridian, 208-888-2141, valleyshepherd.org.

On Stage ISF: MY FAIR LADY—7 p.m. $22$75. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. STE. CHAPELLE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES—Join Ste. Chapelle on Sunday afternoons all summer long for sweet jams, tasty food and a variety of other treats and goodies from local vendors. Gates open at 11 a.m. July 3: Steve Fulton Band. 1 p.m. FREE-$12. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-453-7843, stechapelle.com/5/events.

Art BANK OF AMERICA’S MUSEUMS ON US—Noon-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, museums.bankofamerica. com. IN APPRECIATION: NEW GIFTS TO THE BOISE ART MUSEUM— Noon-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. KAREN WOODS: THE WAY TO WILDER—Noon-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. TALL TALES: NARRATIVES FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION—Noon-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Sports & Fitness 2016 U.S. OPEN FREESTYLE FOOTBAG CHAMPIONSHIPS— Check out this unique and fun event in the heart of the city. Hosted by the Boise Footbag and Circus Arts Juggling Club, the event will showcase the best of freestyle footbag (a.k.a. Hacky Sack), juggling, stilting, poi and other circus arts performers the area has to offer. Plus various workshops, performances and community activities. For all ages. Noon-8 p.m. FREE. Boise State Centennial Amphitheater, Cesar Chavez Lane, behind library on Greenbelt, Boise, fourkast.com/ the-2016-freestyle-footbagchampionships. BOISE HAWKS VS. HILLSBORO HOPS—7:15 p.m. $7-$20. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com. TAMARACK BIKE PARK OPEN— 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Sept. 4. $15-$39, $99-$129 season pass. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy. 55, Donnelly, 208-325-1000. tamarackidaho.com/summeractivities/mountain-biking.

Odds & Ends TREASURE VALLEY SINGLES DANCE—Join the Treasure Valley Singles Club at their new venue in Nampa for weekly social dancing to live bands. Couples welcome, too. For 21 and older. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $6-$7. Eagles Lodge Nampa, 118 11th Ave. N., Nampa. 208887-8870, treasurevalleysingles. weebly.com.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 13


CALENDAR Food FOOTHILLS CIDER FOR THE FOOTHILLS—Stop by Meriwether Cider on Sundays to enjoy their Foothills Semi-Dry Cider, and $1 of every purchase benefits Ridge to Rivers programs. 2-6 p.m. FREE. Meriwether Cider Co., 5242 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-972-6725, ridgetorivers.org. Jack Hale Trio—6 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel Sandbar Patio Bar and Grill, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3431871, riversideboise.com.

MONDAY JULY 4 Festivals & Events BPL HOLIDAY CLOSURE—All locations of Boise Public Library will be closed for Independence Day. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Get Your

Tickets

& Gift Certificates

Online! And Then There Were None

By Agatha Christie Sponsored by Hawley Troxell and Idaho Public Television | May 27– July 31

Love’s Labor’s Lost

By William Shakespeare Sponsored by Roundtree Real Estate and Boise State Public Radio | June 3 – 26

My Fair Lady

Book and Lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner, Music by Frederick Loewe Sponsored by ArmgaSys, Inc, Holland & Hart LLP, and Scene/Treasure Magazines | July 1 – Aug 26

Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare Sponsored by Parsons Behle & Latimer and Boise Weekly | Aug 5 – 28

Forever Plaid Joe Conley Golden*, Love’s Labor’s Lost (2016). Photo by DKM Photography. *Member Actors’ Equity.

Season Sponsor

Season Partners

Season Media Partners

Albertsons Foerstel Design Hotel 43 Micron Foundation Scentsy Truckstop.com

94.9 FM the River KTVB–Idaho’s News Channel 7 Idaho Statesman

14 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

Written and Originally Directed and Choreographed by Stuart Ross, Musical Continuity Supervision and Arrangements by James Raitt Sponsored by ArmgaSys and 107.1 K-Hits | Sept 2 – 25

Available!

Check out our website at

idahoshakespeare.org or call 336-9221 M–F, 10 am to 5 pm

JULY 4TH ANNUAL CALDWELL MODEL RAILROAD CLUB OPEN HOUSE—Located right on the Caldwell holiday parade route, you can watch the parade outside and the trains inside at the Caldwell Model Railroad Club and Historical Society’s annual 4th of July open house. You’ll marvel at the mini trains operating on HO and N Scale layouts. 9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Caldwell Model Railroad Clubhouse, 809 Dearborn St., Caldwell. cmrchs.org. JULY 4TH MCCALL LAKESIDE LIBERTY FEST—Enjoy free fun for the entire family, with bounce houses, water slides, competitions, face painting, artists, local activity tents, music and more. Sponsored by the City of McCall. 11 a.m. FREE. Legacy Park, East Lake St., McCall, 208-634-7142, mccallparksandrec.com. JULY 4TH STAR-GAZING EVENT—NASA’s Juno Mission, designed to probe Jupiter’s deep interior and unlock the origin of the solar system, will arrive at the planet on July 4th. Stay up late with Boise State Physics to celebrate at the Brady Street Garage. You can watch the fireworks and stay to view Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. 10 p.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1000, bit. ly/BSUJupiterEvent. MELBA OLDE TYME FOURTH OF JULY—Head to the scenic hinterlands of Canyon County for a taste of smalltown American patriotism this Fourth of July. The annual celebration literally lasts from dawn to dusk, starting with a fun run and capped off with one of the valley’s best fireworks displays. In between, the whole family can enjoy tractor pulls, parade, children’s games, chicken roundup and lots of food. See the event website for a complete schedule of events. 6 a.m. FREE.

Melba, Off U.S. Hwy. 45 south of Nampa, melbaoldetyme4thofjuly. com/schedule.

TUESDAY JULY 5

On Stage

Festivals & Events

JULY 4TH BOISE HIVE BENEFIT CONCERT: BUILT TO SPILL—Hometown superstars Built to Spill play a special Fourth of July show to benefit Boise Hive. The donor-funded, volunteer-run community space provides a facility where artists of all ages can go to practice and hone their craft. Get more info at boisehive.org. With The Hand and Toy Zoo. For 21 and older. 7 p.m. $20. The Olympic, 1009 Main St., Boise, 208-342-0176, theduckclub. com/events/boise/built-to-spill-3.

ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL TOURS—Join docents for free 45-minute guided tours of the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial every Tuesday, through October. Meet at the statue of Anne Frank in the Memorial. No reservation required. For all ages. 12:15 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise. 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter.org/events.

STARLIGHT: OKLAHOMA—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Sports & Fitness BOISE PARKS AND REC. 4TH ANNUAL CHARITY DODGEBALL TOURNAMENT—Dodgeball isn’t just for elementary schoolers any more, and Boise Parks and Rec. is capitalizing on the game’s increasing popularity to raise funds for its Youth Scholarships, AdVenture program for people with disabilities, and Playcamps. So if you’re age 16 or older, head over to the annual fundraiser for a dose of entertaining mayhem and maybe go home with championship T-shirts. To register, stop by or call Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, 208608-7680; or Whitney Community Center, 1609 S. Owyhee St., 208-854-6625. 10:30 a.m. $5. Shoshone Park, 2800 W. Canal St., Boise, parks.cityofboise.org.

Food JULY 4TH GEM STATE KIWANIS ANNUAL PANCAKE BREAKFAST— Kick off your Independence Day celebrations with the Gem State Kiwanis’ 53rd annual pancake feed. In addition to the delicious grub, there’ll also be local entertainment playing patriotic music suitable for the whole family. FREE for current active-duty military and their families. Buy tickets in advance by calling Karen at 208-331-1456 or at the door. 7-11 a.m. FREE-$8, $25 families. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-3311456, facebook.com/Gem.State. Kiwanis.

On Stage COF: GREY GARDENS—7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org/companyoffools. STARLIGHT: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523. starlightmt.com.

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. Tuesdays, 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

Odds & Ends WONDERFUL WATER CYCLE: EVERY DROP COUNTS—Learn about the water cycle and what you can do to help with water conservation from Kerri PatteeKrosch of the Boise WaterShed Environmental Education Center. For all ages. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib. org/lakehazel.

Food TASTY TALES WITH REDISCOVERED BOOKS—Join Rediscovered Books every Tuesday morning for stories, donuts and fun. 10 a.m. FREE. Guru Donuts, 204 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-3764229, rdbooks.org/tasty-talesstorytime-guru-donuts.

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 29 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: SWAGGER— With Bread and Circus. 5 p.m. FREE. Basque Block BRANDON PRITCHETT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GOD AND COUNTRY FESTIVAL—With Danny Gokey. 6 p.m. FREE, $5 parking. Idaho Center Amphitheater INAEONA—With Immortal Bird, and October Sky. 8 p.m. $8. The Shredder JACK GISH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KARAOKE—8 p.m. FREE. High Note RAWLEY FRYE—10 p.m. FREE. Varsity RYAN WISSINGER—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

LOUNGE ON FIRE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, Eagle

ANDY CORTENS TRIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

NED AND THE DIRT AND THE VOXES—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

BIG WOW BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s SHON SANDERS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar WIDESPREAD PANIC—7:30 p.m. $45-$50. Taco Bell Arena

FRIDAY JULY 1 ANDY BYRON’S AMERICANA MUSIC SERIES: SUZY BOGGUSS—8 p.m. $28-$68. Sapphire

BONE THUGS-N-HARMONY—8 p.m. $15-$100. Revolution BREAD AND CIRCUS—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s DEL MCCOURY BAND—8 p.m. $40-$60. Egyptian DUELING PIANOS ON THE PATIO—6 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JGRUB BAND—8 p.m. FREE. Oak Barrel

16

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

SEAN HATTON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

JULY 20

TAMBALKA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THOMAS PAUL: SINGALONGS LIVE—The Boise-based composer, multi-instrumentalist, vocalist and songwriter performs his new album live. 7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios

TACO BELL ARENA AT BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s WESTERN CENTURIES—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

THURSDAY JUNE 30 ANDY BYRON’S AMERICANA MUSIC SERIES: SUZY BOGGUSS—7:30 p.m. $28-$68. Sapphire BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers BEN HARPER AND THE INNOCENT CRIMINALS—With The Jack Moves. 7:30 p.m. $70. Revolution CYMRY—7 p.m. FREE. Even Stevens DAN COSTELLO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES—Hoochie Coochie Men. 5:30 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KLEINER PARK LIVE: B-TOWN HITMEN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Kleiner Park

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

ON SALE NOW AT TICKETMASTER.COM SWAGGER, JUNE 29

If Park City, Utah-based Celtic rockers Swagger don’t compel you into a head-banging jig, you might want to have your adrenal gland checked. It’s a big sound filled with frenetic fiddle and driving rhythms that border on punk or ska—all centered on “the expected Irish celebration of drink, mischief and music.” With three studio albums under its kilt, Swagger has kept some illustrious company, playing alongside venerable acts like The Young Dubliners. It’s not all brogue stomping party anthems, though. Swagger prides itself on daring to explore “oppression and take an emigrant’s perspective on the virtues and vices of the Irish-American culture.” If you happen to miss the Alive After Five show on June 29, Swagger is set to swing back through Boise for the annual Highland Games, which runs Friday, Sept. 23-Saturday, Sept. 24.

ALL TICKETMASTER OUTLETS CHARGE BY PHONE 800-745-3000

JAMESTAYLOR.COM FACEBOOK.COM/JAMESTAYLOR

—Zach Hagadone With Bread and Circus, 5 p.m., FREE. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, downtownboise.org. BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 15


L AURE NCE BIS H OP

LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE 15

MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—10 p.m. $5. Reef

MUSIC BOX: CLASSIC COUNTRY TRIBUTE—Kim Philley and Ned Evett. 2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

BUILT TO SPILL, JULY 4, THE OLYMPIC

Built to Spill has been one of Idaho’s proudest exports for more than two decades, in part because the band became an arbiter for guitar-driven indie-rock. In the same way frontman Doug Martsch cites J Mascis as an influence, Martsch likely tops many young guitarists’ “Musicians I Want To Play Like” list. Through recording, touring and nonpareil musicianship, Martsch and Built to Spill have garnered a great deal of acclaim worldwide, yet are still a valuable part of the Boise community. When many people will be heading to the park to watch Fourth of July fireworks, Built to Spill—currently touring as a trio with Martsch, Jason Albertini (bass) and Steve Gere—will be plugging in for a show to benefit Boise Hive, a nonprofit that provides rehearsal space, support and resources for musicians. With locals The Hand and Toy Zoo opening, it promises to be an incredible show in a beautiful space for a worthy cause. Now that’s a happy holiday. —Amy Atkins With The Hand and Toy Zoo. $20, 8 p.m. The Olympic, 1009 Main St., facebook.com/theolympicboise. Tix: eventbrite.com.

16 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

FOLK FAMILY REVIVAL—The Lankford Brothers and Caleb Pace. 8 p.m. $15. The Corner Bar, Yellow Pine, Lick Creek Road. FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PROPHETS OF ADDICTION—With Vindicata, Time 4 change, and Break Surface. 8 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder

HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S STAR SPANGLED BASH 2016—The Rocci Johnson Band and DJ Jazzy Jim. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

RYAN WISSINGER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JAKE LEG BLUES BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

WHEATLEY MATTHEWS BACK OUT WEST TOUR—7 p.m. FREE. The District

JGRUB BAND—9 p.m. FREE. The Gathering Place, Eagle

SATURDAY JULY 2 THE BIG WOW BAND—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s BREAD AND CIRCUS—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar CARTER FREEMAN—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DUELING PIANOS ON THE PATIO—6 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s

JOSEPH LYLE—10 p.m. FREE. Reef PATRICIA FOLKNER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TAMARACK SUNSET CONCERT SERIES—Rebecca Scott Band. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Tamarack

SUNDAY JULY 3 CHILLED SUNDAYS—DJs Effy K and Maksym. 10 p.m. FREE. Crowbar ELECTRIC SIX—With In the Whale. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux JACK HALE TRIO—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JULY 4TH BOISE HIVE BENEFIT CONCERT: BUILT TO SPILL—With The Hand and Toy Zoo. 7 p.m. $20. The Olympic ROB HARDING—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TUESDAY JULY 5 CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JAKE VAN PAEPEGHEM—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

STE. CHAPELLE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES—Steve Fulton Band. 1 p.m. FREE-$12. Ste. Chapelle

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT WITH BOBBY KEYS—8 p.m. FREE. Eclypse

STANLEY SAWTOOTH MOUNTAIN MUSICFEST ROUND 2— Suzy Bogguss, Carrie Rodriguez, Bri Bagwell, Eilen Jewell, Jeanne Jolly, Kimberly Dunn and Sweet Lillies. Noon-midnight. $30 adv., $40 door. Mountain Village Resort

WILSON ROBERTS—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: PITY SEX—With PWR BTTM and Petal. 7 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. Neurolux

STOIC—With Drench, and The Further. 6 p.m. $5-$8. The Shredder

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SANDON MAYHEW AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

MONDAY JULY 4

THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


SCREEN THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE NOVEL Our Kind of Traitor: blazing hot and cool blue GEORGE PRENTICE The immersion is instant: an ominous string orchestra provides a bass-heavy soundtrack as two tuxedoed men exchange documents and a pearl-handled revolver in slow-motion snowfall. A Russian diplomat, his wife and daughter are all assassinated, their blood staining the virgin snow. This all happens before the Ewan McGregor (right) and Naomie Harris (left) are unwitting pawns of a multi-layered spy game In Our Kind of Traitor. opening titles of Our Kind of Traitor have been completed. It is a return to the spy-versus-spy It’s a nearly stereotypical scene that we’ve day with wife Gail, nicely played by Naomie world of author John le Carre (The Spy Who witnessed a hundred times before in countless Came in from the Cold, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Harris (the new Moneypenny in the James Bond franchise). For some unexplained reason, other films. Yet, Our Kind of Traitor has a fresh and The Constant Gardener). Krasnov has developed a conscience and wants and—at times—ferocious take on the genre. Based on his 2010 bestseller, Our Kind of That’s in large part due to the capable work of to pass information about his criminal acTraitor reminds us that the Cold War was not director Susanna White, who has previously tivities to British intelas thawed as reported. crafted some superior TV episodes of Masters of ligence in exchange for Here, we have an unwitting OUR KIND OF TRAITOR (R) Sex, Boardwalk Empire and Parade’s End. sanctuary for himself meeting (or is it?) between a BritDirected by Susanna White This is only White’s second full-length and his family. ish poetry professor (or is he?) and feature film, yet she checks all the boxes of Enter: UK supera rich, slovenly, foul-mouthed RusBased on the novel by John le Carre the spy thriller genre: horn-rimmed glasses, spy Hector Meredith, sian oligarch (he most definitely Starring Ewan McGregor. Naomie cool-blue lighting and exotic locales. In one portrayed by the red-hot is). Dmitri Krasnov, deliciously Harris, Stellan Skarsgard and expertly executed scene, a particularly daring actor (quite literally, embodied by Stellan Skarsgard Damian Lewis rescue includes the unlikely elements of the considering his ginger (Good Will Hunting, Thor), boasts Opens Friday, July 1 at The Flicks features), Damian Lewis Swiss Alps, Albert Einstein and a jet that never that he’s the “No. 1 money launleaves the ground. (Homeland, Billions). derer in the Russian mafia.” When All in, Our Kind of Traitor is a tightly packed In a classic le Carre scene, Makepeace tries to Krasnov bumps into Perry Makepeace (Ewan potboiler that plays it cool one moment, then McGregor) in a Marrakech saloon, he’s hoping wiggle out of a shadowy mousetrap: sizzles the next. Your mission, should you decide “I can’t get involved,” Makepeace pleads. Makepeace is either a British spy or knows one. to accept it, is to see it, tell someone else to see “I’m afraid you’re already involved,” MerToo bad for Krasnov, Makepeace is a lowly it, then self-destruct. edith responds. English poetry professor on a Moroccan holi-

SCREEN EXTRA JOHN LE CARRE’S SMALL SCREEN TRIUMPH

Memo to the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences: Please don’t forget Tom Hiddleston and Hugh Laurie when you’re doling out Emmy nominations on Thursday, July 14. Their performances in this past spring’s The Night Manager on AMC B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

were head-and-shoulders above all others. Considering how formidable the level of acting has been on the small screen of late, that should be enough to vault Messrs. Hiddleston and Laurie to a gold statuette. Still, The Night Manager slipped in and out of the crowded television space when it first aired on AMC in

April and May. A word to the wise: find this miniseries, based on the John le Carre bestseller, on one of many VOD streaming platforms as soon as possible and thank us later. While le Carre’s novels have been ideally translated to the big screen (see this week’s review of Our Kind of Traitor, above), this

particular thriller is perfectly paced for the TV miniseries format. Here’s an extra treat for le Carre fans: he makes a blink-and-you’llmiss-it cameo in The Night Manager. Where or when? Well, that’s a mystery, too. —George Prentice BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 17


BEERGUZZLER AMERICAN PALE ALES

FREMONT UNIVERSALE PALE, $1.60-$1.90 A decent head with good persistence tops this hazy, orange tinged pour. The aromas are a light mix of grain; soft, resiny hops; and a touch of stone fruit. Very smooth and well balanced on the palate, there’s a pleasant biscuit quality to the malt and a nice backbone of lightly bitter hops. Citrus and pineapple come through on the finish. Outstanding. GOODLIFE SWEET AS! PACIFIC ALE, $1.60$1.90 It’s a bright gold in the glass with a thick, short-lived head. Lots of bright fruit on the nose, you get melon, mango and berry. Medium to full-bodied in the mouth, the not-too-sweet malt is colored by creamy orange and backed by light hops. Light carbonation makes for a less filling, great tasting brew. ODELL DRUMROLL AMERICAN PALE ALE, $1.70-$2 A light amber pour with a cushiony two-finger head, it leaves a lovely lacing. The hop aromas are the most aggressive of the trio, a combo of pine and citrus zest. That’s true of the palate as well, with a hop profile that pushes toward IPA levels. There’s just enough sweet malt and ripe fruit flavors to keep things in line. —David Kirkpatrick 18 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

FOOD

PATRIC K SWE E NE Y

Declare your independence with an American Pale Ale, a style we liberated from the British. Originating in the early 1700s when the technology first allowed for roasting paler malt, they were often called bitters to separate them from sweeter brown ales. Our American version tends to use softer malt and a more assertive hop profile than the Brits’. Here are three very different takes on the style:

FROM BOOTH TO MOUTH Brunching at the Boise Farmers Market ALE X KIESIG

Under a high summer sky, pop-tents provide shade to the Boise Farmers Market at 10th and Grove streets. From late spring into fall, farmers, specialty food makers and wineries set up here each Saturday and, by 10 a.m., the market is awake with music and voices. The focus here is food: asparagus, radishes, spring onions, corn, peas, herbs and leafy greens. Berries and, soon, tomatoes. Porcini mushrooms that taste like the smell of a forest, garlicky ramps and lingonberries tart as limes. Chicken, duck and quail eggs. Goat cheese, milk, butter and cream. Bison, elk, goat. Beef oxtail, hanging tender, flat iron. Honey, jelly, bread. Fresh pasta and kombucha. It’s all lovely, but nothing bombards an appetite like the smell of frying dough, so I set out for a walking, wandering brunch.

NITRO ICED COFFEE—$4

The first order of business here, like life, is to get some coffee. Neckar does not just serve “some coffee” from its minimalist white cart: Its spokedwheelhouse is pour-over coffee created with an exacting, seven-step method. The nitro-cask cold brew is the cup of coffee you will think about all week. Like with Guinness, a milky, haunting thunderhead forms in a brew as rich as chocolate. The guy next in line asked me, urgently, where I had managed to buy a pint of stout. Though he seemed doubtful, I told him, “This is better.”

SAMBOOSA—$2.65

Haji Sunguro International Foods is a tented booth with a single hot case of pastries on a table draped in a floral cloth. It serves black-eyed pea fritters, sweet fried dough flavored with coconut and a rice-beef soup, as well as its signature item—samboosas—which are Somali pastries: a crispy, puffed triangle of meat, eggs or lentils with onions, bell pepper, cilantro and garlic. All items are served a la carte. A few condiments are offered: Sriracha, ranch dressing, ketchup and Louisiana hot sauce. All of them kind of work.

BOB DELUXE WAFFLE—$8.50

Waffle Me Up serves thick, Belgian-style waffles—mostly sweet versions, from the $3 plain waffle with powdered sugar, to strawberries and Nutella or cookie butter and banana.

Quit waffling and get yourself to the Boise Farmers Market for brunch.

The yeast-risen waffles have depth—chewy like a perfect pretzel—which provides a solid platform for savory flavors, as well. The BOB Deluxe is layered with a fried market egg, bacon, organic syrup and rags of basil on a slice of havarti that melts as though relaxing in sunshine. Of all the vendors sampled, the customer service at Waffle Me Up was most sincere. They did the little things well, coming out to ask us about our food and remembering the name of a guest who had been there only one time before.

MEAT LOVERS’ PIZZA—$8.50

Il Segreto translates to “the secret,” and the setup of the Il Segreto Wood-Fired Pizza stand seems to be obscuring the primary feature: At the back of a setup of banquet tables and banners is the hearth, a brick-mouthed pizza cave on wheels. An 8-inch single-serving pie takes about eight minutes, which seems a little long for the orderand-stand-around-until-it’s-ready model, but that allowed time to go pick up a few things at some of the other booths and, in the end, the wait was worth it. The sausage, sliced meatballs, pepperoni and cheese were rich but not greasy. There was the right amount of sauce, which had zing. We especially liked the thin, flavorful crust, which was bubbling and blistered. If anything, we’d have waited longer if, perhaps, the flames were allowed to caress the crust a little more, but I ate pizza for breakfast outside, and I was happy.

APPLE HAND PIE—$5

Blue Feather Bakery’s booth looks like a Pinterest country fair: miniature pies in tins and hand pies laid out on robin-egg blue shelving, or in baskets or wire bins on burlap-draped tables. Each Blue Feather hand pie is a little different than its neighbor, but all are dressed in white paper sleeves

tied with colored string. One weekend, the lemon curd hand pie contained perhaps the best single bite of portable dessert I’ve ever had: layers of warm, buttery pastry crumbling to a cool, tart lemon center. A chef friend who is an expert at pastry agreed, saying, “Whoa.” More recently, an apple hand pie crackled with coarse sugar was not quite as decadent as I’d have liked more of its cinnamon-flecked filling, but it was delicious nonetheless.

BROWNIE COOKIE VANILLA LATTE GELATO SANDWICH—$4

Mobley’s Craft Gelato owner Mark Mobley has grown his business of plant-based, small-batch craft gelato by word of mouth at the market and is delivering pints door-to-door. The phrase “plant-based gelato” is less elegant than the actual product, whose creaminess and texture is among the best coconut-based frozen desserts I’ve tried. Even if you have no dietary restrictions, you might choose this over ice cream. The ice cream sandwich was excess above a whole morning’s worth of excess. Though a little chilly at first, as it warmed, it was a beautiful final note for the market. Dining is certainly not the market’s primary design, and my multi-cart experiment was a meal certainly not intended by all these well-meaning and talented business owners. The totality of what I ate combined for some weirdness, for sure. We also realized almost everything for sale you could eat right away was bread, or sugar or both, yet there are so many vegetables so close. After all this, there was so much I missed, but had no room for anything else—not beef sticks, cookies, tamales or beignets. Not until next Saturday. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CITIZEN JILLIAN KATES

Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s ‘fair lady’ GEORGE PRENTICE

Jillian Kates is preparing to “dance all night;” then do it again and again. In fact, she’ll dance her nights away all summer as Eliza Doolittle in Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s production of My Fair Lady, running Friday, July 1 through Friday, Aug. 26. The Oklahoma City native remembers how, as a young girl, she would leap on stage after watching a performance at the neighborhood theater. “I’d run out on that stage as they were sweeping up and they couldn’t get me to leave,” she said. Professional voice lessons followed, leading to countless high school and college productions and a bachelor of arts in music from Baldwin Wallace University. Today, Kates is a New York City-based actress with her sights set on Broadway. But this summer, she’s ISF’s “fair lady.” I’m not sure how you got this part, but my sense is that your performance as Lily in last summer’s ISF production of The Secret Garden was as close to an audition as it gets. You knocked it out of the park, quite literally, with your high notes. I feel as if many of my roles led me to this moment. Roles such as... Marian in The Music Man, Reno in Anything Goes and, of course, Glinda in Wicked [Kates was part of the national touring production of the Broadway blockbuster]. Eliza Doolittle may be one of the most recognizable parts in musical theater, yet she’s still a bit of an enigma. Eliza, [first created by George Bernard Shaw in Pygmalion] has to be one of the most complex, interesting, bawdy, bold human beings ever written. What do you think motivates her? She’s a common working girl and she sees socialites walk by every day. She peers through flower shop windows and dreams of being inside that shop someday. Shaw saw Eliza as the definition of a working girl. Yet she becomes the ultimate definition of glamour. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

Have you deconstructed her relationship with Professor Higgins? We’re exploring Shaw’s original intent: not a romantic notion, but rather a magnetic pull to one another. They both teach each other something invaluable. I hope you can appreciate audiences desperately wanting My Fair Lady to be a love story. It still is. A love of speech. A love of learning. A love for a fellow human being. Talk to me about My Fair Lady’s costumes. In most productions, the costumes are practically a character unto themselves. Our costume designer, Charlotte Yetman, is a genius. The colors and fabric will definitely help tell the story. At first, I appear with a lot of bold colors but as I begin to be dressed by Professor Higgins, the colors begin to fade. By the time of the big ballroom scene, I’ll be all in white. As Eliza finds her true self again, the colors being to reemerge. I’m presuming young boys and girls approach you after a show and tell you they want your life. I love kids and I love time to listen to them about their lives. I was on tour with Wicked and my last city was my hometown of Oklahoma City. There I was, walking through the same stage door where I had stood outside as a little girl. And then there they were, these beautiful kids. It was quite a moment. What advice might you give your younger self? Be fearless. Be prepared that not everyone may like you. It’s a pretty hard lesson. By nature, we want everyone to love us—on stage and off. That can be a bit dangerous, but everyone’s different. Believe it or not, not everyone is going to love mint chocolate chip ice cream. Not love mint chocolate chip? How is that possible? I know, right? BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 19


RECREATION WHEN A FAMILY CAN’T AFFORD SUMMER

‘Poverty knows no season’ TARYN HADFIELD While many American families anticipate a summer filled with camping trips, visits to amusement parks or vacations in exotic locales, many Idaho children are part of an increasing number of U.S. families that The New York Times reports, “can’t afford summer.” As The Times’ KJ Dell’Antonia wrote June 5, a growing number of parents continue to find summer to be a “financial and logistical nightmare.” “Poverty knows no season,” said Dalynn Kuster, multi-programs manager for Boise-based nonprofit El Ada Community Action Partnership. “There are too many families struggling who are invisible to the rest of us.” Kuster knows well how burdensome the financial strain can be on low-income families during the summer months. She spends her days helping local families get access to food, housing and assistance with utility bills. When summer comes around, Kuster said she knows without the shelter, meals and support system school provides during the fall and winter, parents are left wondering what to do with their kids from May through August. Kuster said she has seen the issues for low-income families become more and more complex over the years. “Families are facing high rent and high barriers in providing for their children,” Kuster said. “Their wages are not going up, and they are struggling to gain more job skills and education, but the cost to live and survive keeps on increasing.” When children don’t have access to body- and mind-enriching programs during the summer, they often struggle with being prepared for the next school year. On average, reading skills of lowincome children lapse in summer months and are frequently not regained. That said, there may be more at stake than just learning loss for kids in low-income families. “When families don’t have access to good opportunities and programs, their children begin to struggle in school and feel unsuccessful, leading them on a downward spiral of lost confidence,” said Roseanne Swain, superintendent of recre20 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

A number of Boise area nonprofits and agencies stress fun that doesn’t stress the family bank account.

ation for the Boise Department of Parks and Recreation. Treasure Valley YMCA Marketing and Communications Director Katherine Johnson said she sees more and more families every year in need of financial assistance—about one in four YMCA members and participants receive some kind of aid. For the Y’s early childhood development programs—like day-care and pre-school—the numbers are even higher: it’s one in three members that access financial assistance. “The struggles facing parents today are far different than the previous generation,” said Johnson. “Young adults are having children while dealing with the burdens of student loans, job competition and an increased cost of living.” Johnson also reports seeing more and more oneparent or unmarried families, where children don’t have the ability to enjoy programs like a robotics camp or art lessons. At the Y’s Horsethief Reservoir Camp, scores of kids from struggling families are scholarshipped into the overnight summer camp located in the forests near Cascade. “And that’s our goal: to have a child from a high-income neighborhood bunking with a child who is a refugee,” said Johnson. “No one is turned away.” Back in Boise, the city’s Parks and Recreation Department also offers scholarships for all of its programs, covering up to 100 percent of the cost. Those scholarships include programs at the Boise Zoo, Foothills Learning Center and the Boise Urban Garden Center, among others. Swain emphasizes the importance of affordability for all members, not just low-income families. At the El Ada Community Action Partner-

ship, case managers do what they can they can to offer some kind of summer respite for cashstrapped families. For example, El Ada distributes thousands of free passes to the Boise Zoo each summer. “The passes give families a break from their constant stress and allow them to enjoy a positive bonding activity together,” said Kuster. Scholarships, passes and free summer programs can change the course of a child’s life. Swain shared the story of Winston, a boy she had met while working at a Boise Parks and Recreation community center. In 2008, Winston was 10 years old and growing up in poverty. With the family’s limited income, “Winston was bright, but had few resources,” said Swain. However, Boise Parks and Recreation was able to provide Winston with a number of opportunities and mentored the young boy at a neighborhood community center. Ultimately, Winston became a member of the Mayor’s Youth Council. After graduating high school earlier this year, Winston was accepted to Princeton University on a full-ride scholarship, beginning this fall. “Stories like these remind me that summer programs aren’t about kicking a ball around or making crafts,” said Swain. “It’s about helping every child to succeed and realize their full potential.” But the need is ongoing. Treasure Valley organizations say they’re constantly working to meet the growing needs, with a singular goal: To give all children access to a memorable summer. “This is what makes Boise such a beautiful community,” said Swain. “We have our hearts open to the people, families and refugees who are struggling. We care about every child in the community.” B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


HARRISON BE RRY

PLAY

It might look scary (OK, terrifying), but trapeze is surprisingly freeing.

FLY BOISE AND SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR FEAR OF HEIGHTS Chalk it up to the understatement of a teacher who the routine is more technical—it involves “pumping” to gain momentum—it’s an intuitive next step doesn’t want to freak out her students. “From down here, it looks high,” said Paula Mur- and, again, almost everyone sticks the transition. Lessons are about two hours long and, by the end, phy, founder of “aerial arts instruction center” Fly first-timers feel a little like pros themselves. Boise, standing beneath a towering platform prior Safety, naturally, is paramount. One of the most to a Saturday morning trapeze class in a grassy obvious features of Fly Boise’s rig is a nylon net field near Boise Towne Square Mall. stretched five feet above the ground. If everything “From up there,” Murphy added, indicating the goes right, everyone ends up in the net at some platform above, “it looks high.” point in his or her routine. Students are issued a Once they’re arcing through the sky, however, safety harness at the beginning of the class, which trapeze students get something worth a little vertigo: The freedom of actual flight. As it turns out, is hooked to safety lines from the moment they start climbing the ladder to the platform to when almost anyone can learn to soar. they crawl off the net at the end. Murphy started Fly Boise about a year ago Lessons begin with the harrowing prospect of after purchasing a portable trapeze rig for about using the trapeze and quickly become routines $40,000. Learning trapeze acrobatics was on her punctuated by literally falling into the arms of a bucket list after seeing it on television show Circus member of Murphy’s teaching corps. At any given of the Stars. For her 43rd birthday, she checked time, one of them is ushering people to the ladder, that item off her list. Now, Murphy believes the guiding others on the platform and helping people trapeze can help people who are afraid of heights. off the net. “It’s a really great place for people to confront There’s a moment in the second half of the lesthat fear in a controlled way,” she said. son when Murphy tells students to arch their back, That may be true, but the first 10 minutes of a look at the horizon and search out an instructor’s class could be summed up with, “Here’s how you waiting hands. Below is the ground and the mall will swing backward at 20 miles per hour while parking lot. Above is the blue sky. The forces of hanging from an iron bar by your knees 25 feet gravity and upward momentum above the ground. You’ll follow are in stasis and, for that fraction that with a backflip.” Classes are Tuesdays-Thursof a second, these four things—asIt sounds like the kind of stunt days at 7 p.m. and Saturdays phalt and atmosphere, downward that would make Spiderman’s and Sundays at 11 a.m. Fly Boise, 350 N. Milwaukee pull and upward swing—are in palms sweaty, but with a tutorial, St. (outside Boise Towne tension with each other. practice on a low bar and instrucSquare Mall), 208-794-5327, From somewhere seemingly tions delivered in mid-flight, most flyboise.org. above even the sky, a pair of arms students get at least that far. reach out to grab the student’s, The second half of the lesson is the most daunting—and also the most rewarding. and the most intimidating part of the routine when it was described becomes as easy as reaching out In addition to soaring backward through the air, and taking hold. students learn to transfer from one swing to another by grabbing the arms of trapeze pros. Though —Harrison Berry B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 21


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B O I S E W E E K LY CAREERS

SERVICES

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HOUSING

MIND BODY SPIRIT

BW CAREERS

BW ROOMMATES

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

OUTBOUND TELEPHONE REPS Outbound Telephone reps needed for local fund raiser. Previous Business Sales/Telemarketing required. If you have outbound sales experience we are interested in meeting you. Casual dress/work environment. Looking for motivated individuals. Convenient Boise location. Please call 208.473.4021 for an immediate interview. EPIC SALON at 100 W. Main Downtown Boise (Bold and headline) Accepting resumes; Leased hair style stations, nail/pedi tech. Competitive lease. Please contact Troy Sherrill at 208-771-4575.

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BY PRISCILLA CLARK AND JEFF CHEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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23 Conflict at sea 26 Asia’s ____ Sea 27 Geological flat top 28 Staple at a luau 29 Orange Pixar character 30 Main character in Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” 32 River ____ (tributary of the Thames) 34 Balls or fire preceder 37 Way off 40 Decides, in a way

1 Foyer fixture 9 Paratroopers’ gear 15 Building material for an 80-Across (in two different ways?) 20 Unsympathetic response to a complainer 21 Warhol’s “Campbell’s Tomato Juice Box,” e.g. 22 Italian vessel?

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

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13 Before, poetically 14 Letters on many a racecar 15 Part of a plot 16 ____ queen 17 Pitched poorly 18 Queen ____ 19 SAT org. 24 Raft material 25 Pentium creator 31 Profess 33 Long stretch 35 Supercontinent of 200 million years ago 36 “____ be my pleasure” 38 Scope 39 Climbs 41 World of Warcraft beast 42 Waver of a wand 43 Bathroom tile shade 45 Prepped 47 Cowardly Lion harasser 48 Bathroom bar 49 The Pink Panther, in “The Pink Panther” 50 Takes the place of, in batting 51 Seventh film in the “Rocky” series 52 ____ characters (basic means of writing Chinese) 57 “____ the season …” 58 Leftover 60 Hardly original works 63 Curled one’s lip 64 Police-blotter letters 66 Fair-hiring inits. 68 Org. with the Eddie Eagle safety program 70 Tree with catkins 71 Charms 72 Long stretch 73 Delicacy usually eaten as an appetizer 78 Marching band? 79 Queen ____ (pop music nickname)

112 Take a hit 114 Sein : German :: ____ : French 116 Cotton or country follower 117 Siberian river 118 Dry 120 Time out? 121 ____ russe 122 A card? 123 Deli offering 124 Alternatives to Macs 125 What a constant handwasher probably has, for short

80 Stoked 81 Deli roll 82 Rubens or Raphael 84 Gets fitted for a suit? 86 Drive-____ 87 Pool site 90 Leave runny on the inside, say 92 Compete 93 Leftovers 95 Once-common campus event 96 Welcome to the fold? 97 Downside 98 Go haywire 103 Clear for takeoff? 107 OutKast chart-topper 108 On the button 109 Southern beauty 110 Low mounts? L A S T J A W A

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Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

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R C O R H E W D E C E T O N B E Z A D A R S B O E L L Q U A U E N I Q U M U S A M E N R T H F R A E A M E

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B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Enjoy a relaxing massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492. SACRED BODY CARE For Relaxation Call Ami at 208-6976231. ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377.

PETS BW PETS GENTLE GOODBYES Our goal at Gentle Goodbyes is to allow you to peacefully say goodbye to your pet in the privacy, comfort and familiarity of your own home. All euthanasia’s are performed at your home by a licensed veterinarian who is accompanied by a veterinary assistant. Our home euthanasia services are by appointment only. For more information: www.gentlegoodbyes.com or call 297-3990.

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B OISE W E E KLY

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS BOISE SCAVENGER HUNT Early Registration discount ends June 30th! Scavenger Hunt is Sept. 17, 2016 at JUMP (jack’s Urban Meeting Place) Registration opens at 8:30 am, race starts at 10 am sharp. Gather your tribe for a race around downtown Boise! Details at BoiseScavengerHunt. com. Proceeds support Lee Pesky Learning Center.

BW BIRTHDAYS BOXES!! Happy Birthday Thomas! Hope it is full of fun, frenzy, females, food and friendship and maybe a little fire. You’re a cool cat. XXOX.

BW HAVE ELVIS IMPERSONATOR SEEKS MUSICIANS Over 20 years of experience im-

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PETS

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MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

Male/female, 13wks old, $500 each, AKC reg. vaccinated and deworm. (208)938-5147 jpyorkies65@yahoo.com

OFFICE ADDRESS

ADOPT-A-PET

BW EVENTS INITIAL POINTE GALLERY RECEPTION Come to Meridian City Hall’s Initial Pointe Gallery reception for our July artists: Kris Mannion, Claire Remsberg & Ian Smith! Join us Tuesday, July 5th. from 4:30-7:30. 33 E Broadway Ave in. Meridiancity.org/mac/. SUMMER LIGHT Join us Saturday July, 30 at the Rose Room in downtown Boise. Enjoy workshops, live DJ’s, performance art with headliner: Love and Light. Get more info at the website: www.ChochioEvents.com. Tickets: through website or Eventbrite.

COUNSELING

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com SNOWFLAKE: I am a sweet, friendly girl who would love a forever lap to snuggle on.

EMILIO: I love being up high and have beautiful blue eyes. Come see how handsome I am.

BADGER: For a teenaged boy (older kitten), I am very polite but I still like to have fun.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. CORI: 4-year-old, male, Dachshund mix. Bonds with time, but is uncomfortable around strangers and kids. Needs a dogsavvy owner. (Kennel 316 – #31357864)

MAXIMUS: 11-month-old, male, pointer/Dalmatian mix. Could use obedience training. Best in a home with older kids. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31896804)

PIPER: 6-year-old, female, miniature pinscher mix. Friendly, affectionate and active. Can bark excessively. No cats. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #19535443)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT ISABELLA: 5-year-old, female, domestic longhair. Inquisitive. Takes time to get comfortable, but enjoys affection. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31878945)

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

SHELBY: 3-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Shy at first but gets along with anybody who shows him love. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31805535)

TART: 7-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Sweet and sassy. Will purr and roll around for affection. Soft head rubs are her favorite. (Kennel 304 – #31232392)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2016 | 23


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YOGA

BW HOME

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BW SUMMER CAMPS

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Places: black & white photography instructed by Jonathan Sadler. More: info@theatlantaschool.org.

LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Nicole Katheryn Scown. Legal Name

tition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on July 19, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 19, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: CHRISTOPHER D. RICH Clerk of the district court. Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB June 10, 17, 24 and July 1, 2015. LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS Case No. CV IE 1605098 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN under Idaho Code 15-3-801, that Janie Ward-Engelking, has been appointed Personal Representative of the probate estate of ELOISE RUTH WARD, deceased. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to he Personal Representative’s attorney: Rodney R. Saetrum, Saetrum Law Offices, P.O. Box 7425, Boise, Idaho 83707; 208-336-0484; fax: 208-3360448, and filed with the Clerk of the Ada County Court. Pub. June 29, and July 6, 13, 20, 2016.

ART OF THE MATTER Sign up for a week long art camp between June 20th and August 5th. Each week offers something new! Classes for kids and adults. Email: gizwins@msn.com for registration and details. THE ATLANTA SCHOOL 2016 The Atlanta School returns in its 3rd year with programming scheduled to begin July 2016. Now open for registration. Upcoming workshops both July 5-9: Traces and Imprints: installation art & sculpture, instructed by Kris Hargis. Also: Faces and

Case No. CV NC 1609076 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult)

to expand your self-love to unprecedented proportions. You may also feel free to unleash a series of lovely brags.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “When a jet flies low overhead, every glass in the cupboard sings,” writes aphorist James Richardson. “Feelings are like that: choral, not single; mixed, never pure.” That’s always true, but it will be intensely true for you in the coming weeks. I hope you can find a way to tolerate, even thrive on, the flood of ambiguous complexity. I hope you won’t chicken out and try to pretend that your feelings are one-dimensional and easily understandable. In my opinion, you are ripe to receive rich lessons in the beauty and power of mysterious emotions.

gery, a nurse said to me, ‘You may as well try magical thinking. Regular thinking hasn’t helped.’ I said to the nurse, ‘Well, why the hell not?’ That was seven years ago.” In bringing O’Dell’s testimony to your attention, I don’t mean to suggest you will have any health problems that warrant a strong dose of magical thinking. Not at all. But you may get wrapped up in a psychological twist or a spiritual riddle that would benefit from magical thinking. And what exactly is magical thinking? Here’s one definition: The stories that unfold in your imagination have important effects on what actually happens to you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Pop artist Andy Warhol said that in the future, everyone would be famous for 15 minutes. His idea had a resonance with the phrase “nine days’ wonder,” which as far back as Elizabethan times referred to a person or event that captured the public’s fascination for a while. You Capricorns are entering a phase when you’re far more likely than usual to bask in the spotlight. Between now and September 2017, I bet you’ll garner at least a short burst of glory, acclaim, or stardom— perhaps much more. Are you ready for your close-up? Have you prepped for the influx of attention that may be coming your way?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let’s talk about X-factors and wild cards and strange attractors. By their very nature, they are unpredictable and ephemeral, even when they offer benevolent breakthroughs. So you may not even notice their arrival if you’re entranced by your expectations and stuck in your habitual ways. But here’s the good news, Pisces: Right now you are not unduly entranced by your expectations or stuck in your habits. Odds are high that you will spy the sweet twists of fate—the X-factors and wild cards and strange attractors—as they float into view. You will pounce on them and put them to work while they’re still fresh. And then they will help you hike your ratings or get the funding you need or animate the kind of love that heals.

A Petition to change the name of Nicole Katheryn Scown, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Finnian Kristopher Scown. The reason for the change in name is: I’ve never preferred or used my legal name and the name I’ve used for a year is what I want to change it to. A hearing on the pe-

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): During winter, some bears spend months hibernating. Their body temperatures and heart rates drop. They breathe drowsily. Their movements are minimal. Many hummingbirds engage in a similar slowdown—but they do it every single night. By day they are among the most manic creatures on earth, flapping their wings and gathering sustenance with heroic zeal. When the sun slips below the horizon, they rest with equal intensity. In my estimation, Aries, you don’t need a full-on immersion in idleness like the bears. But you’d benefit from a shorter stint, akin to the hummingbird’s period of dormancy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Dear Dr. Brezsny: A psychic predicted that sometime this year I will fall in love with a convenience store clerk who’s secretly a down-on-his-luck prince of a small African country. She said that he and I have a unique destiny. Together we will break the world’s record for dancing without getting bitten in a pit of cobras while drunk on absinthe on our honeymoon. But there’s a problem. I didn’t have time to ask the psychic how I’ll meet my soulmate, and I can’t afford to pay $250 for another reading. Can you help?— Mopey Taurus.” Dear Mopey: The psychic lied. Neither she nor anyone else can see what the future will bring you. Why? Because what

happens will be largely determined by your own actions. I suggest you celebrate this fact. It’s the perfect time to do so: July is Feed Your Willpower Month. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Of all the concert pianos in the world, 80 percent of them are made by Steinway. A former president of the company once remarked that in each piano, “243 taut strings exert a pull of 40,000 pounds on an iron frame.” He said it was “proof that out of great tension may come great harmony.” That will be a potential talent of yours in the coming weeks, Gemini. Like a Steinway piano, you will have the power to turn tension into beauty. But will you actually accomplish this noble goal, or will your efforts be less melodious? It all depends on how much poised self-discipline you summon. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Once upon a time, weren’t you the master builder who never finished building your castle? Weren’t you the exile who wandered aimlessly while fantasizing about the perfect sanctuary of the past or the sweet safety zone of the future? Didn’t you perversely nurture the ache that arose from your sense of not feeling at home in the world? I hope that by now you have renounced all of those kinky inclinations. If you haven’t, now would be an excellent time to do so. How

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might you reinvest the mojo that will be liberated by the demise of those bad habits? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, I have selected three aphorisms by poet James Richardson to guide you. Aphorism No. 1: “The worst helplessness is forgetting there is help.” My commentary: You have the power to avoid that fate. Start by identifying the sources of healing and assistance that are available to you. Aphorism No. 2: “You do not have to be a fire to keep one burning.” My commentary: Generate all the heat and light you can, yes, but don’t torch yourself. Aphorism No. 3: “Patience is not very different from courage. It just takes longer.” My commentary: But it may not take a whole lot longer. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You may not know this, but I am the founder and CEO of Proud To Be Humble, an acclaimed organization devoted to minimizing vanity. It is my sworn duty to protest any ego that exceeds the acceptable limits as defined by the Geneva Convention on Narcissism. However, I now find myself conflicted. Because of the lyrical beauty and bighearted charisma that are currently emanating from your ego, I am unable, in good conscience, to ask you to tone yourself down. In fact, I hereby grant you a license

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The next 28 days will not be a favorable period to sit around passively wishing to be noticed. Nor will it be a good time to wait to be rescued or to trust in others to instigate desirable actions. On the other hand, it will be an excellent phase to be an initiator: to decide what needs to be done, to state your intentions concisely, and to carry out your master plan with alacrity and efficiency. To help ensure your success during the next 28 days, make this declaration each morning before breakfast: “I don’t want to OBSERVE the show. I want to BE the show.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “In life, as in bicycling, pedal when you have to, coast when you can.” So says author James Lough, and now I’m passing on his advice to you—just in time for your transition from the heavy-pedaling season to the coasting-is-fun phase. I suspect that at this juncture in your life story you may be a bit addicted to the heavy pedaling. You could be so accustomed to the intensity that you’re inclined to be suspicious of an opportunity to enjoy ease and grace. Don’t be like that. Accept the gift with innocent gratitude.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One of my readers, Jay O’Dell, told me this story: “After my cancer sur-

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PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

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FIND THE HISTORIC AMERICAN COOKBOOK PROJECT

If you’re like most Americans, your Fourth of July menu may consist of things like hot dogs, potato salad, baked beans, fried chicken or steak. The Founding Fathers, however, would have found that board of fare incomprehensible (except for maybe the chicken and steak). According to most sources, none other than John Adams, the second president of the United States, celebrated his vote for independence with a meal of green turtle soup, poached salmon with egg sauce, green peas, boiled potatoes and Indian pudding or pandowdy (a spiced apple pie baked in a deep dish). digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/ If you want to celebrate this Fourth of July in the style of the first patriots, check out the University of Michigan’s Historic American Cookbook Project, which compiled and digitized 76 cookbooks drawn from the university’s collection of 10,000 volumes. Accessible on the Michigan State special collections website under “Feeding America,” a few gems come close to the revolutionary period. Looke hence for an olde repast. —Zach Hagadone

Advice for those on the verge

DEAR MINERVA,

Our neighbor across the street is trying to trap our cats with a cage set up in his driveway with a bowl of food in it to entice them into his yard. I’ve spent years training our cats not to cross the street. We also suspect he is using a pellet gun to shoot at them. They love being outside in warm weather. They don’t understand why they can’t be out because of this cruel person. Are there laws in Idaho that protect people’s pets from being harassed while on their own property? This person has even tried to call them over to their house when my husband and I were standing in the yard with the kitties. What say you, Minerva? —Kitten Patrol

DEAR KITTEN PATROL,

My first suggestion is to document everything that happens. Dates and times will be important. Take pictures of the setup. Send your neighbors a certified letter asking them to stop harassing your pets. Consult with Idaho Statutes Title 25—Animals, Chapter 35—Animal Care. I think you will find that there are protections in place. Animals are considered property and it is your responsibility to protect your property. Thank goodness you have been able to teach your cats to stick close to home. Once pets leave your property and go onto another person’s property, things get much more complicated. Good luck with this difficult and unneighborly situation. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

“A MOON SHAPED POOL,” RADIOHEAD “THE GETAWAY,” RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS “AMID THE NOISE AND HASTE,” SOJA “I HEAR IT NOW,” A.K.A. BELLE “WHY ARE YOU OK,” BAND OF HORSES

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Taken by instagram user dr_Kelso.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

Do you think McCall’s booze ban will help or hurt its 4th of July celebration??

“I STILL DO,” ERIC CLAPTON

“STRANGER TO STRANGER,” PAUL SIMON “VESSEL,” TWENTY ONE PILOTS

Help: 21.21% Hurt: 72.73% I don’t know: 6.06%

“YOU WILL NEVER BE ONE OF US,” NAILS “SKIN,” FLUME

D i s clai mer: Th i s onli ne p oll i s not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of loc al, statewi d e or nati onal op i ni on.

$311.7 MILLION

$324.8 MILLION

321.4 MILLION

$4.4 MILLION

$2.5 BILLION

150 MILLION

7 BILLION

$1 BILLION

Value of fireworks imported from China in 2015.

Value of all fireworks exported to the U.S. in 2015.

U.S. population estimate on July 4, 2015.

Value of American flags exported to the U.S. in 2015—$4.3 million-worth from China alone.

Amount consumers spent on hot dogs in U.S. supermarkets in 2015.

Number of hot dogs Americans eat on the Fourth of July—if laid end to end, enough dogs to stretch from Washington, D.C. to Los Angeles five times.

Number of hot dogs Americans typically consume between Memorial Day and Labor Day, the equivalent of 818 hot dogs every second.

Value of beer sales over the Fourth of July weekend.

(U.S. Census Bureau)

(U.S. Census)

(U.S. Census)

(U.S. Census)

(National Hot Dog and Sausage Council)

(NHDSC)

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(CNBC)

(NHDSC)

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Boise Weekly Vol.25 Issue 02  

Fourth Goes Dry McCall’s July 4 booze rules and what they mean for the city’s signature summer smash

Boise Weekly Vol.25 Issue 02  

Fourth Goes Dry McCall’s July 4 booze rules and what they mean for the city’s signature summer smash