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BOISE WEEKLY A P R I L 2 7 – M AY 3 , 2 0 1 6 LOCA L A N D I N DE PE N DE N T

“Idaho is above ideology.”

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Gimme Shelter

The ‘Emerald House’ gives a roof to the chronically homeless

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VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 4 5

CITIZEN 20

The Science of Art Meet the computerized paintbrush that’s learning to paint

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Papa Don’t Preach The newest Hemingway film falls far short of the writer’s life

FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Nicole LeFavour Interns: Jonathan Reff Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Marketing Intern: Mac Tackett Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Jim Mowbray, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Fax: 208-342-4733 Phone: 208-344-2055 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

EDITOR’S NOTE DATE SAVING Shutterbugs take note: The deadline for Boise Weekly’s 14th annual Black-and-White Photo Contest is approaching and there have been a few changes to the process. First of all, you have until Wednesday, June 1 to submit your best non-color shots representing the themes of People, Places and Things. As always, the winner will be published on the cover, with a print date of Wednesday, June 15, and entered in the annual BW Cover Auction. Also as always, the $5 per entry fee goes into the prize money pot. You can submit as many entries as your black-and-white heart desires, but you’ll have to do so one at a time. Now, here’s what has changed: Our entry process has caught up to the 21st century and will be conducted digitally. Upload your pieces to bwphotocontest.boiseweekly.com and they’ll be voted on between Thursday, June 2 and Sunday, June 12 to select a People’s Choice winner. On the website you’ll find submission information, be able to view the current entries, vote on your favorites and scope the winners. The top spots will be selected by a sharp-eyed panel of photo loving judges, to be announced. The winner picked for the cover will be required to provide a highresolution copy of the image. As for the fine print, you have to be 13 years or older to participate, automated voting (aka ballot stuffing) is strictly prohibited and will result in the voiding of all spurious votes, and no employees of BW or their immediate family members are eligible to compete. If you want more fine print, you can find it under Official Rules on the contest website. While we’re saving dates, here’s another one to jot down on your calendar: Saturday, June 25 marks the BW’s 25th birthday celebration and it’s going to be a doozy. From noon to 6 p.m. we’re shutting down Broad and Sixth streets for The Big LeBoise block party. More details are to come, but rest assured there will be food, drink, craft vendors and general merriment.

100.3 THE X PRESENTS:

2016

—Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST

Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Shelley Jund TITLE: “Celebration of Corvid Courage” MEDIUM: Copper leaf and mixed media on birch panel ARTIST STATEMENT: Join me for Modern Art at the Modern Hotel And Bar on Thursday, May 5 from 5-10 p.m. I’ll be showing the rest of the series and the accompanying installation in Room 222. You may also view the work at shelleyjund.com.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each

week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

D EARLY BIR

TICKETS! LD OUT $29 SO 1st 500: 500: $34! 2nd

FRIDAY, AUGUST 26 FORD IDAHO CENTER AMPHITHEATER

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE FORD IDAHO CENTER BOX OFFICE, BY CALLING 208.442.3232 AND ONLINE AT WWW.ICTICKETS.COM. BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

FROM NORWAY WITH LOVE E AR SPLIT TING , RIFF RIPPING , STAGE STOMPING NORWEGIAN ME TAL MONSTERS K VELERTAK ARE WINGING INTO BOISE ON SATURDAY, APRIL 30 FOR A SONIC STORM AT NEUROLUX . THE BAND, WHIC H IS GE ARING UP TO RELE ASE ITS L ATEST ALBUM IN MAY, CAUGHT UP WITH BOISE WEEKLY MU SIC WRITER C HRIS PARKER. GE T THE SC OOP ON MU SIC/MU SIC HOME.

POL POLL

According to Idaho Politics Weekly’s newest poll, Idahoans really don’t like Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton but Bernie Sanders could beat Trump in the Gem State. More on News/Unda’ the Rotunda.

SURVEY SAYS

Speaking of polls, the Pew Research Center ran a survey that will steam a lot of right wingers. More education=more liberal, less learnin’=more conservative. Get mad or smug at News/Citydesk.

TOP SCHOOLS

When it comes to national rankings, Timberline High School came out on top of a U.S. News rundown of best schools in Idaho. Find out where other schools landed on the list at News/Citydesk.

OPINION

4 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


OPINION GETAWAY TO HEAVEN The blessed relief of blissful retreat BILL COPE Sensitive readers might believe they have detected a restless ennui in my writing in recent weeks. You aren’t imagining it. I call it “campaign fatigue.” It started back when there were still enough Republican candidates to field a rugby team and has been steadily getting worse. I don’t hold the candidates exclusively responsible for my condition; there is plenty of blame to go around. Seriously, it wasn’t Trump that told MSNBC they had to use that same incessant, blaring, overly-heated, grating musical anthem for their election coverage, all day long, over and over and over and... gad, even thinking about it makes me feel like clawing my own ears off! So Bill, thought I, you could just turn off the television. Or at the least, tune it to one of those channels that never have news, like the ones that sell earrings and ladies shoes? But no, the temptation would be too great. It would be like trying to kick an Oxycontin habit by sticking your stash in your wife’s underwear drawer. Anyway, after hanging around to see who would come out winners in the New York primary, I decided I needed to excuse myself from the world for day or two—at least, that part of the world including anyone named Hillary, Bernie, Donald or Ted. But where to go that wouldn’t be just more of the same, constant rumble of people yelling at one another? That was a problem. Then I remembered the special ink stamp my orientation angel (O.A.) had given me on my last trip to Heaven. I know... I know... Most of you thought I just made all that stuff up about having a couple of near-death experiences last year. Yes, that much is true. But just because it was all a figment of my imagination doesn’t mean I didn’t have a good time there. Even those visions of the End Times my angel showed me were fun. You know... in a greatestdisaster-movie-ever-made way. I couldn’t actually see any remnants of the “Readmit One To Heaven” ink, but I figured anything an angel stamps on you is there to stay. I held my wrist up so it could be seen clearly from on high, and said “Yoo-hoo. Is anybody there?” Next thing you know, I’m standing at the Pearly Gates and my O.A. is waiting for me. ••• “What’s up, Bill? You forget something?” I explained how I was stressed by all the bad vibes down in America, that I needed some “me” time, and my O.A. took my hand and led me inside. “I know just how you feel. We’ve been processing all the souls coming in from Syria, and if you don’t think that’s a damn mess...” He trailed off, shaking his head in angelic consternation. (I should say, on the previous visits I couldn’t tell whether my angel was a “he” or a “she.” One minute B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

he’d look like David Bowie; the next Tilda Swinton dipped in flour. This time, it was all Bowie, a la his Thin White Duke phase. I think that’s a good sign for other aging rock super-stars, don’t you?) We came to the most exquisite, most serene Japanese-style rock garden imaginable and sat down on a simple stone bench. I commented that I was a little surprised to see they allowed something so zen-y in Heaven, and “Dave” said, “Oh sure. You don’t think we’d let some evangelical yahoo landscape this place, do you? Gad, it would all end up looking like the interior of a ’65 Cadillac. Now tell me, Bill. What can we do for you? A massage? Some aromatherapy, maybe?” I told him I just needed to catch my breath for a day or two and I didn’t think I could do it on Earth because of all that election noise. “I hear you, pal,” the angel said. “We’ve had this thing between Yahweh and Satan going on for about... what?... I guess it’s been a little over 6,000 years now. Sometimes I get so sick of it, I’m tempted to go with one of the third-party picks.” I sat quietly for a bit, contemplating what sort of nerve it would take to start a third party in competition with both God and the Devil. Then I asked if the average Heavenian was paying any attention at all to what was going on with the delegate fight and all that. “It’s hard to say,” he answered. “Normally, there are two things we discourage our folks from talking about here... religion and politics. But with Trump down there... you know, being Trump... it’s got everyone a little... how do you say it these days?... WTF!!!” “Yeah,” I said. “It’s hard to keep things in perspective when stuff like that’s happening.That’s why I wanted to get away for a while.” Angel Dave started to say something, but then he stiffened and groaned. “Ah, darn! Have to leave you on your own, Bill. Just got word of another car bombing in a Baghdad street market. Mostly kids and women.” “Anything I can do to help?” I asked. “Nah, you wouldn’t want to see that. You Americans may think you want to put things in perspective, but very few of you are ready for the kind of perspective we get here everyday.” He told me to wander around all I wanted and do my own thing untiI I was ready to get back to the grind. “Just don’t pick any flowers. Not unless you want to spend your next incarnation as a dandelion.” Sometime between now and November, I’ll try to tell you what happened on the rest of my getaway to Heaven. For now, suffice it to say, it’s the only time in my life I wished I’d had an iPhone on me. You wouldn’t believe some of the selfies I could have gotten. BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 5


OPINION FROM THE FAR MARGINS Armageddon

NICOLE LEFAVOUR As a child, I fixated on learning survival skills. My dad taught me to cast a fly rod and pick mushrooms and berries. His hunting and fishing skills had fed five cold and sometimes desperate men in the Arctic in the late 1950s after their canoes capsized in a rapid. One man was lost to hypothermia. My dad killed caribou after caribou, huge sea migrating trout and birds. But it was my mother who taught me to shoot a gun. She’d take me into the desert outside Challis and toss clay pigeons or stack cans. She taught me to fight with a knife, “Blade up so you can cut them if they try to grab you.” Young and wild, she lived nights and worked days as a secretary in New York City. Idaho is a long way from New York, Washington D.C., Boston, even Chicago—places where people cannot imagine the passage of laws as backward as ours. So, yes, I like a challenge. Politics interested me from day one. I was 10 when my parents were knocking on doors for Hunter S. Thompson’s Freak Power campaign for Pitkin County sheriff in Colorado in the early 1970s. I’ve seen political loss turn to disillusionment. I’ve seen marriages and close communities fall apart. I’ve seen people retreat into the wild, the arts or drink, or all of them, just to face the trajectory humanity seems intent on. We all find things that give us hope for our kids, our species or for ourselves. We do this with varying degrees of success or we do not, and instead crumble at the futility of trying to push our nation from a path where we further consolidate our masses of wealth into ever fewer hands, leaving the rest of us desperate to scrape by. I had a bit of an existential crisis in high school. I contemplated the worth of life without the ability to make other lives happier. I had found solutions in the high-school realization that I am not particularly motivated by my own life, but instead highly motivated by the plight of others. There are plenty of people out there across the political and religious spectrum who seem to set aside the idea of financial success in order to give themselves to causes and living a life within a set of values. I’ve lived a good life. I’ve seen sides of the world that are remote and spectacular in their pristine beauty, or vivid and lovely with the kindness of humanity. Maybe I get some peace knowing I’ve tried to make the world a better place, even just 6 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

one student at a time by teaching, or with my voice, my relationships and my vote serving in elected office. Not all I’ve done has been popular. I’ve been a very intentional obstacle to those who would use power to inflict harm. I’ve tried to bring the weight of public opinion down on those who for too long have refused to do anything but stand by while others purposefully inflict harm. Those things let me sleep at night and they wake me—and millions like me—up in the morning to carry on the Sisyphean task of finding ways to make the human condition slightly better. Some days that is harder, like when a Confederate flag flies in the state I love and people I love feel fear. Like when I listen to some of the world’s most powerful and wealthy use their airtime to blame problems they created on immigrants and Muslims or racial and ethnic groups other than their own. It gets harder when I see our nation’s sense of justice and democracy fail under the weight of money and all that it buys. Human populations are like other social animals—we grow less kind and generous when we believe resources are scarce. This is particularly true when we’re told who to blame for scarcity; for loss; for our fears. It’s not difficult to create mobs of monsters. Anger makes ordinary people irrational. We can be manipulated when we’re afraid and neither Donald Trump nor Ted Cruz is afraid to do it. Adolf Hitler did it and created a mob that expected him to follow through on his rhetoric until people began to die— and they did in gas chambers, and of starvation, and by gunshot wounds because the people demanded it, having been told those who died were the source of all their ills, woe and scarcity. It makes sense lately that I dream mostly of armageddon—violence, loss of life, great disaster and strife. In the context of these dreams, my daily waking life seems reasonable, my goals attainable. Still, we walk in a shadow and, regardless of what we believe about any politician’s intent to follow through on his words, some of those men have created angry mobs with a set of expectations that should give us all a reason to get up in the morning and do our best to make the plight of humanity better, our fears and scarcity lesser, and our generosity greater. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


Welcome to Emerald House, the anti-Cooper court GEORGE PRENTICE The living quarters are tight at what has been dubbed “Emerald House,” with seven adults living under one roof, and sharing a bathroom, kitchen and living room. Given the cramped conditions, JoJo and Kelly—two of the residents—were anxious to move the tour of the home into the back yard. “Isn’t this nice?” asked JoJo, smiling, a fresh load of laundry drying on the line behind her. “And to think that we call this home. It’s really something, hmm?” The contrast is stark from August 2015, as tensions began rising around the rapidly spreading downtown tent city that would come to be known as Cooper Court. JoJo, Kelly and their five housemates—all of whom are chronically homeless—lived in Cooper Court, even though the controversial encampment was anything but a place to put down roots. As the tent city grew, so did frustration and anger as Boise engaged in a public debate over what role, if any, the city should take in caring for the scores of men and women who spent their days and nights in Cooper Court instead of in a shelter. “It seems like a dream now,” said JoJo. “No, it was a bad dream.” She said she was remembering the drizzly December day when Boise police barricaded the perimeter of Cooper Court, and removed all of its residents. Boise officials insisted there was ample space in the area’s shelters, while advocates of the homeless argued the multiple reasons why many of the chronically homeless struggled with staying in near-capacity shelters at night, which they were kicked out of at sunrise. What some people may not know is at the same time, an equally intense debate was boiling up inside the walls of Interfaith Sanctuary, the shelter just steps away from Cooper Court.

A CHANGE AT THE TOP

Interfaith Sanctuary provides around 165 beds for men, women and children. “I think it’s fair to say that the Interfaith board of directors was split,” said Jodi Peterson, a former nine-year volunteer at Interfaith, now the shelter’s development and program director. “Some believed that we should be better neighbors, but there were some people saying that the population of Cooper Court was dangerous and we should stay away. And frankly, I believed them at first.” B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

Permits for nine of 10 “temporary” lots along Front Street have lapsed or never existed.

SEVERAL DOWNTOWN BOISE PARKING LOTS OPERATING WITHOUT A PERMIT

Interfaith Sanctuary’s new development and program director Jodi Peterson (center), joins JoJo (left) and Kelly (right) at home at Emerald House, a response to Cooper Court.

Everything changed for Peterson on Sept. 10, 2015. “That’s when Curtis and I were driving back to Boise from McCall,” she said, referring to internationally known Idaho musician Curtis Stigers, who is also Peterson’s fiancee. Stigers had performed at a benefit concert and Peterson said they were bringing some extra water bottles back from the charity event. “I know a bottle of water sounds so simple, but we were warned to stay away and not bring anything over to Cooper Court. That just felt wrong,” said Peterson. “What I saw when we brought them water was a group of really sick people, yet they were taking care of one another.” Peterson said because she was a contract employee, supervising a once-a-week music program for Interfaith Sanctuary, the shelter’s management didn’t stop her from bringing more donations to Cooper Court, including food, sleeping bags, tents and clothing. Over the next three months, as Cooper Court gained in notoriety, so did Peterson as she regularly advocated for the tent city’s occupants via her Facebook page. When Cooper Court was swept by city officials on Dec. 3, 2015, Peterson was vocal about her fears of what might happen to its former residents. “And then, that night, a woman saw me on TV and somehow she got a hold of me and said, ‘I think I can help. I have a house,’” said Peterson. That house turned out to be what is nowEmerald House. Residents have asked for the exact address not be disclosed. In the meantime, Interfaith Sanctuary was reeling from its internal debate over Cooper

Court. The split led to the April 1 resignation of the shelter’s longtime director, Jayne Sorrels, and Peterson said the board asked her to step in and “settle things down a bit.” “Eventually, it evolved into a new full-time position and now I’m the new development and program director for Interfaith,” she said. “I didn’t know I would be ready for that, but here I am.” Among the other bridges in need of rebuilding, she said, is a working relationship with the city. “There was a time when the mayor was a bit mad at me, but that was at the height of Cooper Court,” said Peterson. “I know in my heart that the mayor wanted to do the right thing, but had no idea how to do it. It was a difficult time.”

HOUSING FIRST

Two months after dismantling Cooper Court, Bieter called a press conference to say the tent city was a “stark example of a model that was unsustainable.” More important, he said, the city was prepared to partner with the Boise City/ Ada County Housing Authority, CATCH, Terry Reilly Health Services and the Idaho Housing and Finance Association to build a “housing first” approach to combat chronic homelessness. “The best alternative is to get someone in a safe, clean place to live first,” said Bieter. “Only then can you get to the root causes of homelessness.” Bieter added the city would begin soliciting requests for proposals from area nonprofits and caregivers to provide 8 services for 25 to 30 housing units. In particular, he said, the project would be

There are all kinds of technical names— deficit, shortage, shortfall, insufficiency— when it comes to the lack of parking spaces in downtown Boise. The term most bandied about at Boise City Hall lately is “crunch,” and there is plenty being discussed regarding downtown Boise’s future parking needs. Earlier this year, Michigan-based Carl Walker, Inc., which was commissioned to study Boise parking, updated its previous analyses from 2009 and 2014 and concluded in its newest study that Boise faces “dramatic growth in parking demand” for at least the next five years, and there is a “greater sense of urgency related to crafting a new strategic plan,” including better utilization of existing parking. City planning officials couldn’t agree more and even concede they’ve done a lousy job in keeping track of as many as 10 parking lots lining the highly-visible Front Street corridor. In fact, seven of the 10 lots, each deemed “temporary,” have allowed their permits to lapse, with one expiring as long ago as 2012—the Ada County employee parking lot at 200 Front St. was never even officially permitted for parking. “We think the lot was permitted for a building but it eventually became a lot,” said city of Boise Zoning Manager Scott Spjute in an April 19 presentation to the City Council. “It was never permitted as a temporary parking lot.” Yet another “temporary” lot, this one at 406 Fourth St. in Boise’s Central Addition, has never been officially permitted for parking and there is no application on file. In 1991, the city of Boise amended its code to allow so-called “temporary” lots with permits lasting two years but eligible for annual renewals. During an economic slump in the mid-’90s, city code was updated to allow five-year permits for so-called “interim” parking lots, but the city 8 scrapped that policy two years later and reverted back to the “temporary” BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 7

G EORG E PRE NTICE

G EORG E PRE NTICE

HOME, AT LAST

NEWS

CITYDESK


CITYDESK

ADA C OUNT Y DE VELOPMENT S ERVICES

G EORG E PRE NTICE

NEWS

NOT ALL CLEAR TO LAND

Pilot used Boise Foothills as landing strip without permission

Boise officials on lapsed parking lot permits: “We haven’t tracked them well.”

two-year permitting process, allowing for up to three one-year extensions. A review of city records reveals seven lots—406 Fourth St., 406 Fifth St., 350 E. Myrtle St., 1101 Front St., 116 Sixth St., 329 Grove St. and 1110 S. Oakland Ave.—have expired permits. An eighth, 520 Front St., has a permit that expires in August. The ninth and tenth lots, 406 Fourth St. and the Ada County employee lot at 200 Front St., never had applications on file. “We haven’t tracked them well,” said Spjute, who asked the council for some direction on how to proceed. “The first step is to bring all of the non-compliant lots into compliance,” said Council President Elaine Clegg. “This just hasn’t been fair to the owners of lots who have been properly permitted.” Councilman Scot Ludwig said he agreed all the unpermitted lots needed to be brought up to code, but quickly added he didn’t want to see any undue enforcement that might result in lot closures. “Those lots are absolutely important to fuel downtown growth. Do you know why Microsoft is in this community and not in Denver right now? Because of their absolute need to have a nearby temporary parking lot,” said Ludwig. “At least for now—and this is a bit of a boom time—I would highly recommend that the temporary lots be put on a short leash but not with a termination date. I think the marketplace needs to drive this.” Clegg pushed back against the idea of open-ended permits for temporary lots. “Yes, there’s a parking crunch right now, but I still think there should be a time limit on temporary lots,” she said. “I don’t think we should be terminating anybody right now, but we should have some idea of what the owners’ plans are for their property.” As for the immediate future, Spjute said the message is clear: Get those temporary lots permitted. 7

—George Prentice 8 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

GEORGE PRENTICE When the Boise City Council was asked to weigh in on a proposed private airstrip in the Boise Foothills they had some choice words: dangerous, disruptive, even audacious. Little did they know that the man, identified only as an Alaska resident, had already been landing his Piper “Supercub” in the Foothills. “We can confirm that the man contacted the Ada County Development Services Department and said he had been using the property for a landing strip,” said Kate McGwire, Ada County public information officer. “We informed him that he would need to apply for a permit and once he was told that he had to get that permit, he stopped using the land as an airstrip.” When asked about the airstrip, proposed on land about a quarter of a mile east of N. Alto

Via Court and Table Rock Road, officials with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game said they had “primary concerns of disturbance” to wintering elk and deer, adding, “the presence of wildlife on the airstrip would make it unusable.” The Boise Fire and Parks and Recreation departments also recommended denial.

The Ada County Planning and Zoning Commission will have the final say in the matter. “It all comes down to Thursday, May 5 at 6 p.m.,” said McGwire. “That’s when we’ll have a public hearing on the proposal and the P and Z Commission should then decide on the issue.”

geared to address the chronically homeless, defined as individuals with a disabling condition who have been continuously homeless for a year or more or have had at least four episodes of homelessness in the past three years. A second prong of the initiative, dubbed “Housing First Scattered Sites,” would call for up to 15 existing homes to be used as permanent housing while CATCH and Terry Reilly would provide much-needed services to the residents. “Creating Housing First options is an investment in breaking this reactive cycle and a step toward proactive efforts that will save money and lives,” said Bieter. The mayor didn’t know Emerald House could be a part of a “housing first” solution. Few people knew of the anonymous donation from the woman who called Peterson to say she had a home to donate. “I’ve been very quiet about this,” Peterson said. “We wanted to do this right and not scare anybody away. You may remember that we had a possible solution last winter from a local RV park, but the media attention scared them off.”

That plan was to allow as many as 20 chronically homeless individuals to stay for at least a few months at Boise Riverside RV Park in Garden City. When the idea got a fair amount of Idaho media attention, the owners said too many of the park’s other occupants worried about the controversy, so the plan was scuttled. “So, we’ve taken this step by step, beginning with rental agreements,” said Peterson. A volunteer from Concordia University Law School helped craft rental agreements with special “opt-in behavioral clauses” that require Emerald House tenants to treat themselves and each other with respect. The model, Peterson said, came from similar agreements used in Eugene, Ore.-based Opportunity Village, a tinyhome community for the homeless. “Our Emerald House tenants have promised sweat equity. They’re keeping up the house, they’re gardening, making any necessary repairs,” said Peterson. “Next, we needed mentors, and we’ve had a number of social work students from Boise State University.” Additionally, Peterson said, social workers have been coming by the home to link up

Emerald House tenants with food stamps, Social Security benefits, medical assistance and even job coaching. “We’re pretty excited,” said Peterson. “One of our Emerald House tenants just secured a construction job. It will be his first job in some time.” As for neighbors, the residents said they’ve had nothing but positive reactions because, for the most part, they said things were so quiet at Emerald House. A quick survey of the neighborhood indicates the house is surrounded by about 70 percent commercial and 30 percent residential. “It’s a rather perfect neighborhood for our purposes,” said Peterson. But Emerald House is a long way from perfect because, Peterson said, each of the residents is still wrestling with his or her demons. “It’s fair to say that Emerald House will be here for a while,” she said. “And the folks living there? Well they’ll be better…” Peterson took a long pause before finishing her thought. “You know what? It’ll be awhile before they’re all better. But hey, we’ve already seen what the alternative looks like, haven’t we?”

7

The owner of this “Supercub” landed his plane in the Boise Foothills before asking Ada County officials for a permit to build a landing strip, north of Table Rock.

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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY APRIL 27 On Stage BCT: MARGIN OF ERROR—8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org/season/ margin_error. COMEDIAN DEREK SHEEN—With Lady Bizness and host Eli Nary. 7 p.m. $7, $10 for 2. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com. HOMEGROWN: VIRGINIA WOOLF’S ORLANDO—Alt rock meets Degas in Sarah Ruhl’s adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s fantastical novel about identity, love and ignoring conformity. April 27 is a pay-what-you-can preview. 8 p.m. $5-$10. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365.

MOMENTA FILM SCREENING—Join the Idaho Sierra Club for one of the 10 best documentaries of 2013, which examines a Pacific Northwest coal project that could threaten the global environment on a scale larger than the Keystone XL pipeline. 6:30 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225, idaho. sierraclub.org.

Workshops & Classes SIMPLIFY YOUR FINANCES— Learn how to take charge of your finances from Lanette Marcum of Glacier Bancorp. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Art ADONNA KHARE: THE KINGDOM—Through May 29. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum,

THURSDAY-SATURDAY, APRIL 28-30

War never really ends.

OPERA IDAHO: GLORY DENIED

Col. Floyd “Jim” Thompson holds an unenviable record. Captured by the Viet Cong and held captive March 1964-March 1973, Thompson spent more time in captivity than any other American POW of the Vietnam War. His story was told in the 2001 book Glory Denied: The Vietnam Saga of Jim Thompson, America’s LongestHeld Prisoner of War. The book isn’t an obvious candidate for an adaptation, but American composer Tom Cipullo saw it differently. His acclaimed 2007 chamber opera Glory Denied takes lyrics right from the pages of the book. Opera Idaho will showcase the nontraditional work in a non-traditional space: the Aviation Specialties Unlimited hangar at Boise Airport. Due to language and subject matter, audience discretion is advised. 7:30 p.m. each night, $24-$48. Aviation Specialties Unlimited, 4632 W. Aeronca St., 208-426-8117, operaidaho.org. 10 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. BOISE STATE ART METALS CLUB: RIVETING—Through May 8. 7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO. finearts.boisestate.edu. DON WINIECKI: MAKING THE FAMILIAR STRANGE—Through May 22. 7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4261242, finearts.boisestate.edu. I NEED TO TELL YOU SOMETHING: THE LOST ART OF LETTER WRITING—Through May 6. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org. RACHEL TEANNALACH: INTERSECTIONS AND ENCOUNTERS—Through April 30. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gallery Five18, 518 S. Americana Blvd., Boise, 208-3423773, teannalach.com.

TALL TALES: NARRATIVES FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION— Through April 9, 2017. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. TVAA: CELEBRATING PIPEDREAMS—In celebration of National Public Radio’s season of shows, Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance members draw inspiration from the “King of Instruments” featured every Sunday on NPR’s pipe organ-centric program, Pipedreams. Through July 1. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-4263663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance. org.

Citizen ADA COUNTY 2025 OPEN HOUSE—Ada County is seeking public input on land use, growth and development through a series of open houses, where you can let officials know what you think of

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, APRIL 29-30

Indie-pendence Day.

SHAWN VESTAL/INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE DAY

Rediscovered Books holds a privileged place in Boise. Located in the gamest stretch of downtown’s cultural and commercial core on Eighth Street, it’s one of the few independent retail book stores in Boise. Swing by Friday and Saturday for two big events: a reading by Idaho-born author Shawn Vestal, whose escape-from-the-Mormon Church novel, Daredevils, dropped April 12 and is already racking up awards. Catch him Friday, April 29, at 7 p.m. and then on Saturday, April 30, don’t miss Independent Bookstore Day. From 10 a.m.-8 p.m., enjoy scavenger hunts, beer tasting, music, and get your hands on exclusive products, including a Neil Gaiman coloring book and limited edition prints. Shawn Vestal: Friday, April 29, 7 p.m.; Independent Bookstore Day: Saturday, April 30, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

their goals and policies. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Lake Hazel Middle School, 11625 La Grange St., Boise, 208855-4375, adacounty2025.com.

THURSDAY APRIL 28 On Stage BCT: MARGIN OF ERROR—8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org/season/ margin_error. COMEDIAN PATRICK MELTON—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. HOMEGROWN: VIRGINIA WOOLF’S ORLANDO—8 p.m. $5$10. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365. HYPNOTIST JIM KELLNER—Enjoy an evening of comedy and hypnotism. For 21 and older. 8:30 p.m.

$5 adv., $10 door. The Stockyard Nite Club, 185 S. 2nd E. St., Mountain Home, 208-587-5055. OPERA IDAHO: GLORY DENIED—Tom Cipullo’s chamber opera tells the true story of Col. Jim Thompson, an American soldier held as a prisoner of war in Vietnam from 1964-73. 7:30 p.m. $24-$48. Aviation Specialties Unlimited, 4632 W. Aeronca St., Boise, 208-426-8117, operaidaho.org/ the-season/glory-denied. STAGE COACH: BE MY BABY— 7:30 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre. com.

Workshops & Classes B|ON BOARD—Looking to get involved? Curious what it takes to be part of a commission, committee or board? Join Boise Young Professionals’ b|On Board program. Now in its third year, this three-week training series is designed to inform

SATURDAY, APRIL 30

Branch out this weekend and help seed your urban forest.

RELEAF BOISE

Can you dig it? We knew you could. Begun in 1990 as part of the then-new Community Forestry Unit, the ReLeaf Boise campaign is a shovel-toting band of citizen volunteers who have planted thousands of trees on public rights-of-way throughout the City of Trees. This year’s plantings, set for Saturday, April 30, 8 a.m. -2 p.m., will see nearly 80 trees set into dozens of public sites throughout the city. If you’re apt to join this year’s ReLeaf brigade, you should also circle Thursday, April 28 on your calendar. That’s when, beginning at 7 p.m., prospective volunteers are required to attend a tree planting class. As city officials are quick to point out, “It’s much more than just digging a hole.” 8 a.m.-2 p.m., FREE. Boise Community Forestry, 4969 W. Dorman St., 208-608-7617, parks.cityofboise.org. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR Boise professionals about how to engage with organizations around the community. Also on May 5 and May 12. 5:30-8 p.m. $50-$75. Boise State Andrus Center in BoDo, 301 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3777. boiseyp.org/bypprograms/bon-board. AN EVENING WITH STEPHANIE TELESCO OF BRICK OVEN BISTRO—Join Brick Oven Bistro coowner and Two Million Meals Later author Stephanie Telesco as she demystifies Beanery Creamy Country Corn Gravy from roux to finish. You’ll sample some corny gravy goodness and have the knowledge to recreate this delicious gravy. After the presentation, Telesco will sign copies of the Brick Oven Bistro Cookbook. 6-7:30 p.m. $30. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, 1000 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-389-7605. jumpcooking.eventbrite.com.

Talks & Lectures WATER POLLUTION TRADING ON THE BOISE RIVER—Join Neil Crescenti of Willamette Partnership to learn about the basics of pollution trading and provide a report on development of this approach for the lower Boise River. Hosted by the Boise River Enhancement Network. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Washington Group Plaza, 720 Park Blvd., Boise. boiseriverenhancement.net.

Citizen ADA COUNTY 2025 OPEN HOUSE—Ada County is seeking public input on land use, growth and development through a series of open houses, where you can let officials know what you think of their preliminary goals and policies. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Ada County Courthouse, 200 W. Front St., Boise, 208-287-7000; also at 6-8 p.m. Sawtooth Middle School, 3730 N. Linder Road, Meridian, 208-8554200, adacounty2025.com.

FRIDAY APRIL 29 Festivals & Events BARBARIAN BREWING EXPANSION PARTY—Barbarian Brewing has expanded their taproom, so they’re throwing a party to celebrate. They’ll be releasing three new beers: Plumberry Weiss, Mystery Barrel 1.0, and barrel-aged barleywine, Ol’ Samson. Get grub from the B-Town Bistro food truck, and hear live music by electronic violin and drum duo Razzvio. For 21 and older. 3-10 p.m. FREE. Barbarian Brewing, 5270 E. Chinden Blvd., Garden City. BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS WILD WEST AUCTION—The Wild West Auction for Kids raises critical

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

operating funds for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Ada County. 5:30 p.m. SOLD OUT. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900. adaclubs.org/wildwestauction. INAUGURAL CWI CONNECTIONS EVENT—Join CWI students from across the college for presentations on research, class work and projects as part of the CWI Connections Project. Plus community dancing performances, live music, great food, and the Presidential Writing Awards ceremony. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho Nampa Campus, 5500 E. Opportunity Drive, Nampa, 208-562-3400, cwidaho.cc.

On Stage 6TH ANNUAL SPROUT FILM FESTIVAL—Enjoy thought-provoking short films from around the world that promote greater acceptance, celebrate difference and light the spark to help make the invisible visible. Also at the Flicks on April 30 at 12:30 p.m. 7 p.m. $8-$10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise. 208-422-1759, thearcinc. org. BCT: MARGIN OF ERROR—8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224. bctheater.org/season/ margin_error. COMEDIAN PATRICK MELTON—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ—Celebrate Preservation Week with the Idaho State Archives at the Old Idaho Pen by watching Escape from Alcatraz, starring Clint Eastwood. 8 p.m. $5. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-334-2844, history.idaho.gov. HOMEGROWN: VIRGINIA WOOLF’S ORLANDO—8 p.m. $5$10. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365. MUSIC THEATRE OF IDAHO: THE SECRET GARDEN—7:30 p.m. $18$22. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555. mtionline.org. OPERA IDAHO: GLORY DENIED—7:30 p.m. $24-$48. Aviation Specialties Unlimited, 4632 W. Aeronca St., Boise, 208-426-8117, operaidaho.org. RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: BEYOND WONDERLAND—8 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297. STAGE COACH: BE MY BABY—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Literature AUTHOR SHAWN VESTAL—The PEN//Robert W. Bingham Prize-winning author of Godforsaken Idaho will be in the store reading from and signing his latest novel, Daredevils. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, www.rdbooks.org. GARDEN CITY LIBRARY SPRING BOOK SALE— Add to your library on the cheap at the little book sale that could. You’ll find thousands of books and magazines priced from 50 cents to $1. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness THE NEVER ENDING BOGUS BASIN HARD GUY TRAIL RUN— Enjoy a long (16-mile and 32-mile options) gratifying run, meet some outdoorsy people and help out fallen Wildland Firefighters. For more info, visit the event website. 7:45 a.m. $10. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-332-5100. summitpost. org/hard-guy/405032.

Citizen NATIONWIDE NURSE-IN ON THE CAPITOL STEPS—Join Idaho Moms for Nursing In Public for the annual Nurse-In on the Statehouse steps. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705.

Animals & Pets YAPPY HOUR—Join the City of Eagle Parks and Recreation for Eagle’s very first Yappy Hour. Merrill Park will be transformed into a mobile pop-up dog park where people and their pets mingle. BYOB and BYOD. 5-7 p.m. FREE. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle.

Food FOOD TRUCK RALLY—Chow down with A Cupcake Paradise, Archie’s Place Boise, Burgerlicious, Genki Takoyaki, Hello Dinner and RiceWorks Asian Street Food, plus beer by Payette Brewing, wine by 36th Street Bistro and music by DJ Winkle and DJ Nichole of Radio Boise. 5-8 p.m. 36th Street Garden Center and Bistro, 1665 W. Hill Road, Boise, 208-433-5100, 36streetgardencenter.com. B-TOWN BISTRO FOOD TRUCK— Enjoy some Barbarian beer, Meriwether cider and B-Town Bistro food. 5:30-8 p.m. Meriwether Cider Co., 5254 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-972-6725, meriwethercider.com.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 11


CALENDAR DATE NIGHT AT CHATEAU DES FLEURS—Enjoy a three-course Italian dinner by Chef Franck Bacquet, plus dancing to music by Adam Gottesman. 7-10 p.m. $39. Chateau des Fleurs, 175 S. Rosebud Lane, Eagle, 208-947-2840, chateaueagle.com.

SATURDAY APRIL 30 Festivals & Events 23RD ANNUAL SEVEN ARROWS POWWOW— Immerse yourself in the culture of the first people at this powwow featuring traditional costumes, song, music, demonstrations and storytelling. Nonperishable food donations for the Native American Council of Boise will be accepted at the door. Noon-9 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-5800. mss.boisestate.edu/ pow-wow. AMERICAN LEGION RIDERS’ RUMMAGE SALE—9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Meridian American Legion/ VFW Hall, 22 W. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-898-8930. BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287. facebook.com/ TheBoiseFarmersMarket. CANYON COUNTY CO-OP 2016 SUMMER COMMUNITY MARKET—9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Canyon County Co-op, 1415 First St. S., Nampa, 208-960-0328, canyoncounty.coop. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET— 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Idaho and Jefferson streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE DAY CELEBRATION—Celebrate the second-annual Independent Bookstore Day at Rediscovered Books with a full day of activities, prizes and exclusive Bookstore Day items. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, indiebookstoreday.com. KIDS FUN FEST—Enjoy a day packed full of entertainment and interactive fun zones for all ages. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$5. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-376-0464, ibleventsinc.com. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Nampa Farmers’ Market, Longbranch parking lot, Front and 13th, Nampa, 208-4123814. RELEAF BOISE—Team up with the Boise Community Forestry Unit to plant trees along city streets. Visit bit.ly/bprvolunteers for more information and to sign up. Sat., April 30. FREE. 208-608-7700, bit. ly/bprvolunteers. ROYAL FAMILY KIDS CAMP BLACK AND WHITE BALL—Help Royal Family Kids’ Camp send Treasure Valley foster children on a weeklong camping adventure in the mountains. 6-10 p.m. $60, $110 couples. Stueckle Sky Center, Boise State Broncos Albertsons Football Stadium, 1910 University Drive, Boise, boise.royalfamilykids. org. RUN FOR AUTISM 2016—Join the Autism Society Treasure Valley for their 13th annual Run For Autism.

9-11 a.m. $7-$22. Veterans Memorial Park, 930 N. Veterans Memorial Parkway, Boise, asatvc.org/event/ run-for-autism.

HOMEGROWN: VIRGINIA WOOLF’S ORLANDO—8 p.m. $5$10. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365.

TREASURE VALLEY KITE FESTIVAL—Go fly a kite at the Third Annual Treasure Valley Kite Festival, where kids get FREE kites while supplies last. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, 1900 N. Records Ave., near Fairview Avenue and Eagle Road, Meridian, tvkitefestival.com.

MERIDIAN SYMPHONY RISING STARS YOUNG ARTISTS CONCERT—Highlights include Young Artists Competition winners Anna Black, violin, and Fernando Perez, flute, performing solos with the orchestra. 7:30 p.m. $11.50-$15.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, box office: 208-426-1110, meridiansymphony. org.

WEST BOISE SATURDAY MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise. 208-322-9464, WORLD TAI CHI AND QIGONG DAY CELEBRATION—Celebrate World Tai Chi and Qigong Day with refreshments, adult coloring, and Qigong basics and exercises. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-972-8340. boisepubliclibrary.org/calendar.

On Stage 6TH ANNUAL SPROUT FILM FESTIVAL—12:30 p.m. $8-$10. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise. 208-422-1759, thearcinc.org. BCT: MARGIN OF ERROR—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater. org/season/margin_error. COMEDIAN PATRICK MELTON—8 p.m. 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. 208-4898789, cityofeagle.org.

RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: BEYOND WONDERLAND—8 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297. SATURDAY NIGHT IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Treasure Valley Children’s Theater, 703 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-287-8828, treasurevalleychildrenstheater.com. STAGE COACH: BE MY BABY—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. TV CHILDREN’S THEATER: HANSEL AND GRETEL—11 a.m. and 3 p.m. $5-$12. Treasure Valley Children’s Theater, 703 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-287-8828, treasurevalleychildrenstheater.com/see.

On Stage

FAMILY FUN PET EXPO—This fun-filled family event features pet products, services, contests, and traditional family pets, as well as a variety of rare and beautiful animals. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$5. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City. 208376-0464, ibleventsinc.com.

COMEDIAN PATRICK MELTON—8 p.m. $10-$12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Food EL KORAH SHRINER PROVOST GUARD WINE TASTING—Featuring six local wineries, jazz band, door prizes and silent and live auctions. 6-9 p.m. $20, $35 couples. El Korah Shrine, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571, elkorah.org.

SUNDAY MAY 1 Festivals & Events 23RD ANNUAL SEVEN ARROWS POWWOW—Noon-9 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, mss.boisestate.edu/pow-wow.

HOMEGROWN READING: HEIDI KRAAY’S HOW TO HIDE YOUR MONSTER—See local playwright Heidi Kraay’s MFA thesis project. 7 p.m. $5. Studio 208, The 951 Front Building, 951 E. Front St., Ste. 108, Boise, 208-406-9854.

Food SUNDAY CIDER BRUNCH WITH OWL TREE BAKERY—10 a.m. Meriwether Cider Co., 5242 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City .

MONDAY MAY 2 On Stage HOMEGROWN STAGED READING: HEIDI KRAAY’S HOW TO HIDE YOUR MONSTER—7 p.m. $5. Studio 208, The 951 Front Building, 951 E. Front St., Ste. 108, Boise, 208-406-9854.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

Art ST(R)EAM COFFEE BIKE ARTIST STUDIO/GALLERY BIKE TOUR— Follow on your bike to artists and makers studios in Garden City. Show up between 1:30-2 p.m. to enjoy a complimentary cup of coffee or tea before the tour begins. 2-4:30 p.m. $10. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206407-7529.

Literature

EXPERIENCE IDAHO EXPO—Explore Idaho’s great mix of urban living and outdoor activities, at the Experience Idaho Expo. This event introduces newcomers and native Idahoans to the best products, services and activities that they can experience in their own state. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$5. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City. 208-376-0464, ibleventsinc.com.

GARDEN CITY LIBRARY SPRING BOOK SALE—9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-4722941, notaquietlibrary.org.

Religious/Spiritual

FIRE AND FLOODS: GEOLOGY OF THE TWIN FALLS AREA FIELD TRIP—Join CSI Prof. Shawn Willsey for this full-day trip to Twin Falls. 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $10-$15. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. 208-853-1678, idahomuseum.org. OPERA IDAHO: GLORY DENIED—7:30 p.m. $24-$48. Aviation Specialties Unlimited, 4632 W. Aeronca St., Boise, 208-4268117, operaidaho.org.

MUSIC THEATRE OF IDAHO: THE SECRET GARDEN—1:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $18-$22. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, mtionline.org.

Animals & Pets

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

12 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

SISTERS YNC. SPRING SEMINAR—Join SISTERS ync. for their annual spring seminar “Break Every Chain.” Fee includes seminar and lunch. You’ll enjoy time and space to reflect and rejoice, music and prayer ministry, growth exercises and teaching, and the SISTERS ync. Gift Shop. Convenient online registration and payment available at the group’s website; follow the “seminar” link. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $25. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise. sistersync. com.

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


CALENDAR Art

Sports & Fitness

30 DAYS FOR ART—Roots Family History and the Idaho Commission on the Arts are on a mission to find Boise’s most talented artist. Roots will scan up to three pieces of art in exchange for a $5 donation. The cash will be awarded to one lucky art instructor. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $5. Roots Family History, 1901 Wildwood St., Boise, 208-343-9135, rootsfamilyhistory.com.

BOISE CURLING CLUB LEARN TO CURL—If you’ve ever wanted to try curling, here’s your chance. $10-$20. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-6087716, boisecurlingclub.org.

Literature

TUESDAY MAY 3 Festivals & Events

GARDEN CITY LIBRARY SPRING BOOK SALE—8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-4722941, notaquietlibrary.org. POETICS BOISE OPEN MIC—Read your own poetry or a favorite. 6:309 p.m. FREE. Kind Cuisine Cafe, 4628 W. State St., Boise, 208-3679000, facebook.com/poeticsboise.

ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL TOURS—12:15 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise. 208-345-0304, wassmuthcenter. org/events.

On Stage

Workshops & Classes ERIC SPELLMANN: TOP 10 HACKS TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS—Join nationally known speaker Eric Spellmann to learn how your small business can be more successful whether you’re marketing online, offline or both. 4-6 p.m. $50. Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce, 250 S. Fifth St., Boise; also at 7:30-8:30 a.m. FREE. Hampton Inn-Nampa, 5750 E. Franklin Road, Nampa, 208-442-0036,

Talks & Lectures

BROADWAY IN BOISE: JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT—This new production full of unforgettable songs

THE MEPHAM GROUP

is a re-imagining of the Biblical story of Joseph, his 11 brothers and the coat of many colors. 7:30 p.m. $37.50-$57.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, mc.boisestate. edu.

| SUDOKU

PETER LAGERWEY: PLANNING FOR BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN SAFETY—Join Peter Lagerwey of the Toole Design Group in Seattle for a two-hour presentation on reducing bicycle and pedestrian crashes through better planning, engineering, education and enforcement. RSVP to ctorkelson@ compassidaho.org or 208-4752232. 6 p.m. FREE. COMPASS: Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho, 700 N.E. Second St., Ste. 200, Meridian, 208475-2232, compassidaho.org.

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

HAPPY HOUR every day 4-6 & 9-close $2 OFF

all apps, local beer, wine by the glass, & classic cocktails

ALL DAY SUNDAY!

Kids & Teens JUNIOR MASTER GARDENER CLASS—Learn about gardening, beneficial insects and wildlife in this class. For ages 8-12. 6-7:30 p.m. $45. University of Idaho Ada County Extension Office, 5880 Glenwood St., Boise. 208-287-5900, uidaho. edu.

Food Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

1ST TUESDAY COMPLIMENTARY WINE TASTING—Enjoy complimentary wine tastings on the first Tuesday of the month. Like what you taste? Get a glass for $2 off or $5 off a bottle to consume or to go. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Rice Contemporary Asian Cuisine, 228 E. Plaza St., Eagle, 208-939-2595, riceeagle. com.

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B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 13


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY APRIL 27 CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DUSTY ROOT—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow FLO ELECTRONIC LIVE MUSIC AND DJ’S—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

OPERA IDAHO: CIPULLO’S GLORY DENIED—7:30 p.m. $24-$48. Aviation Specialties Unlimited, 4632 W. Aeronca St., Boise PEEWEE MOORE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s RAWLEY FRYE—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub SPENCER BATT—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JESSE RS—6 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing

WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM— Hosted by The Blind Mice. 8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

LLOYD AND BECKY BLAKE—6 p.m. FREE. Sofia’s MILK CARTON KIDS—With Caitlin Canty. 8 p.m. $22-$65. Egyptian

14 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

THURSDAY APRIL 28 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DIGITOUR SPRING BREAK 2016—With 5Quad, Crawford Collins, DuhItzMark, Loren Gray and Weston Koury. 7:30 p.m. $25. Knitting Factory FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOHNNY SHOES—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 MIKE CRAMER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

OPERA IDAHO: CIPULLO’S GLORY DENIED—7:30 p.m. $24-$48. Aviation Specialties Unlimited, 4632 W. Aeronca St., Boise

BERNIE REILLY BAND—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BILLY BRAUN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ROBBER’S ROOST—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

BLAZE AND KELLY—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

JUDDSON CONSTANTINE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

SPENCER BATT—6 p.m. FREE. Meriwether Cider

BLUES BROTHERS ROCK ‘N SOUL REVUE—7:30 p.m. $15-$18 adv., $20-$23 door. Sapphire

MIKE CRAMER—6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard by Marriott Meridian

THOMAS PAUL—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub WILD NOTHING—With Whitney, and Charlie Hilton. 7 p.m. $15. Neurolux

FRIDAY APRIL 29 BEACH SLANG—With Potty Mouth, and Dyke Drama. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

CYMRY—6 p.m. FREE. Powderhaus Brewing DEVILDRIVER—With Holy Grail, Incite, and Hemlock. 7 p.m. $20$35. Knitting Factory DJ PUPPYCAT—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux FEAR FACTORY—With Soilwork. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Revolution FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

OPERA IDAHO: CIPULLO’S GLORY DENIED—7:30 p.m. $24-$48. Aviation Specialties Unlimited, 4632 W. Aeronca St., Boise PONY TIME—8:30 p.m. $5. The Olympic SPECIAL OLYMPICS CONCERT FOR A CAUSE—Featuring Celebration, the winners of Liquid’s 2014 Battle of the Bands. 6:30 p.m. $25-$50 16 donation. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 15


MUSIC GUIDE 14

SYMPATHY AND THE LION—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District TAMBALKA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

ZACH FORSMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SATURDAY APRIL 30 BREAD AND CIRCUS—10 p.m. FREE. Juniper BRIAR BOOTS—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue

MONDAY MAY 2

TUESDAY MAY 3

1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

MOSS ROSES—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

MONDAY NIGHT OPEN MIC WITH CRAIG SLOVER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: MICROWAVE—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BUCKSKIN—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CYMRY—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Eagle Saturday Market

ON SALE THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 29 AT 10AM

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SEPT. 21

DALE CAVANAUGH—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

DJ V’GER—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. 7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel HECKTOR PECKTOR—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KVELERTAK—With Torche, and Wild Throne. 7 p.m. $15 adv., $17 door. Neurolux MERIDIAN SYMPHONY RISING STARS YOUNG ARTISTS CONCERT—7:30 p.m. $11.50-$15.50. Morrison Center PILOT ERROR—10 p.m. $5. Reef REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill RYAN WISSINGER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SAFFELL—7 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing SHORE LODGE CONCERT SERIES: PETER KARP—6 p.m. Shore Lodge-McCall SONO FUEGO: COMPOSICION—7:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Sapphire TREASURE VALLEY YOUNG ARTISTS: SINGING INTO SPRING—6:30 p.m. $5-$25 family. Brandt Center at NNU

SUNDAY MAY 1 BILLY BRAUN—6 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJ’S—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

16 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

INCITE, APRIL 29, KNITTING FACTORY

In a couple of days, BoDo will rattle with the sounds of DevilDriver, Holy Grail, Incite, Hemlock and Mortal Enemy, and when Incite drops its first savage note its fourth and spanking-new album will be barely a week old. Oppression (Minus Head Records; April 22, 2016) comes two years after 2014’s Up In Hell, which many fans and critics saw as the definitive example of Incite coming into its own. Now, the explosive Oppression illuminates the Arizona-born band’s evolution, particularly its ability to throw down tight, brutal groove metal—and how to choose (or at least work with) a producer. Steve Evetts’, an accomplished producer, engineer, mixer and instrumentalist, has worked with a wide range of emo, metal, punk and rock bands, like Dillinger Escape Plan, Poison the Well, The Misfits, The Cure, Basque rockers Berri Txarrak and hundreds more. Evetts even worked with death/groove/thrash metal trailblazers Sepultura—cool not only because, well, Sepultura, but because Incite vocalist Richie Cavalera is the son of Sepultura co-founder Max Cavalera. The younger Cavalera has learned from one of the best, worked with one of the best and is proud of the results, telling Alternative Press, “This is an album full of aggression, frustration and pure energy. From beginning to end, you get a constant metal feel that’s organic and crushing … I couldn’t be any more fired up than I am right now.” —Amy Atkins 7 p.m., $10-$35.The Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


DR. DON’S DIGITAL PAINTBRUSH

Getting up close and meta with ANA, an art-generating computer program HARRISON BERRY At first blush, ANA’s digital paintings are skyscapes. They have the aesthetic beauty of a sunset drifting through a polluted atmosphere, “Idaho Fire Season 1” was painted by ANA with only minimal input from its creator, Don Winiecki. unnaturally juxtaposing colors and roiling with plumes of smog. But ANA isn’t an artist; it’s a computer program—a collection of algorithms also like to give ANA the ability to “draw.” It’s hang on a household wall. Winiecki then adds developed by Dr. Don Winiecki, who sees his a development, he said, that would make its a human touch: digitally applied diagonal lines creation as a paintbrush he’s teaching to paint. compositions more distinct. across shaded rectangles meant to evoke the Sometimes, however, it’s ANA that does the “I want it to add lines and discrete dimengeometry of the painting itself. They’re his way teaching. sionality,” he said. “Occasionally the flamboyant mistakes in an of teasing the idea that there’s more to ANA’s All that work on the back end of the progenerated images than pretty colors—hints at algorithm create the most fall-down beautiful gram raises questions of who is actually the artcompositions, and that’s where I learn from the the atmospheric and organic, nods at patterns machine,” Winiecki said. “If I don’t define what and geometries that have underpinned art since ist in the Winiecki/ANA relationship. Winiecki doesn’t call himself an artist; rather, he thinks of ancient Greece and refined in modernity. I consider a conservative choice of color, it can himself as a programmer. But ANA isn’t artifi“[I] try to make an explicit reference to a get really bold.” cially intelligent, relying on the code he provides piece of art in the art. I’m fiddling with the ANA stands for “ANA is Not Aaron”— to create images. Traditionally, art has been the “Aaron” being another art-generating computer viewer’s mind,” he said. “That’s my effort to do province of human attributes like creativity and something that pointy-headed art people do, program—and Winiecki is a professor of intuition, but Making the Familiar Strange comwhich is give multiple avenues to people trying sociology in the Boise State University College prises works for which creativity is a calculation to make sense of [the paintings].” of Engineering. Together, they opened their and intuition is a function of the program. Most of Winiecki’s input, however, consists first exhibition, Making the Familiar Strange, That doesn’t necessarily dehumanize the art of refining and expanding ANA’s digital toolApril 20 at the Boise State University Student ANA produces. The viewer could see the exhibibox. Some of the program’s first compositions Union. Making sense of the exhibition and tion as a display of artificiality and technological were geometric, and eschewed the complex Winiecki’s work with ANA is a philosophical color relationships that are the prowess, but each piece in the exhibition could exercise touching on issues current hallmarks of its work. also be an invitation to observe and analyze. like artificial intelligence, MAKING THE STRANGE FAMILIAR From ANA’s uses of color, hue and shade to In addition, Winiecki has computer science and the Runs through Monday, May 22, Winiecki’s meta “glyphs,” the works on display tinkered with ANA’s ability nature of art. Though ANA’s Monday-Friday, 6 a.m.-midnight, at Boise State are interpretively rich. to process light sources in its compositions are computer Saturday-Sunday, 7 a.m.-midnight, The fact that they were created by a comwork, making its composigenerated, Winiecki said FREE. Student Union Building, tions more evocative of atmo- puter can simply be food for thought. It can they have the same aesthetic Boise State University, 1700 University Drive, 208-426-4636, sub. also be a feast for art theorists and philosophers spheric phenomena. and interpretive merits as boisestate.edu. interested in what art is, who makes it and peelIn the future, he’d like to other, human-created works ing back the watch face of creativity. make ANA work better with of visual art. There is enormous variety in how artists conits printer. “It depends on the viewer ceive of and create their work, and many have “There are scenes that I think are fall-down and his or her readiness to engage with what’s in described their processes at length while leaving dramatic, but they come off flat and nothing there, as opposed to a viewer who just wants to unanswered questions about how they manifest special in print,” he said. look at a pretty picture,” he said. their inspirations. ANA’s is code—a digital deciOne of ANA’s compositions will grace the Though Winiecki is technically in control of ANA, his command of the creative process only cover of Boise Weekly, which means the original sion tree with inputs and parameter sets—but it’s still “artistic” in the sense that what comes piece will go up for auction in October. goes so far. He inputs some data to the proout is art. Revenue from its sale, Winiecki said, could gram, but the dimensions of the composition, “That’s where the phenomenology comes in: go toward paying the open-source software the colors used and how they interact are up [ANA] tries to get to the sense of something bedevelopers whose code went into ANA’s to the algorithm. Sometimes the composition fore it becomes sensible or objectively definable,” design. That, or toward education for himself ANA creates is more than a dozen feet high; in Winiecki said. to continue augmenting the program. He’d other instances, the results are small enough to B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

Harold Carver said it best: “Victory!”

BCT PERFORMS MARGIN OF ERROR, REVEALS SEASON’S PLAYS

Political strategist Harold Carver likes to think of himself as a “legend.” A Republican miracle worker and notorious shyster, his tagline is “Victory!”—even in the face of defeat. Carver, played to oversized perfection by Richard Klautsch in Boise Contemporary Theater’s production of Margin of Error, smears everyone around him in “honey” and “shit” but prefers to get as little of either on himself as possible. People are either “data points” or clients represented by color-coded cellphones kept in carry-on luggage by his faithful intern, Daphne Anderson (Veronica Von Tobel). Fogged-in at the Boise Airport and juggling four political campaigns on the brink of disaster, they’re also trapped in a lopsided drama between Carver’s political animalism and the humanity of the people he has been manipulating his entire professional life. Written by Eric Coble and directed by BCT Artistic Director Matthew Cameron Clark, the play is a glimpse into the inevitable moment when the pupil must push back against the mentor. Hopelessly outmatched against Carver’s personality and worldview, Anderson at first can only intuit the disingenuousness in treating voters like pawns and propping up incompetent politicians with outright trickery. Her growing intolerance of her mentor’s cynicism drives the plot but Carver drives the play. His philosophy is too ugly for audiences to identify with, but he’s still the most compelling thing on stage. Margin shows how ingrained cynicism is in the system, and how the only defense against it is moral vigilance. Unfortunately, Coble has written a character loud enough to shout over that message. Up against a combination of deceit, marital problems and legal inquiries (but still flush with optimism and charisma), he raises his fists to God and shouts, “Victory!” It’s also a comedy. From Anderson’s duty to manage an absurd number of cellphones—each a direct link to a political battle—to Carver’s high-school class ring (he claims to have dropped out of college), the play is full of explosive personalities and humorous details. Ahead of BCT’s April 22 performance of Margin of Error, Clark revealed the 2016-17 play schedule, including rock musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch, A Nighttime Survival Guide, Where Did We Sit on the Bus and The Clean House. —Harrison Berry BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 17

HARRISON BE RRY

ARTS & CULTURE

ARTS NEWS


SCREEN

WRITE AND WRONG

The sadly disappointing Papa: Hemingway in Cuba GEORGE PRENTICE There are so many reasons to want to like Papa: Hemingway in Cuba. Unfortunately its script and acting aren’t two of them. Note that I wanted to endorse this film, the first American big-screen production to be filmed in the Communist nation in a half century. Plus, there is plenty for Idahoans to anticipate, considering that Hemingway lived (and died) here and Papa: Hemingway in Cuba is definitely in need of a rewrite. Too bad Hemingway wasn’t available. that his granddaughter, Oscar-nominee and Ketchum native Mariel Hemingway, even makes with United States governmental agencies, and to on the screenplay for Papa, an autobiographical a brief cameo in the movie. check a box indicating that she was going to Cuba telling of how he, as a young newspaperman in Papa has a fairly passable skeletal structure. on a ‘cultural endeavor’” rather than to film Papa. Miami, got to know Hemingway, who was then Cinematographer Ernesto Melara ensures that Suffice to say, Papa did film in Cuba in spending most of his time in Cuba. the film soaks up plenty of Cuba’s splendor and 2015, under a U.S. Treasury Department license Petitclerc died in 2006 and didn’t live to see the film features a lovely score from Mark Isham. exempting the production from most embargo his story brought to the big screen. My sense is Still, Papa is more bones than skin—it never restrictions. Producers were told by U.S. officials that Petitclerc’s script perhaps needed another feels fleshed-out, sadly and ironically, dut to its guardian in his absence; and while that spending would be capped (though producone-dimensional script. ers have not revealed what the film’s budget was). Papa’s director, Bob Yari, may Is it accurate to HemingPAPA: HEMINGWAY IN CUBA (R) Directed by Bob Yari As a result, no film sets could be built and the have an accomplished resume way’s life? No doubt. But production team had to use existing structures for as a producer (Crash), but this is it doesn’t feel authentic, Starring Adrian Sparks, Giovanni Ribisi and Joely Richardson all of their scenes. his first directorial effort and it’s primarily because its lead Opens Friday, April 29 at The Flicks When President Barack Obama set foot in abundantly apparent. characters spend most Cuba in March—the first sitting U.S. president While the film feels thin, its of their time delivering speeches rather than engaging in dialogue. As a re- backstory is rich with controversy. Actress Sharon to visit since the 1959 revolution—a new era of travel and trade was ushered in for the two nasult, Papa’s earnest cast (no pun intended) spends Stone was initially slated to play Hemingway’s wife Mary (the part ultimately went to Joely Rich- tions. A number of Hollywood studios instantly much of the film adrift in a sea of stereotypes. voiced their desire to begin film and television I take little pleasure in criticizing Papa’s script, ardson). However, Stone sued Yari in 2014, alproduction in and around Havana, and with leging she was asked to commit fraud against the penned by the late Denne Bart Petitclerc—a war more Americans anxious to retrace Hemingway’s United States government when she agreed to be correspondent, best-selling novelist and reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle and Miami Herald. in the movie. Stone’s suit in Los Angeles Superior Cuban steps, audiences will no doubt expect a compelling narrative of Hemingway in Cuba. Court alleged that she was encouraged to “comPetitclerc spent the last 35 years of his life in Unfortunately, Papa isn’t that film. mit a fraud and a lie on her license application Idaho, devoting many of his final days working

SCREEN EXTRA UPENDING EXPECTATIONS

In each major award category at the 2016 Oscars in February, the nominees were white. So blanched were they that it kicked off a Twitter hashtag, #OscarsSoWhite—a reminder that people of color are sorely underrepresented in American cinema. It’s a problem for the disability community, as well. “I probably shouldn’t name films, but I Am Sam, with Sean Penn,” said Arc-Idaho Programs Director Nicole Lang. “An actual actor with an intellectual disability should have played 18 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

that role. In films or in television, when the character has [intellectual development disorder], there is an actor with IDD playing that part.” In I Am Sam, Penn plays a man living with an intellectual disability and struggling for custody of his daughter. The film drew fire because Penn does not have IDD. That criticism doesn’t apply to the films that will be shown at the sixth annual Sprout Film Festival, set to take place Friday-Saturday, April 29-30, at The Egyptian Theatre and The Flicks. Organized by Lang, each of the films

features people with IDD and range from short dramas to music videos. Lang said audiences might be surprised at how upbeat they can be. “A lot of times people think it might be sad or about someone’s struggle. ... It’s more uplifting than many people imagine,” she said. The films include shorts like Be My Brother, a 2009 film about a man with IDD charming a woman at a bus stop. In Jack Blond, a James Bond fan becomes the hero when a famous diamond comes to town. There are dozens of films, each

under 20 minutes in length, playing at The Egyptian Theatre April 29. On April 30, catch Billy the Kid, an 84-minute documentary about a young man coming of age with Asberger’s syndrome playing at 12:30 p.m. at The Flicks. While there have been misconceptions about the tone of the films, Boiseans have gradually caught wind of how fun the festival is. “I think people will be very surprised with how good people will feel when they leave,” she said. —Harrison Berry B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


WINESIPPER SPRING INTO ITALIAN WHITES

I’ve read that Italy produces twice as much red wine as white (it’s on the Internet so it must be true) but, according to Italy’s National Institute of Statistics, white wine production edged out red in 2015. You will probably find twice as many reds in most wine shops, but Italy also has a world of outstanding whites. Nothing against the grape, but for this tasting we decided to explore beyond the oh-so-popular Pinot Grigios. 2014 AZIENDA AGRICOLA PIEROPAN SOAVE CLASSICO, $20 From the Veneto region in northeast Italy, this is a blend of Soave’s principal grape, Garganega and Trebbiano. Lovely aromas of melon and lime are colored by touches of ginger, fresh herb and mineral. The flavors are a mix of ripe peach and pear, balanced by tangy lemon, lime and orange, with a touch of white pepper on the finish. 2014 RIOFAVARA MIZZICA MOSCATO DI NOTO, $18 From the southernmost corner of Sicily, this Moscato is unusual in that it is fermented bone dry. There’s a juicy blast of lychee nut on the nose, along with plush apricot, pear, floral honeysuckle, lime and coriander. A lush richness marks the palate as well, offering ripe stone fruit flavors and a hit of citrus zest on the chalky finish. 2014 TERREDORA DI PAOLO FALANGHINA IRPINIA, $17 Falanghina is a grape variety native to Campania in southern Italy. Here, it opens with floral quince, pear and pineapple, along with hints of tarragon and mineral. In the mouth it is lean and lively, filled with bright citrus flavors that turn ripe and rich on the finish. Definitely a food friendly entry. —David Kirkpatrick B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 19


CITIZEN JAKE ELLIS

The retired battalion chief now dousing political fires GEORGE PRENTICE

Jake Ellis knows a thing or two about putting out fires, both literal and metaphorical. “Prevention is way more cost-effective than response,” said Ellis, 55, a retired battalion chief for the Boise Fire Department and now a candidate for the Idaho House of Representatives in West Ada County’s District No. 15. In fact, Ellis helped investigate the aftermath of a January Day 1992 blaze at the Idaho Statehouse. “There were a number of reasons why that fire spread, but there was definitely a lack of planning,” said Ellis. Having worked much of his career at Boise Fire Station No. 5, the then-busiest station in the state, Ellis rose through the ranks from firefighter to driver, captain and finally spent six years as a battalion chief. In between stints of aggressive door-knocking campaigning, Ellis spent a few minutes with Boise Weekly to talk about his political motivations and a life of eating smoke. Did you dream of being a firefighter? Not really. I really wanted to go to college and, in between semesters, I spent eight fire seasons fighting range fires for the Bureau of Land Management. Some of those fire seasons lasted longer than others, stretching out my college career. Why are you a Democrat? I’m socially liberal but fiscally conservative. So does that mean you’ve voted for as many Republicans as Democrats? I have. What do you consider to be your proudest votes? [Governors] Phil Batt and Cecil Andrus. And on a national level? Obama. I believe in the message of change. Are you leaning one way or another among the current crop of presidential candidates? I’m a fan of Bernie Sanders. I like the idea of living in a free market society yet taking care of your fellow man… and woman. To those who say Sen. Sanders is simply advocating for a redistribution of wealth, you would say… 20 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

There’s already a redistribution of wealth. It’s just gone to the wealthy. You were with the Boise Fire Department for 27 years. When you hear a siren, does your blood still rush? Not at all. That’s when it’s time to retire. Every political insider I know has told me to keep an eye on District 15 and how it’s ripe for change. That said, you’re up against a rather popular incumbent, Rep. Pat McDonald. What’s your path to victory? My opponent supported House Bill 311 in 2015, a major tax cut for the wealthy, which would have taken nearly $70 million out of the general fund. It makes no sense to me to say you’re in favor of improving education while taking that much money out of the general fund. To that end, is education near the top of your agenda? The cost of attending college is too high. To lower tuition cost, you’ve got to send in a lot more from the general fund. Where is that money going to come from? We leave way too much money on the table in tax exemptions and inappropriate expenditures. I am not saying I want to raise taxes. I’m saying we have to take a very hard look at our exemptions and prioritize the funds we have. How about the issue of Idaho’s minimum wage? It still sits at $7.25. Nationwide, they’re talking about a $15 wage. Where should it be in Idaho? I think $10 would be a good start. But those efforts have died a quick death at the Idaho Statehouse. Idaho is above ideology. The people of Idaho know what’s true. Too often, the Legislature is out of touch with Idaho. I would be remiss if I didn’t ask about your wristband device tracking your every move. My goal is 7,000 steps a day. That’s a challenge. I’m up for more than one challenge lately. B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 21


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74 ____ Institute (astronomers’ org.) 75 NASA vehicle 77 Literally, “fried noodles” 79 Help for motorcycle daredevils 81 Having the most marbles 82 List for a recital 83 Word with green or brain 85 Hershey chocolate-andcaramel candy 87 Personal highs 88 Targets of the Dodd-Frank Act 89 Three houses flipped this week, e.g.? 92 Whedon who directed 2012’s “The Avengers” 93 Nut 94 Khan : Mongolia :: ____ : Russia 95 N.F.L. QB Newton 98 Little bit 99 Feature of the western end of the Champs-Élysées 101 Surfer’s worry 104 Hooters menu? 110 Nap 112 Cave deposits 113 “Volunteers?” 114 Biscuits with no sharp edges? 117 Deceptive pitch 118 Plumbing or bricklaying 119 Christ, with “the” 120 Overage 121 Edit menu option 122 “____ your head” 123 Physics units

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56 Farmer’s place 58 Some trattoria orders 60 Landlord’s business 62 Wing it? 64 Groups of quail 65 Avant-garde 66 Gulf Coast port that’s gone bonkers? 69 Multitalented Minnelli 72 Source of add-on damages in a lawsuit 12

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CAREERS

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

BY KATHY WIENBERG / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

40 Bridge 44 Victoria’s Secret job description? 47 Copy, briefly 48 In better shape 51 Weather forecast that’s hard to predict? 52 Low 53 Milliner’s accessory 54 Lemonade go-with in an Arnold Palmer 9

HOUSING

of Boise 8 Year Running! Now Hiring Part Time Positions Flexible Schedules and Great Pay with Opportunity to Grow with our Team! Email your Resume to Jobs@mazzahboise.com. RV PARK EMPLOYEES WANTED Seeking employees for MAY - SEPT, preferably seniors 55 and over to work 4 days on and 4 days off. Salary and free RV site. If interested a printable application is available online at siscraidaho.com, Willow Creek Campground. For further info call 362-2087 or 880-6090 or email siscra@gmail.com. CAMPAIGN JOBS! $600-$730 PER WEEK! Call Now! Hiring Immediately! Earn Up To $600-$730/Week Work on an Important Campaign! Drivers Earn Bonuses PLUS Gas Reimbursement! No previous experience required. Full time and part time positions. Make a difference. No fundraising, great political experience. Call Jamie @ 208-471-4620.

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1 Put on the map 2 2009 Best Picture nominee set in the 22nd century 3 Fix, as a pump 4 Plastered 5 Airplane maneuverer 6 ____-in clause 7 Answer sheets 8 Little bit 9 Relief 10 Piece of cake 11 Georgetown player 12 Postal employee 13 Speaks up?

14 End of many country names 15 In addition 16 Diamond-shaped road sign 17 “All Glory, Laud and Honor,” e.g. 19 Campaign … or campaign topic 20 Botanical cover 23 Wearing the most bling, say 28 One of the Avengers 30 First-family name 32 + + + 36 Couple 38 Banned fruit spray 39 Family name of Pope Leo X, Leo XI and Clement VII 40 Protective covering for a pier? 41 Venus and Mars, so to speak 42 It’s in the eye of the beholder 43 Security Council veto 44 Sign seen at a Heartbreakers concert? 45 Field 46 Subject in metallurgy 47 Figure on a utility bill 48 What a limo may be for 49 Served well? 50 What some mascara does to lashes 53 Remains suspended 55 iTunes category 57 Debussy composition 59 Nerve-racking performance, maybe 61 “Likewise” 63 Community- service club 67 Country capital with the world’s tallest building before the Burj Khalifa 68 Like AARP The Magazine

102 Brownish purple 103 “Givee” 104 Part of a trophy 105 Operating system developed at Bell Labs 106 Align 107 It’s a drag 108 Queue after Q 109 Acquire 111 Sandy shade 115 Selfies around 201213, e.g. 116 Low-____

70 Spice 71 Part of AMPAS 73 Knocks the socks off 76 Hon 77 “Later” 78 Almost 80 + 82 Simple sandwich, simply 84 Actor Alan 86 Longtime Sudanese president ____ al-Bashir 89 First name in country music 90 Sabotage 91 Troop group 93 Communion hosts, e.g. 95 Moviedom 96 Dug 97 Gentlemen: Abbr. 98 Physics units 100 Ticket L A S T N E A T E R

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Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492. ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377.

COMMUNITY

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MUSIC::FOOD::FASHION::CULTURE Join the World Village Kick-Off Party. May 13th at the Basque Center. Music by Tambalka, Fashion show of ethnic clothing, foods of the world, silent auction including: Tequila Tasting hosted by the Mexican Consulate. World Village Festival, June 10, 11 & 12 at Capital Park. Visit worldvillagefestival. com & Facebook to donate &/or volunteer!

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ART & ROSES CALL TO ARTISTS This is a call to artist who do original fine wall art and would like to participate in the 26th ANNUAL ART & ROSES EVENT – SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2016. Applicants must live within 125 miles of Boise, original art only for family viewing (no crafts allowed), must be in attendance for the day, must be 18 years of age or older, and must apply by May 23rd. Contact Cherry at 433-9705 for an application or email: artandroses@q. com. Look at our FaceBook page – Art & Roses. CALL TO ARTISTS! Dairy Days is seeking artists/crafters to show and sell their wares Saturday, June 25th in Storey Park- downtown Meridian. No booth fee! Please contact Ellen: 440.2975 or torchlilly@gmail.com for application and details.

PLEASE HELP Last Tuesday Capitol High School senior, Jordan Mabbutt, suffered a spinal stroke. Please consider helping his family by visiting their Go-Fund-Me page: www.gofundme.com/8wz4rvgc. Thank you.

BW EVENTS CAFFE’ CAPRI IS CELEBRATING OUR 4TH YEAR! To celebrate our 4 year anniversary- we’re having some live music at our Gowen Road location! Join us Sat. April 9th 6-9 p.m Live Music with Wendy Matson and Sat. April 30th 6-9 p.m Music with Blaze and Kelly. Free! Columbia Marketplace 2242 E. Gowen Rd. INITIAL POINTE GALLERY RECEPTION Come to Meridian City Hall’s Initial Pointe Gallery reception for our May artists: Treasure Valley Artists Alliance! Join us Tuesday, May 3rd. from 4:30-7:30. 33 E Broadway Ave in. Meridiancity.org/mac/.

BW PROFESSIONAL Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 844-573-1317. KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT Complete Treatment System. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com. KILL ROACHES - GUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets with Lure. Odorless, Long Lasting. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com.

CRISIS

ADOPT-A-PET

OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

CAREERS These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

FREE GED

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

®

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX

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208-376-3961

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

(208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com TWILIGHT: Looking for an energetic, vivacious cat for your busy home? I’m your gal.

INDIE: I have big beautiful eyes; a sweet, cute meow; and soft fur that loves to be pet.

DAKOTA: My favorite things are snuggling people and playing with toys, in that order.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

BW NEED HELP WITH SPECIAL NEEDS INDIVIDUAL IN PRIVATE HOME Full time and part time help wanted for a special needs individual. Various positions. No smoking, physically fit. Please contact Jim 315-2127.

SERVICES

JACKSON: 5-year-old, male, Labrador retriever mix. Has tons of energy. Knows some commands. Best as the only dog in the house. (Kennel 325 – #14451905)

MOLLY: 4-year-old, female, border collie mix. Loyal, loving and intelligent but on guard around strangers and other dogs. Doesn’t like cats. (Kennel 301 – #17214789)

COPPER: 5-year-old, male basset hound. Loves the company of adults. Best as an only animal and with kids over 12. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31120714)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT BABET: 6-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Came to the shelter as a stray. Quiet, purrs when pet and likes to be held. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31233117)

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

DREEA: 10-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Came as a stray. Not sure about being held but likes gentle petting. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31139196)

IVAN: 5-year-old, male, domestic longhair. Quiet, enjoys being petted. Needs a quiet home and lots of attention. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #30987847)

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BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 23


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AUTO BW 4 WHEELS CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com.

LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly. com or call 344-2055 for a quote. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA RE: Aiden Douglas Warner and Michael Arthur Warner Justice.

Legal Names of children Case No. CV NC 1604889 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minors) A Petition to change the name of (1) Aiden Douglas Warner, and the name of (2) Michael Arthur Warner Justice, all minors, now residing in the City of Star, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The names will change to (1) Aiden Douglas Justice Holcroft, (2) Michael Arthur Holcroft Justice. The reason for the change in name is: The children have had no contact with biological father in 8 years and they do not want his name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on May 12, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: March 24, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBBIE NAGELE Deputy Clerk PUB April 6,13,20, 27, 2016. NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME (ADULT) Case No. CV NC 1604904 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF

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THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA A Petition by Bryan Patrick Steve, an adult over the age of eighteen (18) years of age, born in Boise, Idaho, and now residing in Boise, Idaho, proposing a change in name to Bryan Bob George, has been filed in the above entitled court. The reason for the change in is that Bryan has been known by the name of Bryan Bob George since infancy and would like his legal name to reflect the name he is commonly known by. The petitioner’s father is Berry George, and his mother is Allison George, both residing in Boise, Idaho. The petition will be heard at the Ada County Courthouse, Boise, Idaho, on the 12th day of May 2016 at 1:30 p.m., and objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show to the court a good reason against such change of name. PUBLISHED: April 6, 13, 20, 27, 2016. WITNESS My hand and the seal of the District Court this 24th day of March, 2016. Raymond D Schild Sallaz-Schild Law, PLLC: 1000 S. Roosevelt St., Boise, ID 83705, Attorney for Petitioner. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBBIE NAGELE Deputy Clerk and Christopher D. Rich, Clerk.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Nely Maria Gomez. Legal Name

delusion and lovingly devoted to a worthy goal.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “We have to learn how to live with our frailties,” poet Stanley Kunitz told The Paris Review. “The best people I know are inadequate and unashamed.” That’s the keynote I hope you will adopt in the coming weeks. No matter how strong and capable you are, no matter how hard you try to be your best, there are ways you fall short of perfection. And now is a special phase of your astrological cycle when you can learn a lot about how to feel at peace with that fact.

Case No. CV NC 1602697 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Nely Maria Gomez, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Nely Maria Ruiz Gomez. The reason for the change in name is: Ruiz is my adoptive father’s last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on April 14, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: February 19, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBBIE NAGELE Deputy Clerk PUB April 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2016 IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Kambria Lynn Parks. Legal Name

Case No. CV NC 1603685 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Kambria Lynn Parks, a minor, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Kambria Lynn Butler. The reason for the change in name is: Father abandoned at birth, absent father. Want to change to mother’s last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on May 24, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: March 3, 2016. Christopher D. Rich, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB April 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Steven Michael Bornstine. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1513895 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult)

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The oracle I’m about to present may be controversial. It contains advice that most astrologers would never dare to offer an Aries. But I believe you are more receptive than usual to this challenge, and I am also convinced that you especially need it right now. Are you ready to be pushed further than I have ever pushed you? Study this quote from novelist Mark Z. Danielewski: “Passion has little to do with euphoria and everything to do with patience. It is not about feeling good. It is about endurance. Like patience, passion comes from the same Latin root: pati.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’re in a phase of your cycle when you’ll be rewarded for your freshness and originality. The more you cultivate a “beginner’s mind,” the smarter you will be. What you want will become more possible to the degree that you shed everything you think you know about what you want. As the artist Henri Matisse said, if a truly creative painter hopes to paint a rose, he or she “first has to forget all the roses that were ever painted.” What would be the equivalent type of forgetting in your own life? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Am I still a hero if the only person I save is myself?” asks poet B. Damani. If you posed that question to me right now, I would reply, “Yes,

Gemini. You are still a hero if the only person you save is yourself.” If you asked me to elaborate, I’d say, “In fact, saving yourself is the only way you can be a hero right now. You can’t rescue or fix or rehabilitate anyone else unless and until you can rescue and fix and rehabilitate yourself.” If you pushed me to provide you with a hint about how you should approach this challenge, I’d be bold and finish with a flourish: “Now I dare you to be the kind of hero you have always feared was beyond your capacity.” CANCER (June 21-July 22): “We need people in our lives with whom we can be as open as possible,” declares psychotherapist Thomas Moore. I agree. Our mental health thrives when we can have candid conversations with free spirits who don’t censor themselves and don’t expect us to water down what we say. This is always true, of course, but it will be an absolute necessity for you in the coming weeks. So I suggest that you do everything you can to put yourself in the company of curious minds that love to hear and tell the truth. Look for opportunities to express yourself with extra clarity and depth. “To have real conversations with people may seem like such a simple, obvious suggestion,” says Moore, “but it involves courage and risk.” LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I watched a video of a helicopter

24 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

pilot as he descended from the sky and tried to land his vehicle on the small deck of a Danish ship patrolling the North Sea. The weather was blustery and the seas were choppy. The task looked at best strenuous, at worst impossible. The pilot hovered patiently as the ship pitched wildly. Finally there was a brief calm, and he seized on that moment to settle down safely. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you may have a metaphorically similar challenge in the coming days. To be successful, all you have to do is be alert for the brief calm, and then act with swift, relaxed decisiveness. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Show me a man who isn’t a slave,” wrote the Roman philosopher Seneca. “One is a slave to sex, another to money, another to ambition; all are slaves to hope or fear.” Commenting on Seneca’s thought, blogger Ryan Holiday says, “I’m disappointed in my enslavement to self-doubt, to my resentment towards those that I dislike, to the power that the favor and approval of certain people hold over me.” What about you, Virgo? Are there any emotional states or bedeviling thoughts or addictive desires that you’re a slave to? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to emancipate yourself. As you do, remember this: There’s a difference between being compulsively driven by a

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Everyone who has ever built a new heaven first found the power to do so in his own hell.” That noble truth was uttered by Libran philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, and I bet it will be especially meaningful for most of you during the rest of 2016. The bad news is that in the past few months you’ve had to reconnoiter your own hell a little more than you would have liked, even if it has been pretty damn interesting. The good news is that these explorations will soon be winding down. The fantastic news is that you are already getting glimpses of how to use what you’ve been learning. You’ll be wellprepared when the time comes to start constructing a new heaven. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Zugzwang is a German-derived word used in chess and other games. It refers to a predicament in which a player cannot possibly make a good move. Every available option will weaken his or her position. I propose that we coin a new word that means the opposite of zugzwang: zugfrei, which shall hereafter signify a situation in which every choice you have in front of you is a positive or constructive one; you cannot make a wrong move. I think this captures the essence of the coming days for you, Scorpio.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): How do plants reproduce? They generate seeds that are designed to travel. Dandelion and orchid seeds are so light they can drift long distances through the air. Milkweed seeds are a bit heavier, but are easily carried by the wind. Foxglove and sycamore seeds are so buoyant they can float on flowing water. Birds and other animals serve as transportation for burdock seeds, which hook onto feather and fur. Fruit seeds may be eaten by animals and later excreted, fully intact, far from their original homes. I hope this meditation stimulates you to think creatively about dispersing your own metaphorical seeds, Capricorn. It’s time for you to vividly express your essence, make your mark, spread your influence.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “It is a fault to wish to be understood before we have made ourselves clear to ourselves,” said philosopher Simone Weil. I hope that prod makes you feel a bit uncomfortable, Aquarius. I hope it motivates you to get busy investigating some of your vague ideas and fuzzy self-images and confused intentions. It will soon be high time for you to ask for more empathy and acknowledgment from those whose opinions matter to you. You’re overdue to be more appreciated, to be seen for who you really are. But before any of that good stuff can happen, you will have to engage in a flurry of introspection. You’ve got to clarify and deepen your relationship with yourself. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education,” said writer Mark Twain. That’s excellent advice for you to apply and explore in the coming weeks. Much of the time, the knowledge you have accumulated and the skills you have developed are supreme assets. But for the immediate future, they could obstruct you from learning the lessons you need most. For instance, they might trick you into thinking you are smarter than you really are. Or they could cause you to miss simple and seemingly obvious truths that your sophisticated perspective is too proud to notice. Be a humble student, my dear.

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


A Petition to change the name of Steven Michael Bornstine, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Serenity Grace Bornstine. The reason for the change in name is: It will better reflect who I truly feel I am. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 9:30 o’clock a.m. on May 31, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: March 28, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT: Christopher D Rich, and Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB April 13, 20, 27 and May 4th, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA MAGISTRATE DIVISION In the Matter of the Estate of: THOMAS HERMAN BRANDT, Deceased CASE NO.: CV FE 1516423 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-name decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred.Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the clerk of the Court. DATED this 7th day of April, 2016. Angela Hart, Loreli Brandt, Shellie Anne Brandt c/o Penelope S. Gaffney P.O Box 937 Boise, ID 83701-0937 (208) 991-0158 PUB. April 13, 20 & 27, 2016. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. OC CV 1521203, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF

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THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, The Legends Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Patrick Reust, Defendant. TO: Patrick Reust, You have been sued by The Legends Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 1521203. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Sarah M. Anderson of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 3 day of MARCH, 2016. CHRISTOPHER D RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: ROSE WRIGHT, Deputy Clerk PUB April 20, 27 and May 4, 11, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Anthony Thomas Abajian. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1604935 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult)

A Petition to change the name of Anthony Thomas Abajian, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Layla Nayeli Abjian. The reason for the change in name is: transition from male to female. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on 9:30 o’clock a.m. on May 31, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: March 28, 2016. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB April 13, 20 May 4,11 2016. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to C. Sam and Jackie G. Dunn, who are shareholders in the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd., and whose last known address is 27659 Farmway Road, Caldwell, Idaho 83607, of the non-payment of assessments to the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. An assessment bill was mailed to the last known address and has remained unpaid. This notice shall be published for a period of four (4) weeks. Unless the delinquency of $121.50 is received by the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. within thirty-five (35) days of the first publication of this notice, and consistent with the Bylaws, said shares shall be canceled or sold. The mailing address where the payment shall be made is: New Union Ditch Company, Ltd., P.O. Box 31, Eagle, Idaho 83616. By: /s/ Linda Heikes, Secretary of the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Beau Alan Williams. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1606374 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor)

A Petition to change the name of Beau Alan Williams, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Belle Alice Williams. The reason for the change in name is: She has undergone a change in gender. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on June, 21, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: APR 12, 2016. Christopher D. Rich, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB April 20, 27, and May 4, 11, 2016. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to Chris and Nancy Findlay, who are shareholders in the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd., and whose last known address is 145 Horizon Drive, Boise, Idaho 83702, of the non-payment of assessments to the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. An assessment bill was mailed to the last known address and has remained unpaid. This notice shall be published for a period of four (4) weeks. Unless the delinquency of $49.20 is received by the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. within thirty-five (35) days of the first publication of this notice, and consistent with the Bylaws, said shares shall be canceled or sold. The mailing address where the payment shall be made is: New Union Ditch Company, Ltd., P.O. Box 31, Eagle, Idaho 83616. By: /s/ Linda Heikes, Secretary of the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to Anna C. Rhodes, who is a shareholder in the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd., and whose last known address is 2203 West State Street, Boise, Idaho 83702, of the nonpayment of assessments to the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. An assessment bill was mailed to the last known address and has remained unpaid. This notice shall

JEN SORENSEN

be published for a period of four (4) weeks. Unless the delinquency of $123.00 is received by the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. within thirty-five (35) days of the first publication of this notice, and consistent with the Bylaws, said shares shall be canceled or sold. The mailing address where the payment shall be made is: New Union Ditch Company, Ltd., P.O. Box 31, Eagle, Idaho 83616. By: /s/ Linda Heikes, Secretary of the New Union Ditch Company, Ltd. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Hunter William Smith. Legal name of child

Hunter William Smith, a minor, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Hunter William Rudd. The reason for the change in name is: match legal custodian’s last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on June 21, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: April 12, 2016. Christopher D. Rich CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB April 27, May 4,11,18, 2016.

Case No. CV NC 1606316 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of

ADULT

HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 25


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

#boiseweeklypic

FIND STRAWBERRY SLICESTER AND STEMGEM

Advice for those on the verge

DEAR MINERVA,

The same year I lost my partner, my friend was diagnosed with HIV. We are both grieving in different ways. This has strained our friendship to the point where we may no longer be friends. How can we help each other heal from two very different tragedies? —Moving apart

DEAR MOVING,

You are both mourning in similar ways. Life sucks so hard sometimes and we get hit out of the blue with difficult obstacles. This test of your friendship should be one that you can both pass with flying colors. For you, your experiences and love for your partner will live on in your heart and mind—in a way—keeping your partner alive as well. Though definitely a life-changer, HIV is no longer a death sentence. While he may not be mourning the loss of his actual life, he is definitely mourning the loss of what his life once was, which could feel similar. Neither of you will be the same people ever again. Hopefully you can take some of the love that you have left to soothe each other’s pain. What has happened cannot be changed. Your partner is gone and at this point, his HIV isn’t going anywhere. You can change the course your friendship is on. Give each other a lot of leeway to feel how you are going to feel. What would be a true tragedy is to let your friendship die while you both still have so much life left to live. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

To be honest, sometimes we like gizmos because of their kitschy names but it’s even better when they make our lives easier. You can find a discount slicer and huller just about anywhere but these delightful doo-dads, the “Strawberry Slicester” and the “Stemgem,” which sell for for $7.50 and $14.99, respectively (TV shopping channels are bundling both for $18.92), are particularly neat kitchen gadgets by Seattle-based Chef’n. The Strawberry Slicester, $14.99 Slicester is swell for its safety and and Strawberry Stemgem, for evenly slicing berries with one $7.99, Chefn.com squeeze, and we like the StemBuy both at qvc.com, $18.92 gem because it extends easily into the strawberry, removes the hull and leaves so much of the fruity flesh intact. These stainless steel/durable plastic gadgets are significantly safer than a knife and are kid-friendly with very little supervision. —George Prentice

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

“A SAILOR’S GUIDE TO EARTH,” STURGILL SIMPSON “3001: A LACED ODYSSEY,” FLATBUSH ZOMBIES “SANTANA IV,” SANTANA “CHANGES,” CHARLES BRADLEY

“SOUNDS LIKE A REASONABLE THING FOR A BAND TO PLAY,” ELDOPAMINE

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

“DIG IN DEEP,” BONNIE RAITT

Taken by instagram user Dr_Kelso.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

Do you plan to attend the final Modern Art Thursday, May 5?

Yes: 51.85%

“BLURRYFACE,” TWENTY ONE PILOTS

No: 33.33%

“KIN,” LARKIN POE

I don’t know: 14.81%

“HUMAN PERFORMANCE,” PARQUET COURTS “CLEOPATRA,” THE LUMINEERS

D i s clai mer: Th i s onli ne p oll i s not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of loc al, statewi d e or nati onal op i ni on.

57

13

21

$10,090,429

$4,562,778

JULY 1984

13

39.5 MILLION

Age of musician Prince Rogers Nelson (aka Prince) when he passed away April 21, 2016.

Age when Prince formed his first band, Grand Central.

Age when Prince made his network television premiere on American Bandstand—he claimed he was 19 and Dick Clark later said it was “probably the toughest interview I’ve ever done.”

Domestic total gross for the black-and-white film Under the Cherry Moon (1986), Prince’s directorial debut.

Domestic total gross for Prince’s sophomore feature film, Graffiti Bridge (1990)

The month/year Prince held three No.1 spots simultaneously for Purple Rain the movie, the soundtrack and the single “When Doves Cry.”

The official number of times the Purple Rain soundtrack went platinum—it was last certified in 1996.

The certified total number of Prince albums sold.

(cnn.com)

(citypages.com)

(deadspin.com)

26 | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

(boxofficemojo.com)

(boxofficemojo.com).

(riaa.org)

(riaa.com)

(mentalfloss.com)

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

B OISE W E E KLY RENTALS

EVENTS

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208-462-5BOB www.unclebillybobs.com

May-Sept. 2 night minimum stays. Garden Valley, Idaho – only about 1 hour to Boise! A+ Accredited Business with the BBB

MAY 7-8,14-15

9:00 am-5:00 pm 14055 N Broken Horn Rd (past Hidden Springs) Over 100 types of tomatoes, peppers, and more! Worm castings from Urban Worm! MAY 7- enjoy tomato classes & Wild Plum's catering truck!

Get a little freaky in your garden!

SUMMER YOUTH FILMMAKING EXPERIENCE LIVE @ BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY FOR MORE INFO, VISIT WWW.THEDIRECTORSCUT.CA EMAIL: BRYAN@THEDIRECTORSCUT.CA CALL: 1-877-747-2964

AGES 6-9 and 10-14

PETS

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M 

FILMMAKING JULY 4-8

LEGO STOP MOTION ANIMATION

JULY 11-15

MUSIC VIDEO PRODUCTION JULY 18-22

CLAYMATION JULY 25-29

BOISEweekly | APRIL 27 – MAY 3, 2016 | 27


make a STATEMENT 4.27.16

WOMEN’S & CHILDREN’S

#denimday

ALLIANCE

WEAR JEANS for a PURPOSE

#WCABoise

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. There is no excuse and never an invitation for sexual assault. Find out more at: www.wcaboise.org

Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue 45  

Gimme Shelter The ‘Emerald House’ gives a roof to the chronically homeless

Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue 45  

Gimme Shelter The ‘Emerald House’ gives a roof to the chronically homeless