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“For the love of humanity STOP grooming in close quarters with coworkers.”

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Slot or Not

The Idaho Lottery’s digital games have some wondering whether the state is in the gambling business

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Treefort Picks

A roundup of the acts Boise Weekly is most pumped to see at the 2016 Treefort Music Fest

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN 30

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Meals on Wheels How touring bands stay healthy while on the road FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Tara Morgan, Ben Schultz Interns: Jonathan Reff Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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EDITOR’S NOTE ROCK ’N’ RALLY There are precious few perks to being in the news business, but a big one is getting access to events like the recent rally for Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) and Treefort Music Fest, which kicks off its fifth year this week. Unofficial estimates put the Sanders crowd, which gathered March 21 to hear the fuzzy haired firebrand at Taco Bell Arena, at about 7,000 people. Meanwhile, Treefort 2015 brought in 14,000 to downtown Boise for music, technology, beer, stories and more. It might seem odd to conflate the two events, but walking the floor at the Sanders rally brought to mind nothing less than a rock concert. In my unscientific, unsubstantiated and entirely unprovable estimate, the median age in the arena was around 25 years old. Sanders was easily one of the oldest people in the room. I’ve been to more than a few large-scale political rallies, caucuses and primaries, including President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign stop in Boise, where he filled the same room as Sanders. I do not recall the same youthful energy at Obama’s visit—certainly not the same punk rock vibe. At the Sanders really, I saw grungy kids sporting pink, blue and green-dyed hair. I saw zitty guys in long black coats, earnest hippie types and bright-eyed 18-year-olds waving novelty signs reading things like “Talk Bernie to Me” and “Dump Trump”—the latter complete with a picture of a toilet and turd. Nevermind that Sanders talked for an hour and a half about every issue he could possibly touch on: from free college to police accountability to taxing Wall Street. He had the kids in the palm of his hand from the moment he shambled onto the stage. No matter how the caucuses go on March 22, it’s clear there’s passion out there for a different vision. Treefort is, in some ways, a relative of that kind of energy. More than a music festival, it’s a cultural happening rooted in a shared sense of community. If nothing else, the national Bern and the local enthusiasm for Treefort show what can be accomplished when our better instincts are harnessed for a common good— whether it’s politics or a good, old-fashioned rock bacchanal. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Omashte Witkowski TITLE: “Endless Possibilities” MEDIUM: Acrylic Print ARTIST STATEMENT: Positive energy and healing vibrations are intended in every artwork, illustration and design I create. My work is unique, colorful and can be used in a variety of ways to bring illumination, transformation and joy into interior decorations and designs.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

TREEFORT COVERAGE IT’S TREEFORT TIME AG AIN, WITH THE FIF TH- ANNUAL DOWNTOWN MUSIC/ ART/FILM/FOOD/ TECHNOLOGY/ YOGA/ LITER ATURE/BEER E X TR AVAG ANZ A SE T TO RUN WEDNESDAY, MARC H 23- SUNDAY, MARC H 27. MORE THAN 400 BANDS ARE SE T TO DESCEND ON THE CIT Y OF TREES, AND WE’LL BE KEEPING TAB S ON AS MANY OF THEM AS WE CAN. CHEC K B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M FO R M O RE.

BERN’D It was all Bernie, all the time at boiseweekly.com on March 21, as the Democratic Vermont senator and presidential hopeful visited Boise. Check out BW’s complete coverage on News/Citydesk.

STALKER A Boise man is facing up to 35 years in prison after pleading guilty to stalking and shooting a local woman. The victim recovered, but her case shows the need for a new law. Details on News/Citydesk.

MEA CULPA An eastern Idaho sheriff who made national headlines for his comments that most rape accusations in his county are unfounded walked back his statements last week. Get more on News/Citydesk.

OPINION

4 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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OPINION

Architectural Rendering

CRUMBLING FOUNDATIONS 6 New tune—same old crummy lyrics

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BILL COPE Could someone do me a favor? It would probably have to be someone in the broadcasting biz, maybe from the sales department of one of our local TV stations, because I need a general idea of what it costs to run an advertisement 10... maybe 12 times a day on each and every local station for three... maybe four months. I’m sorry to be so unspecific on exactly how many times I’ve seen the ad I’m referring to, but I know it’s been a lot. It seems every station I watch is running this same ad, first thing in the morning right on through the day to my bedtime. If the past few years have been any indication, I suspect it will be running until the Idaho Legislature wraps it up for the year. I’m sure you know the ad I’m talking about. It’s the one in which a school bus drops off four bewildered looking kids in the desert and leaves them there while a somber voiceover scolds us about what a crap-ass job we’re doing of educating Idaho children. The ad will run until the Legislature is done because that’s the way this sales team works: Come education budget writing season, they saturate us with bad news about how miserably we’re failing our youngsters, and insist it’s time to try something different with the billion-and-a-half bucks Idaho puts into public education every year. In case you weren’t sure... yes, it is brought to us by the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation—the allegedly philanthropic organization whose alleged purpose is to aid Idaho parents and teachers in giving our kids the allegedly best education possible. If you have any doubt that the ad is an ad and not a public service announcement, instead, don’t kid yourself. Someone is trying to sell you something as surely as if it was a Pop Tart or a burial plot. I first noticed the Albertson Foundation’s overbearing presence in this matter in 2011, when they were running full-page ads in newspapers statewide in enthusiastic support of reforms being fronted by then-Idaho Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna. The foundation was adamantly for changes to Idaho’s education system that, as it turned out, parents and teachers were adamantly against—largely because Luna’s “reforms” centered on an incremental privatization of our public schools by putting emphasis, and heaping unearned praise, on charter schools and virtual academies. Idahoans rejected those reforms then, and have never shown any indication that they have changed their minds. That hasn’t stopped the foundation from pushing the same agenda at the same time every year, with the same misleading information. The only difference from today’s ad (with the bewildered students) and the argument BOISE WEEKLY.COM

it made five years ago is in the approach. The Albertson Foundation is going straight for the guilt-gut: How can we continue to abandon our children in the cold, cruel desert of college unpreparedness? What kind of monsters are we!? The trouble with what we are being told now is that it’s false. The claim that only one in five Idaho students attending public schools is ready to face the world after graduation is distorted in a way that only someone with a veiled purpose could distort it. I was tickled to see the Boise school board call this bunkum for what it is. In an op-ed published late last month, Marcia Greeley (vice president of the Boise School District Board of Trustees) put it thus: “Let’s be clear: This campaign promotes an agenda designed to undermine public schools. It is highly inaccurate. It offers no real solutions to postsecondary readiness. It is a disservice to the work teachers, parents and students do every day.” Yet the question remains: Why would the Albertson Foundation be trying to undermine public schools? Even worse, it seems to be working. As reported in December from a survey—conducted by... guess who!... the Albertson Foundation—fewer than 50 percent of Idahoans who responded to the survey would recommend their school district to someone else. Greeley did relate that the executive director of the foundation has publicly acknowledged its goal is to “increase charter school seats by 20,000 in the next few years.” If one doesn’t consider what was learned during the Luna nonsense about who had big money invested in what, as well as what we have learned about charter schools and their relative performance, that doesn’t sound so insidious, does it? But we have learned about the big money behind this, and we have learned about the “uneven” performance of charter schools. So might the Albertson Foundation be hoping we’ve forgotten what we’ve learned, as it continues its onslaught of negativity toward public schools? OK then, since the foundation insists on repeating what it has been trying to convince us of for five years, I don’t feel it’s out of line to repeat what I (and many others) have been saying in response to this propaganda. Next week, in Part 7 of this seemingly endless series, I will attempt, in as succinct a way as possible, to recapitulate what defenders of public schools believe is going on. If before then someone comes forward with an idea of how much money the Albertson Foundation is dumping into those ads, maybe I’ll have time to suggest how much good such a wad of dough would have done had it gone to enhance Idaho schools, rather than gut them.

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A n g e l a’ s S t o r y

“I did this because I wanted my daughter to be a part of history. She can share this with her family one day and on to the future families. I also wanted her to have a place in the world where she will always be remembered.” - Angela, Boise

BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 5


NEWS

GEORGE PRENTICE

PATRICK SWEENE Y

UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

BETTING AGAINST THE HOUSE

Les Bois Park went dark on March 20.

Has the Idaho Legislature sanctioned state-owned slots? GEORGE PRENTICE

ALL BETS ARE OFF When Treasure Valley Racing reopened the gates of Les Bois Park in July 2011, bringing back live horse racing to the Treasure Valley after three years, most Idahoans had never heard of “historical horse racing.” More important, TVR managers didn’t say anything about the gambling devices when they promised to generate 300 jobs at the race track. Fewer than five years later, TVR President John Sheldon announced the track would go dark again, and he specifically pointed to the absence of the devices, which allow gamblers to bet off of a massive database of previous races. “In the absence of another revenue source, we don’t believe running Les Bois Park is financially viable,” said Sheldon on March 20. “We therefore are closing down all operations.” The controversial machines first came to most Idahoans’ attention in 2013, when the Idaho Legislature allowed racetracks to introduce historical horse racing devices. Soon enough, hundreds of the machines were cling-clanging at turf clubs attached to the racetracks. Two years later, more than a few lawmakers said they had been duped and were not aware that the machines were so similar to slot machines, which are illegal in Idaho. The issue took on an extra level of melodrama when, after the Legislature voted to kill the machines, Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter vetoed the vote, giving racetrack owners a temporary reprieve to keep the machines going. Meanwhile, the Legislature said Otter’s veto wasn’t valid because it came in too late. The issue even ended up before the Idaho Supreme Court, which, in September 2015, overturned Otter’s veto, thus killing the machines one more time. TVR pinned its last hopes this year on Senate Bill 1220, which would have voided the 2015 vote that killed the gambling machines. The 2016 Legislature was having none of it, and refused to hold hearings on the measure. —George Prentice 6 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Jonathan Krutz shook his head as he looked at a group of patrons at the McCleary’s Pub on Orchard Avenue. The customers weren’t foulmouthed or falling-down-drunk. They weren’t even sitting at the bar. They were hunched over on stools in a far corner of the bar, transfixed by a row of bright, blinking machines. “Now, you tell me: Are those or aren’t those slot machines?” asked Krutz, who teaches economics at Boise State University and serves on the board of directors for anti-predatory gambling group Gambling With the Good Life. The machines are Idaho Lottery Touch Tabs games, and the people sitting in front of them were playing furiously—each transaction took less than two seconds. A woman in her 20s conceded she plays three to four times a week. “I once made as much as $500,” she said, after asking to remain anonymous. When asked how much she had lost in a single sitting, her smile evaporated. “About $500,” she said. The Idaho Lottery game the McCleary’s patrons were playing was simple: Feed cash into a machine and swipe a finger across the screen—no worries, an ATM was an arm’s length away. Then, with no skill or decision making required, the screen indicated a loss or a win. Players won free games (occurs often) or cash (occurs much less frequently), which they redeemed by taking a receipt from the machine to the bartender. For the record, the Idaho Lottery Commission has limited the machines—of which there are approximately 300 across the state—to establishments that require patrons to be 21 or older. “I can appreciate that they want to keep these machines from underage gamblers, but it’s curious to me that they’re putting them where alcohol is served. That’s definitely not a plus,” said Krutz. By any account, the Idaho Lottery is formidable. At the conclusion of Fiscal Year 2015, the lottery funneled $45 million into public education, the permanent building fund and the Department of Education Bond Levy Equalization Fund. Since 1989, those dividends have totaled more than $730 million. “The lottery is certainly being promoted as economic development, but it’s the exact op-

The Idaho Lottery Commission says this is not a slot machine, but some anti-gambling activists beg to differ.

posite,” said Krutz. “It’s economic cannibalization and bad for our citizens.” Krutz spends his days examining the economy. Since 2011, he has taught business economics at the undergraduate and graduate levels in the Boise State College of Business and Economics. On March 8, Krutz stood before the Idaho House State Affairs Committee and urged lawmakers to take a serious look at the Instant Touch Tab machines, pointing to Title 18, Chapter 38 of Idaho Statute, which outlaws gambling. That includes slot machines. “Now that the historic horse racing machines are gone, these Lottery Touch Tab machines are the second-most predatory form of gambling in

the state, second only to the slot machines that you see in Native American casinos,” said Krutz. “And here’s the kicker: They’re owned and operated by the state.” Jeff Anderson couldn’t disagree more. Anderson has been director of the Idaho Lottery since 2007, and he said the machines have not only been fully vetted, but they’ve been given the green light by the Idaho attorney general’s office. “They are not electronic simulations of casino slot machines, and we had an opinion from the attorney general’s office indicating the same,” Anderson said. “The Lottery Commission examined that opinion, recommended a pilot project in 2011, notified leadership from both sides of the BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITYDESK

“We have nothing to hide. We have a strong a very distinct line in the Idaho Constitution that aisle of the Idaho Legislature and tried out about interest, a reputation and a track record of being a dozen machines for approximately 120 days. … should not be crossed and that line is a slot machine. The Constitution says we can’t have them.” totally transparent and following the law, and There was adequate interest to roll them out to that’s what we’ve been doing with these Touch Rep. James Holtzclaw (R-Meridian) also more locations.” Anderson even invited lawmakers to check out pushed back, saying, “Obviously, most of us know Tab devices,” he said. “It’s a little troubling at times to have to sit and listen to people miswhat the Constitution says. Unfortunately, there the machines, which isn’t the first time they have characterize what we’re doing and saying that been asked to look at automated games of chance. are inconsistencies throughout the state of Idaho we snuck these machines out in the cover of In 2013, the Legislature agreed so-called “histori- when it comes to the Constitution.” Krutz later said he was stunned by Holtzclaw’s darkness, which is absolutely not true. We believe cal horse machine” machines could be installed we’ve been operating within the law and we have remarks. in or near live horse racing operations across an opinion from the attorney general’s office that “I don’t know how a citizen is supposed to Idaho. In a well-publicized turnabout, legislators says as much. And folks enjoy them.” rescinded the law when they recognized they had respond to that. The Constitution is the corThat said, at least a few members of the House approved of machines that were unconstitutional. nerstone of who we are as a people,” said Krutz. State Affairs Committee thought the issue war“If a representative feels that way, I’m deeply “Now we have these Lottery Touch Tab maranted a good, long look—maybe even a public concerned.” chines where you sit down and slide your finger hearing. Grant Ipsen was seated in the House hearacross the screen every few seconds to gamble,” “I think we need a hearing on this. The said Krutz. “Those historic horse racing machines ing room during the March 8 exchange. He Legislature needs to be consistent on this, and I weren’t horse racing and these Lottery Touch Tab said he has a vested interest in the issue. From definitely have some questions,” said Rep. Ken 1992 to 2002, Ipsen sat on the other side of the machines are certainly not a lottery. They’re slot Andrus (R-Lava Hot Springs). microphone as state senator representing Boise’s machines.” Fellow Republican Rep. Vito Barbieri (R-DalLegislative District 17. Anderson said the two issues are apples and ton Gardens) agreed the oranges. issue “probably required “For one, we have no IDAHO STATUTE 18-3810 : “IT SHALL BE A some discussion.” But authority over an historiBarbieri’s argument against cal horse racing machine,” MISDEME ANOR FOR ANY PERSON TO USE, having a hearing was that it said Anderson. “And as much as someone would POS SES S, OPE R ATE, KEEP, S ELL, OR MAINTAIN FOR was “so late in the session.” Ultimately he voted against like to call an electronic the effort to hold a public Touch Tab a slot machine, U SE OR OPE R ATION OR OTHERWIS E, ANY WHERE it’s not. There are no spin- WITHIN THE STATE OF IDAHO, ANY SLOT MACHINE OF hearing on the Touch Tab Machine issue. ning wheels, no cherries, The vote was extremely no max-bets or anything A N Y SORT O R KI N D WHATSOE VE R.” close: 9-8 to kill the issue like that. They’re quite for the year. One of those different.” voting against a public hearing was Rep. Paulette Ipsen debated against any level of gambling Krutz said he had no real beef with the Idaho Jordan (D-Plummer), who reminded her colin Idaho through much of his political life Lottery Commission. leagues that she is a member of the Coeur d’Alene and, today, he serves on the board of the Idaho “Look, that commission is charged with Tribe, which boasts 100,000 square feet of chapter of Stop Predatory Gambling, a national one thing: maximizing revenue, not necessarily gambling at its northern Idaho casino. She is also nonprofit that says gambling—and particularly protecting Idaho. So, I don’t fault them at all,” lotteries—continue to push more Americans into secretary of the executive board for the National said Krutz. “But to be clear, it is definitely the Indian Gaming Association. Legislature’s job to uphold the Constitution of the poverty. “I hate the fact that we couldn’t even hold “I’m not a spring chicken, but I vividly recall state of Idaho.” a public hearing this year. But the people who When Krutz took the issue to the State Affairs growing up in Malad, down in Oneida County have some real questions about these Touch Tab Committee, a few lawmakers pushed back against and we had a wonderful neighbor who unfortuMachines have no real power or revenue stream his proposed measure, and particularly to its mul- nately lost his farm by putting all of his money behind them,” said Krutz. “I promise you that into the slots,” Ipsen said. “Today, Malad is tiple references to the Idaho Constitution. overrun by tens of thousands of people streaming the people who want gambling have quite a bit “Mr. Krutz, I need to ask why you continue in from Utah to play the Idaho Lottery. So many of money to spend fighting for slot machines. In to reference the Constitution,” said State Affairs that sense, it’s an unfair playing field. But I’m not Committee Vice Chair Rep. Gayle Batt (R-Wild- people were coming into this tiny area of Malad that Oneida County had to bring in porta-potties intimidated by any of this.” er). “I would think any law that the Legislature Meanwhile Ipsen, who saw more than a few because people were peeing in the streets.” would pass would need to pass muster with the proposed pieces of legislation die on the vine In 1992, Ipsen said he led the push to put Constitution.” during his time at the Statehouse, is patient. specific language in Idaho statute to outlaw slot Krutz reminded Batt of her committee’s “Sure, I was disappointed, especially consid180-degree reversal on the constitutionality of the machines or any imitations thereof. ering the fact that this was the same committee “Look, the Idaho Lottery is established and historic horse racing machines. that had to reverse itself just last year on those protected by the Constitution. We’re not out “I would point you back to your debate over historical horse racing machines,” he said. the historic horse racing devices,” said Krutz. “Yes, to stop the lottery. But we’re trying to get those Not that either are betting men, but it’s a unconstitutional Touch Tab Machines out of it’s possible that laws are passed that the Legislapretty sure thing Ipsen and Krutz will be in the lottery,” said Ipsen. “This is state-sponsored ture thinks are constitutional but [it] later needs front of lawmakers this next year, asking for a to revisit the same issue when more information is gambling on a slot machine.” reconsideration on the Touch Tab machines. Meanwhile, Anderson said he welcomes revealed. In this case, it’s a state agency that has, in “We’ll be back,” he said. “It’s too important. my opinion, gone far beyond what they’re allowed any and all dialogue regarding the Touch Tab After all, we’re talking about the Constitution.” Machines. to do. So, that’s why we’re so deliberate. There is

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

KE L S E Y HAWES

NEWS

A motorist added a new crack to the River Sculpture in downtown Boise.

IS IT CURSED? It took years of meeting, planning, design and more than $200,000 in public funds to repair “The River Sculpture,” one of Idaho’s highest profile pieces of public art. But in the early morning hours of March 20, a Meridian woman ran a red light at Capitol Boulevard and Front Streets, hit a taxicab in the intersection and slammed into the sculpture. Emergency responders rushed Blanca Rodriguez, 24, to an area hospital after police said her Dodge Neon, traveling north on Capitol, hit the sculpture in front of the Grove Hotel just before 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. Police later said that Rodriguez was not seriously injured and was cited for failing to obey a traffic signal. City officials said they hoped to recover the expense of repairs to the sculpture, estimated at $5,000, from Rodriguez’s insurance company. The River Sculpture, designed and built by Alison Sky, was commissioned in 1999 and paid for by the Hotel Ownership Group and Capital City Development Corporation, and gifted to the city of Boise in 2004. In the following years, the artwork fell into disrepair from vandalism, water damage and overall degradation. In 2014, the city began repairs, which ultimately totaled $270,000—$200,000 coming from the city and the rest coming from the Grove Hotel and CCDC. Josh Olson, the city’s Cultural Asset Program manager, likened the project to recreating a “layer cake” of huge granite slabs from a quarry in Finland. Among the multiple improvements to the River Sculpture were installation of 140,000 one-inch glass tiles; replacement of the original neon components with LED lights; installation of a reverse osmosis water filtration system; restored cast glass “gems”; and a reinforced hardware system. After much expense and work, the newlyrepaired River Sculpture reopened in late 2015. Back to the drawing board. —George Prentice BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 7


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY MARCH 23 Workshops & Classes ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK— Join Canyon County Parks and Recreation for FREE public workshops for anyone interested in the prehistory and history of our region. Visit canyonco.org for a complete schedule of events. Through March 25. FREE. Celebration Park, 5000 Victory Lane, Melba, 208-4952745. canyonco.org. TREE PROBLEMS—Join Arborist Debbie Cook to learn about insects and diseases that affect our trees but also about the most common problems people create by incorrect cultural practices. To register, visit bprwebtrac.cityofboise.org or call 208-608-7680. Wed., March 23, 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org. 208-608-7680.

WATCH N’ LEARN ABOUT STARTUPS—Join Trailhead for a weekly discussion group covering Sam Altman’s “How to Start a Startup” video lectures. Popcorn will be provided. 12 p.m. FREE-$30. Trailhead, 500 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3445483, trailheadboise.org.

Art ADONNA KHARE: THE KINGDOM—Through May 29. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. BOISE STATE ART METALS ANNUAL SILENT AUCTION—Through March 31. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. FREE. R. Grey Gallery Jewelry and Art Glass, 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com. FOLK ART: THE DREW AND KATIE GIBSON COLLECTION— Through July 24. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330. boiseartmuseum.org/exhibition/folk-art-gibson-collection.

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-27

I NEED TO TELL YOU SOMETHING: THE LOST ART OF LETTER WRITING—Through May 6. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org.

THURSDAY MARCH 24

JOSÉ BENÍTEZ SÁNCHEZ: PEOPLE WALKING IN SEARCH OF SUNRISE—Through April 15. 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY PINK HARD HAT AFTER-HOURS—For women interested in supporting Habitat by fundraising, event planning or construction volunteering. There will be appetizers and a no-host bar. 4-6 p.m. FREE. The Amsterdam Lounge, 609 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3459515. hfhboise.org.

KARL LECLAIR: PHENOMENA— Through April 15. 7-12 a.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-1242. finearts.boisestate.edu. TVAA 6 BY SIX SHOW—Through March 31. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. TVAA: THIS AMERICAN LIFE— Through April 8. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663. treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

Festivals & Events

On Stage BOISE RAW ARTISTS SHOWCASE: SIGNATURE—Enjoy music, art, fashion, film, hair, makeup, photography, performance art and accessories. 7 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Revolution Concert House and Event Center, 4983 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-938-2933.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 24-27

THE CENTER FILM SCREENING: THE SALT OF THE EARTH—Famed photographer Sebastioo Salgado’s life and work are revealed by his son, Juliano, who went with him during his last travels, and by award-winning filmmaker Wim Wenders. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Magic Lantern Cinemas, 100 E. 2nd St., Ketchum, 208-726-3308, mlcinemas.com. CURIOUS GEORGE—Join the inquisitive, lovable star of books, movies and the award-winning PBS television show for this delightful new musical. 7:30 p.m. $14. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. OPERATINI: YO-HO-HO AND A BOTTLE OF RUM—This is your chance to experience opera in a relaxed setting with great food and a specially designed martini based on the upcoming opera. 6 p.m. $20, $35 for 2. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

FRIDAY MARCH 25 On Stage ALMOST THERE PRESENTS: THE ROOM—Join Liquid Laughs and Almost There Productions for exclusive midnight showings of Tommy Wiseau’s 2003 masterpiece as part of Comedy Fort 2016. 11:45 p.m. $7, $10 for 2. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com. DISNEY’S PETER PAN JR.—Watch local youths aged 6-18 perform in MeridianCUE’s production of the delightful stage adaptation of the classic Disney film. 7 p.m. FREE-$5. Centennial High School, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise. 208-8410320, meridiancue.org.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 25-27

T H E P OWE R O F G LOVE

Gettin’ techy with it.

Storied event.

Get fit with a keg lift.

HACKFORT

STORYFORT

YOGAFORT

The sheer number of participants and events at Treefort Music Fest’s Hackfort is enough to overload a person’s hard drive, with panels, workshops and TED-style talks that “explore the intersection of technology with education, civic life and the arts.” Taking place mostly at the Owyhee and Trailhead, featured speakers have traveled from all over the country to talk about prototypes, virtual reality, music, startups, software development, tech reporting, gaming, filmmaking and mobile platforms. Hackfort also includes a four-day Hackathon wherein teams are challenged to create an app to make roads safer for cyclists, promote public transportation and improve ridesharing. Winners receive free legal consulting from Perkins Coie and four tickets to Treefort 2017. Various times and locations. For a schedule of events visit treefortmusicfest.com/hackfort.

Storyfort is “bringing the genius of story to Treefort.” And how. Writers of all stripes will pack up their pens and pencils to present a passel of panels on all things literary. The yarns start spinning on Thursday with a raft of discussions on Treefort history, infamous Idaho news stories (featuring Boise Weekly’s own Harrison Berry), a presentation from Jeff Chu on “the telling of others’ stories” and a history of Boise rock. Friday is packed with talks including screen adaptations and a happy hour story time with some of Boise’s favorite booze slingers, sharing quirky details and arcane histories of their favorite liquors. Poetry and boozy reminiscences dominate Saturday while Sunday starts with mimosas and poetry and Nationally acclaimed novelist Anne Panning will preside over the fort’s finale. Various times and locations. For a schedule of events visit treefortmusicfest.com/storyfort.

Yogafort started as two yoga classes offered on the early mornings of Treefort in 2014. Now, it spans three days of the Treefort Music Fest, offering nearly 25 classes at the Rose Room and Woodland Empire. The yoga sessions incorporate dance, live music, DJs, drums, traveling instructors and local favorites. Highlights include “Yinlicious,” taught by Sage Yoga’s Marisa Weppner; “Primal Yoga,” a body bootcamp with an elevated level of fitness; “Chakra Rock,” which promises to illuminate the full spectrum of your energy centers; and Boom Box Body’s “Keg Fit Hiit,” a workout that uses Woodland Empire’s empty kegs in the back room of the brewery, followed by a “recovery beer.” Drop in for a single class or pick up a three-day Yogafort pass for $55. Various times and locations. For a schedule of events visit treefortmusicfest.com/yogafort.

8 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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CALENDAR MODERN CLASSICS: 208 ENSEMBLE—The Modern Classics chamber music series features The Chimera Duo and collaborations with a variety of local music groups, including the 208 Ensemble on March 25. 6:30 p.m. $5-$15 adv., $5-$18 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

Religious/Spiritual GOOD FRIDAY PROGRAM: THE RISEN CHRIST—Join Ten Mile Community Church to celebrate Good Friday with this stirring, familyfriendly production of the Easter cantata The Risen Christ. 6 p.m. FREE. Kuna Performing Arts Center, 637 E. Deer Flat Road, Kuna, 208955-0200, tenmilechurch.org.

Odds & Ends EYES OF THE WORLD PSYCHICFORT—Enjoy a different kind of internal journey, with Tarot, intuitive healing, crystal bowl healing, palm reading, past life readings, massage, channeling, Reiki and more. Through arch 27. 12-7 p.m. $1 per minute. Eyes of the World Imports, 1576 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-1212.

Food

On Stage

STE. CHAPELLE WINERY AFTERHOURS—Cover charge includes your first glass of wine; light appetizers also available. Featuring live music by Patrick Dansereau. 6 p.m. $10. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-4537843, stechapelle.com.

ALMOST THERE PRESENTS: THE ROOM—Join Liquid Laughs and Almost There Productions for a midnight showing of Tommy Wiseau’s 2003 masterpiece as part of Comedy Fort 2016. 11:45 p.m. $7, $10 for 2. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459.

SATURDAY MARCH 26 Festivals & Events MINING AND GEOLOGY MUSEUM VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION—Learn what museum volunteers are up to and how you might fit in. 2-4 p.m. FREE. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. 208571-5720, idahomuseum.org. TREASURE VALLEY BIG GAME BANQUET—Join the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation for their annual banquet, featuring live and silent auctions and raffle. 5 p.m. $20$370. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208468-1000. rmef.org/events.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $5-$10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-9914746, boisecomedy.com. DISNEY’S PETER PAN JR.—2 p.m. and 7 p.m. FREE-$5. Centennial High School, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise. 208-841-0320, meridiancue.org. SATURDAY NIGHT IMPROV—Featuring a rotating variety of formats and local funny folk. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8, $25 family pack. Treasure Valley Children’s Theater, 703 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-287-8828, treasurevalleychildrenstheater.com.

Workshops & Classes HOW TO GROW BOUNTIFUL BLUEBERRIES— Learn how to grow this great-tasting berry as small shrubs in your own yard with Dennis Fix, the blueberry man. Call to save your seat. 10 a.m. FREE. FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-4000, farwestgardencenter.net. READY YOUR OUTDOOR PANTRY: COOL SEASON VEGGIES—Learn what to get started in your garden, the tools, timing and tricks you need to start your spring garden early and maximize your success with edibles. 11 a.m. FREE. Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road, Boise, 208-995-2815, madelinegeorge.com.

Sports & Fitness SRRSCCA AUTOCROSS RACING—Driving your vehicle to it’s limit and having a good time while doing it is the name of the game in this timed competition. Beginners welcome. In the west parking lot. Also on Sunday, March 27. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE to watch, $30-$45 to enter. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City. 208-340-3756, srrscca.com. STATE OF IDAHO POND SKIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS—In celebration of closing weekend of the incredible 2015-16 ski season, the Tam Fam is calling all brave skiers and riders ready to huck it for the inaugural State of Idaho Pond Skimming Championship. Competitors will be judged on trick creativity, wacky outfits and crowd hype. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208-325-1000, tamarackidaho.com/event/3157.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 9


CALENDAR Kids & Teens

Food

Religious/Spiritual

CAPITAL CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY EGG HUNT—Capital Christian Center hosts this FREE, familyfriendly event with thousands of candy-filled eggs, a live kids show, skydiving Easter bunnies, jump houses, food trucks and a mascot dance-off with the Easter Bunny. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, 1900 N. Records Ave., near Fairview Avenue and Eagle Road, Meridian. 208-8881060, capitalchristian.com.

CHATEAU DES FLEURS AFTERNOON TEA—Enjoy a selection of handmade teas, pastries and finger sandwiches in an unforgettable setting. Call to reserve your seat. 1-3 p.m. $20-$34. Chateau des Fleurs, 175 S. Rosebud Lane, Eagle. 208947-2840, chateaueagle.com.

THE JOURNEY EASTER SERVICE AND EGG HUNT—Celebrate Easter with live music, a choreographed dance performance, and an Easter egg hunt for the kids. Two services, at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. FREE. The Journey Boise, 9105 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-3748.

CENTRAL BENCH ANNUAL SPRING EGG HUNT—Join the Central Bench Neighborhood Association for this informal gathering of neighbors. Adults can have some snacks and drinks, and try their hand at lawn games while the kids keep busy with crafts, face painting and, of course, the egg hunts. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. FREE. Wright Congregational Church, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-343-0292, wrightucc.com. COLLEGE PREP 101— Teens and their parents learn how to make informed decisions about their education and ensure they’re able to attend the best college/ university for the least amount of out-of-pocket money possible. To register, visit mycollegeanswers. com and click on College Prep 101 Workshop. 2-4:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-853-0332, mycollegeanswers.com. NAMPA REC FLASHLIGHT EASTER EGG HUNT—Add a twist to your traditional egg hunt: hunting in the dark. Live music will begin at 8 p.m. and the hunt will begin at 9 p.m. Take your own flashlight and search for every last egg. For ages 13-17. 8-9:30 p.m. $3. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

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hott estst Sho Bes

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Boise, Idaho

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HOMEBREWSTUFF SATURDAY BEER TASTING—Explore the local and regional craft beer scene. Whether you’re a seasoned aficionado or just discovering the world of craft beer, it’s sure to be a fun and educational experience. Saturdays, 6-7 p.m. Continues through March 26. FREE. HomeBrewStuff Bottle Shop and Taproom, 9115 W. Chinden Blvd., Ste. 105, Garden City, 208-375-2559, homebrewstuff.com.

SUNDAY MARCH 27 Festivals & Events BPL HOLIDAY CLOSURE—All locations of the Boise Public Library will be closed in observance of Easter Sunday. Boise Public Library, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness SRRSCCA AUTOCROSS RACING—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE to watch, $30-$45 to enter. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City. 208-340-3756, srrscca.com.

Odds & Ends EYES OF THE WORLD PSYCHICFORT—11 a.m.-6 p.m. $1 per minute. Eyes of the World Imports, 1576 W. Grove St., Boise, 208331-1212.

Food 39TH ANNUAL MELBA FIRE/QRU EASTER BREAKFAST—Join the Melba Volunteer Fire Department for their amazing all-you-can-eat breakfast fundraiser. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE-$5. Melba Fire Department, 408 Carrie Rex, Melba, 208-495-2351. ANGELL’S EASTER BRUNCH AND DINNER—Celebrate Easter with brunch (11 a.m.-2 p.m.) or dinner (5 p.m.-close). Reservations strongly recommended. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. & 5-9 p.m. Angell’s Bar and Grill Renato, 999 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-4900. angellsbarandgrill. com/menus/easter. BANBURY EASTER BRUNCH—Celebrate Easter with a special brunch. Children under 6 eat FREE. Reservations required. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

NAMPA REC SWIMMING POOL EASTER EGG HUNT—Enjoy a new way of hunting Easter eggs. You’ll have the challenge of looking for eggs hidden in the swimming pool. There’ll be prizes for the eggs you find. Hunts divided by age: 5 and younger at 1 p.m., 6-8 at 1:30 p.m., 9-12 at 2 p.m. 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. FREE with NRC admission. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. SILVER SAGE BAPTIST EASTER EGG HUNT—Everyone is welcome. FREE hot dogs following the egg hunt. 2-3:30 p.m. FREE. Silver Sage Baptist Church, 5858 S. Maple Grove Road, Boise, 208-362-0309, silversagebc.com.

Odds & Ends EYES OF THE WORLD PSYCHICFORT—10 a.m.-7 p.m. $1 per minute. Eyes of the World Imports, 1576 W. Grove St., Boise, 208331-1212. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

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CALENDAR FREE-$28.50. Banbury Golf Course, 2626 N. Marypost Place, Eagle, banburygolf.com, 208-939-4600. SHORE LODGE EASTER BRUNCH—Enjoy a celebratory, three-course brunch complete with live piano music and Easter fun fit for the entire family. Reservations recommended. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $15$30. Shore Lodge-McCall, 501 W. Lake St., McCall. 208-634-2244, shorelodge.com/. STE. CHAPELLE EASTER BRUNCH AND MIMOSA BAR—Join Ste. Chapelle for Easter brunch, featuring a gourmet spread from A Lively Chef, and a mimosa bar. For the whole family. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE-$32. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208453-7843. stechapelle.com.

MONDAY MARCH 28 Festivals & Events VETERANS HOUSING OUTREACH—Veterans can get connected with essential VA services like housing and medical care.

10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

On Stage

On Stage ONE MIC STAND COMEDY—See local and loco comedians take the stage with hilarious lines and stories. 8 p.m. FREE. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com. STORY STORY NIGHT: DAZED AND CONFUSED—Hear about rock and roll hangovers from Justin Newell, Connie Sales and Paul McClanahan, mixed with an open story slam. Hosted by Jodi Eichelberger, with music by Stardust Lounge. Pie Hole pizza and a full bar available. 7 p.m. $12. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571, storystorynight.org. POETRY SLAM—7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe, 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-429-1911, thehighnotecafe. com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

TUESDAY MARCH 29

| SUDOKU

BLIP READING SERIES: TOM DAVIS—Join Homegrown Theatre for the monthly reading series featuring work by local playwrights. March’s featured play is The Sunshine State, by Tom Davis. A Q&A session with the author and actors follows the reading. 7 p.m. By donation. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208376-4229. GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL: JAZZ AMBASSADORS OF THE U.S. ARMY FIELD BAND—The official touring big band of the United States Army has received great acclaim both at home and abroad performing America’s original art form. Tickets for this performance are free and can be picked up at The Morrison Center Box Office. 7 p.m. FREE (ticket required). Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110. geneharris.org. POSTSECRET: THE SHOW—Take a visual, auditory and emotional journey through the beauty and complication of our deepest fears, ambitions and confessions. 7 p.m. $25-$60. Wood River High School, 1250 Fox Acres Road, Hailey, 208578-5020, sunvalleycenter.org. TUESDAY NIGHT COMEDY: ERIC DASILVA— Comedian Eric DaSilva brings his tour-de-force comedy act to Liquid Laughs for one night only. With Dash Kwiatkowski. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459.

Talks & Lectures CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND IDAHO WATER SUPPLY UPDATE—Join Idaho Rivers United for a talk by Ron Abramovich, USDA NRCS Snow Survey Program water supply specialist. Abramovich will discuss the current increase in climate variability trends that we are seeing. He’ll also discuss the current snow and water supply conditions in southwest Idaho. 6 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, idahorivers.org/ new-events.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. Tuesdays, 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 11


TREEFORT LEAFING THROUGH TREEFORT 2016

Boise Weekly’s list of the must-see acts at Treefort Music Fest 2016 BEN SCHULTZ As Treefort Music Fest has grown, so has its music lineup. Now in its fifth year, more than 450 acts are scheduled to perform during the five-day fest, including some big-name headliners like retrosoul screamer Charles Bradley, folk-metal-electronica songstress Chelsea Wolfe, quirky electropop duo Cocorosie and psyched-out garage-rock band Thee Oh Sees. Also on this year’s list of impressive acts is local dream-pop champ Trevor Powers in what will reportedly be one of his final performances as Youth Lagoon. Of course, that still leaves several hundred bands and musicians to check out, so Boise Weekly went through the lineup and made a list of what promise to be some of the best shows from local and touring artists. Keep in mind, this list is by no means exhaustive. That would only spoil some of the fun.

TOURING ACTS/ARTISTS ACID MOTHERS TEMPLE (NEUROLUX, MARCH 23, 11:40 P.M.) Acid Mothers Temple seems to have grown fond of Boise. The internationally respected Japanese psychedelic collective—which fuses metal, folk, jazz and experimental music—played The Crux in 2014 and the Crazy Horse in 2015. The band’s commitment to, as Pitchfork’s Mark Richardson put it, “transformative ecstasy through profound disorientation” makes it an especially good fit for TFM 2016.

VAADAT CHARIGIM (NEUROLUX, MARCH 24, 9 P.M.) The TFM 2016 lineup features a number of impressive international acts, including Vaadat Charigim, a shoegaze trio from Tel Aviv, Israel, whose melancholy tunes and hazy, droning guitars have earned comparisons to Slowdive and My Bloody Valentine. Vaadat Charigim’s songs aren’t just sound and fury: The all-Hebrew lyrics are a reflection of uncertainty and disillusionment felt by those living 12 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Thundercat, aka Setphen Bruner, is a deft blend of funk, electronica and other genres, and is credited with turning rapper Kendrick Lamar onto jazz icons Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis.

in Israel today. You don’t need an interpreter to enjoy the music, though. As Pitchfork’s Ian Cohen observed, “[T]here really is no language barrier if you’ve got an ear for … the dark grey moods this music is typically suggesting.”

WILLIS EARL BEAL (BOISE CONTEMPORARY THEATER, MARCH 25, 5:45 P.M.) Imagine Al Green or Marvin Gaye moving to the Pacific Northwest and obsessing over the instrumentals in David Bowie’s Berlin trilogy. That’s what Willis Earl Beal sounds like on his 2015 album, Noctunes (Tender Loving Empire), which Stereogum praised for its “dark majesty.” In 2013, the Portland, Ore.-based musician told The Guardian he dislikes performing live “as it makes him feel exposed” but, hopefully, the intimacy of Boise Contemporary Theater will help. It’s definitely a bonus for the festival-goers lucky enough to hear Beal’s somber melodies; icy synthesizer drones; and rich, delicate vocals

THUNDERCAT (EL KORAH SHRINE, MARCH 25, 11:15 P.M.) Kendrick Lamar garnered widespread acclaim last year for his 2015 album To Pimp a Butterfly (Top Dawg/Aftermath/Interscope), which drew heavily from ’70s funk and jazz. The rapper shifted away from the languid beats of his breakthrough good kid, m.A.A.d city (Top Dawg/ Aftermath/Interscope, 2012) thanks largely to the influence of Stephen Bruner, aka Thundercat, who played bass on Butterfly and turned Lamar on to the work of jazz greats like Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis. Lamar isn’t the only high-profile artist to call upon Thundercat’s talents. The Los Angelesbased musician has worked with a variety of acts, including Stanley Clarke, Suicidal Tendencies, Erykah Badu, Snoop Dogg and Flying Lotus.

As befits someone with such a broad-ranging C.V., Thundercat’s solo work deftly blends funk, electronica and other genres.

SKATING POLLY (WATERCOOLER, MARCH 26, 7:50 P.M.) Kelli Mayo and Peyton Bighorse of Skating Polly may be young—they started playing together at ages 9 and 14, respectively—but they’ve already accomplished more than many older musicians. The tunefully abrasive, riot grrl-influenced duo has played with several noteworthy artists, including Mike Watt, Babes in Toyland and The Flaming Lips. They’ve also had albums produced by Exene Cervenka from X and K Records founder Calvin Johnson.

ODDISEE (KNITTING FACTORY, MARCH 26, 11:10 P.M.) Treefort-goers excited to see Aesop Rock perform on Saturday should try catching the act just before him, too. Oddisee may not have the loquacity of Aesop, whom engineer-journalist Matt Daniels ranked as having the largest vocabulary in hip-hop history, but the East Coast rapper delivers incisive, socially conscious rhymes in a smooth flow worthy of one of his major influences, groundbreaking emcee Rakim.

HEAD WOUND CITY (THE SHREDDER, MARCH 26, 12:30 A.M.) Here’s to fairness and accuracy in band names. This L.A.-based grindcore supergroup’s music features ear-wrenching riffs courtesy of guitarists Cody Votolato (The Blood Brothers) and Nick Zinner (Yeah Yeah Yeahs). Some throat-shredding yelps from ex-Blood Brothers vocalist Jordan Billie and pulverizing rhythms from bassist Justin Pearson and drummer Gabe Serbian (both 14 of San Diego hardcore group The Locust) add even more cranium-crunching power. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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TREEFORT CHUCK RAGAN (THE OLYMPIC, MARCH 27, MIDNIGHT) 12

Folk and country have always held an appeal for a certain segment of punk rockers: In the 1980s, John Doe, Exene Cervenka and DJ Bonebrake from L.A. band X formed a country side-project called The Knitters with roots-rock musician Dave Alvin. Raspy-voiced singer-songwriter Chuck Ragan falls squarely within this tradition. He first gained recognition in the 1990s as a member of the post-hardcore group Hot Water Music, which Wondering Sound contributor Jason Schreurs called “one of the few underground bands to consistently inject hope into the punk scene.” Switching from punk to Americana, Ragan’s more recent songs continue to focus on themes of endurance and compassion. They should brace up anyone whose spirits are flagging from five full days of Treefort.

LOCAL ARTISTS

Donnelly native Jeff Crosby and his Refugees have made a name for themselves far beyond the frontman’s Gem State roots.

2X2 (THE OLYMPIC, MARCH 24, 6:40 P.M.) Few vocalists in Boise can match Gia Trotter for poise and versatility. She has lent her sweet, strong voice to a variety of groups over the years, including Mostly Muff, Spondee, The Very Most and her own old-school country project, Larkspur. Trotter’s latest project embellishes that voice with plaintive tunes, reverb-heavy guitar jangle and drummer Robert Reeves’s steady beats. Like most groups featuring her vocals, it sounds great.

Anarchy. On his latest album, Waking Days (selfreleased, 2015), his warm, smoky croon serves as the perfect vehicle for impeccably crafted countryrock tunes. “The album’s canyon echoes reverberate in a pleasantly familiar way,” No Depression observed, “but the songs are fresh and personal.” If you catch Crosby’s band, consider buying some merch: Crosby was recently hospitalized, and his medical bills are around $39,000.

OTHER FEATHER (THE DISTRICT, MARCH 25, 7 P.M.)

TISPER (EL KORAH SHRINE, MARCH 26, 5 P.M.)

Jan Reed and Jean Cardeno played an excellent set at The District during Treefort 2015. Those who missed the indie-folk duo now known as Other Feather should consider listening to its winsome tunes, enigmatic lyrics and clean harmonies this time around. Look out as well for Other Feather’s debut album, which will hopefully come out later this year.

Musician Samwise Carlson has performed around Boise for a few years now, but it almost doesn’t feel right to include his self-described “fantasy-folk project” in a local artists section. Between Carlson’s eerily high tenor and the delicate weave of guitar, cello and keyboard, Tisper doesn’t sound of this earth. Instead, it sounds like something you might hear if you were wandering with Dante and Beatrice through Paradise.

CERBERUS REX (THE SHREDDER, MARCH 25, 8:15 P.M.) Good news: One of Boise’s hardest-rocking bands recently put out its debut album (the rough mixes have been available for streaming on its Bandcamp page for more than a year). Bad news: As of presstime, Cerberus Rex’s self-titled album was cassette-only. Then again, the best way to experience this stoner rock trio’s bellowed vocals and gargantuan riffs is to hear it live.

JEFF CROSBY AND THE REFUGEES (MAIN STAGE, MARCH 26, 1 P.M.) Donnelly-born singer-songwriter Jeff Crosby has received some well-deserved attention over the past few years. In addition to touring with Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons, Crosby had songs featured on the soundtrack for TV show Sons of 14 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

GLENMERLE (MARDI GRAS, MARCH 26, 5:30 P.M.)

for the Arts and the Library of Congress. If you missed this group at last year’s Jaialdi festival, take the chance to see it at Treefort.

FINN RIGGINS (LINEN BUILDING, MARCH 26, 10:30 P.M.) One could argue Treefort wouldn’t exist without Finn Riggins. Thanks to the indie-rock band’s relentless touring schedule in its early years, keyboardist Eric Gilbert built the connections that allowed him to organize the first festival in 2012, with Lori Shandro and Drew Lorona. This group isn’t worth seeing just for its cultural significance, though—Finn Riggins’ anthemic tunes, propulsive rhythms and soaring vocals embody the expansive, celebratory spirit of Treefort. Also, the addition of Hillfolk Noir’s Travis Ward on bass frees up Gilbert and Lisa Simpson to rock out even more on synthesizer and guitar, respectively.

WESTERN DAUGHTER (LINEN BUILDING, MARCH 27, 6 P.M.)

AMUMA SAYS NO (THE BASQUE CENTER, MARCH 26, 9 P.M.)

Though barely a year old, this emo/post-punk group has already been making a name for itself. New Noise Magazine made Western Daughter’s debut album, As the Sun Went Down (Broken Bark Records/Camp Daze, 2015), available for streaming in December 2015. Under the Gun Review editor Kyle Florence wrote that “these intuitive up-and-comers readily blur the boundaries between a wealth of different genres.” The band’s balance of sophisticated musicianship and raucous power make it one of the most promising young groups in the current Boise scene.

Amuma Says No’s joyous blending of rock with Basque dance music make it one of the most distinctive groups in Idaho. The band has received national attention, playing the Kennedy Center

Get the full Treefort Music Fest schedule at treefortmusicfest.com, or download the app for iOS or Android.

Playing as A Sea of Glass, this band’s mix of ringing guitars, angelic vocals and hard-driving rhythms made it one of the most exciting local acts in recent years. This Treefort set will mark the group’s first performance under its new moniker, Glenmerle. Whatever the band chooses to call itself, the teaser on its Treefort profile suggests this performance will be more of the gorgeous same.

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342-4222 ★ 646 FULTON ★ theflicksboise.com

• cinemas • café • videos • fun

Opens March 25 A commander in the Danish Army stationed in Afghanistan (Pilou Asbaek) struggles with his conscience and possible prosecution when his unit mistakenly kills a group of civilians. Tobias Lindholm (A Hijacking, The Hunt) is the director. Subtitled in English. Academy Award Nominee Best Foreign Film

“A drama that raises ethically telling questions about war, conscience, compassion, and heroism.”

Opens March 25

Inside: Special Events & April-June Film Schedule Additional films not listed may be shown. Check www.theflicksboise.com

Schedule is subject to change. VOL. 32, NO. 2

Opens April 1 Hank Williams is played by Tom Hiddleston in this biography based on the book by Colin Escott and directed by Marc Abraham. Elizabeth Olsen, David Krumholtz and Bradley Whitford also star. “…a superb performance by Tom Hiddleston.” DAVID SEXTON, This is London

“…a gorgeously mounted production.” Screen International

Spirituality and Practice

Terrence Malick’s latest drama centers around a Hollywood writer (Christian Bale) lost in the decadence surrounding him. Cate Blanchett, Natalie Portman, Brian Dennehy and Imogen Poots co-star.

Opens April 8 Jake Gyllenhaal, Naomi Watts and Chris Cooper star for director Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club) in this drama about an investment banker who finds help after his wife is killed in a car crash and his life begins to unravel. “Offbeat, exuberant and occasionally quite hilarious.” JORDAN MINTZER, Hollywood Reporter

Opens April 1 Col. Katherine Powell (Helen Mirren) is in command of an operation to capture terrorists in Kenya. As the mission escalates, a young girl enters the kill zone, triggering an international dispute over the implications of modern warfare. Aaron Paul, Alan Rickman, Barkhad Abdi and Jeremy Northam also star for director Gavin Hood. “A rivetingly suspenseful drama.” JOE LEYDON, Variety

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Opens April 8 Sally Field stars as a woman who spent most of her adult life caring for her mother and working in an office. Trying to re-enter the world of romance does not come easy for her, nor does meeting someone age appropriate. Max Greenfield and Tyne Daly co-star in this delightful human comedy directed by Michael Showalter. BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 15


SPECIAL EVENTS AT THE FLICKS Lunafest APRIL 2 AT 12:30 Join us for the annual Lunafest presented by Soroptimist International of Boise. Short films by, for and about women will be presented. $15 tickets are available at The Flicks. Soroptimist International of Boise is a volunteer organization dedicated to enhancing the status of women and girls locally, nationally and internationally. soroptimistboise.org

S e asoo n Ticcket s, S tuddentt Tickett s & Pay-pp er-Play Layaway

The Snake River Alliance presents The Safe Side of the Fence

i48 Competition and Festival

APRIL 25 AT 7:00 This documentary tracks the behavior of the US government and private contractors from the creation of the first atomic weapon to the nuclear industry of today. Director Tony West will introduce the film and host a Q & A afterward. Tickets are $12 in advance and at the door.

Queen Mimi to Benefit Corpus Christie House MAY 19 AT 7:00 Mimi Haist left her cheating husband thirty years ago and lived on the street until she was welcomed into a Santa Monica laundromat where she met locals including Renee Zellweger and Zach Galifianakis. Filmed over 5 years by Yaniv Rokah, this documentary is not rated. Corpus Christie House is Boise’s homeless day shelter, providing showers, laundry and educational opportunities. Tickets are $10 in advance and at the door.

Join us for the Idaho Forty Eight Hour Film Competition! Teams from around Idaho have 48 hours to write, shoot, and edit an original 3-6 minute short film. The 13th annual “All Films” screening is Saturday, June 11th at The Flicks and the “Best of the Fest” screening and awards cerem ceremony is Sunday, June 12th at the Ju Egyptian. Tickets are $5.00 for The Flicks and $7.00 for the Egyptian. More information M ida idaho48.org

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE

Non-credit courses, lectures and events for the intellectually curious over age 50.

Become a member now! $35 osher.boisestate.edu (208) 426-1709

MA Taylor*, The Fantasticks (2015). * Member Actors’ Equity. DKM Photography.

www.idahoshakespeare.org or call 208-336-9221

2016-2017

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Die Fledermaus Fleed PUCCINI’s MASSENET’s Tosca Werther WƌŽĚƵĐƟŽŶƐăůĂĂƌƚĞ͗ ^ŽƵƚŚWĂĐŝĮĐŝŶŽŶĐĞƌƚŝŶŽŶĐĞƌƚ͕ Featured Recital

www.operaidaho.org 16 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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'ALLERYs#LASSES 3UPPLIESs%QUIPMENT 14 Varieties of Take-n-Bake Lasagnes Gourmet Entrées & Desserts U Dine-In or Take Out 1504 Vista Ave. U Boise U (208) 345-7150 www.cucinadipaolo.com

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Opens April 15 Pulitzer Prize winning food critic Jonathan Gold takes to the streets of L.A to ferret out the best ethnic cooking. Writer/director Laura Gabbert captures the vibrant food culture of Gold’s city.

Opens April 29 Opens April 22 Opens April 22 Don Cheadle ventured behind the camera to write and direct this biographic snapshot of Miles Davis during the 1970’s. Cheadle also stars as the gifted trumpet player. Emayatzy Corindealdi plays Frances Taylor, his wife and muse. Ewan McGregor and Michael Stuhlbarg co-star.

Dave Eggers’ best-selling novel about an American businessman avoiding bankruptcy by selling a project to a Saudi Arabian king was adapted for the screen by director Tom Twyker. Tom Hanks, Sarita Choudhury and Tom Skerritt star.

Cliff Curtis (Whale Rider) stars as a New Zealand chess champion who keeps his bipolar disorder at bay by teaching children to play. Based on the true story of Gen Potini, this inspirational drama was written and directed by James Napier Robertson. “It’s a film with the texture and truth of life and at its heart is a beautiful performance by Cliff Curtis.” CATH CLARKE, Time Out

“…his tribute to the artist is energized at every step by a fitting improvisational spirit, echoed onscreen in Davis’ performances.” DAVID ROONEY, Hollywood Reporter

Opens April 29 The first drama filmed in Cuba in fifty years features Giovanni Ribisi as a journalist who idolized Ernest Hemingway and became a frequent visitor to his home outside of Havana in 1959-the time of the Cuban Revolution. Based on a true story, it also stars Adrian Sparks, Joely Richardson and Minka Kelly and was directed by Bob Yari. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Opens May 6 Writer/Director John Carney (Once, Begin Again) tells the coming of age story of a 14 year old boy in 1980’s Dublin, who finds music a way out of a difficult home life. “It’s crowd-pleasing, heart-warming, hits all the right notes, and is eager to please.” FIONNUALA HALLIGAN,

Opens May 13 Writer/director Robert Budreau uses the career of trumpeter Chet Baker (Ethan Hawke) as a starting point for this drama about a jazz musician making a comeback in the 1960’s Carmen Ejogo co-stars. “Ethan Hawke gives one of the best performances of his career.”

Screen International

BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 17


ADMISSION Bargain MatinĂŠes (before 6:00) . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7 Regular Prices: General Admission . . . . . . . . . .$9 Children, Students with ID, Senior Citizens 65+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7 Active Military . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7 Flicks Card (10 admissions for 1 or 2 persons) . . . . . . .$65 Unlimited Annual Pass (for one person) . . . .$250 Gift CertiďŹ cates available in any amount.



UPSCALE MEN’S & WOMEN’S CLOTHING & SHOEZ plus consignment

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COMING IN MAY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Jane Austen’s novella, Lady Susan is charmingly adapted by writer/director Whit Stillman. Kate Beckinsale and Chloe Sevigny star in this period comedy about matchmaking in the English countryside.

THE LOBSTER In the near future single people are required to ďŹ nd partners to marry or else be turned into animals. Colin Farrell stars as a divorced man who is given 45 days to ďŹ nd a mate. Rachel Weisz, Ben Whishaw, LĂŠa Seydoux, Olivia Colman, and John C. Reilly costar in this imaginative, delightfully absurdist comedy from visionary ďŹ lmmaker, Yorgos Lanthimos. ÂŽ Winner of the Grand Jury Prize, Cannes 2015

“Love & Friendship� is a most particular pleasure.� KYLE SMITH, New York Post

Tilda Swinton, Mathias Schoenaerts, Dakota Johnson and Ralph Fiennes star for director Luca Guadagnino (I am Love), in this remake of La Piscine, a French farce from 1969, about a rock star whose island vacation is interrupted by an old ame. “Ralph Fiennes squeezes every last drop from this juicy role.“ PETER BRADSHAW, Guardian

•••••••••••••••••

The

Meddler Marnie (Susan Sarandon), a recent widow anxious to share her money and time with her grown daughter moves from New Jersey to L.A. Lorene Scafaria is the writer/director; Rose Byrne and J.K. Simmons co-star.

“Sarandon’s exuberant performance is delivered with care and conviction.� DAVID EHRLICH, Time Out

18 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

COMING IN JUNE • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • MAGGIE’S PLAN Rebecca Miller wrote and directed this modern comedy about a student who falls for her professor and plots to make him a father. Greta Gerwig, Ethan Hawke, Julianne Moore, Maya Rudolph and Bill Hader star. “A smart, goofy delight.â€? RICHARD LAWSON, Vanity Fair

Opens June 24 Set in a mining village in Wales, writer/director Louise Osmond tells the true story of a group of working class friends who decide to take up the sport of kings. They breed a foal and train him to be a champion. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


HARRISON BERRY

CULTURE

Democratic presidential hopeful Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke to an estimated 7,000 people at Taco Bell Arena on the Boise State University campus.

HARRISON BERRY

HARRISON BERRY

BERN, BABY BERN Bernie Sanders’ Boise campaign stop draws thousands HARRISON BERRY

Sanders said Americans who work 40-50 hours per week shouldn’t live in poverty.

Actress and activist Susan Sarandon introduced Sanders to the crowd.

HARRISON BERRY

Outside Taco Bell Arena March 21, thousands of Idahoans stood in long lines to hear from Democratic Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, the progressive presidential hopeful whose campaign promises free public university education, criminal justice and campaign finance reform, and a $15 minimum wage. Queuing with other supporters, Sri Arjuna said he was impressed with the contender’s consistency on the issues. “It’s hard to find a politician who keeps saying the same thing for decades,” he said. During a speech that lasted more than an hour and a half, Sanders outlined his positions on a huge swath of issues, discussing everything from Democratic primary opponent Hillary Clinton’s speeches on Wall Street to controversial Republican frontrunner Donald Trump to mass incarceration. “It’s a better investment to send a kid to the University of Idaho than to jail,” Sanders told the cheering crowd, which unofficial estimates pegged at about 7,000 people.

Sanders: “I thought I walked into the wrong state. I was told Idaho is a conservative state.”

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 19


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY MARCH 23 BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KAYLEIGH JACK—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers NEW TRANSIT TRIO—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 STEVIE V—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2016— Treefort runs March 23-27 and features more than 400 bands and musicians performing in venues across downtown Boise, as well as forts for food, story, yoga, comedy,

20 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

beer, film, technology and more. Get the full schedule at treefortmusicfest.com. Various times and locations. WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM—Hosted by The Blind Mice. 8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THURSDAY MARCH 24 BEN BURDICK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

BBS: JOHNNY RAWLS AND SMOOTH AVENUE—7 p.m. $10. The Playhouse

OPERATINI: YO-HO-HO AND A BOTTLE OF RUM—6 p.m. $20, $35 for 2. Sapphire Room

CARTER FREEMAN—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub

SPENCER BATT—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2016— Downtown Boise, treefortmusicfest. com

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRIDAY MARCH 25 A-TRAK—With Herobust, AuZOMaTiK, and ONSLO. 8 p.m. $15-$45. Revolution BILL RECTOR—8 p.m. FREE. Piper CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers IDAHO MUSCLE—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

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MUSIC GUIDE JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LEFTOVER SALMON AND PIMPS OF JOYTIME—8 p.m. $21-$40. Knitting Factory MODERN CLASSICS: 208 ENSEMBLE—With The Chimera Duo. 6:30 p.m. $5-$15 adv., $5-$18 door. Sapphire

MONDAY MARCH 28 CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MONDAY NIGHT OPEN MIC— 6:30-9:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

REFLECTIONS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND MOSQUITOES—With Chubby Lovin’. 7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe, 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-429-1911, thehighnotecafe.com.

TUESDAY MARCH 29

R.K. SPUD MOORE—6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard by Marriott Meridian

CASEY KRISTOFFERSON—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

CHARLIE PARR AND TRAVIS WARD—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SMOOTH AVENUE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

STE. CHAPELLE WINERY AFTERHOURS—With Patrick Dansereau. 6 p.m. $10. Ste. Chapelle TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2016— Treefortmusicfest.com

SATURDAY MARCH 26

DAVIS FRENCH—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL: JAZZ AMBASSADORS OF THE U.S. ARMY FIELD BAND—Tickets for this performance are FREE and can be picked up at The Morrison Center Box Office. 7 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION FORUM—6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire Room KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—6 p.m. FREE. The Local OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s PATRICIA FOLKNER—6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard by Marriott Meridian RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: LITTLE GREEN CARS—With John Mark Nelson. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

ANDREW SHEPPARD—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel CAMDEN HUGHES—6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard by Marriott Meridian CHAZ BROWNE BAND—7:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Sapphire CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DALE CAVANAUGH—7 p.m. FREE. High Note EMILY STANTON BAND—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s GAYLE CHAPMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 HECKTOR PECKTOR—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s MIKE ROSENTHAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill SHON SANDERS—8 p.m. FREE. Piper TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2016— Treefortmusicfest.com

SUNDAY MARCH 27 JEREMY STEWART—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—2:30-5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2016— Treefortmusicfest.com

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

V-FORT, MARCH 23-24, VISTA BAR It’s a sure thing downtown Boise will be a crush of revelers dancing, singing, drinking and snapping selfies amid the din of 400-plus bands at the fifth annual Treefort Music Fest (March 2327). If you’re looking for kickass music without the insane crowds (or expense), Treefort is branching out to the Bench with V-Fort at the venerable Vista Bar. Amble to the A-frame or—better yet—catch the Treefort shuttle up the hill for a two-day, double-header of live local music including Piranhas BC, Dogs in the Fight, Camacho, Upinatem and Figure 8 on Friday, March 25 starting at 8 p.m. On Saturday, March 26, Nude Oil, The Jerkwadz, The Good Guys and Caedus will take the stage and hold it until 1 a.m. Even better, your friendly neighborhood Bench watering hole is hosting V-Fort gratis. No cover charge. No tickets. No problem. Just be sure to tip your servers. —Zach Hagadone 8 p.m., FREE. Vista Bar, 813 S. Vista Ave., 208-345-5058, vistabarboise.com. BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 21


WINESIPPER COMING UP ROSÉS The arrival of the first 2015 rosés from the south of France is a cause for celebration. It’s a sure sign that spring has arrived. Typically, you want to consume rosés in their youth, when they are at their charming and refreshing best. Some do evolve nicely, which is the case for one of the top picks here. 2015 CHATEAU DES DEUX ROCS, $14 A blend of Cinsault, Syrah and Grenache Noir from Cabrières, a region in France’s Languedoc known for its excellent rosés. It’s a salmon pink pour, slightly darker than the Commanderie, with bright ruby tinges around the edge. Offering zesty watermelon and orangesicle aromas, the flavors center on crisp lime backed by subtle pomegranate with spicy citrus peel on the finish. 2015 LA COMMANDERIE DE LA BARGEMONE, $18 This Provence house was founded by the Knights Templar in the 13th century. The palest of pinks, the color belies the rich fruit flavors on the palate. Opens with fresh spring green aromas with lively clover backing the strawberry and tropical fruit. Oh-so-crisp and refreshing on the palate, you get heady citrus, subtle stone fruit and a long, brisk, bone-dry finish. 2014 MAS DE GOURGONNIER, $19 This certified organic wine is from the Les Bauxde-Provence, the first appellation to require its vineyards to be farmed biodynamically. It opens with strawberry rhubarb and tangerine aromas with a touch of black pepper. The flavors lean toward cherry, raspberry and currant with a richness and structure that probably comes from the Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend. A bigger styled rosé that’s drinking beautifully now. —David Kirkpatrick 22 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

FOOD MEALS ON WHEELS

How two Treefort musicians stay healthy on the road JESSICA MURRI They were somewhere in South Dakota when the only food Rachel Lark and her bandmates had was meat—nothing but meat. “Even the potato chips were bacon potato chips,” Lark said. “Everything was meat-infused. We ate the food, because you never turn down free food, but for days afterward, we wished we would have not eaten for a day than to have eaten that food.” Struggling to stay healthy and eat well is a real challenge facing many of the musicians who made their way to Boise for Treefort Music Fest 2016. “When I was on tour with my old band, we were really good about stopping at grocery stores to get food, so we were eating sandwiches and carrots and hummus and fruit,” Lark said. “When you’re one person on the road, and you’re doing all the driving and booking yourself, it’s hard to motivate yourself to go grocery shopping in the middle of an eight-hour stint of driving and figure out a meal.” Lark, who is performing at Liquid Lounge on Thursday, March 24 at 11:15 p.m., calls her music “reality folk,” wherein she takes a traditional singer/songwriter aesthetic and mixes in electronic loops. Her songs explore sex, drugs and partying and, on occasion, meat. For example, “Warm, Bloody and Tender,” adding she feels lucky she didn’t start touring untells the story of a menstrual night of passion: “Just like steak / pussy tastes better / when it’s warm, til 2011, because there are now way more Whole Foods across the country than there used to be. bloody / and tender.” “I don’t like thinking of myself as highThough she is driving alone from San Francisco, Lark has a few tricks up her sleeve to help stay maintenance. I don’t want anyone to think I’m going to freak out because there’s no superfood healthy along the way. For one thing, she never smoothies around,” Lark said. “That said, it is reeats fast food. She brings her own pour-over ally delightful when you are in the middle of the coffee and treats herself to expensive superfood country and you stumble upon smoothies. She takes a hippie co-op. It’s like a mecca. nine minutes every CELLO JOE It’s like, they have dates! Dates, morning for her With Rachel Lark; Thursday, March 24; 10:15 p.m. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth everybody! Dates!” workout routine and St., 208-287-5379. Musician Joey “Cello Joe” when Lark eats in a For pass prices and more information, visit Chang also had to figure out restaurant, she mostly treefortmusicfest.com. how to maintain a healthy diet orders salads. while on the road, especially She has also when he started touring with his cello strapped to learned to ease up on herself when it comes to his bicycle. eating poorly on the road. What began as a necessity to get his cello “I practice a lot of forgiving myself for eating around the Berklee College of Music in Boston junk food,” Lark said. “My lifestyle outside of bloomed into a plan to tour exclusively on his touring has become very health conscious. I know I need lots of sleep and to be really healthy bicycle. After college, Chang joined a group of 15 other musicians from San Francisco and rode for at least two weeks before I get on the road,”

5,000 miles along the California coast and into Mexico. “Before that, the longest bike ride I had ever done was from my house to the coast, about 50 miles,” Chang said. The group rode cargo bicycles loaded with camping gear, instruments and a makeshift pedalpowered PA system. “We’d prop up the back wheels and get people from the audience to pedal our bikes in place,” Chang said. “We could plug the PA into that and do a show anywhere without having to be on the grid. We could play on the beach or in a plaza.” The physical demands of riding up to 30 miles per day for seven months called for special attention to Chang’s diet. He sought local grocers and co-ops for organic foods, fresh and dried fruits, vegetables, organic meal bars and peanut butter. Not everywhere Chang tours has healthy options, though. “When you have to deal with that, it’s rough,” he said. “I played at a festival in Illinois and the food in the cafeteria was atrocious. Straight up tons of meat, mac and cheese, iceberg lettuce. Not what we were used to. We’re used to fine dining and fancy farmers markets, but you don’t see that everywhere.” Now, Chang takes a bag of healthy snacks with him wherever he goes and since that first tour, he has cycled through Utah and the Pacific Northwest, as well as on five-month tour in Europe. Chang isn’t biking to Boise to perform at Treefort Music Fest. He’ll fly this time, and perform with his cello and affinity for beatboxing at Liquid on Thursday, March 24, at 10:15 p.m., right before Lark. When Chang and Lark get here, they’ll probably take music promoter Seth Brown’s advice when it comes to eating in restaurants with local and natural food choices. Brown suggests Bittercreek Alehouse, Red Feather Lounge, Wild Root and Juniper. “[Musicians] have some pretty unusual requests for the fanciest organic natural food or beverage that Boise may or may not have access to,” Brown said. “Some requests are pretty easy to fulfill at the Boise Co-op, but [for] some items, we just have to explain that it is not available and find the next best substitute.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


GU Y HAND

FOODFORT

The inaugural Foodfort serves up everything from tastings to talks with some of Boise’s finest chefs.

FILL UP AT TREEFORT

From Foodfort to food trucks to Camp Modern, get your grub on TARA MORGAN The blitz of bands and booze that is Boise’s Treefort Music Fest 2016 is now upon us. If you plan to hitch a ride on this festive five-day fun train, it will behoove you to keep your belly full. This year, in addition to the lineup of local food trucks parked outside the Main Stage on Grove Street—including Archie’s Place, Calle 75 Street Tacos, Genki Takoyaki and Salt Lake City-based Poutine Your Mouth—you’ll also find a new fort dedicated entirely to food: Foodfort. Located inside the expanded Alefort tent, a 180-foot behemoth that runs up 12th Street from Grove Street to Main Street, Foodfort Tastes will boast a rotating lineup of 10 local chefs serving small plates that you can purchase for one or two tokens. Options include everything from heirloom polenta and lamb sugo from The Modern Hotel, served Friday, March 25 from 4-8 p.m.; to beer-braised duck on polenta with heirloom tomato jam from Richard’s Café Vicino, served Saturday, March 26 from Noon to 4 p.m.; to pork belly, mushrooms and sunchokes from State & Lemp, served Saturday, March 26 from 4-8 p.m. At the north end of the tent, past a breezeway with picnic tables and a lounge, you’ll find The Hideout stage, where food-focused discussions will take place. (Full disclosure: I organized these panels.) Dubbed Foodfort Talks, the presentations are free, all-ages and open to the public, so no wristbands required. Panels include: The Future of Idaho Wine with Telaya, Split Rail and Sawtooth on Friday, March 25 from 4:30-5 p.m., with a free wine tasting; Defining Local with Peaceful Belly, Bittercreek Ale House, Idaho BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Preferred and Agri Beef Co. on Saturday, March 26 from 2:30-3:30 p.m.; and The Rising Tide of Third Wave Coffee with Evans Brothers Coffee Roasters, Neckar Coffee and The District Coffee House on Sunday, March 27 from 12:15-12:45 p.m., which also includes free samples. Before the Foodfort Talks coffee panel begins on Sunday, you can fill up on eggy fare at the Food Truck Brunch, which runs from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Grove Street. Food trucks like B-Town Bistro, Boise Fry Company and The Funky Taco will offer special breakfastthemed dishes to soak up the previous night’s debauchery. Speaking of brunch, Bittercreek Ale House is hosting its third annual Treefort Brunch Friday, March 25 through Sunday, March 27 with live music and an assortment of special dishes, including breakfast tacos, breakfast poutine, breakfast pizza and specialty cocktails. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, with bands like Jonathan Warren, Motel Radio and Sheep Bridge Jumpers performing. If you prefer Basque fare over breakfast eats, hitch your horse at Camp Modern, which is transforming the Modern Hotel parking lot into a sheep camp with spit-roasted whole lamb, paella, grilled chorizo, solomo and campsite cocktails. The Burning Lamb event takes place Friday, March 25 through Sunday, March 27 from 3-9 p.m. There will also be an array of bands like AAN and Lost Lander performing free, all-ages show. For more information, visit treefortmusicfest.com/foodfort. BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 23


COURTESY OF WILL VON TAGEN

SCREEN HEART OF DARKNESS MEETS HANSEL AND GRETEL Boise filmmaker Will Von Tagen’s After Walpurgisnacht tracks rogue folklorists through Germany HARRISON BERRY Will Von Tagen taps into a rich vein of German folklore with After Walpurgisnacht.

The title of Boise filmmaker Will Von Tagen’s second feature-length film, After Walpurgisnacht, presents a challenge to moviegoers right off the bat. Pronounced “Val-PURG-iss-nakt,” it’s kind of a mouthful, even for German language students sweating out their exams. “It’s funny because people struggle with the title already,” Von Tagen said, noting audiences wrestled with the title of his first film, Almosting It, which is set for digital release in May. “I like to educate people a little bit about how deeply it runs in German literature. I’m not just making this word up.” Walpurgisnacht, which draws its name from an 8th century Catholic feast day whose April 30 eve doubles in folk tradition as a witches’ sabbath night, is set for an October premiere in Boise. Taking its cue from the witchy connotation, the film is a psychological thriller about an oral historian called to the Harz Mountains near the former border of East and West Germany to investigate a rogue folklorist who is using the region’s history and identity to consolidate control over the locals. Think Heart of Darkness meets “Hansel and Gretel.” “You told [folk tales and legends] to children to scare the daylights out of them,” Von Tagen said. “It’s … examining what was being done in the [German Democratic Republic] to these towns and what would happen if someone manipulated what people believed in in this region to try and take some sort of control.” From the end of May to mid-June, he’ll be producing and shooting in and around remote Harz-area German villages that have been decaying since the fall of the Berlin Wall. 24 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Sets include abandoned health resorts, longneglected villages, stony caves in the woods and Buzludzha—the site of a majestically creepy, flying saucer-like Soviet monument in Bulgaria. Von Tagen will populate these locations with a mix of locals and American actors who have experience with German. Almosting It veteran Jay Koeppl will play the lead opposite Boise actor Drake Shannon, as the film’s antagonist. German actress Luisa Wietzorek will play the female lead. For his previous film, Von Tagen cast Lee Majors in a supporting role, but said he won’t cast a big-name actor in Walpurgisnacht. “I decided rather than investing a lot of money to fill a role like that, we’re going to skip over that and put the money back into the film,” he said. “A lot of indie films feel the need to put [in] a Michael Madsen or someone the audience will recognize, but honestly, if it’s not in the right type of role or for the right reasons, it’s a distraction.” In the background of the film is the looming cultural presence of Walpurgisnacht itself—a Burning Man for Satanists, pagans and hippies that features heavily in German film, music and literature. Not least of these is Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s closet drama Faust, in which the titular character witnesses the bacchanalia on the summit of the Harz Mountains’ highest peak, Brocken. The film will also play off so-called “Ostalgie,” or nostalgia among former residents of the GDR for East Germany’s socialist aesthetic, typified by

the former republic’s quirky crosswalk signals and Trabant automobiles with their loud, twostroke engines. “What I found interesting was that there was this age gap. Everyone who was 30 years or younger during the reunification has this Ostalgie. Everyone above that, they despise that. Finding where the disconnect was, that perspective shift is a thing,” Von Tagen said. Among other influences are George Balanchine’s Walpurgisnacht Ballet and Felix Mendelssohn’s choral oratorio, Die erste Walpurgisnacht. Von Tagen said he had originally hoped to score the movie with Robert Franz, Jim Cockey and Boise Philharmonic, but Franz’s upcoming departure from Boise Phil and other factors put that project on hold. Now, the movie’s scoring is “sort of a budget-contingent thing now.” “I still don’t know what or who will do the scoring, but it will be derived [and] recomposed from the traditional music of the region,” Von Tagen said. He described Walpurgisnacht’s budget as “micro,” with funds coming from local sources, similar to Almosting It. Distribution will be by Gravitas Ventures. After the local success of his first film, Von Tagen said he’s working with the Boise Virtual Reality Project during the shoot to create 3-D project updates for fans. A rollout for the VR updates will take place First Thursday, April 7, at Boise Rock School. “How cool would it be if we were shooting that every single day and giving people back home a chance to be on set with us?” He said. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN DAVE WAGERS

Living the sweet life at Idaho Candy Company

LEARN TO PLAY BRIDGE We welcome new members! Now is your chance to learn the world’s best card game. You have heard of it: now you can play it.

GEORGE PRENTICE

Beginning Bridge Lessons There’s a chance one of those chocolate marshmallow eggs you got in your Easter basket when you were a kid was made by Idaho Candy Company, the all-things-sweet Boise landmark that has been manufacturing delights for more than a century. “We make these for another company back East, but I can’t tell you who they are,” said Idaho Candy Co. President Dave Wagers, smiling and pointing to a container of candy eggs. “We’ll make about a half-million of them: chocolate and dark chocolate.” That’s one of many secrets at Idaho Candy, which swung open its doors on Eighth Street in 1909 and is still producing more than 1 million confections each year, including the Idaho Spud and Cherry Cocktail candy bars, Owyhee Butter Toffee and the Huckleberry Gem candy bar (introduced in 2012). Some of the recipes date back more than 100 years. Wagers’ father, John, purchased Idaho Candy in 1984 and Dave worked summers there when he was a kid. He had no intention of having a career at a candy company, though, and went to work for billionaire Ross Perot’s Electronic Data Systems in Texas, Virginia and Europe. When Wagers’ dad asked that one of his three sons become Idaho Candy’s next plant manager in 1991, Dave returned to his hometown and, this year, he’ll celebrate his 25th anniversary in the family business. “It’s funny how life always brings you back home,” Wagers said. I’m presuming this business is as much a science as it an art. If you’re any good at it, it’s more art. Mars and Hershey’s? It’s a lot more science there. And your recipes have been around for a while. Since the early 20th century. What has changed over the years? Preservatives? I’m actually trying to back away from preservatives. We’re always looking to clean up the label. What does that mean? No artificial flavoring or preservatives. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Let’s talk about your location. Your storefront is clearly a showcase, but this would be the last place I would put a manufacturing facility. A 24,000-square-foot manufacturing plant in the middle of a city. The only thing close is Meadow Gold Dairy, and they’re not really in the middle of downtown.

Wednesdays, 6 Weeks April 6, 2016-May 11, 2016 6-8pm The Bridge Cooperative of Boise, 5903 W Franklin. $40 For 6 Weeks and Textbook To register, email bridgeco14@gmail.com or phone Kay at (208) 484-2714 Sponsored by Boise Unit 394 of The American Contract Bridge League ACBL BoiseBridge

Doesn’t Idaho Candy use all four floors of this building to its advantage? The chocolate is done in the basement, where it’s more temperate. Our main office and showroom is on the ground floor. Brittle and toffees are made on the second floor and the marshmallows are on the top floor. We don’t have any air conditioning there. And that’s by design? Air conditioning would add humidity, and that makes it harder to make candy. So is it fair to assume Idaho’s climate works in your favor? The climate is spectacular for making candy. That said, global warming has become more of an issue. It can get so hot in July now, that, on occasion, we can’t get the chocolate right. You have to handle chocolate very quickly and if it’s too warm, the chocolate can’t set up, and you have to slow everything down. Are you doing everything you want to be doing? I get to do so many different things. It’s really fun; and believe it or not, I still like fixing the machines all these years later. Working at Idaho Candy can be a real adventure. You may come home some evenings covered in corn starch and it can get pretty hot up on that top floor. We probably need to grow. As some point, it’s going to be much harder to manufacture at our location and we may have to move, but if we were to build a $2 million plant, the candy company will need to sustain that. We’re really the stewards of Idaho Candy. This company and the Idaho Spud means something to most Idahoans if they’ve been around for a while. I don’t want to be the guy who screws that up. BOISEweekly | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | 25


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NYT CROSSWORD | DOUBLE-CROSSED ACROSS 1 Joke’s target 5 Own (up) 9 One of the Five Pillars of Islam 13 French film award 18 Phlegmatic 20 Prefix with distant 21 Black-and-white, in sneaker lingo 1

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1 Wharton, e.g., informally 2 Maurice who painted Parisian street scenes 3 Grippers for geckos 4 At risk of capsizing 5 Scary 6 Math term that uses all five vowels exactly once 7 Things taken home from the beach?

8 Protest type 9 Deep laugh 10 Lavish Vegas casino opened in 2009 11 Lowest part 12 Book before Judges 13 Deliberate 14 Robe-wearing ruler 15 Certain balloons 16 Smith graduate, e.g. 17 Start on a righteous path 19 CNBC interviewee, maybe 28 Ring figure? 29 Old Spanish kingdom 34 Cousin of inc. 37 Muscle strengthened by a StairMaster, informally 39 “That guy?” 40 My Chemical Romance and others 41 Mine transport 43 Up in years 47 Chat-room policers, informally 48 ____ Hawkins dance 49 Spirit 51 Fairly recent 52 Some game-show prizes 53 Peninsula in 2014 headlines 54 Quitting aid, of sorts 55 Relative of a skillet 57 Fix 58 Band with a Ben & Jerry’s flavor named for it 59 Trudge 60 Glows 61 “Something to Talk About” singer, 1991 66 Sports teams wear them, informally 69 Dangerous rifts 70 “I could go with whatever”

71 Like Mount Rushmore at night 72 Kicked oneself over 74 “S.N.L.” bit 79 Country singer Lee ____ Womack 80 Nursed 81 1990s craze 82 Chatting online with, for short 84 Bedroom shutter? 86 Ukraine neighbor 87 Some 88 Secrecy, with “the” 89 Those saying “somethin’,” say 90 Capital that’s home to the world’s largest castle, per Guinness 91 Take umbrage at L A S T D R P H I L V A S E

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92 Multistory temple 93 Small-capped mushrooms 99 Out of favor 100 Motorcyclist’s invitation 102 Hero of kid-lit’s “The Phantom Tollbooth” 104 Ballpark figs. 105 Part of the “everything” in an everything bagel 106 “Super cool!” Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com SMUDGE: Intensely affectionate, soft and snuggly sweetheart. Come see how loving I am.

PINKIE: Polite and calm gentleman waiting to charm my way into your home.

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These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

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RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. BEEFCAKE: 2-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Can be rowdy but also content to hang out on your lap. Loves to talk. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #30740430)

BUDDY: 8½-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Lots of energy and curiosity. Will need a patient family. Best in a home without small children. (Kennel 308 – #10275404)

PANSY: 2-year-old, female, terrier mix. Loves attention, gets along with people and dogs alike. Enjoys walks and runs. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #31078580)

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AUTUMN: 8-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Loves to be petted under her chin. Would be a perfect addition to a calm, loving family. (Kennel 26 – #31065228)

LORD RANSFORD: 2-yearold, male, domestic longhair. Sweet, will roll onto his side and reach out for attention. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #30937989)

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BOISE WEEKLY CALL TO ARTISTS Help us celebrate our 25th Anniversary this June. Seeking all local artists/ crafters and creatives to show and sell their wares during our downtown block-party event. Please email: ellen@boiseweekly. com for details. KIBROM’S ETHIOPIAN RE-OPENS! Those of you still mourning the loss of Kibrom’s Ethiopian food have to wait no longer! They have opened a new restaurant and are back to serving their delicious food. Go see them at 3506 W. State Street in Boise.

NAMPA’S FARMERS MARKET OPENING! Join us for our season opening April 30th from 9 am-1 pm. Enjoy music from Mom & Double Image and Hispanic Folkloric Dancers of Idaho. Located at Lloyd Square in historic downtown Nampa:14th and front.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): When Orville and Wilbur Wright were kids, their dad gave them a toy helicopter powered by a rubber band. The year was 1878. Twenty-five years later, the brothers became the first humans to sail above the earth in a flying machine. They testified that the helicopter had been a key inspiration as they developed their invention. In the spirit of the Wright Brothers’ magic seed, Aries, I invite you to revive your connection to a seminal influence from your past. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to feed a dream that was foreshadowed in you a long time ago. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The task of a writer is not to solve the problem but to state the problem correctly,” said Russian writer Anton Chekhov. Whether or not you’re a writer, Taurus, that is also your special task in the coming weeks. The riddle that has begun to captivate your imagination is not yet ripe enough for you to work on in earnest. It has not been defined with sufficient clarity. Luckily, you have the resources you need to research all the contingencies, and you have the acuity to come up with a set of empowering questions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The good news is that if you eat enormous amounts of chocolate, you will boost your memory. Science has proved it. The bad

news is that in order to get the full effect of the memory enhancement, you would have to consume so much chocolate that you would get sick. I propose we consider this scenario as a metaphor for what may be going on in your life. Is it possible you’re doing things that are healthy for you in one way but that diminish you in another? Or are you perhaps getting or doing too much of a good thing—going to unbalanced extremes as you pursue a worthy goal? Now is a favorable time to figure out if you’re engaged in such behavior, and to change it if you are. CANCER (June 21-July 22): When the young director Richard Lester got his big break, he took full advantage. It happened in 1964, when the early Beatles asked him to do their first movie, A Hard Day’s Night. Lester’s innovative approach to the project propelled his career to a higher level that brought him many further opportunities. Writing of Lester’s readiness, critic Alexander Walker said, “No filmmaker ... appeared more punctually when his hour struck.” That’s what I hope you will soon be doing in your own chosen field, Cancerian. Do you understand how important it will be to have impeccable timing? No procrastination or hemming and hawing, please. Be crisply proactive. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): As a young man, the poet Arthur

28 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Rimbaud (1854-1891) left his home in France and settled in Abyssinia, which these days is known as Ethiopia. “I sought voyages,” he wrote, “to disperse the enchantments that had colonized my mind.” You might want to consider a similar strategy in the coming weeks, Leo. From an astrological perspective, it’s going to be an excellent time both to wander free of your usual haunts and to disperse the enchantments that have colonized your mind. Why not find ways to synergize these two opportunities? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): At one point in his life, author C.S. Lewis had a rude awakening as he took stock of the progress he thought he had been making. “I am appalled to see how much of the change I thought I had undergone lately was only imaginary,” he wrote. I want to make sure that something similar doesn’t happen to you, Virgo. You’re in the midst of what should be a Golden Age of Self-Transformation. Make sure you’re actually doing the work that you imagine you’re doing—and not just talking about it and thinking about it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “There are questions that you don’t ask because you’re afraid of the answers,” wrote Agatha Christie. I would add that there are also questions you don’t ask because

you mistakenly think you already know the answers. Then there are questions you don’t ask because their answers would burst your beloved illusions, which you’d rather preserve. I’m here to urge you to risk posing all these types of questions, Libra. I think you’re strong enough and smart enough, and in just the right ways, to deal constructively with the answers. I’m not saying you’ll be pleased with everything you find out, but you will ultimately be glad you finally made the inquiries. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): If you are enmeshed in a jumble that makes you squirm or if you are caught in a tangle that stifles your self-love, you have three choices. Here’s how Eckhart Tolle defines them: 1., get out of the situation; 2., transform the situation; 3., completely accept the situation. Does that sound reasonable, Scorpio? I hope so, because the time has come to act. Don’t wait to make your decision. Do it soon. After that, there will be no whining allowed. You can no longer indulge in excuses. You must accept the consequences. On the bright side, imagine the new freedom and power you will have at your disposal. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Here’s a proposed experiment. Sidle up to a creature you’d love to be closer to, and softly sing the following lyrics: “Come with me,

go with me. Burn with me, glow with me. Sleep with me, wake with me.” At this point, run three circles around the creature as you flap your arms like a bird’s wings. Then continue your singing: “Rise with me, fall with me. Work with me, play with me. Pray with me, sin with me.” At this point, leap up into the air three times, unleashing a burst of laughter each time you hit the ground. Continue singing: “Let me get high with you. Laugh with you, cry with you. Make me your partner in crime.” At this point blow three kisses toward the creature, then run away. (P.S. The lyrics I’m quoting here were composed by songwriter Fran Landesman.)

“We teach each other how to live.” Poet Anne Michaels said that, and now I’m passing it on to you—just in time for the phase of your cycle when acting like a curious student is your sacred duty and your best gift to yourself. I don’t necessarily mean that you should take a workshop or enroll in a school. Your task is to presume that everyone you meet and every encounter you have may bring you rich learning experiences. If you’re willing to go as far as I hope you will, even your dreams at night will be opportunities to get further educated. Even your vigils in front of the TV. Even your trips to the convenience store to buy ice cream.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In getting energy from food, we humans have at our disposal more than 50,000 edible plants. Yet we choose to concentrate on only a few. Wheat, corn, rice, and potatoes make up two-thirds of our diet and 11 other staples comprise most of the rest. Let’s use this as a metaphor for the kind of behavior you should avoid in the coming weeks. I think it will be crucial for you to draw physical, emotional and spiritual sustenance from a relatively wide variety of sources. There’s nothing wrong with your usual providers, but for now you need to expand your approach to getting the nurturing you need.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In her poem “Time,” Piscean poet Lia Purpura wonders about “not picking up a penny because it’s only a little luck.” Presumably, she is referring to a moment when you’re walking down a street and you spy an almost-but-not-quiteworthless coin lying on the concrete. She theorizes that you may just leave it there. It adds next to nothing to your wealth, right? Which suggests that it also doesn’t have much value as a symbol of good fortune. I urge you to reject this line of thought in the coming weeks, Pisces. In my astrological opinion, you’ll be wise to capitalize on the smallest opportunities. There will be plenty of them, and they *will* add up.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

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LEGAL SHOP HERE BW SHOP HERE RANDALL SCOTT JEWELERS GRAND OPENING Randall Scott Jewelers (formally M & M) has opened a new store in downtown Boise! Join us First Thursday, April 7th, for our Grand Opening Party! 30% off storewide. Jewelry starting at only $9! Stop in the store to sign up for our diamond stud earring giveaway. We offer engagement rings, fine jewelry, jewelry design, sterling silver jewelry and jewelry repair. 1008 Main Street.

BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly. com or call 344-2055 for a quote. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: ROBERT JAMES SNEIDER and SOPHIA ANN MOORE, Legal Name Case No. CVNC 1602679

A Petition by ROBERT JAMES SNEIDER, who was born May 5, 1989 at Sebastopol, California, and SOPHIA ANN MOORE, who was born January 26, 1978 at Boise, Idaho, both of whom now reside at 201 N. Flume Street, Boise, County of Ada, State of Idaho, have filed with the above-entitled Court a Petition for change of their “Family” surname to MOORE-BRIDGES, and that they hereafter be known as ROBERT JAMES MOORE-BRIDGES and SOPHIA ANN MOOREBRIDGES, respectively, the reason being that they want to adopt a new combined “family” name, utilizing husband’s grandmother’s maiden name. The Petition for Change of Name will be heard at 130 o’clock p.m. on the 10th day of May, 2016, at the Ada County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Front Street, Boise, Idaho. Objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show the court a good reason against such a change of name. WITNESS my hand and seal of said District Court this 18th day of Feb., 2016. By: CHRISTOPHER D. RICH and DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk PUB March 09,16,23 and 30, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Natalie Marie HarringtonSmith. Legal name of child

minate his parental rights 10/2015. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on May 17, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Feb 25, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Christopher D. Rich CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT and Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk. PUB March 16, 23, 30 and April 6, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Beth Marie Taylor. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1601442 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult)

Beth Marie Taylor, now residing in the City of Star, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Phedre Marie Delaunay. The reason for the change in name is: I do not identify with my legal name, family issues. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on APR 12, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: FEB 18, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB March 16, 23, 30 and April 6, 2016.

A Petition to change the name of

ADULT

Case No. CV NC 1603553 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Natalie Marie Harrington-Smith, a minor, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Natalie Marie Berry. The reason for the change in name is: I have re-married and biological father has signed the form to ter-

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FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

1PUGLIFE ENTERTAINMENT

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

DEAR MINERVA, I have this dilemma. While I am at work, sometimes I notice that my nails need trimming. I am kind of a forgetful person, and so I never remember to do this at home until it is too late. I am quite careful in going forward with the task of snipping them, as I don’t want them to go flying all over the place; like, into somebody’s sandwich or anything. But, occasionally one or two get away from me. The problem is this: When, despite my best efforts one does get away, my coworker gives me the stink eye. Really, it only glanced off her eyeglasses, it didn’t go into her eye or anything. So, I don’t think this is at all a big deal. What do you think? With warmest affection, —Clauz

The guys at 1puglife Entertainment seem surprised at comparisons to The Trailer Park Boys and/or Jackass. Even a cursory viewing of their videos reveals they’re at least soul brothers with Sunnyvale Trailer Parkers and the eponymous asses. Based in the tiny hamlet of Inwood, Ontario (that’s eastern Canada, eh), 1puglife is Chris Whitcroft—a bearded good old boy with a mane of fiery red hair and an encyclopedic vocabulary of Canuck slang. Out of his machine shop at Inwood Customs pours a steady stream of motorized lawnmowers, youtube.com/user/1puglife and Power Wheels-type cars that are 1puglife.com souped up and sent on punishing stunts that usually result in one of Whitcroft’s minions getting seriously “dicker’d up.” Visit 1puglife’s YouTube channel, and you’ll see the “ultimate drift trike and power wheels romp” and “the great canadian dumpster jump.” It’s not all jumps and wrecks—Whitcroft takes viewers on bizarre outings to buy fuel filters, visit with his “crawdad,” and generally run afoul of the police and various other “bylaw dicks.” This is no mockumentary. It’s life in Inwood. —Zach Hagadone

Taken by instagram user harrisonberry0725.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

DEAR CLAUZ, For the love of humanity STOP grooming in close quarters with coworkers. No one should suffer your unwanted body parts flying around the room. If you don’t want them anymore, why would your coworkers? I have to say that you deserve the stink eye. Yes, you absolutely do. You have broken an unspoken social contract. Therefore, she doesn’t owe you kindness. You have effectively invaded her space with your detritus. Clip in the bathroom. Clip in your car. Clip anywhere else where you can be alone with your grooming. Stop grossing people out immediately and be a better person, I implore you. Now I must go unswallow. With Warmest Affection, Minerva. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

“UNTITLED UNMASTERED,” KENDRICK LAMAR

“99 CENTS,” SANTIGOLD “DIG IN DEEP,” BONNIE RAITT “GOOD GRIEF,” LUCIUS “BLACKSTAR,” DAVID BOWIE

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

“EVERYBODY WANTS,” THE STRUTS

Do you think Idahoans should be able to carry concealed firearms without a permit within city limits?

“OUROBOROS,” RAY LAMONTAGNE

Yes: 85.32%

“INCARNATE,” KILLSWITCH ENGAGE

No: 14.10%

“3001: A LACED ODYSSEY,” FLATBUSH ZOMBIES

I don’t know: 0.57%

“LONELY IS A LIFETIME,” THE WILD FEATHERS

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to b e a s c i e n ti f i c s a mp l e o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r nati onal op i ni on.

5

400+

10

20+

6

$159

14,000

69%

The number of years of Treefort Music Fest; also the number of days of Treefort 2016.

The number of musicians and bands performing at Treefort 2016.

The number of “forts” at Treefort 2016 (outside of the bands and musicians).

The number of venues participating in Treefort 2016.

The number of months before Treefort 2016 that passes for the fest went on sale.

The cost of a five-day Treefort 2016 pass when passes went on sale in September 2015.

The estimated number of people who attended Treefort 2015.

The approximate percentage of Treefort 2015 attendees age 20-39.

30 | MARCH 23–29, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 40  

Tree fort Picks: A roundup of the acts Boise Weekly is most pumped to see at the 2016 Treefort Music Fest

Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 40  

Tree fort Picks: A roundup of the acts Boise Weekly is most pumped to see at the 2016 Treefort Music Fest