Page 1

BOISE WEEKLY J U N E 1 – 6 , 2 0 1 6 LOCA L A N D I N DE PE N DE N T

VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 5 0

“We’ve spent the last 20-some years arguing politics like a couple of grumpy uncles.”

5

FarewellAfterand Adieu two decades in print, Boise Weekly’s Bill Cope signs off

9

Jump into June

Get the who, what, when and where for June First Thursday

23

COPE 5

Another Round

The legal back-and-forth over booze in Idaho movie theaters isn’t over

FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Ben Schultz Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Digital Media Account Executive: Lisa Clark, lisa@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Ryan Johnson, Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Bill Hagler, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Kara Vitley, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

EDITOR’S NOTE COPING WITH A BIG CHANGE I’m not going to lie, it wasn’t Bill Cope’s idea to retire his column, which has been published in Boise Weekly for more than 20 years. Sure, he has admitted on a few occasions that he felt burnt out, that words have sometimes been harder to spit out onto the page than they should be or inspiration was nowhere to be found. He knew there would come a time when, as he said, “either I would outgrow Boise Weekly or Boise Weekly would outgrow me.” Neither of those things are necessarily true, and I think Bill probably would have happily continued to fill his half-page each week until there really was nothing left to say—and we all know that would never happen with Bill. His departure from the pages of BW is driven by a number of things. First, we have to do a lot with what space and freelance funds we have each week, and often that means sacrificing content. Trimming back our opinion section will give us much needed flexibility, which leads to the second factor in making our decision: There are many other voices in the community that should be heard. Again, more flexibility will allow us to feature more and varied perspectives. Third, and Bill himself told me a month or so ago, that 20+ years is a long time to be grinding on a deadline. You may or may not know this, but Bill is also an author, and an author needs time and freedom to work. Stepping back from the weekly churn—which also included two lengthy posts per week on boiseweekly.com—will give him the brain space to focus on those bigger projects. It’s going to be weird around here without Bill. He and I had a longstanding phone appointment on Thursday mornings, which will feel strange to skip. He will always be part of the Boise Weekly’s DNA, as evidenced by the almost 40-pages of his articles archived on boiseweekly.com—and those only go back to 2004. Bill has plenty more to say on Page 5, so I’ll leave it to him. I’ll finish by saying it’s been a privilege to work with him and to have read him since I first picked up a copy of BW in 1999. I’m looking forward to seeing what he comes up with next. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST

Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Tomás Montaño TITLE: “Rosabel” MEDIUM: Mixed media on old shipping pallet ARTIST STATEMENT: Come see my solo exhibit everything needn’t always be something, a series of abstract paintings on repurposed wood surfaces showing the entire month of June at Gallery Five18. Opens First Thursday, June 2.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each

week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

TOURIST TROUBLE AF TER A SPATE OF TOURISTS BEHAVING BADLY AT YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK , UNITED STATES PARKS OFFICIAL S ARE C ONSIDERING TAKING A STEP THAT MIGHT CR AMP SOME PEOPLE’S SUMMER VACATION PL ANS : LIMITING THE NUMBER OF VISITORS ALLOWED IN THE PARK . FIND OUT HOW BAD THE PROBLEM IS ON NE WS/CIT YDESK .

NOT A GAME

Idaho State University is facing separate allegations that members of its men’s tennis and women’s softball teams suffered religious discrimination and bullying. Get the details on News/Citydesk.

QUALITY ART

HEAT WAVE

Break out that box fan, as Boise is expected to experience triple-digit temperatures over the weekend of June 4-5. Find out how this heat wave stacks up against previous years’ at News/Citydesk.

TRIALS

As detainees at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. prison in Cuba press their case for being allowed to present evidence of their abuse, trial watchers wonder what will come next. More on News/National.

OPINION

SPRING SIDEWALK SALE EVERYTHING IN THE STORE AT LEAST

40% OFF

SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICES SUGG *SOME EXCLUSIONS MAY APPLY

ONE DAY ONLY

200 E 52ND ST. BOISE ID 83714 (Off Chinden) (208) 672-0530 Mon. - Fri. : 9-5 Sat. : 10-3

SATURDAY JUNE 4TH

4 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


OPINION CURTAIN

Part Two: The end of the end BILL COPE And here is my final column for Boise Weekly. It has been an honor and a joy to be allowed this forum. We all have opinions, but to be given the opportunity to share those opinions with so many—and from a vantage considerably more prestigious than a bar stool—has been one of the high points of my life. I cannot end it and not again give my profound thanks to the people who made it possible. BW founders Larry Regan and Andy HeddenNicely took me on, bless their hearts. And bless the subsequent owners, publishers and editors who were kind enough to keep me on, especially the generous and energetic Sally Freeman. Her dedication to this paper and the town it represents is astonishing, and the people of Boise should know it. If memory serves correctly, I have reported weekly to a succession of 13 different editors. Dave Madison, Bob Steel, Shea Anderson, Rachael Daigle and Zach Hagadone were standouts, each leaving an indelible print on the development of both the paper and myself. I’ve been proud to call them friends. In fact, I have many friends now that I wouldn’t have, if not for these two decades of working around such talented, bright people. I must acknowledge Agatha Christie for my title these past two weeks and to those readers who’ve sent kind cards and letters over the years, I apologize for not always returning... “Cope! Say it ain’t so! Tell me y’r playin’ another one o’ them dumb jokes what y’r always cookin’ up!” “Red, I wish I could. But it’s true. This is it.” “But all them years together! But all them dispussions we had! All them tender momen’s we shared!” “Tender moments? Red, we’ve spent the last 20-some years arguing politics like a couple of grumpy uncles.” “Gull durnit, it weren’t all arguin’. Like when y’r daughter coul’n’t show up an’ sing in her little kid Christmas play acause she had the croup. Or when she gradualated on out o’ highschool and went off t’ college. Or when y’r daddy died... n’ y’r momma. Ya’ can’t deny there was some tender momen’s.” “Red... buddy. I didn’t realize you were paying attention all those times.” “’Course I was payin’ attentions! I was there ever time, Cope. Ever gull durn dang time. I been there whether you knew it or not. Good times an’ bad.”... “I was there too, dippy. You can’t just stick us in a f***ing mop closet anytime you’re not turning us into metaphors.” B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

“Badger! Gosh, I’m glad you could make it. And listen, you guys, you’re like weird, crazy, cranky ghost brothers, or something, but I don’t know if I could have done it without you. Honestly, you’ve bailed me out more times than anyone will ever know. And I’m sorry if you feel like I exploited you for material.” “And thanks for splitting the paycheck with us, you selfish p***k.” “Aw jeez, Bob. I’m going to miss you. You too, Red. I mean that.” “You’re not going to sit around on your a** and fester, I hope. It’s in your bones to be a f***ing know-it-all. If you try to stop cold turkey, you’ll end up one of those guys who hang out on bar stools, muttering about how the whole world is going to sh**. You ought to start a blog. “ “Yeah, I’m thinking about other things I might do. But I gotta tell you, an independent blog is sort of scary to an old fart like me. Like stepping off a dock without knowing how deep the water is.” “Maybe so, Cope, but ol’ Badge’s right. Y’r way too mouthy t’ keep all that poop bubblin’ ‘round in y’r noggin t’ y’rself. “ “You know, the hardest part of this is losing that connection I’ve had with my readers. I have no idea how many people that amounts to, but even if it’s just one or two folks out there, I’ve felt them. I’m not kidding. For 20 years I’ve felt their presence on the other end of this... what do I call it?... this communion I’ve had with them. I’ve felt their frustration and isolation, their loneliness in what so often seems a hostile environment, and I’ve felt their support and appreciation... their relief, even... that somebody was saying what maybe they’d say, if only they had the stage like I’ve had. I know that sounds a little... a little...” “Full of yourself?” “Yeah. OK. Maybe sort of self-important, I admit. But it’s not my imagination, Bob. And I know a lot of what I’ve written over these 20 years has been comforting and sympathetic... maybe even intimate... to some number of people. And I’d like those people to know they’ve meant the same to me. However many there are... whoever they are... I think of them as friends and I’m sorry I have to say goodbye. And sad. Damn sad.” “So, Cope. Would a beer cheer ya’ up any? “And you’re buying, a**hole. You owe us weird, crazy, cranky ghost brothers that f***ing much.” “A beer? Sure. Sounds good, Red. And Bob, you bet. I’m buying. But listen... if we end up on bar stools, let’s keep the conversation to a minimum, OK fellas? We wouldn’t want anyone to think I was talking to myself, right?”

SATURDAY, JUNE 4TH AT THE VAC

BOISE PREMIERE OF “THIS AIN’T NO MOUSE MUSIC!”. CHRONICLES THE FIFTY-YEAR QUEST FOR THE MUSICAL SOUL OF AMERICA BY CHRIS STRACHWITZ, FOUNDER OF INDIE-LABEL, ARHOOLIE RECORDS. Q&A WITH FILMMAKER CHRIS SIMON, 7PM, TICKETS AT BROWN PAPER TICKETS

WWW.WORLDVILLAGEFESTIVAL.COM

JUNE 10TH-12TH

CAPITOL PARK • DOWNTOWN BOISE

MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF YOUR FRIENDS IN THE COMMUNITY

TATE FAMILY

CHARITABLE

TRUST

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 5


NEWS

G EORG E PRE NTICE

J ES S ICA MURRI

CITYDESK

A HEALTHIER BOISE Terry Reilly health center opens in Central Bench neighborhood June 20

In August 2015, Central Bench neighbors offered suggestions for a newly proposed city park.

TWO NIGHTS, TWO MORE BIG PROPOSED CHANGES TO BOISE

In blink-and-you’ll-miss-them alterations to Boise’s landscape, two more changes surrounding two high-profile proposals will move to the forefront in the coming weeks: one involves the undeveloped eight-acre site where Franklin Elementary School once stood, and the other has to do with the heavily traveled Main Street/Fairview Avenue corridor, connecting the downtown core to the Boise Connector and points west. In 1905, the Boise Independent School District built Franklin Elementary on the corner of Franklin Road and Orchard Street. The school stood for more than a century before it was torn down in January 2010. The city of Boise desperately wanted the location for a new park and, in 2013, turned to Boise voters, asking them to approve a wide-reaching bond measure that would have included a $760,000 purchase of the land from the school district. The bond failed, but the school district came back to the city and offered to sell three of the 7.7 acres for $395,000 with an option to buy the remaining land for $1.24 million. The city attempted to find a non-profit partner to help fund the purchase of the remaining space, but none materialized. Instead, the school board put the remaining 4.7 acres up for auction. Maverik, Inc. was the top bidder, purchasing the land for approximately $1.3 million in January 2015. A few days later, the Central Bench Neighborhood Association wrote a letter to the city, saying it “was very disappointed to see that Maverik Inc. had purchased this property to develop yet another gas station/ convenience store.” Maverik officials began a charm offensive, launching a website promising its Franklin/Orchard project was “the best alternative” for the site because of the company’s “willingness to invest in the area and keep the neighborhood a great place to live and play.” In a letter to Maverik’s new neighbors, company Vice President of Real Estate Lance Dunkley said the 8 new store would be “a safe, attractive 6 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

GEORGE PRENTICE Many can’t see the forest for the trees. And some construction workers can’t see the drywall for the building. So it shouldn’t have come as a big surprise when, one recent morning in May, a builder looked up from his work at a construction site on the Boise Bench and asked, “Can you tell me what this will be when we’re done building it?” Heidi Traylor, executive director of Terry Reilly Health Service, smiled and assured the builder she would explain the end result just as soon as she was done giving Boise Weekly a tour of what will be a new health center. Every time we meet with Traylor, it’s at a new TRHS site under construction. In November 2014, it was at what would be a new health care facility in Nampa. In July 2015, it was when she was helping break ground in Caldwell for Hope Plaza, a campus of health care, daycare and shelter for victims of domestic abuse. Our most recent visit with Traylor was at the corner of Cassia and Latah streets at what will become the newest TRHS medical facility, joining a dozen dental and behavioral health clinics across the Treasure Valley. While health care has become one of the most deconstructed, debated and politicized issues of the 21st century, the people at TRHS have little time to participate in that debate. They’re too busy serving tens of thousands of patients every year. Terry Reilly himself wouldn’t have had it any other way. A conscientious objector of the Vietnam War, Reilly and wife Rosie began a tutoring service in their Nampa home for children of Canyon County farmworkers. The Reillys soon noticed some of the children were suffering from severe ear infections. With the help of physicians, the Reillys began offering health care, and their living room clinic moved to a revamped Nampa grocery store. More clinics followed and the Terry Reilly legacy was in motion. In 1986, Reilly died in a plane crash while campaigning to become Idaho lieutenant governor. Not long after, in 1992, Traylor joined the Terry Reilly organization as an intern. Over the years, she served as a therapist, program director of SANE Solutions, administrator of Allumbaugh House and eventually the executive director of the organization in 2012. While Traylor inspected the progress of the newest TRHS clinic, she peered out the window to survey the neighborhood.

Terry Reilly Executive Director Heidi Traylor: “People here are doing their best to get by. That’s why we love this—truly, a neighborhood clinic.”

“We really like this neighborhood: a lot of hard-working young families but a good many seniors, too. There’s a good number of single heads of households, refugee families, you name it,” Traylor said. “It’s not an affluent part of town by any means. People here are doing their best to get by. That’s why we love this—truly, a neighborhood clinic.” Decision-makers at Boise City Hall couldn’t be more pleased. “We can’t say enough good things about Terry Reilly,” said Diana Lachiondo, director of Community Partnerships at the city of Boise. “They’re always stepping up on matters that are challenging, yet they always seem to find a way to make things work that add value to the community. The fact that this clinic addresses physical and behavioral health as well as dental in one clinic, that’s tremendous.” The new Boise Bench clinic will offer primary care, such as physical exams, prenatal and pediatric care, immunizations, health screenings and treatment of chronic diseases. Under the same roof will also be dental care, behavioral health services and overall case management. “People ask me all the time, ‘Why do you integrate those services so much instead of spreading them out to different clinics?’” said Traylor. “But we see examples every day that remind us that this is the way to go. Just yesterday, we saw a patient come into a Caldwell dental clinic for oral surgery, but her vital signs indicated elevated blood pressure and heart issues,” she said. Traylor also said a number of patients who come in for physical or dental care also disclose depression. “This way, we can have them talk to behavioral health just a few steps away. The alternative would be that those people might drift away or get lost

in the cracks,” she said. The location of the new health center lies close to two Boise neighborhoods: the Central Bench and Vista. City officials say the availability of community services, particularly health care, was identified as a prime need for the area. “It came out early, and it was loud and clear, that residents of that area said they needed better access to health services,” said Lachiondo. “It’s fair to say that it’s a neighborhood of challenges and opportunities. Yes, we have a lot of working families there, a fair amount of seniors, new Americans and even young professionals who work downtown. There just hasn’t been as much access to health services.” According to 2009-2013 U.S. Census five-year estimates, almost 28 percent of families living in the Bench area do not have health insurance and another 27 percent have public coverage such as Medicaid or Medicare. For those families with children under 18, the percentage living in poverty is as high as 28 percent; with children under 5 years of age, it reaches 40 percent. The new health center is not a free clinic. The TRHS economic model does provide low- to no-cost care on a sliding scale, but just as much care is billed to traditional insurance carriers. Unfortunately, the growing number of Idahoans who have secured coverage through Obamacare are learning the term “Affordable Care Act” may be a misnomer. In a March 2 investigation, we learned 37 percent of individual market plans offered on the Idaho health care exchange earlier this year had deductibles of $5,000 or higher, and out of pocket maximums were more than $10,000. “The Affordable Care Act has changed 8 quite a bit, some of it positive, some of it misleading,” said Traylor. “Yes, on paper B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 7


CITYDESK

NEWS

BAKED POTATO

Boise’s premature heat wave GEORGE PRENTICE

The ACHD open house for the Fairview/Main Project begins 5:30 p.m., Thursday June 2.

place where residents can refresh and refuel on their way to and from 6 the park.” One outstanding issue remains, however. There is no park. So, gas station or not, city of Boise officials want to begin developing the city’s three acres. In August 2015, Central Bench residents were already attending workshops asking the question, “What kind of park do you want?” Neighbors suggested everything from a splash pad, to tennis courts to a community center. “What our outcome will be, we’re not exactly sure,” said Toby Norton, parks resource manager for Boise Parks and Recreation. “It’ll be fun to see what all is generated out of this.” Apparently the city is ready to present some of its early-stage conceptual designs for the park. The public is invited to give input on the conceptual designs at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, June 1, at the Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road. Meanwhile, the Ada County Highway District is also inviting the public to an open house where it will ask citizens to “shape your streets.” Specifically, ACHD is looking at the possible reconfiguration of travel lanes on Fairview Avenue and Main Street between Whitewater Park Boulevard and 16th Street in what it calls the Fairview/Main Project. The proposal, if implemented, could reduce the number of vehicle lanes, shore up bicycle lanes on both roads and possibly add more on-street parking. The ACHD open house for the Fairview/ Main Project begins at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 2, at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave. For anyone unable to attend, ACHD promises to share details on achdidaho.org by Friday, June 3. —George Prentice 8 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

Brace yourself Idaho. Here comes the heat. Again. While meteorologists have all kinds of gizmos and scientific models that point them to precise forecasts, it didn’t take Jay Breidenbach, meteorologist and senior hydrologist with the National Weather Service Office, to use a word not often heard in long-range forecasts: “Whooosh.” “We’ve had some nice weather lately, highs in the mid-70s. But when you add 15 to 20 degrees, it’s going to be… Whooosh… hot,” he said. “We’re forecasting temperatures hitting the 90s by Friday, June 3 and close to 100 by Sunday, June 5. That would smash the record for that date, 95 degrees.” Breidenbach had just emerged from the latest briefing at the NWS office in Boise when he told Boise Weekly, “It’s going to be a bit of a shock to the system.” Among the weather patterns that Breidenbach and his NWS colleagues are keeping a close eye on was a significant system of high pressure building over the region. “It’s much like what you might see in the middle of summer, perhaps in late June or sometime in July, but here we are at the beginning of June,” he said. Triple digits first settled in the Treasure Valley last year on June 26, bringing an unwelcome blast of furnace-like heat. Boise registered nine

consecutive days exceeding 100 degrees, peaking June 29, 2015 at what Breidenbach called an “astounding” 110 degrees. Offering some relief in this year’s immediate forecast, Breidenbach was quick to add that “heat waves come and go.” That said, Breidenbach said his latest forecast model indicates a better chance of warmer-than-normal days in the months ahead. “We’re coming out of an El Nino year in 2015,” said Breidenbach, referring to the periodic warming of the regions of the Pacific Ocean. “And while we’re seeing some of the temperatures in the Central Pacific beginning to cool off, the residual of that is pointing to warmer conditions over the Western U.S.” As for long-range forecasting—the predictions that extend far beyond the usual 10 or 15 days—Breidenbach said the NWS has to turn

to historic trends. Most of those signs also point to hotter summers ahead. “We’ve definitely seen warmer summers over the past decade,” he said. “And we don’t see any reason that would end.” While triple-digit temperatures may be a burden for Idaho’s recreation industry, perhaps the greatest fear is that record-setting heat will trigger yet another bad season for wildfires. In 2015, fire burned more than 712,000 acres in Idaho and firefighting costs hit $60 million. “That string of 100-degrees last June dried out our forests and rangeland. And when a lightning strike follows, it can contribute to a pretty bad fire season,” said Breidenbach. “Right now, our forests are nice and green. But whoosh, you have a heat wave like the one we’re about to have and things start drying out pretty fast.”

those people are insured, but then they see their deductibles. In fact they’re underin6 sured.” Perhaps the unseen silver lining of the Affordable Care Act is something called the Health Infrastructure Investment Program, which made the Boise Bench health center possible. “We were awarded $767,000 for the buildout of this location,” said Traylor, pointing to the construction of medical and dental exam rooms, counseling offices, behavioral health space all framing a central workspace where physicians, dentists, nurse practitioners, psychiatric nurse practitioners, nursing staff and dental hygienists will work in what is called a Patient Centered Medical Home. “The layout design minimizes the number of steps for a patient,” said Traylor, adding that if all goes as planned, she’ll take the keys to the building in the first few days of June, hold an open

house for the community two weeks later and open for business on Monday, June 20. True to form, Traylor already has her sights set on her next project: a new mental health crisis center for Boise. Earlier this year, the Idaho Legislature earmarked enough funds to create two mental health crisis centers: one in Twin Falls and another in Boise. Centers have already been established in Idaho Falls and Coeur d’Alene. “That funding becomes official on July 1,” said Traylor. “And caring for a mental health crisis is something that Terry Reilly knows about.” The Allumbaugh House in Boise, which is run by TRHS, has been operating for six years, focusing on mental health and addiction issues for citizens without means. The facility opened its doors through a unique coalition the city of Boise, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Ada County, the city of Meridian, Saint Alphonsus and St. Luke’s hospitals, the Boise City/Ada

County Housing Authority and the United Way of Treasure Valley. “We’re having those conversations right now,” said Lachiondo. “We still need to make some decisions on who will be the operators and where that new crisis center might be located. And yes, there is some potential at Allumbaugh House,” she said, adding that the City of Boise is serving as the fiscal agent for the process. She said Boise could see the new mental health crisis center as early as this December. “So, that might keep us busy in the coming six months,” said Traylor. “Right now, we’re just excited to get this Boise Bench health center completed.” Construction workers at the site could be forgiven for eavesdropping a bit, listening to Traylor detail exactly what they were working on. All of a sudden, it wasn’t about hammers, nails or drywall. They were building a place where people care.

NWS meteorologist Jay Breidenbach: “Right now, our forests are nice and green. But whoosh, you have a heat wave like the one we’re about to have and things start drying out pretty fast.”

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


FIRST THURSDAY central ART OF WARD HOOPER GALLERY AND VINTAGE SWANK— Check out the local art and fantastic vintage finds from all over Idaho. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 745 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-866-4627, wardhooper.com. ARTISAN OPTICS—Check out the annual Anne et Valentin trunk show. The entire eyewear collection will be in store 1-8 p.m. Plus live music 5:30-8 p.m. by local musician Fiona Luray. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 190 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3380500, artisanoptics.com. BITTERCREEK ALEHOUSE—Art of the Worm: Get to know the underground worms that Bittercreek Alehouse employs in their quest to eliminate organic waste. Tours run from 6-8:30 p.m. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-4296340, bcrfl.com/bittercreek. BUY IDAHO—Buy Idaho has partnered with iconic Idaho artist Ward Hooper to create a 30th Anniversary commemorative calendar. Enjoy the calendar release party with Idaho wine tastings from Potter Wines, Arno chocolates from Twin Falls, and live entertainment. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 745 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-866-4627, wardhooper.com.

EVERMORE PRINTS—Evermore Prints presents The Narratives by Samuel Paden. Drop by for original artwork, lively conversations and light snacks and beverages by The Mode Lounge. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 780 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-3837, evermoreprints.com. FLATBREAD NEAPOLITAN PIZZERIA—Enjoy happy hour from 4-6 p.m. with 50 percent off all cocktails, beer and wine. After 5 p.m., you’ll get 20 percent off all bottles of wine until they’re gone. Kids under 12 eat FREE with the purchase of an adult meal. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 800 W. Main St., Boise, 208287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com. JAMBA JUICE—Enjoy free samples of premium freshly squeezed juices, including all natural fresh produce, all day long. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 132 N.

Eighth St., Boise, 208-658-1765, jambajuice.com. JUNIPER—Wine in Freak Alley: Kick off Idaho Wine Month with a tasting and live music against the backdrop of Freak Alley. All proceeds benefit the Idaho Wine Scholarship Fund. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation. 211 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-1142, juniperon8th.com. LUX FASHION LOUNGE—If you’re in the market for new and resale men’s and women’s clothing for a fraction of retail price, then LUX is the boutique for you. Check out their unique selection of jewelry, hats and purses. Plus different local art in store each month. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 817 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-4589, facebook.com/ Lux-Fashion-Lounge.

GALLERY FIVE18

CHANDLERS—Enjoy some special new bites at Chandlers New Social Hour from 4-6 p.m., featuring a menu of delicious small plates and creative cocktails, all priced between $5-$7. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 981 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com. THE CHOCOLAT BAR—Father’s Day is just around the corner. Show the dads in your life how special they are with handmade artisan chocolates and beer. Cloud 9 Brewery will be sampling select beers with the chocolates. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 805 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208338-7771, thechocolatbar.com. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOM—Take advantage of specials on products as well as audio/visual presentations on spiritual healing based on the Bible. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 222 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-3445301, cschurchboise.org/readingroom.html. COSTA VIDA—The coast is calling at Costa Vida downtown. Surf in for the best beach-inspired fresh Mexican food now available downtown, on the Grove. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 801 W. Main St., Boise, 208-429-4109, costavida.net. DOWNTOWN BOISE ASSOCIATION—Get in on the fun with the First Thursday Scavenger Hunt in Downtown Boise and maybe win a $30 Downtown Boise gift card. Visit six of the listed scavenger hunt locations and look for a logo card that features a fun fact about downtown. Take a photo or write down the fun fact, and send them to info@downtownboise.org to be entered to win a gift card. To see this month’s scavenger hunt locations, pick up a copy of Boise Weekly or follow #FirstThursdayBoise. 5-9 p.m. FREE, Downtown Boise, downtownboise.org.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

“Tressa in San Francisco,” by Tomas Montano.

TOMAS MONTANO SOLO EXHIBITION

From politics to the weather, these are extreme times. It can be tough to know what or who to believe, and uncertainty and mistrust can throw people off their groove. That’s not the case with local artist (and former BW staffer) Tomas Montano. His work embraces extremes of color, material and subject matter but finds balance in the artist’s wealth of craftsmanship and talent. Montano’s new solo exhibition at Gallery Five18, everything needn’t always be something, is a case study in how riotous color and a graffiti-esque sense of line, run through a powerful sense of equilibrium can radiate equanimity and warmth. The works presented in everything emphasize Montano’s media mastery, with images, symbols and textures layered in such a way that each viewing can reveal a new element or idea—you may find you can’t live without a little something hanging in your home. Opening reception: 5-9 p.m., FREE. 518 S. Americana Blvd., 208-342-3773, galleryfive18.com. BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 9


FIRST THURSDAY MCU SPORTS—Check out McU’s Bike Maintenance Clinic (5:30-6:30 p.m.), where interested bikers of any experience level can learn keep their bikes in good condition between tune-ups. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 822 W. Jefferson St., boise, 208-342-7734, mcusports.com. MIXED GREENS—Tastings from Williamson Winery and Backcountry Bars, and art from Chique Lixo and Paint and Bone. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 237 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-344-1605, ilikemixedgreens.com.

THE MODE LOUNGE—Callie Ann James presents a series of drawings featuring beautiful objects in various stages of vitality and decay. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 800 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-342-6633, themodelounge.com. THE NORTH FACE—Check out the new USA Collection, great for that Fourth of July barbecue, summer Olympic viewing, or just the next adventure in the great outdoors. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 802 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-331-9790, stores.thenorthface.com/id/boise/USA35.

OLD CHICAGO—Enjoy happy hour 4-7 p.m., with appetizer and drink specials, $1 off all pints and $3 well cocktails. Kids eat free all summer Monday-Thursday. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-0037, oldchicago.com. REDISCOVERED BOOKS—Join acclaimed wilderness photographer Mark Lisk to celebrate the release of his new coffeetable book, Sawtooth-White Cloud. Lisk and writer Nicole LeFavour bring to life the stark beauty of these high places.

5-9 p.m. FREE. 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

City. They’ll have some goodies to share. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 176 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-433-9333, scottrade.com.

SAGE YOGA AND WELLNESS—Check out Integrating the Light of Divinity, the new show by Sage yoga teacher Sarah Nesbitt, and enjoy wine tastings by Indian Creek Winery and beginner yoga with Bonnie Oshea 5:30-7 p.m. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 242 N. Eighth St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-338-5430, sageyogaboise.com.

SNAKE RIVER TEA CO.—Join Snake River Tea for BOGO 12 oz. tea drinks and 30 percent off all loose leaf tea purchases. As always, you’ll get three free daily tea samples to try before you buy. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 801 W. Main St., Boise, 208-841-9746, facebook.com/SnakeRiverTeaCo.

SCOTTRADE SECURITIES—Drop by and say hello to the Scottrade team and the newest team member from Salt Lake

THE STUDIO: AN ELITE SALON AND SPA—Check out the grand opening of Bobbi Bullock Medical Esthetics located in The Studio. There’ll be door prizes, wine, desert, art, music and special pricing all night with Bobbi Bullock, certified nurse practitioner. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 702 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-577-6252, facebook.com/ TheStudioAnEliteSalonAndSpa. SUPERB SUSHI—Swing on down and sample some awesome wines and in-house smoked salmon samples. Unlimited $1 nigiri with the purchase of any sushi roll all night long. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 280 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208385-0123, superbsushidowntown.com.

east side THE AMSTERDAM LOUNGE—Visit the comfy Amsterdam Lounge and take in live music by Jake Ineck and work by local artists. Indulge in a delicious wine tasting or a satiating coffee cocktail. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 609 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3459515, boisesbestbars.com/ amsterdam. BARDENAY—Catch the distillers and tour the distillery to find out all you want to know about our nation’s first small batch distillery pub. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 610 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-426-0538, bardenay.com. CAPITOL CELLARS—Enjoy 25 percent off Idaho wines by the bottle and Pinney’s Potato Croquettes for $7.50 starting at 5 p.m. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 110 S. Fifth St., Boise, 208-344-9463, capitolcellarsllc.com. FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—See Minerva Jayne’s Selfie-Ish art show, featuring her irreverent, body-positive self-portraits that explore the fantasies of personal identity. Plus live advice (6-9 p.m.) from Minerva Jayne. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. GUIDO’S ORIGINAL NEW YORK STYLE PIZZERIA— Enjoy pizza with an attitude. You get a large one-topping pizza and one bottle of select wine, two bottles of beer, or four fountain sodas for only $22. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 235 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-345-9011, guidosdowntown.com. HIGH NOTE CAFE—Live music by Megan Nelson begins at 6 p.m. You can enjoy $2 specialty mimosas with homemade juice all day. Plus a from-scratch menu and local art for sale. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-429-1911, thehighnotecafe.com. IDAHO MADE—Don’t miss the second annual Seconds Sale at this unique local and handmade gift shop . You’ll see new works by members, and get great deals on seconds. Refreshments will be served. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 108 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-830-9450. THE MELTING POT—Take advantage of the First Thursday 2-for-$22 special: cheese fondue for two and two glasses of house wine. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 200 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-343-8800, meltingpot.com/boise. TRADER JOE’S—Join Trader Joe’s for some tasty treats. As usual, they’ll do a tasting of some of their favorite products along with beer and wine. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 300 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-336-7282, traderjoes.com. ZEE’S ROOFTOP CAFE—Enjoy live music by Douglas Cameron, plus a $5 wine tasting to benefit Boise MS. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 250 S. Fifth St., Boise, 208-381-0034, facebook.com/zeesrooftopdeli.

south side ATOMIC TREASURES—Stop in and check out the collection of vintage, retro, art and found objects. You’ll find decorative and unique treasures for home, jewelry, books, collectibles, vintage ephemera. Lots of weird stuff, cool junk, unusual and unforgettable gifts. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Ste. 105, Boise, 208-344-0811.

10 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


FIRST THURSDAY BODOVINO—Drop by for a complimentary wine tasting and local art. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 404 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-8466, bodovino. com.

for any occasion. They’ll also be featuring gift ideas for the special dads in your life. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com.

BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY—Kick off your summer with a movie. You’ll enjoy an animated film (2015, PG) about a young girl named Riley growing up with her emotions. Plus crafts, coloring and popcorn. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Celebrate Idaho Wine Month with great specials all month long, including buy-3-get-1-free deals. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-345-9463, snakeriverwinery. com/tasting.

BONEFISH GRILL—Celebrate Idaho Wine Month at Bonefish. All Idaho wines will be half off with purchase. Plus $6 Bang Bang Shrimp all day. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 855 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-433-1234, bonefishgrill.com. FRESH OFF THE HOOK SEAFOOD—Enjoy $2 off all beer on tap, wine and appetizers, such as Calamari Strips, Seared Ahi, Crab Cakes and more. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 401 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0220, freshoffthehookseafood.com.

SOLID GRILL & BAR—Don’t miss out on the free tasting, free art show, and free appetizers. Plus 2-for-1 drinks and live music. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620, solidboise.com. TRAILHEAD—The Rescued Film Project presents Lost and Forgotten, a collection of iconic and fleeting photographic works

rescued from lost and forgotten rolls of film. The selection explores private, sentimental, curious and everyday moments lost and forgotten by time. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 500 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-5483, trailheadboise.org.

west side THE ALASKA CENTER—Chi E Shenam Westin introducing oil paintings of the Boise River, Spring Awakening. Allan Ansell open studio, with complimentary portraits. Joseph Pacheco fine pen and ink drawings and cards. Judson Cottrell full new body of fractal art; Radio Boise open house. Candice Andrews fine art wedding photography and full-service photography experience. Kathl Whitacre premiere

REDISCOVERED BOOKS

HA’ PENNY BRIDGE IRISH PUB— Enjoy 20 percent off your food and drinks. Plus live music and an outside deck for you to enjoy. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 855 Broad St., Boise, 208-343-5568, hapennybridgepub. com.

R. GREY JEWELRY GALLERY— Celebrate the accomplishment of graduation with art, the perfect gift

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BEN & JERRY’S SCOOP SHOP— As always, enjoy $1 scoops all day on First Thursday. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 103 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-3421992, benjerry.com.

RADIO BOISE— Drop by and check out Radio Boise’s open studio. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1020 W. Main St., Alaska Building, Ste. 200, Boise, 208-424-8166, radioboise.org. SACA ENTERTAINMENT—Enjoy music in the atrium by SACA Entertainment. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1020 W. Main St., Boise.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE

BOISE ART GLASS—Watch free demos or take a class while cooling off with a snow cone from special guest Kona Ice of Boise. Class: Make Your Own Tumbler $40. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

FIREFUSION STUDIO—Have fun at FireFusion Studio getting creative with sterling silver foil shapes and glass enamel. You can also make your very own glass tumbler with Boise Art Glass, perfect for a cold beverage on a hot day or warm evening. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

JUMP—Building tours begin on the half hour while tractor tours begin on the hour. Both tours will launch from the lobby, below the large orange JUMP sign along Ninth Street. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1000 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-389-7605, jacksurbanmeetingplace.org.

QUE PASA—Enjoy the best in Mexican expression, featuring thousands of items from Mexican master craftsmen: Sterling silver, pottery, blown glass, Talavera, dragons, fairies, mermaids and Day of The Dead. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018.

ART SOURCE GALLERY—In Reflections of the Lost and Found, Anne Watson Sorensen reveals how her paintings evolve. She must lose good things in order to find deeper, richer ways to paint the desired outcome. Plus music by John Sorensen. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

XTREME FITNESS AND WELLNESS—Enjoy fresh fruit and veggie smoothies as you check out Xtreme’s workout facility in connection with Endurance Boise. Owners and coaches who will be available to answer any questions you may have about your fitness program. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1114 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 310-489-0828, xtremefitnessandwellness.com.

DISTRICT COFFEE HOUSE—Writer and photographer Mike Medbury will be showing his work at the District for the month of June. Enjoy pour-over tastings. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-3431089, districtcoffeehouse.com.

HAPPY FISH SUSHI AND MARTINI BAR—Enjoy a 20 percent discount on Happy Fish’s great sushi, which is rolled to order and made with the freshest ingredients. They also have a full bar. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 855 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-3434810, happyfishsushi.com.

MR. PEABODY’S OPTICAL SHOPPE—Mr. Peabody’s is always getting in new frame styles, with frame and single-vision lenses starting at $95. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Ste. 101, Boise, 208-344-1390, mrpeabodysoptical.com.

ALLAN R. ANSELL PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC—Featuring an open studio, with complimentary portraits. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Alaska Center, 1020 W. Main St., Boise, 208-863-2808, ansellphotography.com.

THE OWYHEE—See local actors perform favorite monologues, show tunes and short scenes in the lobby of the Owyhee. Featuring happy hour appetizers and beverages. Free street parking after 6 p.m. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, theowyhee.com.

CHI E SHENAM WESTIN—Enjoy paintings of the Boise River, Spring Unfolding. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Alaska Center, 1020 W. Main St., Boise, fineartamerica.com/profiles/ chieshenam-westin.html.

HAIRLINES—If it’s time for a new DU, head to Hairlines, home of Lui The Hair Whisperer. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3839009.

LABRY FINE ART—LaBry Fine Art, Mouvance Winery, and Bodovino join forces to offer exceptional paintings, photographs and sculpture, and an excellent wine-tasting experience. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Eighth Street Marketplace, 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 166, Boise, 505-4014534.

exhibition of hand-thrown zen tea ware and pottery. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1020 W. Main St., Boise.

A mountainous achievement.

SAWTOOTH WHITE CLOUD BOOK SIGNING

President Barack Obama signed a landmark bill into law in August 2015 designating the Boulder-White Clouds as wilderness area. The bill, H.R. 1138, established separate wildland units protecting the Hemingway-Boulders Wilderness, Boulder-White Clouds Wilderness and Jim McClure-Jerry Peak Wilderness. Whatever your side in the debate over what to do—or not to do— with Idaho’s wildland spaces, it’s worth the hike to Rediscovered Books to join acclaimed photographer Mark Lisk and local marquee writer (and BW columnist) Nicole LeFavour at a signing party for their new coffee table book, Sawtooth White Cloud, which features images and language depicting the stark, high-mountain beauty, deep-cut valleys, jagged peaks and crystalline lakes of the Sawtooths. 7 p.m., FREE. 180 N. Eighth St., 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

FOOT DYNAMICS—Save an additional 10 percent off all items already on sale. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1021 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3863338. GALLERY 601—Help Gallery 601 celebrate 35 years business. You’ll want to take advantage of their 3.5 hour sale, with 35 percent off all artwork, books and figurines. You can also enter to win a framed work of art. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 211 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-336-5899, gallery601.com. GALLERY FIVE18—Check out everything needn’t always be something, a solo exhibit of new works by Tomas Montano. The exhibit runs through June 30. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 518 S. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-342-3773, galleryfive18.com. LANEIGE BRIDAL AND TUX—Stop by and find the dress of your dreams at LaNeige Bridal. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Alaska Center, 1020 W. Main St., Ste. 104, Boise, 208-5140439, laneigebridal.com.

Personality personified.

MINERVA JAYNE’S “SELFIE-ISH”

She’s a sought-after emcee, comedian, performer, columnist (see Page 30) and artist. Minerva Jayne also has the personality to match her talents, and is exploring one while showing off the other at Flying M Coffeehouse. Join Boise’s blonde bombshell on First Thursday for the opening of her new art show, Selfie-Ish, which she describes as “irreverent, body-positive self-portraits [that] explore the fantasies of personal identity.” The opening is set to run from 5-9 p.m., but if you need some advice on your own personality (or just have a question you’d like answered), MJ will present a live version of her Boise Weekly column, “Minerva’s Breakdown: Advice for Those on the Verge,” 6-9 p.m. Attendees are encouraged to submit questions—anonymously, of course—for consideration. Selfie-Ish hangs at Flying M through June and proceeds benefit Jayne’s transition goals. Opening reception: 5-9 p.m.; “Minvera’s Breakdown” live: 6-9 p.m.; FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 11


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 On Stage ALIVE AFTER FIVE: KALEO—Kick off 2016’s Alive After Five with Kaleo, the Iceland-based alternative band. With The Wind + The Wave. 5 p.m. FREE. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise.

Art 37TH ANNUAL IDAHO WATERCOLOR SOCIETY JURIED MEMBERSHIP EXHIBITION—This exhibition showcases a glimpse of the breadth of styles the medium can achieve and highlights watercolor artists throughout Idaho. Through June 26. 7:15 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State SUB, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242. finearts.boisestate.edu.

CRATERS OF THE MOON—Craters of the Moon is an exhibition in two parts, one at Craters of the Moon National Monument near Arco, and one at The Center in Ketchum. Coinciding with the National Park Service Centennial, the exhibition at The Center features work by five artists, each considering Craters of the Moon from different points of view. Plus, the Center has commissioned two of the artists to create large-scale, site-specific sculptures that will be located at the monument this summer before being relocated to sites in Ketchum in the fall. Through July 30. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491. sunvalleycenter. org/visual-arts/upcoming-exhibitions. TALL TALES: NARRATIVES FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION— Tall Tales presents a stunning arrangement of narrative works from Boise Art Museum’s Permanent Collection. The exhibition explores the ways in which artists—from today and yesterday—use a visual language to tell tales. Through April

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

, 9, 2017. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. TOUCHMARK SPRING ART SHOW—Check out works by professional Treasure Valley artists, featuring unique art full of color and in various forms of media. Through June 4. 8 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Touchmark at Meadow Lake Village, 4037 E. Clocktower Lane, Meridian, 208-789-0064, touchmarkmeridian.com. TVAA: CELEBRATING PIPEDREAMS—In celebration of National Public Radio’s season of shows, Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance members draw inspiration from the “King of Instruments” featured every Sunday on NPR’s pipe organ-centric program, Pipedreams. Through July 1. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-4263663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance. org.

The best day of the year for the approximate 26,000 K-12 students in the Boise School District is Thursday, June 2—the last day of classes. That’s only the half of it, though. Later that day, all six outdoor public swimming pools will open for the summer. Youth season swim passes start at $30 for Boise residents, and a family pass for residents is $114 and covers up to five family members, including at least one adult. For some one-time-only fun, family swim nights are every Wednesday and on weekends, with a family rate of $9. Swimming lessons are also available at all six pools, and eight 25-minute classes are offered Mondays-Thursdays in two-week sessions. Get more information at parks.cityofboise.org June 2-Sept. 5, prices vary. Borah, Fairmont, Ivywild, Lowell, South pools and the Natatorium, parks.cityofboise.org/parkslocations/pools. 12 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

Literature BPL SUMMER FEST KICKOFF AND REGISTRATION PARTY—Boise Public Library kicks off its 2016 Summer Fest reading program with parties at all four locations. Readers of all ages are invited to have some goodies and get registered for summer reading. The program runs June 1-July 31, and is open to Boise residents with a public library card and their children. Kids and teens get a free book when they register. Online registration is available. 3-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-972-8320. boisepubliclibrary. org/summerreading.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JUNE 3-4

Splish splash.

BOISE POOLS OPENING DAY

TVAA: MY FAVORITE THINGS— Check out this exciting, colorfully diverse exhibition of works by members of the largest local artist collective in the state. Through June 2. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Initial Point Gallery, Merdian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway St., Meridian, 208-8884433, meridiancity.org.

Sports & Fitness FITONE NATIONAL RUNNING DAY 2016 REGISTRATION LAUNCH—Join FitOne Boise for National Running Day any time from midnight to midnight on June 1 to register for FitOne’s Sept. 24 5K, 10K, Half Marathon. In addition to one-dayonly special pricing, you’ll also receive the 2016 FitOne Fit For Summer Package, with free 30-day membership to Axiom Fitness, $10 off at Shu’s Idaho Running Company, and 10 percent off at Albertsons. Plus exercise equipment will be set up so you can take your pledge to be healthy. $20. Village at Meridian, 3600 E. Fairview Ave. at North Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-888-1701, fitoneboise.org/ race/launch.

Citizen

Among the many great things about Greece are Alexander The Great and the ancient nation’s food. Boise’s own Greek Food Festival celebrates 35 years of greatness—two more than Alexander did—with another spread of souvlaki, dolmathes and gyros Friday, June 3-Saturday, June 4 at Sts. Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church. Mow down on Mediterranean delights 11 a.m.-9 p.m. both days and enjoy entertainment including Greek music and dancing. No Greek feast would be complete without diners joining the dance floor, but if your Kalamatianos is calamitous, don’t worry—free Greek dance lessons will be on offer. Cost to attend is a donation of $1, while kids under 12 get in free—a pittance to pay for a taste of greatness. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. ; $1 donation, kids under 12 FREE. Sts. Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 2618 W. Bannock St., 208-761-6087, boisegreekfestival.com.

CITIZENS’ COMMITTEE ON LEGISLATIVE COMPENSATION MEETING—The Citizens’ Committee on Legislative Compensation will meet to review the 2016 Change in Employee Compensation for state employees and elected officials. In House Wing Room EW42. (The meeting will also be streamed live on Idaho Public Television.) 10 a.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208433-9705, capitolcommission. idaho.gov.

BOISE PARKS DEPT. FRANKLIN PARK INPUT MEETING—Boise Parks

FRIDAYS, JUNE 3-AUG. 26

Greek out on Mediterranean fare.

GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL

and Rec invites neighbors of the undeveloped old Franklin School site to a public meeting, where department staff members will present conceptual designs for the city-owned three-acre parcel. Input provided by the public will be used to define the design for the Franklin site. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-9728340, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Air time.

MERIDIAN MOVIE NIGHT

Sure, you could spend your Friday nights watching the 500th episode of whatever TV show you’ve been binging, but if you’re going to watch something anyway, why not take it outside? The Cabelone Movie Night in Meridian outdoor film series kicks off Friday, June 3 at Settlers Park, with a screening of the 2015 Oscar-winning animated feature Inside Out, a funny, affecting, whimsical exploration of childhood for the whole family. On June 10, Walt Disney’s 1937 classic Snow White and the Seven Dwarves hits the big screen, followed by a new classic, 2015’s Minions, featuring everyone’s favorite yellow, pill-shaped troublemakers who just want a villain to love. All screenings start at dusk and are free to attend. No smoking or alcohol is allowed at these family friendly events. Movies begin at dusk, FREE. Settlers Park, 3245 N. Meridian Rd., Meridian, 208-888-4433, meridiancity.org/movienight. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR THURSDAY JUNE 2

Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200. boisepubliclibrary. org/summerreading.

Festivals & Events 2016 IDAHO STATE GOP CONVENTION—It’s three days of “faith, family, freedom and firearms” at the 2016 Idaho GOP state convention. 10 a.m. FREE. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter. com. BPL SUMMER FEST KICKOFF AND REGISTRATION PARTY— Boise Public Library is kicking off its 2016 Summer Fest reading program with a big party at each of its four locations. Readers of all ages are invited to join the fun, have some goodies and get registered for summer reading. The program runs June 1-July 31, and is open to Boise residents with a public library card and their children. Kids and teens get a free book when they register. Online registration is also available. 4-5:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public

FIRST THURSDAY IN DOWNTOWN BOISE— First Thursday takes place throughout downtown Boise from 5-9 p.m. and focuses on providing visitors the chance to stroll through the unique shops and galleries in downtown, while enjoying in-store entertainment and special events. See a special section elsewhere in this issue of Boise Weekly. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Downtown Boise, 208-4725251, downtownboise.org. JULIA DAVIS PARK DOCENT TOURS—Designed for enthusiasts of local history and those new to Boise, the Julia Davis Park Docent Tours offer visitors an introduction to Boise’s flagship park on First Thursdays, May through October. Volunteer docents identify sites and markers of historic significance, revealing why Julia Davis Park is the cultural and historic heart of Boise. Registration is required online or by calling 208-338-9108. 4-5:30

SATURDAY, JUNE 4

p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-3389108, juliadavispark.org.

On Stage BLT: FLAMING IDIOTS—Through June 4. 7:30 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater. org/current-season. COMEDIAN OLEK SZEWCZYK—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDY OPEN MIC WITH MIKEY PULLMAN—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. OUTLAW FIELD: TONY BENNETT—See the Grammy Award-winning singer perform at the Idaho Botanical Garden. 7 p.m. $53-$102. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: CHICAGO— Enjoy Broadway’s longest-running American musical, a dazzling and satirical look at fame, justice and the media machine set in the 1920s. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208-498-0571, spotlight-theatre.com/currentproduction.html. STAGE COACH: THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL—7:30 p.m. $17.50. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Art

Kids rule the road.

SAINT ALPHONSUS CAPITOL CLASSIC

Thousands of kids screaming with delight as they run down the middle of Capitol Boulevard is a pretty great sight. Now in its 34th year, the Saint Alphonsus Capitol Classic Race is a one-mile (mostly downhill) burst of energy from the Boise Depot to the State Capitol. This year’s event will step off one hour earlier than past events, so motorists take note: Kids will rule the road starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 4. Hundreds of volunteers will be handing out T-shirts, refreshments and an Olympic-style medal to participants. Parents, if you haven’t yet signed up your young ones (the race is open to kids ages 6 to 14), you can still register at saintalphonsus. org/capitol-classic. The fee is $25 and proceeds benefit children’s health programs at Saint Al’s. No child will be left out—all abilities are welcome and assistance is available for those unable to pay. 10 a.m., $25. Boise Depot to Idaho Capitol, 208-367-3997, saintalphonsus.org/capitol-classic. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

EAGLE PLEIN AIR FESTIVAL— More than 50 artists will visit paint, draw, and sketch the natural landscape in the 2016 Eagle Plein Air Festival and Competition. Meet the artists at the reception June 2, take a painting lesson June 3, and watch the Quick Draw Competition or create your own work of art June 4. At the closing Exhibition and Awards Reception June 4 5-8 p.m., the public can view and purchase these visions of Eagle. 5-7 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-8889898, eaglepleinairfestival.com.

Citizen A TIME FOR LOVE TONY BENNETT PRE-CONCERT BENEFIT— Make this concert an evening to remember with drinks and hors d’oeuvres in the English Garden before enjoying the legendary crooner on reserved seats in the first rows. Call the IBG box office at 208-3438649 for reservations. 5:30-7 p.m. $200. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org/events/a-time-for-love.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 13


CALENDAR Food CREATE COMMON GOOD SUPPERCLUB— Join Chef Katy Osuna for an Idaho version of the menu that won her the San Francisco Culinary Clash March 6 at the Michelinstarred restaurant LUCE. Courses include savory cannoli and crostini; ricotta gnudi with dandelion green pea pesto and brown butter; pollo al mattone with spiced ricotta, seasonal vegetables and whey foam; and panna cotta with lavender-gin granita, pistachio crumble and rhubarb. 6 p.m. $95. Create Common Good Kitchen, 2513 S. Federal Way, Ste. 104, Boise, 208-2586800, createcommongood.org/ experience-ccg/supperclub.

FRIDAY JUNE 3 Festivals & Events 2016 IDAHO STATE GOP CONVENTION—8:30 a.m. FREE. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com.

On Stage AFRICAN CHILDREN’S CHOIR— The African Children’s Choir will melt your heart with their charming smiles, beautiful voices and lively African songs and dances. The program features well-loved children’s songs, traditional Spirituals and Gospel favorites. A free-will offering will be taken to support ACC programs, such as education, care and relief and development programs. 7 p.m. FREE. First Presbyterian Church, 950 W. State St., Boise, 208-345-3441, africanchildrenschoir.com.

Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. JAY OWENHOUSE—Don’t miss your chance to see Jay Owenhouse, a legendary escape artists and one of the most awarded illusionists in history, who appears for one night only in Dare to Believe! 7:30 p.m. $25-$64. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com. PROJECT FLUX 2016— Check out Project Flux’s full-length dance concert featuring the re-staging of influential company works premiered the past few years, including Successive. Stagnant., a collaboration with Ballet Idaho that premiered in March; and M.A.S.H., which debuted in 2014. A public reception will follow each concert, with complimentary food and beverages. 8 p.m. $20. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy Annex, 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0556, balletidaho.org. SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: CHICAGO—7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208-498-0571. spotlight-theatre.com/currentproduction.html.

STAGE COACH: THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL—8 p.m. $17.50. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. STARLIGHT: FIDDLER ON THE ROOF—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com. SUN VALLEY FESTIVAL JAZZ PARTY WEEKEND—Join the Sun Valley Jazz and Music Festival for this three-day Jazz Party. A mix of artists will float across genres and provide you with a matchless musical experience. Visit the event website for a complete schedule. Call 1-877-478-5277 to reserve your seat. 6 p.m. $75 single, $239-$339 passes. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City. 1-877-4785277, sunvalleyjazz.com/riverside.

Art ART IN THE GARDEN OPENING CEREMONY— Help the Idaho Botanical Garden celebrate the arrival of sculptures created using recycled steel and other materials by the late Dr. Max Kaslo at the opening ceremony of the Gregory and Kay Hardy Kaslo Art in the Garden pro-

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

BLT: FLAMING IDIOTS—8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104. boiselittletheater.org/currentseason/. COMEDIAN OLEK SZEWCZYK—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com. ISF: LOVE’S LABOR’S LOST—When a king decrees that his court be free of women so that he and his men may study without distraction, what could possibly go wrong? Nothing, until a beautiful princess and her delectable entourage pay a visit and put the men’s resolve to the ultimate test. Love letters gone awry set in motion a series of hysterical misadventures that turns the court topsy-turvy in a hilarious Shakespearean study of “Wooing 101.” 8 p.m. $20-$27. Idaho

14 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR gram. There will be hors d’oeuvres by Willowcreek Grill and a cash bar. Make your reservations online or by calling the IBG Box Office. 6-9 p.m. $20. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. EAGLE PLEIN AIR FESTIVAL—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-888-9898, eaglepleinairfestival.com. IDAHO WATERCOLOR SOCIETY 37TH ANNUAL JURIED SHOW RECEPTION AND AWARDS CEREMONY—Meet the artists, enjoy refreshments, see all of the incredible paintings, and attend the awards ceremony. The exhibit runs through June 26. 5:30-9 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-1242, idahowatercolorsociety. wildapricot.org. SAMUEL PADEN: THE NARRATIVES—Check out this solo exhibit of recent mixed-media paintings by Samuel Paden. The Narratives focuses on the male figure as a catalyst for a conversation on the crossroads of sexual identity, patriarchy within American culture, and

gender representation. Through June 30. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Evermore Prints, 780 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-3837, facebook. com/SamuelLPaden. TOMAS MONTANO: EVERYTHING NEEDN’T ALWAYS BE SOMETHING—Check out this solo exhibition of new works by Tomas Montano, everything needn’t always be something. Through June 30. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gallery Five18, 518 S. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-342-3773, galleryfive18.com.

Food GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL—Enjoy wholesome and delicious authentic Greek food, plus family fun for everyone. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$1. Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 2618 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-345-6147, boisegreekfestival.com.

SATURDAY JUNE 4

Literature

Festivals & Events

BPL SUMMER READING BOOK SALE—Ramp up your summer reading with some great buys from the Friends of the Boise Public Library. The sale will include fiction, nonfiction, children and youth titles, CDs, VHSs, DVDs and more. Everything will be priced at 50 cents; cash or checks preferred. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary. org/Friends.

2016 IDAHO STATE GOP CONVENTION—8 a.m. FREE. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, fordidahocenter.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287, facebook.com/ TheBoiseFarmersMarket. CANYON COUNTY CO-OP 2016 SUMMER COMMUNITY MARKET—9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Canyon County Co-op, 1415 First St. S., Nampa, 208-960-0328, canyoncounty.coop. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. CFREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Idaho and Jefferson streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through Oct. 15. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. 208-489-8789, cityofeagle.org. FORGET ME NOT FESTIVAL— Check out the Second Annual Forget Me Not Music Festival to benefit the Alzheimer’s Association. There will be local musicians, food vendors, an exercise class, a small car show, therapy animals, and an online auction. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Brookdale Parkcenter (formerly Alterra Wynwood at River Place), 739 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-629-2191, brookdale. com. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Oct. 29. FREE. Nampa Farmers’ Market, Longbranch parking lot, Front and 13th, Nampa, 208-412-3814.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

NPL SUMMER READING KICKOFF CARNIVAL—Join the Nampa Pubic Library to celebrate its Summer Reading Program kickoff. Sign up for the program and enjoy games, vendors, outdoor snacks and more. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800. nampalibrary.org/calendar. OUTPOST DAYS—Enjoy food, vendors, petting zoo, live music, lost art demonstrations, live and silent auctions and more. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Owyhee County Historical Museum, 17085 Basey St., Murphy. 208495-2319, owyheemuseum.org.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 15


CALENDAR TREASURE VALLEY RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL—Enter the royal court of her majesty Marguerite de Valois, queen of France, as she welcomes knights, Vikings, sword fighters, Shakespearean actors and dancers. There will be yummy food and drinks, living history demonstrations, and live music. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. $2-$4, $8 families of 4 or more. Rotary Park Pond, Caldwell, sawtoothrenaissance.com.

ISF: LOVE’S LABOR’S LOST—8 p.m. $20-$27. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

WEST BOISE SATURDAY MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise. 208-322-9464.

STAGE COACH: THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL—8 p.m. $17.50. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

On Stage

STARLIGHT: FIDDLER ON THE ROOF—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

2016 WORLD VILLAGE FEATURE FILM SCREENING: THIS AIN’T NO MOUSE MUSIC!—Take a trip through the heart of American music in the story of Chris Strachwitz and Arhoolie Records. This documentary by Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling chronicles the sounds of great American roots music. Attendees will have the opportunity to stay for an open discussion with Simon following the film. The screening officially marks the beginning of the second annual World Village Fest, taking place June 10-12 in Capitol Park, Downtown Boise. 7 p.m. $12. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, worldvillagefestival.com. AFRICAN SUMMER NIGHT BALL—Headliners The Spirit of Ojah Dance Band plays with the rhythm and spirit of the ojah, fire and love, mixed into one. Ghanaian highlife, reggae and soukous provide beats and intonations, masterfully composed by the artists in the Spirit of Ojah, led by legendary drummer Roger Ocquaye from Ghana. 7 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-342-5553.

SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: CHICAGO—7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208-498-0571, spotlight-theatre.com/currentproduction.html.

SUN VALLEY FESTIVAL JAZZ PARTY WEEKEND—9 a.m.-2 p.m. and 6 p.m. $75 single, $239-$339 passes. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 1-877-478-5277, sunvalleyjazz.com/riverside.

Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org/Friends.

Sports & Fitness LIMBITLESS CHALLENGE TABLE ROCK ASCENT—Join LIMBitless Life for the first event of its kind in Idaho, providing a unique opportunity for the adaptive community to engage in a physical experience that will empower and enable them to go beyond their limits. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $10. Table Rock, Boise, limbitlesslife.org.

Kids & Teens 2016 7TH ANNUAL BOISE WALK FOR CHILDREN WITH APRAXIA— Help support the battle against Apraxia of Speech, a neurological speech disorder that affects roughly one in 1,000 children’s ability to clearly and correctly produce syllables and words. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $12-$25. Guerber Park, 2200 E. Hill Road, Eagle, casana.apraxiakids.org/boisewalk.

Art EAGLE PLEIN AIR FESTIVAL—8 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-8889898, eaglepleinairfestival.com.

Literature BPL SUMMER READING BOOK SALE—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd.,

Food GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL—Enjoy wholesome and delicious authentic Greek food, plus family fun for everyone. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$1. Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 2618 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-345-6147, boisegreekfestival.com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

BLT: FLAMING IDIOTS—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater. org/current-season/. COMEDIAN OLEK SZEWCZYK—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-9914746, boisecomedy.com. FAIR USE—Check out this staged reading of the play exploring Pulitzer Prizewinning author Wallace Stegner’s controversial use of pioneer Boise resident Mary Hallock Foote’s writings. Playwright Sands Hall explores this literary controversy in her comic-drama, while also celebrating the Footes’ lives and accomplishments. 7 p.m. $15. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3980.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

16 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 17


CALENDAR SHORE LODGE WINEMAKERS DINNER FEATURING REVELRY VINTNERS—Experience an exclusive wine pairing guided by Jared Burns, Revelry Vintners’ maverick winemaker and founder. Sip and savor his best bottles of singlevineyard and blends alongside a menu crafted by Shore Lodge’s extraordinary culinary team. 6:30 p.m. $95. Shore LodgeMcCall, 501 W. Lake St., McCall. 208-634-2244, shorelodge.com/ packages/2016-june-winemakers-dinner.

OPERA IDAHO ART SONG RECITAL SERIES—Join Opera Idaho’s Resident Company singers in this series of recitals dedicated to the form of under-produced music called art songs. These non-staged songs often incorporate well-known poems and seasonal themes with complex music and piano. 2:30 p.m. FREE. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise. 208-345-3531, operaidaho.org/ the-season/other-events.

SPECIAL OLYMPICS ROUND UP—Help Special Olympics Idaho fund its plethora of programs while enjoying a catered dinner by MickeyRay’s BBQ, complimentary beer and wine, live and silent auctions, raffle prizes, dancing to Big Wow Band and much more. Purchase tickets online or by emailing shannon@idso.org. 6 p.m. $50. Special Olympics Idaho Headquarters, 199 E. 52nd St., Garden City, 800-915-6510, idso.org.

STAGE COACH: THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL—2 p.m. $17.50. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

A TASTE OF IDAHO WINEMAKER’S DINNER—Crossings Winery is kicking off Idaho Wine Month with their Third Annual Taste of Idaho Winemaker’s Dinner. You’ll enjoy a five-course gourmet meal with wine pairings featuring locally made food and wine from our beautiful state. 5 p.m. $100. Crossings Winery, 1289 W. Madison Ave., Glenns Ferry, 208-3662313, crossingswinery.com.

SUNDAY JUNE 5 Festivals & Events OUTPOST DAYS—8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FREE. Owyhee County Historical Museum, 17085 Basey St., Murphy. 208-495-2319, owyheemuseum.org. TREASURE VALLEY RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL—10 a.m.-5 p.m. $2-$4, $8 families of 4 or more. sawtoothrenaissance.com.

On Stage AFRICAN CHILDREN’S CHOIR— Enjoy the joyous song and dance of the African Children’s Choir. 6 p.m. By donation. Valley Shepherd Church of the Nazarene, 150 W. Maestra St., Meridian, 208-8882141, valleyshepherd.org. COMEDIAN OLEK SZEWCZYK—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ISF: LOVE’S LABOR’S LOST—7 p.m. $20-$27. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

18 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

SUN VALLEY FESTIVAL JAZZ PARTY WEEKEND—10 a.m.-3 p.m. $75 single, $239-$339 passes. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City. 1-877-478-5277, sunvalleyjazz.com/riverside.

Art ART AND ROSES—Don’t miss the 26th annual fine art sale to benefit the Julia Davis Rose Garden fund. You’ll find original art by over 60 local Idaho artists, plus food and music. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise.

Odds & Ends BOISE DEPOT TOURS— Learn about the Boise Depot from expert Eriks Garsvo. This guided tour will highlight the history of the iconic Boise Depot and take guests through the progression of local rail service, from the railroad’s arrival in Boise and construction of the Depot to its years of operation and renovation. The tour finishes with an up-close look at the bells in the 96-foot tower. Space is limited; register online. Noon and 1:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, parks.cityofboise. org/parks-locations/parks/boisedepot.

MONDAY JUNE 6 On Stage STARLIGHT: FIDDLER ON THE ROOF—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-4625523, starlightmt.com.

Art TVAA: SOCIAL SAVVY FOR ARTISTS WITH JESSICA TOOKEY— Join the Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance for a presentation by professional artist Jessica Tookey on “Social Savvy.” Learn how to use social media to drive people to your website and get you more sales and recognition without taking too much of your creative time. Open to the public. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Idaho Parents Unlimited, 4619 Emerald, Ste. E, Boise, 208-342-5884, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

Animals & Pets KEGS4KAUSE: SNIP— Take your friendly four-legged friends, enjoy a cold one, and support Spay Neuter Idaho Pets’ spay and neuter programs. SNIP receives 50 percent of the proceeds from beer sales to support its spay/neuter programs. Plus, a local food truck will be on site. 3-10 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing River Street Taproom, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, 208-344-0011. snipidaho.org.

TUESDAY JUNE 7 Festivals & Events ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL TOURS—Join docents for free 45-minute guided tours of the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial every Tuesday, through October. Meet at the statue of Anne Frank in the Memorial. No reservation required. For all ages. 12:15 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise. 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter.org/events.

On Stage ISF: LOVE’S LABOR’S LOST—8 p.m. $20-$27. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Workshops & Classes MOFFATT THOMAS EMPLOYMENT LAW BREAKFAST BRIEFING—Join the Moffatt Thomas Employment Law team for their semi-annual breakfast briefing. Attendees will receive information on important developments in Idaho employment law that will affect business decisions confronting organizations in the upcoming year. 8-10 a.m. $15. Moffatt Thomas, 101 S. Capitol Blvd., 10th Floor, Boise, 208-345-2000, moffatt.com/news.

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


NOISE STE VE N MAT VIE W

FRANK SINATRA HAS A MOHAWK

Franks and Deans fuse punk and the Rat Pack BEN SCHULTZ Frank Sinatra hated rock and roll when it first emerged in the mid-1950s. In a 1957 article for the French magazine Western World, he called it “the most brutal, ugly, degenerate, vicious form of expression it has been my displeasure to hear.” “It fosters almost totally negative and destructive reactions in young people,” Sinatra added. “It smells phony and false. It is sung, played and written for the most part by cretinous goons and by means of its almost imbeFranks and Deans will play Friday, June cilic reiterations and sly, lewd—in plain fact, 3, and Saturday, June 4, at Tom Grainey’s. dirty—lyrics … it manages to be the martial Both shows will feature performances by local music of every sideburned delinquent on the burlesque dancers as well as Vegas-based dancer face of the earth.” Nickole Muse. Rock and rollers haven’t necessarily held Franks and Deans’ current lineup includes a grudge against the Chairman, though. The members of Las Vegas-based punk band Franks two musicians with strong ties to Boise. Guitarist-vocalist Jordan Hoss led the local punk and Deans, for example, have listened to Old Blue Eyes and his Rat Pack buddies for most of band Switch Hitter in the early- to mid-2000s. Ryan Sampson, who also sings and plays guitar, their lives. “These songs have always been pushed down fronted the local ska-punk band The PirkQlaters around the same time. our throats by everybody—our grandparents, The newest recruit to the band, Sampson music teachers,” said bassist-vocalist Rob joined in 2014 after getting a phone call from DeTie. Hoss. When his friend explained the concept of Still, DeTie’s love for the songs made famous by Sinatra and his associates inspired him the band, he wondered, “How has nobody even thought of this?” to form the band. “We get that a lot from “Obviously, Me First [and FRANKS AND DEANS other local bands around the Gimme Gimmes] and other Friday, June 3 and Saturday, here,” Sampson said. “Everybands that have done punk rock June 4; 10 p.m.; FREE. Tom body’s just mad because they covers have inspired it,” he said. Grainey’s, 109 S. Sixth St., 208didn’t come up with it first.” “But I was just sitting back and 345-2505, tomgraineys.com. That last remark might was like, ‘Man, this stuff needs to be slightly tongue-in-cheek: be brought back to life.’” When Sampson talked to Boise Weekly, he So far, DeTie and his bandmates have sucstressed the supportiveness of the Vegas music ceeded at that goal. Franks and Deans’ debut scene. album, How Did You All Get in My Room? “It’s no secret that I was trying to get out (Squidhat Records, 2015), balances raucousness and reverence as it reinvents such Rat Pack [of Boise] for a long time,” he said. “I kept moving somewhere and moving back, movchestnuts as “Ain’t That a Kick in the Head,” ing somewhere and moving back. And I don’t “The Lady is a Tramp” and “Mr. Bojangles.” know, man—this place is hopping. If there’s a The group has become a fixture of the Vegas local show, you’re gonna have a crowd. It’s the rock scene, hosting the Franks and Deans damnedest thing that I’m not used to. … And Weenie Roast at the Double Down Saloon the all the local bands show up for the other local first Wednesday of every month and opening bands. It’s one big family.” for acts like Jello Biafra, The Toasters and The When Vegas concert-goers check out the Reverend Horton Heat. B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

Chairmen of the board.

Franks and Deans Weenie Roast, they get something memorable. “It is the dancing girls,” Sampson said, “but there’s magicians, there’s comedians. We had a midget onstage; he took his shirt off and people were stapling dollars to him. It gets chaotic. Punk rock Ed Sullivan Show.” There’s more to Franks and Deans than sensationalism, though. The band will often play four-hour sets and can spend months working on arrangements for different songs. According to Sampson and DeTie, their version of “Luck Be a Lady” proved especially hard to figure out. “They were working on that before I even came down,” Sampson said. “We tried everything—flamenco guitar, you name it. And Hoss actually locked himself in the music room and somehow connected Madness’s ‘Night Boat to Cairo,’ ‘Luck Be a Lady’ and ‘Ghost Town’ by The Specials.” The band’s repertoire keeps growing, too. “Originally, it was just Rat Pack songs,” Sampson said. “And then we started throwing Bobby Darin in there. Now, it’s just crooners in general—like, still within that ’40s to early-’60s music of Vegas. … We’re gonna have almost 60 songs in our arsenal.” Working on so many covers doesn’t leave the band’s members much time for writing original songs. DeTie doesn’t mind, though. “I still do a little bit of writing myself, but Franks is my main focus,” he said. Sampson felt the same way. “Basically, what we’re trying to do is take the old Great American Songbook and make it ‘listenable’ for the younger people,” he said. “And it’s fucking working.” BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 19


LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: KALEO—Kick off the 2016 season of Alive After Five at the Basque Block with Kaleo, the Iceland-based alternative pop-rock-blues band. With The Wind + The Wave opening. 5 p.m. FREE. Basque Block

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: KALEO, JUNE 1

JJ Julius Son might have met two of his three bandmates as gradeschoolers in their hometown outside Reykjavik, but he sounds like he’s from Iceland by way of Arkansas. On “Way Down We Go,” Julius Son belts out a trudging blues march with vocals that leap from baritone growls to gravelly Southern-tinged wails to yelps that sound like they were learned in the holler. A listener would be hard pressed to peg an “Icelandic influence” to Kaleo’s amalgam of indie folk, rock and blues, but there is something buried in Kaleo’s sound that undeniably sets it apart from its American counterparts. It might be that the band, now based in Austin, creates something like a super-refined dose of everything audiences love about its stated influences but without the genres’ formulae. —Zach Hagadone With The Wind + The Wave, 5 p.m., FREE. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, downtownboise.org.

20 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio VON STOMPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM—Open jam hosted by The Blind Mice. 8 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

ANDY CORTENS TRIO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THURSDAY JUNE 2

CARMEL CROCK AND KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Sofia’s

ARBOR LABOR UNION—8 p.m. $8. Flying M Coffeegarage

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DALE CAVANAUGH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY: CURTIS SALGADO, THE ORIGINAL BLUES BROTHER—Modern-day Blues icon Curtis Salgado, the man who inspired the original Blues Brother in 1977, brings his high-energy show to Boise, a CD Release Party for his latest album, The Beautiful Lowdown. 7:30 p.m. $20-$25 adv., $25-$30 door. Sapphire

ECLYPSE KARAOKE NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Eclypse ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KARAOKE—8 p.m. FREE. High Note PURE BATHING CULTURE—With Aged Ex-Champion and Up is The Down is The. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio

A FILM IN COLOR—With Batholith, and Epistolary. 8 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MAX PAIN AND THE GROOVIES—8 p.m. $5. The Olympic MEGAN NELSON—6:30 p.m. FREE. High Note OUTLAW FIELD: TONY BENNETT—7 p.m. $53-$102. Idaho Botanical Garden

FRIDAY JUNE 3 AFRICAN CHILDREN’S CHOIR—7 p.m. FREE. First Presbyterian Church, 950 W. State St., Boise BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 CAITLIN ANNE WEBSTER—With Andrew Sheppard. 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s CLASSICAL REVOLUTION—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District DUELING PIANOS ON THE PATIO—6 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GREAT BAIT—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

Kings of Love KINGS OF LOVE TOUR—With Bobby V, J Holiday, and Pleasure P. 8 p.m. $25-$60. Revolution KUTT CALHOUN—With Whitney Peyton, Sincerely Collins, Zero and Northfresh Entertainment. 8 p.m. $12. Salon Eden, 6125 W. Fairview PARIAH REIGN POWERHOUSE TAKEOVER—With Sautrah, Onslo, No Friends, Juice Kings, Stux and Born. 8 p.m. $10. PowerHouse REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill VOICE OF REASON—10 p.m. $5. Reef

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


MUSIC GUIDE WAYNE WORTHEN—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio WHITAKER AND OLIVER—7:30 p.m. FREE. High Note

SATURDAY JUNE 4 AFRICAN SUMMER NIGHT BALL—With The Spirit of Ojah Dance Band .7 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Mardi Gras THE BEST LYRES—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill BRENDA RAY AND HALEY JOHNSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District BRETT DENNEN—With Firekid. 8 p.m. $25. Egyptian CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SAM BEAM (OF IRON & WINE) AND JESCA HOOP—8 p.m. $30$34.50. Egyptian SONO FUEGO—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio THOMAS PAUL—11 a.m. FREE. High Note WOH SUNDAYS—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

MONDAY JUNE 6

TUESDAY JUNE 7 BPL SUMMER FEST CONCERT SERIES: THOMAS PAUL—With Bob Nagel, Todd Chavez and Eric Dewitt. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Collister CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JASON HOMEY—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: THE WOMBATS—7 p.m. $15 adv., $17 door. Neurolux

THE MOJO BOOGIE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio

REFLECTIONS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

RICHARD SOLIZ—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio UNLEASH THE ARCHERS—With As the Sky Darkens, and Tulpaa. 8 p.m. $8. The Shredder

CLAY MOORE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 DALE CAVANAUGH—7 p.m. FREE. Powderhaus Brewing DUELING PIANOS ON THE PATIO—6 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

HAPPY HOUR every day 4-6 & 9-close $2 OFF

all apps, local beer, wine by the glass, & classic cocktails

ALL DAY SUNDAY!

LISTEN HERE

HILLFOLK NOIR—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio JACK HALE—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten MARV ELLIS AND WE TRIBE— 10 p.m. $5. Reef MISS ABAGAIL—7 p.m. FREE. High Note MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio OLD DOGS NEW TRIX—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio OPHELIA—7 p.m. FREE. SockeyeFairview

SUNDAY JUNE 5 AFRICAN CHILDREN’S CHOIR—6 p.m. By donation. Valley Shepherd Church of the Nazarene, 150 W. Maestra St., Meridian ALEXANDRA SJOBECK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 APRIL RIGBY—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio ECLYPSE KARAOKE NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Eclypse HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJ’S—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SAM BEAM AND JESCA HOOP, JUNE 5, EGYPTIAN THEATRE

Fans of indie folk/pop are likely already familiar with Sam Beam (of Iron & Wine) and Jesca Hoop, the latter whom LA Weekly lumped with Beam as successful “idiosyncratic solo artists,” who play in a space “somewhere close to folk, but often experimenting with rock, country, pop and even electronic music.” Beam and Hoop joined forces on Love Letter for Fire (Sub Pop, April 2016), and the results are a collaboration so ethereal and seamless, you’ll wonder why they hadn’t teamed up before. Describing the process of co-songwriting, Beam told LA Weekly, “I like the conversation element of it.” That might be putting it mildly. Beam can hold a wistful note truer and longer than anyone but Rufus Wainwright and Hoop’s crystalline delivery—carrying the merest hint of a country lilt—adds dimension and depth to everything it touches. Buoyed by a backing band that includes a rich complement of strings, their voices rise in a sonic wholeness approaching opera but with the intimacy of a hushed conversation around a low-burning campfire. —Zach Hagadone Doors at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m.; $30-$34.50. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 21


CULTURE NEWS

ARTS & CULTURE WALLACE STEALER

What a famous literary theft, a memorial to early Boiseans and a stage play have in common HARRISON BERRY

David Bazan with Laura Gibson (pictured) at The Olympic on Thursday, June 16: A winning show.

HUMOR, THE HUMAN CONDITION AND HOUSEKEEPING

22 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

“It was kind of disgraceful that the house there is pretty much gone except for the foundation,” she said. For the past 18 months, Worthington has been part of a team working to build an interpretive center on the site housing illuminations of the Footes’ achievements and legacies in Boise. It has gotten green lights from the Idaho Humanities Council, the Idaho State Historical Society and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Worthington and her partners in the project have set for themselves a $70,000 fundraising goal, of which they’ve already raised $47,000. The production of Fair Use and other historical-themed events, she hopes, will get them the rest of the way. While Arthur will be represented equally with his wife at the interpretive center, Worthington said she has a particular fondness for Mary. Since moving to Boise in 2004, Worthington has performed impersonations of famous American women to adult audiences through the Idaho Humanities Council. So far she has collected a roster of 13 historical figures, ranging from Foote to First Lady Martha Washington to Mrs. Santa Claus. She recalled an instance when a member of the public asked her if Martha Washington, the wife of President George Washington, was still alive. It’s egregious, she said, so many women who have affected the course of history are unknown or misunderstood. “My goal is to help people realize the importance of women in Fair Use, which will receive a history. There are so many women who played such vital roles, and people know almost nothstaged reading at 7 p.m., Sating,” she said. urday, June 4 at the Boise State For her, Stegner’s appropriation of Foote’s University Danny Peterson Theater, work is also egregious, but has another moFoote’s contribution to littive: some of the play’s FAIR USE erature and American history proceeds will support an effort Saturday, June 4; 7 p.m.; $15. Danny will stand the test of time. to memorialize the Foote famPeterson Theater-Morrison Center, Boise State University, 2201 W. “She presented to the ily’s legacy in Idaho at the site Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-3980, East a woman’s perspective of their original homestead, theatre.boisestate.edu. on the West. People in the located between the Discovery East were just hungry for Picnic Area and Lucky Peak something about the West, and she presented Dam Recreation Area at what is now Foote Park. a different point of view because she was For Dr. Janet Worthington, there was a need looking at it from the perspective of a female,” that wasn’t being met for recognizing the Footes’ Worthington said. time in the Treasure Valley. Stanford University’s literary program—his students included Sandra Day O’Connor, Wendell Berry and Ken Kesey—and was the winner of numerous prestigious awards, including the National Book Award. For Hall, imagining someone of Stegner’s stature unethically using someone else’s work was ripe for exploration. “I kept imagining him sitting at his desk copying—typing someone else’s words. What an interesting thing that must have been for him,” she said.

RYAN JOHNSON

Are you one of the funniest people you know? If you are and have less than six months stand-up experience, have never been paid for stand-up and have performed at fewer than 15 open mics, you should audition for Boise’s Funniest Person 2016. On Saturdays in July, the amateur comics chosen compete before a live audience and a panel of judges for a chance to win $1,000 and the title of BFP. Auditions are at Liquid on Saturday, June 18, 2-6 p.m.; and on Monday, June 20 and Tuesday, June 21, 7-10 p.m. Show up, register for a spot (first come, first served) and when you’re called, you’ll go into a room, hang out with a few judges, answer some questions, tell a joke and get your picture taken. It’s easy, it’s casual and the whole process should take about 10 minutes. More info at boisesfunniestperson.com. On a more serious but no less entertaining note, two of Barsuk Records’ finest play The Olympic on Thursday, June 16. Singersongwriter David Bazan (Pedro the Lion) has often waxed on faith, existential angst and other massive conceptual themes. No matter how dense the subject matter, however, Bazan has always had a knack for building a synth/ bedroom pop-esque tune, layering little notes and big melodies in surprising ways that beg repeated listens—this is especially true of his hot-off-the-press release Blanco (Barsuk, May 2016). Opening for Bazan will be sweet-voiced songster Laura Gibson, the inspiration for NPR’s incredibly popular Tiny Desk Concert series. Gibson also has a hot new release, Empire Builder (Barsuk/City Slang, April 2016), which is rife with her dreamy vocals and reflections on loss and redemption. This show promises to be as engaging as it is thought-provoking. In some Boise Weekly housekeeping news, the deadline for our annual Black-and-White Photo Contest is today, Wednesday, June 1, at midnight. We’ve gone totally digital, so visit bwphotocontest.boiseweekly.com for submission rules and instructions. Passports to Patios begins today, too. Get your passport in our June 1, June 8 or June 15 editions; visit the fabulous participating locations and get it stamped; and return it to BWHQ for a chance to win prizes worth more than $2,000. Instructions are inside each passport and at boiseweekly.com. Bon voyage! —Amy Atkins

Wallace Stegner’s novel, Angle of Repose (Doubleday), was published in 1971. The next year, it won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. It has since been lauded as one of the finest, most influential works of literature about the American West, but it has also been dogged by controversy. As much as 10 percent of it was lifted directly from the letters and journals of early Boise resident Mary Hallock Foote, and the now-famous literary theft is now the subject of an play soon to be performed in Boise. “What I try to lay out in the play is a kind of trial. ... There’s a legal versus ethical discussion,” said Sands Hall, author of the play Fair Use. In 1876, Mary Hallock Foote and her husband, Arthur, moved West from the East Coast, spending time in towns like Leadville, Colo.; Grass Valley, Calif.; and, from 1884-95, in Boise River, Idaho. Arthur was a mining engineer later credited with developing a plan to irrigate the Boise Valley. Mary was a noted illustrator and author of popular reports on the experience of being a woman in the Wild West. Hall said Stegner would have likely been ignorant of the increased interest scholars and the public began to have in pioneer women’s writings, which earlier in the 20th century would have been all but forgotten. In an ironic twist, Foote’s Reminiscences of a Victorian Gentlewoman in the Far West—Stegner’s source material—was published the same year as Angle of Repose. The controversy has been an enduring part of the conversation surrounding Stegner’s most famous novel. Fair Use, which was first performed in Boise by New Heritage Theatre in 2004, attempts to make sense of that controversy. The dramatis personae in the play include, among others, MHF, WS, Playwright, Historian and Actors (all listed as such). In Fair Use, Playwright pens a stage play exploring an identical act of literary theft in which the victim and perpetrator are able to speak with one another. Playwright is a staunch defender of Foote while Historian tries to salvage Stegner. At the core of Fair Use is the act of theft. During his life, Stegner was regarded as one of America’s foremost literary figures. He founded

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


SCREEN THE BAR TAB FROM IDAHO’S FAILED CINEMA LIQUOR LICENSE STING

35TH

ANNUAL GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY JUNE 3RD & 4TH, 2016 11:00AM – 9:00PM

Located at Sts. Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church at the corner of 27th and Bannock, Boise, Idaho. Live Entertainment Featuring Greek music and dancers, Grecian imports, Greek Pastries, Food To Go, Church Tours

‘Popular speech doesn’t need to be protected’ GEORGE PRENTICE

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

GEORGE PRENTICE

Always The First Friday & Saturday After Memorial Day BOISE GREEK FESTIVAL.COM

A defunct Idaho state law barred Gem State cinemas from serving alcohol during R-rated film screenings, now one theater is suing for lost revenue.

The story had it all: sex, alcohol, pop culture, politics. So when the state of Idaho was slapped with a lawsuit over the tight leash it held on alcohol consumption at R-rated movies, media pounced. The Idaho Legislature did, too, quickly crafting new legislation to address the issue. In the wake of the Meridian Cinemas dba Village Cinema vs. Idaho State Police lawsuit and Idaho House Bill 544 becoming law, it’s important to note two things: No. 1, the lawsuit is far from over and, No. 2, the underlying—and more important—debate at hand involves government overreach doing irreparable harm to a private business and protections of free speech guaranteed under the United States Constitution. “The case involves the application of very broad and fundamental principles to rather discreet and salacious circumstances. So yes, that seems to always generate interest,” said attorney Preston Carter, of Boise-based Givens Pursley LLP. He represents the Village Cinema owners, who were contacted by ISP Alcohol Beverage Control officers warning them about serving adult beverages at certain R-rated films. “As a result, our clients started… well, let’s say self-censorship. That’s the right phrase. It’s a strong phrase, but it’s the right phrase,” Carter said. But the warnings kept coming. In a February 2015 sting operation, two undercover ABC detectives ordered a Bacardi and Diet Coke and a Blue Moon beer and, while watching an evening screening of Fifty Shades of Grey, took copious notes detailing each simulated sex act and chronicling how long each one lasted: B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

“In this scene, the male and female both removed all their clothing and were completely naked. The scene lasted three minutes,” the notes read. “The male lifted the female’s skirt up onto her back and pulled her panties down below her buttocks. The male slapped the female’s bare buttocks multiple times and appeared sexually stimulated by his conduct.” That scene was approximately one minute long. “With the female on her back, the male placed an ice cube in his mouth and began to touch and/or caress the female’s body, including her bare breasts. The scene lasted two and a half minutes.” Critical consensus of Fifty Shades of Grey held the film was a dud. The New York Times called it “terrible” and the Guardian described it as filled with “daytime soap performances.” “There’s a good saying: ‘Popular speech doesn’t need to be protected,’” said Carter. “Notice that they didn’t come after Village Cinema for showing 12 Years a Slave.” Carter was referring to the 2013 Oscar winner that earned an R rating for extreme depictions of rape and sexual cruelty but told the true story of a free black man sold into slavery. “That film wasn’t tested. It was popular. It won the Best Picture Oscar,” said Carter. “But the First Amendment doesn’t make a distinction. Those sorts of controversial, uncomfortable subjects have to be allowed.” As written, Idaho Code 23-614 shackled beer, wine and liquor licenses at select Idaho cinemas to specific words prohibiting films showing “acts

or simulated acts of sexual intercourse” and “any person being touched, caressed or fondled on the breast, buttocks, anus or genitals.” Captain Russ Wheatley, the man in charge of ISP’s ABC unit, says in retrospect, the old law overreached. “The new legislation passed by the Idaho Legislature earlier this year removed the ‘prohibited acts’ section because there were some concerns that it was a little over-broad,” Wheatley said. “What that means for a movie theater now is that we want to make sure we’re protecting constitutional rights here.” Wheatley added the revised legislation still ties liquor licenses to Idaho’s obscenity laws, “which already existed,” but when asked if the lawsuit was over and done with, he said, “I’m not going to talk about that particular point because I can’t.” Carter confirmed the lawsuit is still pending, and the case is “still at its absolutely earliest stage.” It turns out Village Cinema’s liquor license is secure, but theater operators say they suffered significant economic damage due to the previous threats from ABC and self-censorship. “That includes lost revenues caused by [ABC’s] conduct, not showing some movies, shifting movies into smaller theaters, having fewer screenings, the expense of pre-screening films and, of course, the lost sale of alcohol,” said Carter, adding his client also expected to recover attorney’s fees from the state of Idaho. “We’re in discussions right now. I can tell you that there is a temporary stay right now, but that expires on July 1.” In other words, while there may not be a sequel, this particular show is far from over. BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 23


CITIZEN TYNE RAFAELI

Audiences will love wunderkind director’s Idaho Shakespeare Festival debut GEORGE PRENTICE

It is rare to sense you’re in the presence of greatness, but that’s the sensation when meeting Tyne Rafaeli, who makes her Idaho Shakespeare Festival directing debut with Love’s Labor’s Lost, which opens Saturday, June 4. Though still in her early 30s, Rafaeli’s reputation precedes her. She’s a competitive gymnast who trained in Moscow, Russia; she’s a classically trained actress; and has collaborated six times with director extraordinaire Bartlett Sher—including on recent critically acclaimed Broadway revivals of The King and I and Fiddler on the Roof, both of which are still playing to sold-out audiences in New York. How did the Idaho Shakespeare Festival come onto your radar? Bart Sher has become the most important mentor of my career, and the Idaho Shakespeare Festival formed so much of who he is as an artist. Bart introduced me to [ISF Creative Director] Charlie Fee and we started talking about some ideas. Two years later, here I am. Once you decided on Love’s Labor’s Lost, how soon thereafter do you choose the setting or time frame of your production. I’m a bit of a private detective. I extract certain visual, rhythmic or aesthetic ideas from the play. I present those hunches to my designers. For example, I had a hunch that we needed to be in contact with nature; we also know that the people we meet share a dense language and live in a community in transition. All that said, what will we see on stage? We stole a little from Botticelli, a little from Wes Anderson and a little from Pina Bausch. You mentioned the word “dense.” Indeed, this may well be Shakespeare’s densest play. It has the longest scene, the longest speech and the longest word. So, let’s talk about that word. Honorificabilitudinitatibus. It’s interesting to note that it’s spoken by a street-smart groundskeeper, among the lowest on the social scale 24 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

in this story. I think that’s quite intentional by Shakespeare. I would be remiss if I didn’t ask about the last two years of your professional life. You’re the associate director—along with Bart Sher—of two Broadway shows that wowed critics and audiences. First, there was a lavish new production of the King and I at Lincoln Center, starring Ken Watanabe, and then a provocative revival of Fiddler on the Roof, which is up for a few Tony Awards in the coming days. They’re both still running in New York, and we’ll be bringing the King and I to London’s West End later this year. Regarding Fiddler on the Roof, your production made a rather interesting choice to frame the show in the 21st century, with reference to the current global refugee crisis. Talk to me about making that choice. We’ve been experiencing the most terrible refugee crisis since World War II, and we’re doing Fiddler on the Roof. How could we not make that choice? We thought it was a political and moral obligation. I need to ask about another musical that’s on your professional horizon. Tell me about the new show you’ll be directing, entitled Chasing Rainbows. I think it’s going to be pretty epic. It’s the story of the early career of Judy Garland, leading up to her performance in the Wizard of Oz. My guess is we’ll be crying before the evening is through. Do you have access to the original music from the Judy Garland songbook? We do. We’ll open the show at the Goodspeed Theatre in Connecticut this September. Can I assume it’s heading for Broadway? We’re concentrating on making it as a beautiful a production as we can. If it has a life after that, it would be a blessing, but we don’t think about that too far in advance, do we? B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


WINESIPPER SAVOR SOUTHERN RHONE REDS

I like Syrah but, for the most part, I prefer when it’s blended with a healthy dose of Grenache. That (along with a few other grapes) is what you get with a southern Rhone red. Grenache makes a fruit forward, softer style wine while Syrah brings a little muscle and depth to the blend. Together they make a great late-spring, early-summer barbecue red. 2014 CHATEAU DE SEGRIES COTES DU RHONE, $15 In this blend, Grenache leads off (50 percent), followed by Syrah (30 percent), and equal parts Cinsault and Carignan. The floral aromas are marked by dusty rose, spicy raspberry and ripe cranberry. It opens with beautiful red fruit flavors, balanced by a core of ripe tannins and soft acidity. Finishes with creamy blackberry and pepper. 2013 DOMAINE D’ANDEZON COTE-DURHONE, $16 Syrah (backed by Grenache) dominates this wine made by a cooperative in a small town near Avignon. The nose is a mix of cherry, raspberry and blueberry with touches of spice and sweet balsamic. The bright cherry and creamy blueberry on the palate is backed by earthy oak and black pepper. Soft tannins come through on the long finish. 2014 MORGAN COTES DU CROW’S, $17 This ringer from Monterey, Calif., a blend of 53 percent Grenache and 47 percent Syrah, made the cut. The complex array of aromas are a mix of strawberry, buttery oak, pepper and soft cherry with a kiss of chocolate. The California terroir is unmistakable in this fruit forward, user friendly wine. You get ripe cherry and berry fruit flavors, a silky texture and a food friendly hit of acidity on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 25


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

SERVICES

YARD SALE

CAREERS

CLASSIFIEDS

FREE GED ®

Test Classes

208-376-3961

NYT CROSSWORD | BEST-PICTURE ADAPTATIONS ACROSS

21 Best Picture adaptation about … a search for the perfect brew, with “The”? 23 Disney Channel’s “____ and Maddie” 24 … inaudible metrical poetry, with “The”? 26 Northeast Corridor train 28 Like groaners 29 River islet 30 1988 chart-topping country album

1 2013 Best Picture nominee in which a main character isn’t human 4 Airplane part 9 “Hairspray” mom usually played by a man 13 Leg presses work them 18 60 minuti 19 Successors to Cutlasses

1

2

3

4

18

19

23

24

26

6

7

8

9 20

31

38

33 40

51

58

42

52

68

64

69

86

91

103

87

82

88

99

116

101

83

94

26 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

95

106

109

110 118 123

126

78

102

117

122

77

90

105 108

76

89

100

104

115

66

93

107 114

61

75

92 98

55

65

81

85

97

36

48

74

96

35

17

70

80

84

34

60

73

79

16

44

47 54

63

72

15

43

53

59

62

125

41

46

67

14

22

32

50 57

13

29

39

56

12

21

45

113

11

28

49

71

10

59 Chance occurrence, old-style 60 Bad sound in a changing room 61 Vegas-to-Denver dir. 62 Part of a city network 63 “Relax” 64 Reusable part of a common thank-you gift 67 … a reed and percussion duet? 71 Group standing at the U.N. 74 Treat with a “Golden” variety

25

27 30

37

5

32 Game for bankers? 33 Psychedelic 37 … a fat Eastern monarch? 43 One in a no-blinking contest 45 Second draft 46 Neighbor 48 Extended rental? 49 Sea urchin, at a sushi bar 50 … fools accompanying a pack of wild animals? 56 King’s handful

BY KEVIN G. DER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

119

120

111 121 124

127

128

112

75 They rank below marquises 79 Words before and after “what” 80 O.T. book before Jeremiah 81 Chorus line? 82 Obstacle in road repairs, maybe 84 … an éclair or crème brûlée, with “The”? 90 Previously 91 Spork part 92 Daughter in E. M. Forster’s “Howards End” 93 Neighbor of Irkutsk on a Risk board 96 Badger 99 … gorgeous fur? 103 Shred 105 Lit ____ 106 Safari sight? 107 Singer DiFranco 108 Like a portrait that seems to be watching you 110 Winnower 113 … cooties from hugs and kisses? 121 Blender setting 122 … a salon woman I go to? 123 Tush 124 Set of anecdotes 125 A while, in hyperbole 126 Olympian with a bow 127 Jet similar to a 747 128 Benedictine title

DOWN

1 Chihuahua greeting 2 Country singer Church 3**** 4 Honeydew cousins 5 U.S. women’s soccer star Krieger 6 Volume measure 7 Cause of boiling over 8 Sarge, e.g. 9 Jet 10 Stand up to 11 Bit of safari equipment 12 Enlightened Buddhist 13 “Enough is enough!” 14 “____ voce poco fa” (Rossini aria) 15 PIN point 16 One having a ball? 17 G.R.E. takers: Abbr.

20 Ice-cream order 22 Juniors, maybe 25 Writer ____ Stanley Gardner 27 1880s-’90s veep ____ P. Morton 31 Step ____ 32 Half of a Vegas show duo 34 Shroud 35 ____ Drive (street where Harry Potter grew up) 36 Dweller along the Mandeb Strait 37 Bridge support 38 “As such …” 39 College-campus offering 40 Like carpaccio or crudités 41 Geisha’s accessory 42 Metaphorical low point 44 Physicist Nathan who postulated wormholes 47 Attempt at a dunk tank 51 Spiced teas 52 The White House’s ____ Room 53 Peeping Tom’s spot 54 Modern encyclopedia platform 55 Muses 57 Simon of the “Mission: Impossible” films 58 It circles the globe 63 Merino mother 64 Stethoscope’s place 65 War on Poverty agcy. 66 Main ingredient in queso relleno 68 Bite 69 Like candied apples 70 Gillette razor name 71 Liquor purchase 72 Ring around the collar? 73 Chief Theban god 76 Hightailed it 77 Peaceful protest 78 Apt anagram of SNAKE

82 Slip 83 Quash 85 Peachy 86 Things zygotes come from 87 Pen point 88 Commission, e.g. 89 “You’re stuck with me” 94 What stars do 95 Hilton alternative 97 Equilibrium 98 Sancho Panza, e.g. 100 About 3/4 of a football field 101 ____ Heep (Dickens villain) 102 Like some sponsorship packages 104 One taking a long shot? 108 Prefix with spore 109 “Slow Churned” brand 111 Antipasto pairing

L A S T K A R S T S

T R I C I A

C O M E R

E C O N O

G A S P A T

A N T I F U R

E N C H A N T

L O A M I M M A A G N E L E S A U N T D O R S I E S A M E T A S Y E R R L A C L I P A N T

E M P T O R

P A R T I I I

A T A T R A I O S M O E T I O N O T H A T

112 Reason for a class struggle? 113 TV inits. since 1975 114 Photographer’s asset 115 Certain fraternity chapter 116 “Wowie!” 117 Musician’s asset 118 Lapel attachment 119 Suffix with subsist 120 Never, in Nikolaus Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

S O N R C O O T A G H A S T E N O A O N B E G S D O N I R A N H I G S W E G T Y R E A D T N N E O F F S A L E V E E E A R T M I S I L

S I R D U K E

F O N D L Y I P H O N E

M T V E A G A N

R E L P I O T

E A R M A S T C E A L N N A U S L Y A L R U M L I N A A O M E L O A N T E

J P E V G S I G L N O O S L E E E O D N W R A A R N D F O R

U R D U

D O E E Y P E O S S H M L I Y L N W E A I M T I N W I E C P A T R

D A M S E L S

M A T T E A

A M O U R

N E W T S

N E T T L E

G O H O M E

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY OFFICE HOURS

CAREERS BW CAREERS INSURANCE/INSPECTOR Millennium Information Services is looking for independent contractors to perform exterior residential property insurance inspections in a local territory. Earnings based on number of inspections you complete. Ideally, should be currently in business performing like work. You will need the following items to begin: Dependable vehicle, digital camera, measuring wheel, fold-up 17 foot ladder & PC with high-speed Internet access. To learn more about Millennium and to register online, please visit us at www.millinfo.com and register on our employment page in your state under field operations/ Independent Property Inspector. OUTBOUND TELEPHONE REPS Outbound Telephone reps needed for local fund raiser. Previous Business Sales/Telemarketing required. If you have outbound sales experience we are interested in meeting you. Casual dress/work environment. Looking for motivated individuals. Convenient Boise location. Please call 208.473.4021 for an immediate interview. PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.TheIncomeHub.com.

CAREERS RETAIL CUSTOMER SERVICE EVALUATOR (MYSTERY SHOPPER) Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores is seeking a Retail Customer Service Evaluator. 2+ years experience in retail management preferred. Position will require up to 5 days/ week of travel mostly nights and weekends. For immediate consideration, please apply on www.loves.com/careers

HOUSING BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BW RENTALS REDNECK TRAILERS VACATION RENTALS “A little tacky on the outside, but clean and cozy on the inside”. Come to Garden Valley, ID and check out Uncle Billy Bob’s redneck trailers vacation rentals. Unclebillybobs.com.

MIND BODY SPIRIT BW HEALTH, FITNESS ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-244-7149 (M-F 9am-8pm central).

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

ADOPT-A-PET

COMMUNITY

MAILING ADDRESS

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS

P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

BOISE HEMP FEST WANT YOU Boise Hempfest is scheduled for August 13th, 2016 in Julia Davis Park and seeking sponsors, vendors, speakers, entertainers and volunteers. Visit: www.boisehempfest.org.

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

BW EVENTS

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

PHONE

INITIAL POINTE GALLERY RECEPTION Come to Meridian City Hall’s Initial Pointe Gallery reception for our June artist: Karen Lowery! Join us Tuesday, June 7th. from 4:307:30. 33 E Broadway Ave in. Meridiancity.org/mac/.

(208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

Special $30. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 6am-6pm & by appt. I travel. 8805772. Male Only. Private Boise studio. MC/VISA. massagebyeric. com.

classified@boiseweekly.com

BW KICKS Everyone knows a Nick that is a complete tool. I know three! What gives? To the group of guys pestering a homeless man in downtown Boise, I hope you guys get your faces lit on fire and someone has to put it out with a fork.

CHERKAHN: There’s nothing better than a play session followed by a comfy lap to rest in.

COUNSELING

DEADLINES*

DAKOTA: I’m polite, mellow, outgoing and super sweet—come be my forever friend.

LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

* Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Enjoy a relaxing massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492. SACRED BODY CARE For Relaxation Call Ami at 208-6976231. ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377.

LUNA: I’m a big, bodacious, beautiful buddy and love to goof off and make you laugh.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

BW KISSES WELCOME LISA! You are a great addition to the team- we’re so happy to have you....now go kick some ass! XXOX.

BW SUMMER CAMPS 2016 STEM SUMMER CAMPS! Challenge Island is a high-energy, hands-on Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math education program with over 100 challenges brand new to Idaho! We offer In-School Field Trips, After-School Enrichment, parties, summer camps and more! www. challenge-island.com/boise, on Facebook, and Twitter! “Where Engineering Meets Imagination”. ART OF THE MATTER Sign up for a week long art camp between June 20th and August 5th. Each week offers something new! Classes for kids and adults. Email: gizwins@msn.com for registration and details.

LUCY: 2 1/2-year-old, female Labrador retriever/ Doberman pinscher mix. Needs a cat-free home with kids 12 or older. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center - #21721188)

MIKO: 2-year-old, male Chihuahua mix. Loves other dogs. Would be a perfect pal for seniors or a home with kids 6 and up. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center - #31491505)

NADINE: 2-year-old, female, Chihuahua mix. Prefers a quiet home with adults. No holding until she gets to know you. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center - #31531157)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT BACARDI: 5-year-old, male, domestic longhair. Came in as a stray. Needs a patient, quiet home. Will need to stay the night to be neutered. (Kennel 5 #31646951)

EBONY: 1-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Has a quiet but curious nature. Loves to be petted anywhere on her head. (Kennel 108 #30557217)

RILEY: 6-year-old, male, domestic longhair. Needs to find his forever home. Friendly and mellow, loves to lounge on a warm lap. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center - #10746528)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 27


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY MASSAGE

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

FOR SALE

CALL TO ARTISTS

BW SHOP HERE BRITE SIGNS Sign Rental 208-866-6843.

more), depression glass, X-mas decor, cast iron cookware. Fun Finds! Plus small furniture, lamps, Le Crueset kitchenware, silverware, sewing, beads(sorted) and gardening supplies. Clothes of excellent quality, hats, vintage hat boxes, handbags, books, music and some electronics. Bedding, tablecloths, quilts & towels. Two generations of momentos. 4215 Denton Street in Boise. June 3rd 9am-5pm, June 4th 9am-5pm, June 5th 9 am-5pm

BW YARD SALES YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055. Collectibles & Contemporary: Extensive collection of costume jewelry, dolls(including early Barbie, Native American,and so much

PETS BW PETS RATTLESNAKE AND PORCUPINE AVOIDANCE TRAINING Keep your dog safe by teaching it to avoid the sight, sound and smell of rattlesnakes or porcupines. The Idaho Humane Society and Idaho Chukar Foundation offer one-on-one training sessions. Sign up early to guarantee a spot

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The voices in our heads are our constant companions. They fill our inner sanctuary with streams of manic commentary. Often we’re not fully cognizant of the bedlam, since the outer world dominates our focus. But as soon as we close our eyes and turn our attention inward, we’re immersed in the jabbering babble. That’s the bad news, Aries. Now here’s the good news. In the coming weeks you will have far more power than usual to ignore, dodge, or even tamp down the jabbering babble. As a result, you may get a chance to spend unprecedented amounts of quality time with the still, small voice at your core—the wise guide that is often drowned out by all the noise. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): We are inclined to believe that the best way to see the whole picture or the complete story is from above. The eagle that soars overhead can survey a vast terrain in one long gaze. The mountaintop perspective affords a sweeping look at a vast landscape. But sometimes this perspective isn’t perfectly useful. What we most need to see may be right next to us, or nearby, and it’s only visible if our vision is narrowly focused. Here’s how poet Charles Bernstein expresses it: “What’s missing from the bird’s eye view is plain to see on the ground.” Use this clue in the coming weeks.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I foresee fertile chaos in your immediate future, Gemini. I predict lucky accidents and smoldering lucidity and disciplined spontaneity. Do you catch the spirit of what I’m suggesting? Your experiences will not be describable by tidy theories. Your intentions will not fit into neat categories. You will be a vivid embodiment of sweet paradoxes and crazy wisdom and confusing clarity. Simple souls may try to tone you down, but I hope you will evade their pressure as you explore the elegant contradictions you encounter. Love your life exactly as it is! Methodical improvisations will be your specialty. Giving gifts that are both selfish and unselfish will be one of your best tricks. “Healing extremes” will be your code phrase of power.

being willingly lost in a wild, idyllic, relaxing setting.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): According to many sources on the Internet, werifesteria is an obscure word from Old English. But my research suggests it was in fact dreamed up within the last few years by a playful hoaxster. Regardless of its origins, I think it’s an apt prescription to fix what’s bugging you. Here’s the definition: “to wander longingly through the forest in search of mystery and adventure.” If you are not currently seeking out at least a metaphorical version of that state, I think you should be. Now is an excellent time to reap the catalytic benefits of

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Between now and July 25, there’s a chance you will reach the peak of a seemingly unclimbable mountain. You could win a privilege that neither you nor anyone else ever dreamed was within your reach. It’s possible you’ll achieve a milestone you’ve been secretly preparing for since childhood. Think I’m exaggerating, Virgo? I’m not. You could break a record for the biggest or best or fastest, or you might finally sneak past an obstacle that has cast a shadow over your self-image for years. And even if none of these exact events comes to pass, the

28 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I’m debating about which of your astrological houses will be your featured hotspot in the coming days. I’m guessing it will come down to two options: your House of Valid Greed and your House of Obligatory Sharing. The House of Valid Greed has a good chance to predominate, with its lush feasts and its expansive moods. But the House of Obligatory Sharing has an austere beauty that makes it a strong possibility, as well. Now here’s the trick ending, Leo: I’d like to see if you can emphasize both houses equally; I hope you’ll try to inhabit them both at the same time. Together they will grant you a power that neither could bestow alone.

odds are excellent that you will accomplish another unlikely or monumental feat. Congratulations in advance! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “My mother gave birth to me once, yeah yeah yeah,” writes author Sara Levine. “But I’ve redone myself a million times.” I’m sure she is not demeaning her mom’s hard work, but rather celebrating her own. When’s the last time you gave birth to a fresh version of yourself? From where I stand, it looks like the next 12 to 15 months will be one of those fertile phases of reinvention. And right now is an excellent time to get a lightning-flash glimpse of what the New You might look like. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Author Rebecca Solnit offers some tough advice that I think you could use. “Pain serves a purpose,” she says. “Without it you are in danger. What you cannot feel you cannot take care of.” With that in mind, Scorpio, I urge you to take full advantage of the suffering you’re experiencing. Treat it as a gift that will motivate you to transform the situation that’s causing you to hurt. Honor it as a blessing you can use to rise above the mediocre or abusive circumstances you have been tolerating. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Aphorist James Guida contemplates the good results that can

come from not imposing expectations on the raw reality that’s on its way. “Not to count chickens before they’re hatched,” he muses, “or eggs before they’re laid, chickens who might possibly lay eggs, birds who from afar might be confused with chickens.” I recommend this strategy for you in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. Experiment with the pleasure of being wide open to surprises. Cultivate a mood of welcoming one-of-a-kind people, things, and events. Be so empty you have ample room to accommodate an influx of new dispensations. As James Guida concludes: “Not to count or think of chickens.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “No gift is ever exactly right for me,” mourns Capricorn poet James Richardson. Don’t you dare be like him in the coming days. Do whatever you must to ensure that you receive at least one gift that’s exactly right for you. Two gifts would be better; three sublime. Here’s another thought from Richardson: “Success repeats itself until it is a failure.” Don’t you dare illustrate that theory. Either instigate changes in the way you’ve been achieving success, or else initiate an entirely new way. Here’s one more tip from Richardson: “Those who demand consideration for their sacrifices were making investments, not sacrifices.” Don’t you dare be guilty of that sin. Make

sacrifices, not investments. If you do, your sacrifices will ultimately turn out to be good investments. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Life will invite you to explore the archetype of the Ethical Interloper in the coming days. The archetype of the Helpful Transgressor may tempt you, as well, and even the Congenial Meddler or the Compassionate Trickster might look appealing. I urge you to consider experimenting with all of these. It will probably be both fun and productive to break taboos in friendly ways. You could reconnoiter forbidden areas without freaking anyone out or causing a troublesome ruckus. If you’re sufficiently polite and kind in expressing your subversive intentions, you might leave a trail of good deeds in your wake. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your theme comes from the title of a poem by Fortesa Latifi: “I Am Still Learning How to Do the Easy Things.” During the next phase of your astrological cycle, I invite you to specialize in this study. You may imagine that you are already a master of the simple, obvious arts of life, but here’s the news: Few of us are. And the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to refine your practice. Here’s a good place to start: Eat when you’re hungry, sleep when you’re tired, and give love when you’re lonely.

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


for you and your dog! Saturday, June 4, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m Julia Davis Park. Find more information and registration forms at idahohumanesociety.org.

LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: ABYGALE GRACE RODRIGUEZ. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1608027 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Abygale Grace Rodriguez, a minor, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Abygale Grace Wardein. The reason for the change in name is: Abygale’s father is a convicted felon and is required to register as a sex offender. I have since remarried, and it is Abygale’s desire to share our last name, as she has bonded with my husband. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for the 23rd day of June 2016, at 1:30 P.m. at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 4, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT, By: DEBBIE NAGELE Deputy Clerk PUB May 11, 18, 25, June 1, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Caleb Thomas Atwood. Legal Name of child

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY

Case No. CV NC 1608862 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Caleb Thomas Atwood, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Caleb Mackenzie Atwood. The reason for the change in name is: Caleb prefers this new name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on July 19, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 16, 2016. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIDRE PRICE, Deputy Clerk PUB June 1,8,15, 22, 2016.

PEN PALS BW PEN PALS Sexy, Smart & funny woman seeks a pen pal and maybe more. Christine Purcell #95766 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. Hello I’m Kenneth Strong #95094 ISCI 10C 68B Po Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Looking for a f/m pen pal, size does noot matter would just like a friend may bee moving soon, my formal address on IDOC web site. Plus I’m a ginger, love cubby woman age 18-35. Hello, my name is Nicole Bores. I am incarcerated at PWCC until approximately February 2015. I’m tall Greek beautiful sweet, loving, outgoing and full of life. I’d like pen pals to share good times with … look for me on my Facebook under my name reach me at Nicole Bores IDOC #75937 at PWCC unit 3 bed

35A 1451 Fore Road Pocatello, ID 83204. 35 year old Christin male looking for likeminded individual to get to know and share with my interests are, reading working out, music, movies, I am a small town guy if interested please right. Fernando Santos #79065 ISCI unit 13 PO Box 14 83707. SWM, 30 yrs old. Looking for penpal with low standards. My interest include; whatever your interests are. Don’t set the bar too high and you won’t be disappointed. I don’t wear an armband James Sinclair #66656 ISCI 13 B44A PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Wanting male penal friend relationship. Shirley Stone Jones 68719 PWCC 1450 Fore Road Pocatello, ID 83204. I’m 48, 5’10 half Native American. Let’s talk about Harley’s, God, hunting, fishing, dancing, camping, children, grandchildren, music life’s lessons and goals. I hope to hear from you soon! Come and get it! Ladies of Boise, I’m Sam Terry one of a kind and I’m looking for a pen pal who can go the distance. Batteries not included. Write to: Sam Terry #103744 ISCI Po Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Fun, 26 y.o Butch lesbian ISO mature companion to write and maybe more Christine Herzet @ BCJ 605 N Capitol Idaho Falls, ID 83402. People change!! I’m Available!! Looking for a friend maybe more 30 year old blond hair, blue eyes, female. I lost myself along the way but am stronger now more than ever. Love the outdoors, hunting, fishing, and also cozy nights on the couch. Been through some hard time and I’m getting back up. I’d love a friend, pen pal, just anyone

real!! Willing to relocate. Please contact me Adina Ahlers 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. I’m a 33yr old kinky Hispanic woman who is currently incarcerated. I’m 5’5 dark brown eyes, dark brown hair, with multiple tattoos. If your interested in knowing more please write: Adriana Dominguez #106572 Unit 1 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. S.W.F 33 currently incarcerated forthe next 3 yrs. I am looking for M or F 30+ yrs old to correspond with. I am missing that connection to the outside world. You can find pictures of me on Facebook. Shari Widaman #101383 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83205. My name is Sandra Norgaard #86795. Currently in search of a pen pal. Someone who isn’t afraid to be themselfs. Who would also like to get ot know someone new. I’m currently doing a short time in South Bois. I am 34 yrs old, and looking forward to hering from someone. Sandra Norgaard #86795 SBWCC 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd Kuna, ID 83634.

c/o Ada county Jail 7210 Barrister Dr Boise, ID 83704. I am a 44 SWF. Who enjoys being outdoors, Someone who enjoys making others laugh. I love to learn new things and go on adventures. I have brown hair, brown eyes. I’m 5’11, medium build. I am currently an inmate at Pocatello Women’s Corrections center. I am looking for someone who is willing to get to know me as a person and become friends with. I am spontaneous and love having a good time. If interested, you won’t be disappointed. Anna Sangberg #37015 PWCC Unit 1 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. Hi my name is Monica. I’m looking for a penpal to keep me company while I’m down. All I want is a letter or two a week someone who likes

to write. I’m 28 years old. Some things I enjoy doing is listening to old school music and watching football. My address Monica Harrington #111287 SBWCC 13200 S Pleasant Valley Rd Kuna, ID 83634 Hey what’s up, all you real men out there! I’m Krystal Damon #87065 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. I’m beautiful Native American, hazel eyes, affectionate, humorous. Looking for someone to help pull me through. So whatcha think is that you? Hey what’s up…. Looking for an exciting fun pen pal, been down 3 yrs with 2 more to go. I’m Hawaiian and Native with caramel eyes. If you would like to learn more about me, write me at… Heather Davis #97039 1451 Fore Rd unit 2119A Pocatello, ID 83204.

ADULT

Wanted new friendships, 35 year old female currently incarcerated for 9 months, releasing to Boise. I have a sense of humor, am open minded, and love adventures. I have long curly brown hair, blue eyes and a great smile; pictures available- contact Tammy Jennings #95464 1451 Fore Rd PWCC Pocatello, ID 83204. Hi my name is Wathana Insixiengmay. Age:26, I weigh 140 and height is 5’9. Asian, eye color: brown eyes, Hair color: black. Age Limit: 25-50. Currently locked up in Ada county Jail looking for a pen pal or a relationship, someone to talk to and get to know one another. Wathana Insixiengmay #90174

JEN SORENSEN

HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 29


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

#boiseweeklypic

FIND GOOGLE SCIENCE JOURNAL

Advice for those on the verge DEAR MINERVA,

Do you feel like interracial couples (gay or straight) are treated differently than others? Thanks, —Ebony and Ivory

DEAR EBONY AND IVORY,

Alas, in 2016, we still have hang-ups about race, but I think it is improving. I still see angry, hateful comments on the use of interracial couples in advertising and people seem to still find it tiringly necessary to point out differences in race in relationships that don’t look like their own. I think that some people have a hard time accepting the fact people from two different racial experiences and backgrounds can find love with one another. I find that to be a completely ridiculous assumption and I don’t care who knows it. Coming from a background where people were very vocal about viewing any white person who was involved with another race as not being “good enough” to find a white person to be with, I have little tolerance for such ignorance and absurdity. Racism still exists and therefore there are still struggles for interracial couples. When you break down the myth surrounding race, you really see that we are all part of humanity. We have a long way to go but I think our generations coming up have a refreshingly different view on the world. Love has no boundaries but those that we put on it in our own flawed minds. My advice is when you see the bigotry, shut it down. Finding love is hard. Why must we make it harder? SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

Experiment kits are usually designed to appeal to kids, so a fullgrown person might feel silly buying one in a toy store. With a new app from Google, anyone with an Android device can nerd out in privacy. Developed as part of Google’s Making and Science initiative, Google Science Journal, turns a mobile smartphone into a mobile lab, and using the phone’s existing sensors, the app lets users “organize ideas into projects, make predictions, take notes and collect data in multiple trials, then annotate and explore results.” Google partnered with Exploratorium, the San Francisco-based “museum of science, art and human perception” to offer a slew of relatively inexpensive external kits filled with sensors, controllers and craft supplies. Grab a kit—or just use items found around FREE, play.google.com the house—and connect an Arduino component (Arduino is an “open-source electronic prototyping platform for creating interactive electronic objects”) to the phone and an addiction to “Angry Birds” may give way to hypothesizing and logging computations on the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow. Find project ideas and more information at makingscience.withgoogle. com. —Amy Atkins

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

“RIMROCK COUNTRY,” IDYLTIME “PURPLE,” BARONESS “I STILL DO,” ERIC CLAPTON “2,” MUDCRUTCH “COMING HOME,” LEON BRIDGES

6.

“LOVE LETTER FOR FIRE,” SAM BEAM AND JESCA HOOP

7. 8. 9. 10.

“THE IMPOSSIBLE KID,” AESOP ROCK “PAGING MR. PROUST,” THE JAYHAWKS

“A SAILOR’S GUIDE TO EARTH,” STURGILL SIMPSON “FALLEN ANGELS,” BOB DYLAN

Taken by instagram user d.b.photo.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

If you travel this summer, how will you reach your destination?

Plane: 41.46% Train: 2.44% Automobile: 53.66% Bus: 0% Bike: 2.44%

D i s clai mer: Th i s onli ne p oll i s not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of loc al, statewi d e or nati onal op i ni on.

1616

49.6 MILLION

38%

125 MILLION

150 MILLION

450 MILLION

$7.3 BILLION

Publication year of The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, suggested to be the world’s first science fiction novel.

Unit sales of science fiction/fantasy/magic books in the United States, 2013-2014.

Increase in science fiction/fantasy/magic book sales in the juvenile market, 2014.

Value of total book sales for the Harry Potter series.

(Publishers Weekly)

Approximate sales of The Lord of Rings, making it one of the best-selling single volume books in history.

Approximate combined sales of all books in the Harry Potter series.

(Publishers Weekly)

Lowball estimate for the number of Star Wars books in print. Conservative estimate for how many individual titles have been printed: “more than 1,000.”

(BBC)

(Scholastic Children’s Books/statisticbrain.com)

(Small Beer Press)

30 | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

(Wall Street Journal)

(Toronto Star)

$24.8 BILLION Estimated value of the Harry Potter franchise, including books, films, DVD/digital, toys and rentals. (IMDB, Scholastic Books/ statisticbrain.com)

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY CAREERS

SERVICES

POURING

Photo Restoration • Printing Services Photo Capture • Art Reproduction

Are you an intelligent, energetic,

PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE NOT NECESSARY.

riverworksimaging.com • 2418 Main Street • 208 340-8788

detail-oriented, fearless, proactive self-starter who dreams of working AWESOMENESS at a place as kick-ass as you are REQUIRED.

?

Email a short cover letter and your resume to: hireme@boiseweekly.com or drop it off at Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. No phone calls. CAREER TRAINING

ON TAP

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2016 | 31


Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 50  

Jump Into June: Get the who, what, when and where for June First Thursday

Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 50  

Jump Into June: Get the who, what, when and where for June First Thursday