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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

M A RC H 9 – 1 5 , 2 0 1 6

“I was going to walk right in front of a car.”

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BFF’s

New ‘friends’ group aims to help protect the Boise Foothills

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Through Their Eyes

Boise’s homeless community turns the camera on itself for photo documentary project

VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 3 8

NEWS 6

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Erin go Bragh

The Young Dubliners hang onto their youth while serving as elder statesman of Celtic rock

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2 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Tara Morgan, Chris Parker Intern: Jonathan Reff Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART AUCTION 2015 GRANT RECIPIENTS Though we’ve talked about this many times before, it bears repeating… Each week, the cover of Boise Weekly is an original work by a local artist and once each year, the public has the opportunity to bid on those works at our our annual Boise Weekly Cover Art Auction. Artists receive 30 percent of the price their work garners and the remainder of the proceeds go into our Cover Auction Grant program and to support our investigative journalism mission. We’d like to thank everyone who applied for a grant and while we wish we could support them all, following are the recipients of our 2015 Cover Art Auction Grant: Organizations: Bob’s Art Farm, BOSCO, Hermit Music Festival, LED, Serenata Orchestra and World Village Festival. Individuals: Dave Eggar, Kirsten Furlong and Veiko Valencia. If you have questions or want more information on how to apply for our grant program, email Amy or Sally at boiseweekly. com. Winners, your checks are in the mail (seriously). In other news, this week’s edition of BW takes a few interesting angles of the issue of homelessness in Boise. On Page 6, staff writer Jessica Murri profiles the important—though underfunded—work done at the Allumbaugh House, which helps those struggling with mental health crises and drug and alcohol abuse get back on their feet. Getting sober, however, is only a piece of the puzzle. Staying that way and getting into a stable environment is every bit as important, which is the thrust behind the city of Boise’s new “housing first” strategy for dealing with homelessness. On Page 8, Murri takes another look at homelessness, but through the eyes of those affected by it. As part of her senior project, 17-year-old Sarah Ridgway gave cameras to seven people staying at Interfaith Sanctuary and asked them to document their lives. The results were as beautiful as they were impacting. —Amy Atkins and Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Tyrel and Heather Whitt TITLE: “Vintage Bubbles” MEDIUM: mosaic glass on reclaimed door ARTIST STATEMENT: Heather and Tyrel Whitt have been crafting glass  mosaics in Boise for more than 10 years. From Saturday Market to Idaho Made to commissions to the Ketchum Art Festival, creating and recreating beauty and whimsy through R.A.D. glass mosaics in antique frames. See image of the full door on Page 26.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM

OPINION

What you missed this week in the digital world.

LANE CHANGES THE ADA COUNT Y HIGHWAY DISTRICT IS AG AIN TA KING UP THE DISCUS SION OF DOWNTOWN BIKE L ANES, WITH AN OPEN H O U S E PL A N N E D FO R WE D N ES DAY, MARC H 16. THERE, AC HD OFFICIALS ARE E X PECTED TO ASK AT TENDEES WHE THER A L ANE OF TR AFFIC OR STREE T PARKING SHOULD BE REMOVED ON MAIN AND IDAHO STRE E TS TO MAKE WAY FOR MORE BIKE INFR ASTRUCTURE. GE T MORE AT NE WS/CIT YDESK.

CRUELTY FREE Lawmakers signed off on a bill March 8 to revise Idaho animal cruelty laws, strengthening some penalties for companion animals and pets. Get the details on News/ Unda’ the Rotunda.

SVFF 2016 The fifth annual Sun Valley Film Festival has wrapped but you can read Boise Weekly’s coverage, including a conversation with director Oliver Stone and recaps of Idahomade entries, at Screen/Film.

OPINION

4 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

FINICUM RALLY A demonstration was hosted March 5 at the Capitol, rallying against the death of Robert Finicum, shot by police Jan. 26 amid a militia takeover in Oregon. More on News/Unda’ the Rotunda.

SIEGE THE DAY

Time to breach these radicals’ barricades BILL COPE Here’s what should happen at the Capitol building. The one that belongs to every man, woman and child in America. The federal Capitol, which until relatively recently served as the national epicenter of citizen involvement in their own governance and that since 2010 has been commandeered by a lawless cabal determined to cut citizens out of the process of governance. Here’s what should happen if these renegades do what they are threatening to do if President Barack Obama nominates anyone to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court left by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia: 1) Gather enough FBI agents, DEA agents, ATF agents, SWAT teams, local law enforcement officers, military police and any other available crime-fighting units to surround the Capitol entirely and make sure the outlaws know they are ready to move in at a moment’s notice. In the first stages, the lawmen should maintain a low profile while the turncoats are allowed to conduct their press conferences and photo-ops, strutting out their anti-democratic, anti-government insurgency, and struggling to explain why they are justified in refusing to allow our duly-elected, twice-elected president to execute his constitutional mandate to keep the Supreme Court stocked with a full count of nine. At the same time, the honorable individuals within Congress, within the news media and the general public should continue to point out that there is no justification whatsoever—legal, historical or moral—to the criminals’ refusal to act. 2) At the first actual, concrete act of defiance, most likely to be a decision by the rebel leader Sen. Mitch McConnell to deny any hearings on a nominee, all access to and egress from the building should come to an end, except for Congress members willing to perform their constitutional obligation to give the president’s nomination a fair hearing. If the mutineer riffraff persist in their efforts to subvert this 228-year-old process, the decent and law-abiding senators should be evacuated from the building and installed into another venue where they might perform their jobs unimpeded by sabotage and obstructionism. To the unthinking, this will appear to be a partisan suppression of disloyal Republicans by Constitution-abiding Democrats. But Harry Reid, as leader of the responsible faction of the Senate, can assure any wavering insurrectionists, as well as the public, that every senator willing to do the job he is being paid to do, and who has the guts to reject the dictates of his party bosses, is welcome to join them. 3) Those treasonous vermin who prove themselves incapable of living by the laws of the land

should have their bank accounts and staff budgets frozen, and any further compensation—be it in the form of salary, health coverage or expense allowance—should come to an immediate halt. The Senate cafeteria should be closed and locked, and all utilities should be cut off. Undoubtedly, the seditious scofflaws will appeal for help from like-minded morons in terms of food, toiletries and sympathy. At this stage, the authorities should allow only packets of stale turkey jerky and six packs of Diet Mountain Dew to be delivered to the perfidious misfits holed up in our once-honored institution. No doubt, some of the traitors will encourage feeble-minded fringies to join some sort of revolution of the chronically disgruntled. One can almost picture Sen. Ted Cruz shrieking like the Wicked Witch of the West as he calls for an uprising against the tyranny of people who simply expect the United States government to function as though it was comprised of adults rather than drama queen idiots. A few ne’er-do-wells and borderline mental cases—i.e., the typical “patriot” bums who show up at any opportunity to show off their guns and deranged ranting—will actually make their way to Washington, thinking, “Hot damn! This is why I traded the RV for an AR!” But as this is not some phony confrontation staged by cretinous inbreds on an isolated Nevada ranch or Oregon nature reserve, we might expect those would-be Bundys will be surprised to find that they are no match for either the assemblage of law enforcement personnel or the crowds of protesters gathered on the Capitol Mall demanding the occupiers be taken into custody for neglect of duty, desecration of government property with their noxious presence, corruption of American values, heritage and jurisprudence, as well as any other appropriate charges. 4) We can anticipate the end of this siege will come quickly. Undoubtedly, many of the malcontents will find they weren’t as prepared as they thought they were to go more than a few days without cocktail hours, lobbyists to comp their dinners at expensive restaurants and regular interviews with Fox News quislings. However, there should be no negotiations with the turncoat scum that does not end in a televised hearing on whomever President Obama nominates for the Supreme Court. It’s unlikely the scheming snakes would approve any such nominee, and there is no legal way they can be forced to do so. But it will give the nation a valuable opportunity to understand—just in time for the general election—what puny, disgusting rats they are who would commandeer the entire nation if we let them. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 5


CITYDESK TRE ASURE VALLE Y L AND TRUST

NEWS FROM THE STREETS TO SOBRIETY AND BACK AGAIN

After detoxing in the Allumbaugh House, many people without a home have no choice but to go back to the same bad situation as before JESSICA MURRI

In the summer of 2015, volunteers built a new trail in Harrison Hollow.

When David Gordon took over as Ridge to Rivers program manager 12 years ago, the city of Boise had 95 miles of trails to manage. Now, those miles have doubled, with around 400,000 visitors per year. “We have four full-time positions and we pick up four more seasonal positions for trail crew,” Gordon said. “Since I’ve got here—up until this year—we’ve had the same size crew. We added one permanent position and two seasonal positions this year. The eight of us focus on the dirt.” The city has focused largely on acquiring foothills land through the 2001 foothills levy and now the new Clean Water and Open Space levy—both for $10 million. What that means for Gordon and his crew is 200 miles of trail that need infill, tread, established slopes, drain dip and erosion repairs, invasive weed mitigation and a “laundry list” of other trail maintenance. That’s just putting a Band-Aid on the problems,” Gordon said. “If we had additional funds, we could build cooler trails. We could turn old two-tracks into single track trail that would be much more fun. But that’s not a real high priority because we have all these other things to work on.” A handful of years ago, a solution to this funding problem was in the works when a small group of citizens came together and started talking about the creation of a friends group for the foothills. Friends groups are 501(c)3 nonprofits that become helpful tools to raise money for large projects, as well as broaden awareness and strengthen community assets. For example, the Friends of the Park helps raise millions of dollars for the Boise River Park, allowing the first phase to be constructed in 2012, as well as the next phases, which are slated for construction in 2017. While the city can’t ask for donations to fund such projects, a friends group can. Zoo Boise has its own Friends group, as well as the Boise Public Library. Gordon and other city employees longed to see a friends group of their own. However, the creation of a friends 7 group for the foothills quickly turned rocky. “It was so challenging even just to get 6 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Brian Finbraaten’s rock bottom happened under a carport off of Fairview Avenue and Milwaukee Street. His brother had just died in Rapid City, S.D.,and Finbraaten never got to say goodbye. His marriage fell apart after his wife was charged with domestic battery. He left his home in Coeur d’Alene in search of employment and another shot at staying sober. Instead, he ended up under the carport. In 2010, a few years before that night, Finbraaten took a bus to Boise with only a few bags in hand. He found his way to the Boise Rescue Mission, then bounced from shelter to shelter, from campsite to campsite. Nothing in his life stayed stable for more than a month or two. He struggled to find his way out of the bottle. He admitted to using his food stamp card to buy cooking sherry and V8 to get himself drunk. He failed again and again to maintain sobriety. That night under the carport, he’d had enough. “I just said, ‘That’s it. I’m done.’ I started walking out to the street. I was going to walk right in front of a car,” Finbraaten said. “That’s when some of my buddies tackled me to the ground and called 911. The hospital said my suicidal thoughts were alcohol-related. They said, ‘You’ve really got an alcohol problem, Brian.’” That wasn’t the first—nor the last—time Finbraaten checked himself into the Allumbaugh House, which is a facility that offers medically-managed detoxification and mental health crisis services to the Treasure Valley. It’s operated by Terry Reilly Health Services and receives funding from the cities of Boise and Meridian as well as Ada County, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center, St. Luke’s Health Systems and the United Way of Treasure Valley. Over the six years since Finbraaten moved to Boise, he admitted himself into the Allumbaugh House 18 times. “I was absolutely embarrassed to walk in again and again,” Finbraaten said. “But the people at Allumbaugh house are selfless and nonjudgmental. They even found me a few times on the street and they were like,

JES SICA MURRI

FRIENDS LIKE THESE

It took Brian Finbraaten 18 trips to the Allumbaugh House and about six years before he was able to maintain his sobriety. It’s been more than a year now, and he has his own apartment and hope for the future.

‘Brian, man, you know you can come back.’ I wouldn’t be here right now if it wasn’t for Allumbaugh. I would be on the street, or I would be dead.” When Finbraaten says “here,” he’s referring to a nice, new apartment building where he qualifies for Section 8 housing. Despite the warm spring air, the 53-year-old still wears several layers of clothing, including a blue hoodie that brings out the blue in his eyes. His thumb and index finger are stained with nicotine from years smoking cigarettes. He talks openly about his struggles with alcohol and proudly shows his one-year coin from Alcoholics Anonymous. He said he owes much of it to the Allumbaugh House. Finbraaten’s tenderness toward the Allumbaugh House is mirrored in Cindy Miller, when she speaks of the patients that have

come through the door. The Allumbaugh House was built in 2010 and Miller has managed it since then. “More than half of the employees that began with us are still here, which is rare in this kind of health care. It speaks to how important this is for all of us,” Miller said. “It’s because of the patients—their gratitude, their generosity, their kindness and appreciation— that makes this so meaningful.” Her demeanor is warm as she gives a tour of the facility. The common area has several couches and a flat screen TV, high ceilings and large windows, as well as vibrant paintings on the walls. Through the hall is the nurse’s station—manned 24/7—and the dormitories: eight beds for women and eight beds for men. There’s the “zen” patio, complete with a large, BOISE WEEKLY.COM


TRE ASURE VALLE Y L AND TRUST

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

NEWS

JES SICA MURRI

shady tree and a fountain. A pot of coffee brews in the kitchen and Life’s Kitchen delivers lunch and dinner daily. Despite a total of 24 beds, the Allumbaugh House can only take on 16 patients at a time with the funding it currently receives. It often has a sizable waitlist. “We do not bill for any services,” Miller said. “Our priority population is for the underserved.” More than half of Allumbaugh’s patients are without a home. Each patient voluntarily enters the program and is usually discharged within five to seven days, but they often don’t have anywhere to go except back to the street. That’s something Miller would like to see change. She said she reaches out to family members of the patients, as well as sober living homes and transitional housing, but there is a lack of bed capacity across the area. “Our highest concern is in the people who are returning to the streets,” she said. “Their risks of relapse are extremely high.” Finbraaten can attest to that. Many of his relapses happened because he had nowhere else to go after he sobered up at the Allumbaugh House. “[The homeless community] is really tight-knit if you’re in with them,” Finbraaten said. “You share everything—your beer, your smokes. You need a piece of clothing, you get it. But you have to break free from them to stay sober.” Even once Finbraaten moved into a sober living house, his old friends were in the park right across the street. “They were continuously saying, ‘Just come on and have a beer with us,’” he said. “I tried to isolate myself from the homeless community, but you know, people get lonely.” The city of Boise’s newly announced ‘Housing First’ plan won’t address the problem of having nowhere to go for at least a year, if not two. The plan calls for community developers to submit proposals for a 25-unit complex that would house chronically homeless. The city promises to contribute $1 million toward construction of such a project, and proposals are due in September. The city is also working with the Boise City/Ada County Housing Authority, CATCH, Inc. and Terry Reilly to identify 15 units scattered around the valley to provide permanent housing. “Our ‘Housing First’ cake is not fully baked,” said Mike Journee, spokesman for the city of Boise. “The goal is to get someone into a stable housing situation, then provide wraparound services.” Such services include mental health and substance abuse treatment as well as financial counseling. Journee said Point-in-Time counts in years

CITYDESK

The Boise Foothills Friends will create more opportunities to “get your hands dirty.”

an agreement hammered out,” Gordon said. “It baffles me why that was so challenging. You think it would be fairly easy, but it led to [the citizens involved] throwing their hands up and stepping away.” Three years ago, a friends group was created and called Boise Trail Works. “Which is kind of an odd name,” Gordon said. “Honestly, nothing has been done. So we’re still at ground zero on how to succeed. And it took two years just to get to that point.” That is, until Saturday, March 5. The Egyptian Theatre nearly sold out for the Land Trust of the Treasure Valley’s inaugural Les Bois Film Festival, which showcased 15 short nature films from all over the world and a few local gems. It was after one such film that Brooke Green, a board member of LTTV, took to the stage and made an important announcement. “We are launching an effort to continue trail maintenance projects starting tonight, called the Boise Foothills Friends,” she said. “Or, BFF. It’s a chance to donate time and money, and get your hands dirty. Become a BFF, and participate in the Boise Foothills Friends.” More information on the new foothills friends group is at lttv.org/friends-of-thefoothills. Tim Breuer, the executive director of LTTV, has had this in mind for a long time. He was the original Ridge to Rivers program manager, so he understands firsthand the challenges Gordon and his crew are facing. “Working with the Land Trust puts this idea 10 years ahead of the game, as opposed to creating a new nonprofit,” Breuer said. “It’s hard to start something new and sustain it.” He said the new sub-group of the Land Trust will work closely with the city’s Foothills and Open Space senior manager, Sara Arkle, as well as Gordon, and help Ridge to Rivers grow a support staff. “This is a model where you’re not just relying on tax dollars and the government to get stuff done, but instead incorporating a non-political. non-governmental organization,” Breuer said. “You can’t just keep buying trails. You have to take care of what you already have.” 6

The staff of the Allumbaugh House helps patients medically detox , then overcome substance abuse problems and find sober housing . While the house has 24 beds, it only has the funding to fill 16 of them.

past have revealed there are about 100 people without a home living in Boise. He said those 100 people cost the community up to $6 million per year between medical care, incarceration and service at the shelters. “If we could get all those 100 folks into housing, it would cost the community $1.6 million annually,” he said. But for now, it’s up to the community to come forward with proposals for the plan. Journee said he has no idea how many proposals will actually come in this September. “We’ll contribute money to the construction, but we expect the community to put together the programming and the ongoing funding for this so it’s a long-term, permanent resource,” Journee said. Until then, it’s a difficult cycle of addiction to break, according to Miller. “It’s been very hard for us to do real outcome measurement because this is a very transient population,” she said. “We take people back as many times as we need to and view it as another opportunity to help them. I don’t know if it’s going to be the fourth time here or the 10th time here that everything will come together.” Finbraaten said he doesn’t know what changed on his 18th and final visit to the facility. “They’ve given me their share of tough love,” he said. “They said, ‘OK Brian, what’s really going to be different this time?’ It was

after the 18th time that I came up with the answer. You know, I don’t honestly know. I just want to try to live. I just want to live.” Finbraaten left that facility for the last time on Feb. 18, 2015 and hopped from his counselor’s home to sober living to camping in isolated areas to staying in motels. He said things started turning around the longer he was sober. “The things that have happened—the only way to explain it would be divine,” he said. “As I stayed sober, doors opened. I was chosen on the lottery—one of the 1,200 chosen out of 12,000 people in the state of Idaho—for Section 8 housing. “There’s no way, if I had been drinking, that I would have gotten into this place,” Finbraaten added. “The legwork that had to be done, the doors that are slammed—you just have to persevere and continue on.” The first time Finbraaten stepped into his new apartment, he was overcome with emotion. “I was in shock,” he said. “I went in there and I just started screaming and dancing the jig.” Finbraaten said he’s starting to deal with some of the long-term effects of living in survival mode for so many years, but he’s looking for jobs in construction and plans to quit smoking on his 54th birthday, later this month. He even wants to start working out. “I made it,” he said. “It’s amazing that I got here.”

—Jessica Murri BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 7


DISPOSABLE CAMERAS; INDISPENSABLE PERSPECTIVE Seven occupants of the Interfaith Sanctuary capture their lives through photos JESSICA MURRI

S

arah Ridgway had no idea what she would find when she developed the film contained in seven disposable cameras she picked up at Interfaith Sanctuary. When the pictures were processed, she saw deep purple sunsets and geese flying overhead. There was a photo of the Boise Train Depot and another of the Boise River, taken from the middle of Friendship Bridge near Boise State University. At a glance, there was no way to tell who snapped the pictures—they could have been shot by a college student, a commuter, a person walking his or her dog. Or, a person without a home. The photo of the Boise River was taken by Troy. Troy has a weathered face and thick beard that has grown to reach his chest. He struggles to find work because of his posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis. He has a young boy living in Seattle. “I asked him during our interview, if he could be anywhere, where would he be, and he said wherever his son is,” Ridgway said. “He said [visiting his son] is ‘more important than going to Paris or London or Amsterdam or New York. That’s my goal in life. That’s my little boy.’” Ridgway, 17, met Troy in late 2015, when she began putting together her Idaho Virtual Academy senior project—“Through Our Eyes”—which included giving cameras to seven people staying at Interfaith and asking them to document their lives. The participants had a week with the cameras and, at the end, Ridgway interviewed each of them. “I told them to photograph things that resonated with them or moved them in some way, or made them feel inspired,” Ridgway said. “I didn’t know what to expect.” She edited the photos in Adobe Lightroom and compiled them in a glossy, hardcover book. Alongside the photos Ridgway incorporated a high-quality portrait of each participant against a black backdrop and wrote long passages taken from their interviews. That was the most challenging part of the entire project, Ridgway said. “I’ve always struggled with speaking with others,” she said. “I struggle with anxiety and stuff, but this helped me a lot. It was therapeutic. I reflected back after and I was like, ‘Wow, I talked to seven complete strangers for 20 minutes each and I got through it and I’m still alive and breathing.’ I was surprised how easy it was to chat with them.” Ridgway picked Interfaith Sanctuary in an attempt to “humanize” the homeless community. Her project came together

8 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

during the turbulence surrounding Cooper Court—a tent city that had popped up in an alley near Americana Boulevard that was broken up by Boise police in December after months of rising tension. “A lot of people essentially view them as flaws in the system,” Ridgway said. “I’ve heard people describe them as trash and that’s something that really hurts my heart. They’re working really hard. They’re not lazy. They’re not drug addicts. Troy was telling me that he’s never tried drugs or drank, but he still has trouble finding work because of the stigma tied to the homeless community.” Some of the photos captured the dismantling of Cooper Court. One photo, taken by 25-year-old Briana, showed a group of protesters standing on the corner of Americana Boulevard and River Street, holding umbrellas and picket signs over their heads. “Homelessness is Not a Crime,” read one sign. The picture is black-and-white, dark and gritty, but the words stand out as a strong focal point in the middle of the image. “Briana is a big advocate for human rights and the homeless community,” Ridgway said. “She’s very passionate about standing up for what she believes in. She was telling me how she was really moved by the protesters there, and happy that people were standing up for [the residents of Cooper Court].” In her book, Ridgway explains Briana was kicked out of the house over a turbulent relationship with her stepfather and didn’t have enough money to find her own housing. Now, she’s staying at Interfaith and expecting a baby in May. Other photos depicted the daily lives of the photographers. Sherry snapped a photo of one of her friends talking to a Boise police officer on a bike. The interaction looks friendly; both the woman in the picture and the officer are smiling as they talk. “She was trying to show in this picture that there can be a positive connection [between law enforcement and the homeless community],” Ridgway said. “It’s not always a battle.” Another common theme throughout the photos is nature. That was especially important for a woman in her early 20s named Freya. She took pictures of trees and ducks, the river bank and the spindly branches of a willow tree. “When I’m upset or something, I go walking around or sitting around nature,” Freya is quoted in Ridgway’s book. “I spent three hours one day walking around [Kathryn] Albertson Park because it just calms me down so much. … I love the sight of the sunset hitting the river at the end of the day.” Freya moved to Boise from Dallas a few years ago and was shocked by the cold. She wound up homeless after losing her

job and started hanging around people who used drugs. She told Ridgway she also began using but kicked the habit and now stays at Interfaith Sanctuary. “She wants to study culinary arts,” Ridgway said. “She loves cooking and the way food can become an art. Her dream is to go to Italy to study, then open her own restaurant and call it Denise’s, after her grandmother. I’m really hoping she’s able to do that someday.” One of Ridgway’s favorite photos shows a large jigsaw puzzle of an ancient art gallery, put together save for one missing piece. The photo was taken by a former police officer named Samira. According to Ridgway’s book, Samira speaks 17 languages and has lived in India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Israel, the West Bank and all over the United States. She worked for the federal government, then became a corrections officer and a warden. She especially liked working with troubled youth. She was eventually attacked and beaten with a wooden board, which caused severe damage to her body and landed her in a wheelchair. “When they went for my legs, they went for my career,” Samira told Ridgway. She lost her job due to budget cuts and ended up without a home. She said other people living on the street have not been accepting of her because of her past in law enforcement. Regardless, she strives to continue learning. She checks the stock market almost daily and spends her time at the Education Center in the Corpus Christi House. That’s where she took the picture of the puzzle. “She told me they’ve been looking for this one piece for five years and they haven’t been able to finish the puzzle,” Ridgway said. Once she finished compiling her project, Ridgway didn’t feel quite ready to let it go. She said she wants to create a larger book in the next year or so, with as many as 30 participants and a wider demographic—including those living at City Light Home for Women and the Boise Rescue Mission. Ridgway also plans to start volunteering at Interfaith Sanctuary once she turns 18 in April. She’ll attend Boise State University in the fall to double major in fine arts and photography. Her “ultimate dream” is to study abroad. Overall, she said her passion will always remain in photography. “Photography is such a simple art. Anyone can pick up a camera and just press a button to take a picture,” Ridgway said. “Yet it’s such an expressive form of art. It’s personal. I love seeing other people’s perspectives and how they approach their subjects.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BRIANA

PHOTO CREDIT: SAR AH RIDGWAY

Briana said she was appreciative of the people who came to protest the city of Boise’s dismanteling of Cooper Court. She was “happy that people were standing up for [us].”

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

FRE YA

PHOTO CREDIT: SAR AH RIDGWAY

“When I’m upset about something, I go walking around nature ... because it calms me down so much. I love the sight of the sunset hitting the river at the end of the day.”

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L ARRY

PHOTO CREDIT: SAR AH RIDGWAY

Larry snapped this picture of Cooper Court (left) eft) in the last few days before the camp was disbanded by the Boise Police Department.

Larry said he’s had a passion for photograph photography all his life. He said it was challenging to shoot with a disposable camera rather than tthe camera on his cellphone.

SAMIRA

PHOTO CREDIT: SAR AH RIDGWAY

“I can say the Hail Mary in English, then run over to the Synagogue and read the Torah in Hebrew, then go to the Mosque and say the Koran in Arabic,” Samira said when talking about her diverse upbringing. She traveled the world, working for the U.S. government.

10 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Samira used to have a career in law enforcement, but was attacked and beaten with a wooden board. She lost her job and eventually ended up living at Interfaith Sanctuary.

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SHERRY

TROY

PHOTO CREDIT: SAR AH RIDGWAY

With her disposable camera, Sherry (who didn’t want her photo taken) captured the daily lives of her and her friends.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

The photo Troy took of the Boise River from Friendship Bridge is a photo that’s been taken by Boise residents thousands of times.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 11


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY MARCH 9 Festivals & Events LETTER-WRITING PARTY—Have you been wanting to write a letter to the editor, to a senator or representative, to let them know what you do or don’t want? Check out this Letter-Writing Party to get it done in a fun, supportive atmosphere with friends, food and beverages. 6-8 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-3342225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: WILLOW—When George Lucas and Ron Howard get together to make a fantasy flick, you get the strangely underrated Willow, with Val Kilmer, some brownies and lots of magic. 7 p.m. $9 adv., $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-387-1273. boiseclassicmovies.com/deals/ willow.

I NEED TO TELL YOU SOMETHING: THE LOST ART OF LETTER WRITING—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Workshops & Classes TREE PRUNING—Join arborist Dennis Matlock to learn the correct way to make a pruning cut, To register, visit bprwebtrac.cityofboise. org or call 208-608-7680. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-608-7680, boisepubliclibrary.org.

KARL LECLAIR: PHENOMENA— Through April 15. 7 p.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242. finearts. boisestate.edu. KRISTIAN HARGIS MFA THESIS EXHIBITION: A SHARED CONNECTION—10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/ visualartscenter.

Art ADONNA KHARE: THE KINGDOM—Through May 29. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. BOISE STATE ART METALS ANNUAL SILENT AUCTION—Through March 31. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. FREE. R. Grey Gallery Jewelry and Art Glass, 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com.

TVAA 6 BY SIX SHOW—Through March. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

FOLK ART: THE DREW AND KATIE GIBSON COLLECTION— Through July 24. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330. boiseartmuseum.org/exhibition/folk-art-gibson-collection.

Literature

SPRING AUTHOR SERIES—Book lovers meet local authors on Wednesdays in March during The Library at Cole and Ustick’s annual Spring Author Series. Guest authors will share information about their books and their writing process. March 9: Heather Woodhaven, author of romantic suspense and humorous women’s fiction, who released The Secret Life of Book Club last year. Noon FREE. Boise Public Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-972-8300, boisepubliclibrary.org.

THURSDAY MARCH 10 Festivals & Events CWI FREE FINANCIAL AID COMPLETION NIGHT—Get help understanding your financial aid options and completing your financial aid application. 5-7 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho Micron Center for Professional Technical Education, 5725 E. Franklin Road, Nampa, 208-562-3000. collegeofu.com/ FAnight. RUMI NIGHT—Celebrate the life and work of the 13th century Persian poet and mystic philosopher with poetry, conversation, Persian desserts and tea. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200.

Food

READ ME TV: AN EVENING WITH CHRISTINA BAKER KLINE—7 p.m. FREE. Centennial High School, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-939-1404, readmetv.com.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MARCH 11-12

READ ME TV AUTHOR RECEPTION: CHRISTINA BAKER KLINE—Join fellow book lovers to welcome Read Me Treasure Valley featured author Christina Baker Kline to Boise. See the website for a complete schedule of events. 4:30-5:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, readmetv.com.

2016 GIRL SCOUT COOKIE SEASON—Pick up a box of your favorite Girl Scout Cookies through March 13. Girl Scouts of Silver Sage Council, 1410 Etheridge Lane, Boise, 208-377-2011, girlscouts-ssc.org/ cookie-locator.

SATURDAY, MARCH 12

THE CENTER FILM SCREENING: MEET THE PATELS—This laugh-outloud, real-life romantic comedy follows Ravi Patel, the Indian-American TV and film actor (Master of None with Aziz Ansari, Scrubs, Transformers) as he and his family search for a mate. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Magic Lantern Cinemas, 100 E. 2nd St., Ketchum, 208-726-3308. meetthepatelsfilm.com. COMEDIAN ANDY KINDLER—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: SNOOPY! THE MUSICAL—7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208498-0571, spotlight-theatre.com. STAGE COACH THEATRE: THE CEMETERY CLUB—7:30 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

On Stage

Literature

BLT: CALENDAR GIRLS—7:30 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

HEMINGWAY LITERARY CENTER AND MFA READING SERIES: SHAHRNUSH PARSIPUR—7 p.m. FREE.

SATURDAY, MARCH 12

ELLEN DE ANGELIS

Confutatis maledictis, flammis acribus addictis, voca me cum benedictus.

“They simply landed on the wire, and they watched him.”—Neil Gaiman

Jet black.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC: MOZART REQUIEM

THE 22

LEWIS BLACK

Commissioned by a nobleman who intended to claim it as his own and finished by one of Mozart’s students after the master’s death, the Requiem in D Minor is simultaneously one of the greatest pieces of music and (in a sense) one of the most magnificent pieces of plagiarism ever scored. Experience it with the Boise Phil and Master Chorale on Friday, March 11 at the Northwest Nazarene University Brandt Center. The Requiem will be reprised Saturday, March 12 at the Morrison Center, along with performances of the overture to Don Giovanni and Tchaikovsky’s homage to Amadeus, Suite No. 4, Mozartania. Friday, March 11, 8 p.m. $22-$43.50. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8790. Saturday, March 12, 8 p.m. $23.75-$71.50. Morrison Center; 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane; 208426-1110; boisephil.org.

Regardless of how important birds are to us, we humans have sadly been the cause of some birds’ demise (bye bye, dodo). In some cases, though, we have remembered our responsibility, like with the California condor when the population dropped to 22. The Gymnogyps californianus has since been reintroduced to a few Western states and Mexico, but conservation efforts are still an integral part of its survival. As part of that effort, local artist and Boise Weekly staffer Ellen DeAngelis and the Peregrine Fund World Center for Birds of Prey will unveil a massive installation: 22 life-size California condor silhouettes perched atop the Record Exchange. The 22, which runs through April, will help “bring awareness to Boise’s continued conservation efforts.” 1 p.m., FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., 208344-8010, therecordexchange.com.

Lewis Black is famously angry. In the throes of his standup acts and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart monologues, his jowells shudder and his outstretched index finger wags in hypertensive aprobrium at the excesses of capitalism, attempts to curtail people’s voting rights—since 2013 he has been an “ambassador for voting rights” for the ACLU—and immigration. His rants are so impassioned words have trouble escaping his mouth; on stage his movements straddle the line between gesture and spasm with the elan of someone sticking a penny in a light socket. He is an uncorked bottle of apoplectic rage. Catch the man live Saturday, March 12, at the Egyptian Theatre as part of his The Emperor’s New Clothes: The Naked Truth Tour. Tickets are $43. 8 p.m. $43. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, egyptiantheatre.net.

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CALENDAR Boise State Hemingway Center, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208426-3023, english.boisestate.edu/ mfa/visiting-writers.

FRIDAY MARCH 11 Festivals & Events 44TH ANNUAL BOISE ROADSTER SHOW—Noon-10 p.m. FREE-$10. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, facebook.com/boiseroadstershow.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC AND MASTER CHORALE: MOZART REQUIEM—8 p.m. $22-$44. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8790, boisephil.org. COMEDIAN ANDY KINDLER—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. DAISY’S MADHOUSE: WOMEN— Enjoy this hilarious parody of the beloved classic, Little Women. 8 p.m. $13 adv. $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise. 208-918-1351, daisysmadhouse.org.

CONCORDIA SCHOOL OF LAW LEADERS IN ACTION AWARDS— Join Concordia University School of Law to honor two significant leaders in Idaho: Ted Epperly, M.D., and the Hon. Edward Lodge. 6 p.m. FREE. Concordia University School of Law, 501 W. Front St., Boise. 208-9555402, law.cu-portland.edu/getinvolved/leaders-action-awards.

DAVID ARCHULETA IN CONCERT—When he was 16 years old, David Archuleta came in second during the seventh season of American Idol in 2008. Eight years and six albums later, here’s your chance to catch up with the ex-teen heartthrob. 8 p.m. $35-$70. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

On Stage

EL KORAH SHRINE 2016 MELODRAMA: THE BOARDING HOUSE BLUE’S—8 p.m. $13, $90 table for 8, $15 dinner. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571, elkorah.org.

BALLET IDAHO: NEW DANCE, UP CLOSE—This edgy studio event allows Ballet Idaho dancers and other local choreographers to push ballet into new territories. 8 p.m. $20$25. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116, balletidaho. org. BLT: CALENDAR GIRLS—8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: SNOOPY! THE MUSICAL—7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208498-0571, spotlight-theatre.com. STAGE COACH THEATRE: THE CEMETERY CLUB—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Sports & Fitness IDAHO ENDURO SERIES MOVIE PARTY—Enjoy a great MTB film, the best beer in Boise and friends you haven’t seen all winter. The Idaho Enduro Series will be unveiling the 2016 race season. 6 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. The Pursuit Bogus Basin, 2590 Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-859-9114, facebook. com/idahoenduroseries.

SATURDAY MARCH 12 Festivals & Events 44TH ANNUAL BOISE ROADSTER SHOW—10 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE-$10. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650. facebook.com/boiseroadstershow. IDAHO MARCH FOR BERNIE—The march will start at the Capitol and finish at Ann Morrison Park, where there’ll be food trucks, a bounce house, face-painting and entertainment. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705. INAUGURAL RIDE FOR JOY THERAPEUTIC RIDING PROGRAM GALA—Dress to impress for this Vintage Western Gala to provide support and celebration for the children with disabilities and veterans who benefit from the Ride for Joy Equine Riding Program. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $75, $125 couples, $450 table for eight. Honalee Farm Event Center, 7010 Moon Valley Road, Eagle, 208-286-0533, rideforjoy.afrogs.org/#/index. VOLGA GERMAN HERITAGE CONFERENCE—To celebrate the 250th anniversary of the establishment of the Volga German colonies in Russia, the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University is hosting an all-day seminar series. 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $40-$50. Concordia University School of Law, 501 W. Front St., Boise. 503493-6369, cvgs.cu-portland.edu/ events/2016Mar12.cfm.

On Stage BALLET IDAHO: NEW DANCE, UP CLOSE—8 p.m. $20-$25. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3459116, balletidaho.org. BLT: CALENDAR GIRLS—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. BOISE PHILHARMONIC AND MASTER CHORALE: MOZART REQUIEM—This concert is all about Mozart, featuring the iconic Requiem, with the Boise Philharmonic Master Chorale. 8 p.m. $24-$72. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110. boisephil.org. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

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CALENDAR COMEDIAN ANDY KINDLER—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. COMEDIAN LEWIS BLACK: THE NAKED TRUTH TOUR—The pissedoff optimist is the rare comic who can cause an audience to laugh themselves into incontinence while providing a cathartic release of anger and disillusionment. 8 p.m. $43. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-3871273, egyptiantheatre.net. DAISY’S MADHOUSE: WOMEN—8 p.m. $13 adv. $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise. 208-918-1351, daisysmadhouse.org. EL KORAH SHRINE 2016 MELODRAMA: THE BOARDING HOUSE BLUES—8 p.m. $13, $90 table for 8, $15 dinner. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571, elkorah.org. SPOTLIGHT THEATRE: SNOOPY! THE MUSICAL—7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208498-0571, spotlight-theatre.com/ current-production.html. STAGE COACH THEATRE: THE CEMETERY CLUB—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Sports & Fitness YMCA ST. PATRICK’S DAY FUN RUN—Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day the healthy way, with a 1-mile, 5K or 5-mile fun runs. 9:30 a.m. $20$28. Gene Harris Band Shell, Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, ymcatvidaho.org/runs/stpatricks-day-fun-run.

Odds & Ends CASINO RUEDA SALSA DANCING—Dance to the best Salsa, Timba, Bachata and Reggaeton tunes. 9 p.m. $5. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com.

Food FOOD TRUCK RALLY GOES TO THE DOGS—Take your family and your dogs to join the leprechauns and celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with good food, live music and green beer available for purchase. All proceeds support the continued development of the Nampa Dog Park. 2-6 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square, Intersection of 14th and Front streets, Nampa. 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

SUNDAY MARCH 13 Festivals & Events 44TH ANNUAL BOISE ROADSTER SHOW—10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$10. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650. facebook.com/boiseroadstershow.

On Stage COMEDIAN ANDY KINDLER—8 p.m. $10-$12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

SOLAS 20TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR—Help the quintessential IrishAmerican band celebrate 20 years of making music. Also on Monday, March 14. 7 p.m. $25-$35. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208343-1871, sapphireboise.com. STAGE COACH THEATRE: THE CEMETERY CLUB—2 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Art THE 22 ART INSTALLATION—Join local artist Ellen DeAngelis and the Peregrine Fund World Center for Birds of Prey for the unveiling of 22 life-size California condor silhouettes perched atop the Hitchcock Building, home of The Record Exchange. 1-4 p.m. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, peregrinefund.org.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

Calls to Artists STAGE COACH THEATRE AUDITIONS—Director Kelliey Black Chavez is looking for five female and two male actors for Stage Coach’s May 27-June 11 production of David Nehls’ The Great American Trailer Park Musical. For audition questions, contact Chavez at Kelliey@Bluerealm.net. 10 a.m. FREE. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Literature BEYOND THE BOOK DISCUSSION—Join a lively discussion of Christina Baker Kline’s novel, Orphan Train, as part of the Read Me Treasure Valley communitywide reading project. For ages 18 and older. 10 a.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Star Branch, 10706 W. State St., Star, 208-286-9755, adalib.org.

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CALENDAR Literature AUTHOR BONNIE OLIN: THE OWYHEE RIVER JOURNALS—Join author Bonnie Olin for a richly illustrated journey into the Owyhee Canyonlands. 3-4:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-8884451, mld.org.

Kids & Teens

and their beloved canines. No pets allowed; service animals only. 7:30 p.m. $35-$90. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, box office: 208-426-1110, cesarsway.com.

tors and directors. 7 p.m. $8-$12. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

MONDAY MARCH 14

BONNIE OLIN: THE OWYHEE RIVER JOURNALS PRESENTATION— Author Bonnie Olin presents photos and video of her and photographer Mike Quigley’s 2006 inflatable kayak trip on Deep Creek and the East Fork Owyhee River. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise, idahooutdoorassn.org.

Festivals & Events

COURAGEOUS KIDS CLIMBING—Kids with special needs enjoy a fun and challenging time climbing a cargo net, rope ladder and recycled tires from small vehicles. To reserve a spot, contact organizer Jeff Riechmann at jeffriechmann@ cs.com or via the Courageous Kids Climbing Facebook page. 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, facebook.com/ CourageousKidsClimbing.

ETHICS, HELLS CANYON DAM AND COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY CONFERENCE—Join the Center for Environmental Law and Policy for this conference on ethics and the future of the Columbia River and its major tributary, the Snake River. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Hatch Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-1677, celp.org/ethics-boise.

On Stage

Animals & Pets CESAR MILLAN LIVE— The star of the hit Dog Whisperer series reveals the secrets of happier, healthier relationships between humans

BCT 5X5 READING SERIES: THE OPEN HOUSE—Catch Will Eno’s new play in the raw, then stick around for a discussion with the ac-

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Talks & Lectures

WHAT STUDENTS REALLY THINK ABOUT HOOKING UP—Learn about the history of hookup culture in the U.S. and what college students really think about it. 3-4:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, genderstudies.boisestate.edu.

TUESDAY MARCH 15 On Stage COMIC CINEMA REMIX: THE LOST BOYS—Join Brett Badostain, Chad Heft, Dylan Haas and Alisha Donahue as they lovingly eviscerate the original movie exploiting teenage vampire angst. 8 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297. facebook.com. GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA—Don’t miss your chance to experience one of the greatest big bands of all time. 7 p.m. $15-$30. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, mc.boisestate.edu.

Literature AUTHOR KATHY DEINHARDT HILL—Meet Deinhardt Hill, author of Spirits of the Salmon River and Hanged: A History of Idaho’s Executions. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229.

Talks & Lectures

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

16 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

HONG KONG: WHERE CHINA AND GLOBAL ADVANTAGES CONVERGE— Join Clement C. M. Leung, Hong Kong commissioner for Economic and Trade Affairs, USA, for a discussion of how Hong Kong will use its unique advantages to continue to grow from the regional center of finance, trade and logistics to being a truly global center. 3:15 p.m. FREE. Boise State Micron Business and Economics Building, 2360 University Drive, Boise, 208426-1125, cobe.boisestate.edu/ hongkong.

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MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY MARCH 9 AUSTIN MARTIN—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers EMILY STANTON BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing GRANT GREEN AND MICHAELA FRENCH—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato HEY MARSEILLES—With Hibou. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux JAZ FAGAN—5 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KARAOKE—8 p.m. FREE. High Note LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid NONPOINT—With Midline, and Breakdown Boulevard. 8 p.m. $15$35. Revolution OPHELIA—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

HOKUM HI-FLYERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THIS END UP!—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

VOICE OF REASON—10 p.m. $5. Reef

KOTTONMOUTH KINGS 20TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR—With Marlon Asher, Whitey Peyton, Chucky Chuck, Olyghost and Bryan Torch. 8 p.m. $18.50-$40. Knitting Factory

SATURDAY MARCH 12

LOYD AND BECKY BLAKE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

ANDY CORTENS DUO—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

NAOMI PSALM—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

BILLY BRAUN—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

PALE DIAN—With Cloudmover and Ryan Hondo. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

BOISE PHILHARMONIC AND MASTER CHORALE: MOZART REQUIEM—8 p.m. $23.75$71.50. Morrison Center

SPENCER BATT—8 p.m. FREE. Piper SUPER DIAMOND: THE NEIL DIAMOND TRIBUTE—8 p.m. $5-$25. Revolution

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TYLOR BUSHMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

THURSDAY MARCH 10 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s POLYRHYTHMICS—With Lounge On Fire. 9:30 p.m. $8 adv., $12 door. Reef

KOTTONMOUTH KINGS, MARCH 11, KNITTING FACTORY

RAWLEY FRYE—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub

With marijuana legal in some form or another in more than 20 states, one might think the stoner mystique would be lessened. Apparently not, according to Placentia, Calif.-based Kottonmouth Kings. Founded in 1994, the Kings are chronic chron rockers with a pedigree that goes back clear to Doggy Style, which was formed by frontman Brad “Daddy X” Xavier in 1983. For the record, that means some of the Kings have been ripped and rapping since Snoop Dogg was in middle school—and long before he laid claim to both canines and cheeba. Through all those years—and more than a dozen studio albums— the Kottonmouth Kings have stayed true to their genre, combining punk intensity with psychedelic hip hop and a sense of goofball humor (don’t believe me? Watch the video for “Kronitron”). As members of the pothead pantheon, the Kottonmouth Kings deserve their royal reputation. Now they’re bringing their “high standards” to Boise as part of an anniversary tour.

RYAN WISSINGER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

FRIDAY MARCH 11 BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill BOISE PHILHARMONIC AND MASTER CHORALE: MOZART REQUIEM—8 p.m. $22-$43.50. NNU Brandt Center BREAD AND CIRCUS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole DAN COSTELLO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 DAVID ARCHULETA—8 p.m. $35$70. Morrison Center DJ MALLWALKER—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

—Zach Hagadone With Marlon Asher, Whitey Peyton, Chucky Chuck, Olyghost and Bryan Torch. 8 p.m., $18.50-$40. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com. BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 17


MUSIC GUIDE CITY FOLK—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

NNU JAZZ REVIVAL—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue

DALE CAVANAUGH—7 p.m. FREE. Crescent Brewery, Nampa

OLD DOGS NEW TRICKS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ROBOTIC STIMULUS TOUR 2016—With Coloring Electric Like and Cannabidroids. 8 p.m. $5$10. The Shredder

GHOST REVOLVER—7 p.m. FREE. High Note HANS CHEW—10 p.m. $5. Reef

RYAN WISSINGER—8 p.m. FREE. Piper

JACK HALE—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten

SHON SANDERS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JR. JAMMERS GREATEST HITS—2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $7$10. Nampa Civic Center

SIDECAR TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Boise Brewing

LINDSEY AUTUMN, SEQUOIA AND JAYDEN BOYER—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District

YOUNG DUBLINERS—With Chad and Vashti Summervill, and Maw Band. 8:30 p.m. $14-$30. Knitting Factory

SUNDAY MARCH 13

MONDAY MARCH 14

TUESDAY MARCH 15

DIRTY REVIVAL—7 p.m. $7 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

LIL DURK—With Bonaphied, Lee Haze, Mill Bill, and Zero. 7:30 p.m. $25-$75. Knitting Factory

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BILLIONAIRE BUCK: THE BLACK JEW TOUR—With Mr. Capone E and Young Drummer. 9 p.m. $25$35. Reef

NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJ’S—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid

OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

SCOTT KNICKERBOCKER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY— 6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SOLAS 20TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR—7:30 p.m. $25-$35. Sapphire

SOLAS 20TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR—7 p.m. $25-$35. Sapphire

WILSON ROBERTS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JOHNNY SHOES—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s MAKING FUCK—With My Sexy Assassin, Piss Angel, and Batholith. 8 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: THE WEARY TIMES—7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

CLAY MOORE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

UI VANDALEERS ALUMNI CONCERT—For UI alumni only. 6 p.m. FREE. Beside Bardenay

GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA—7 p.m. $15-$30. Morrison Center JACOB CUMMINGS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

THE WONDER YEARS—With Letlive, Tiny Moving Parts, and Microwave. 7 p.m. $18-$35. Knitting Factory

DAVID SAFIAN

NOISE

“We’re trying to chat up the young chicks. There is no advantage to you telling me your dad used to listen to us.”

FOREVER YOUNG

Young Dubliners are masters of their craft—and that has taken time CHRIS PARKER :DWHUÀQGVLWVRZQOHYHORUNHHSVMRVWOLQJDERXW XQWLOLWGRHV7KUDVKLQJDERXWWRRN'XEOLQQDWLYH .HLWK5REHUWVIURPRQHVLGHRI /RV$QJHOHVWR WKHRWKHUXQWLOKHZRXQGXSLQWKHEDUWKDWKHOSHG ELUWKQRWMXVWWKH<RXQJ'XEOLQHUVEXW&HOWLFURFN EURWKHUVLQDUPV)ORJJLQJ0ROO\ 0RUHWKDQ\HDUVODWHUWKH'XEOLQHUVDUH IRUHIDWKHUVRI WKHVW\OHZKLFKFRPELQHVWKH UROOLFNLQJÀGGOHGULYHQMLJRI ,ULVKPXVLFZLWKIXOO WKURWWOHURFNZKLFKLVDJDLQRQGLVSOD\ZLWKWKHLU FURZGIXQGHGDOEXPNine ´%HLQJDEOHWREUDQFKRXWDOLWWOHQRZKDVFUH DWHGDORWRI WKHIXQEXWWKH¶HOGHUVWDWHVPHQ·WKLQJ LVELWWHUVZHHW3HRSOHZLOOFRPHXSWRXV¶2KPDQ ,JUHZXSZLWK\RXJX\V·*RDZD\:H·UHWU\LQJWR FKDWXSWKH\RXQJFKLFNV7KHUHLVQRDGYDQWDJHWR \RXWHOOLQJPH\RXUGDGXVHGWROLVWHQWRXVµVDLG 18 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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TRIGON-FILM

SCREEN

Two Oscar nominees, two amazing journeys: Embrace of the Serpent (left) and Theeb (right) are both playing at The Flicks in Boise.

UNCHARTED PASSAGES

The unforgettable journeys of Theeb and Embrace of the Serpent GEORGE PRENTICE Yet another compelling journey comes in remote mountaintop. The journey across the Embrace of the Serpent—imbued with mindTheeb, a beautiful but violent story about a prebending shades of Werner Herzog’s Aguirre, the aquatic serpent that is the Amazon River will pubescent boy living in the early 20th century be perilous for Karamatakate and Koch-GrunWrath of God and hints of Francis Coppola’s during the time known as the “Arab Revolt,” berg, but the greatest dangers lie on the river’s Apocalypse Now—treks deep into the Amazon when Arab nationalists fought for survival shores, where Roman Catholic missionaries River and even deeper into our imagination. against the Ottoman Empire. have enslaved hundreds of tribal children to Filmed in spellbinding black and white, the In this Oscar-nominated feature film debut do the missionaries’ gruesome Columbian film made it onto bidding. Dressed in white robes from writer/director Naji Abu Nowar, Theeb the Oscar shortlist as one of pays homage to master director David Lean’s and singing “Oh, Come All Ye 2015’s five best foreign films EMBRACE OF THE SERPENT (NR) Lawrence of Arabia but from a non-WesternFaithful” in Latin, the children and boasts an impressive Starring Nilbio Torres, Antonio oriented viewpoint. In Nowar’s film, a blond are forbidden to speak in their 98 percent critic rating on Bolivar, Jan Bijvoet and Brionne British Army officer arrives in a small desert native language and repeatedly Rotten Tomatoes (rottentoDavis village where orphans Theeb (Jacir Eid Alwhipped. matoes.com). Opens Friday, March 11 at The Hwietat) and his two older brothers live. When Embrace of the Serpent is a “The jungle is fragile,” Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., 208the Englishman lures one of Theeb’s brothers film of two parallel journeys, says Karamakate—the sole 342-4288, theflicksboise.com. into escorting him across the decades survivor of an Amazonian desert in search of gold, Theeb apart: First, tribe—in the opening moTHEEB disobeys his brother’s orders and Koch-Grunberg’s in 1909, ments of Embrace of the Serpent. “If you attack (NR) follows the men into the desert. with young Karamatakate her, it strikes back.” Directed by Naji Abu Nowar The 14-year-old Al-Hwietat is a as his guide and then, years It’s all the more reason why Karamakate (a Starring Jacir Eid Al-Hwietat, star-in-the-making and a revelaphenomenal performance from amateur Nilbio later, when a much older Hassan Mutlag Al-Maraiyeh and tion in this epic story of ill-fated Torres) has more in common with the Amazon Karamakate (portrayed by Hussein Salameh Al-Sweilhiyeen colonial ambitions. Antonio Bolivar) leads an River and its surrounding jungle than with Now playing at The Flicks “If the wolves offer friendAmerican biologist (Brionne humankind. ship, do not count on success,” Davis) hoping to retrace the Karamatakate serves as an unwilling guide says a narrator. Unfortunately, 1909 expedition. Ultimately, to disease-stricken German explorer Theodor determining who the real wolves is not an easy the two tales of Embrace of the Serpent weave Koch-Grunberg (Jan Bijvoet), who is searchtask. into a singular narrative about a search for ing for something called yakruna, a sacred Both of these films are extremely violent. higher ground and a meditation on cultures plant with miraculous healing powers, which Viewer discretion is advised. forever lost. can only be found deep in the Amazon on a BOISE WEEKLY.COM

The Sheepskin Specialist

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 19


WINESIPPER SAUVINGON BLANC

2013 BENZIGER SAUVIGNON BLANC, $14 The aromas on this California North Coast entry can best be described as elegant, with soft lime, green apple and blood orange. The flavors are round and ripe, marked by sweet lime playing against racy grapefruit. Beautifully balanced, the supple, almost creamy finish has hints of lime zest and mineral. 2014 MARISCO VINEYARD, THE NED SAUVIGNON BLANC, $13 It’s unmistakably New Zealand, but The Ned is more subtle than you might expect from that region. The nose offers ripe lime aromas, floral lilac and lavender, with a touch of lemongrass. The palate is loaded with ripe tropical fruit including key lime, pineapple, kiwi and grapefruit. The finish is crisp, clean and lingers nicely. 2014 MARKHAM SAUVIGNON BLANC, $14 Incredibly rich aromas race from the glass, filled with floral honeysuckle, ripe melon and citrus zest. There’s a core of sweet citrus on the palate, surrounded by pineapple, kiwi and grapefruit flavors. A hint of flint comes through on the finish, while the addition of 13 percent Semillon adds melon flavors to this delicious Napa Valley blend. —David Kirkpatrick 20 | MARCH 9–15, 2015 | BOISEweekly

FOOD NEWS

KE L S E Y HAWES

As spring approaches, I’m ready to take a break from winter reds. I like to do a complete 180 and embrace the oh-so-crisp and refreshing charms of Sauvignon Blanc. That it’s been unseasonably warm the past few weeks makes that transition even more desirable. The wine panel tried Sauvignon Blancs from around the world and, not surprisingly, New Zealand made the cut. What was a little surprising is that two from California beat out wines from Chile, France and Washington state. Here are the top Sauvignon Blanc picks:

FROM CANAPES TO COCKTAILS

New restaurants Oak Barrel of Eagle and Richard’s offer fresh cuisine, while Lost Grove Brewing opens near Boise State TARA MORGAN Catering company Boise Oak Barrel is transitioning from canapes to cocktails at its new restaurant and lounge, Oak Barrel of Eagle, located at 1065 E. Winding Creek Drive. Husband and wife team Mark and Kristina Anderson officially opened the restaurant March 4. “We believe that food in its most natural form is better for you and tastes better,” said Kristina. “So we’re bringing a very fresh cuisine concept to Eagle and the surrounding communities.” Though Kristina ran the kitchen at her catering company, she hired Executive Chef Mike Gradian to take the reins at Oak Barrel of Eagle. The menu includes American standards like salads, burgers and grilled salmon, along with more unusual offerings like Basque-marinated flat iron topped with chimichurri and the Plato de Tapas, a starter with manchego, roasted asparagus wrapped in serrano ham, tortilla de patata and dried chorizo. Oak Barrel of Eagle is currently serving lunch and dinner seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. The spot also boasts a cocktail lounge, open every day from 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m., with live music on Friday and Saturday nights. “I’m really excited about some of my signature drinks that we’ve come up with,” said Kristina. “We’re calling it the New School of Classics.” Cocktails options include the Silver Fizz Disaronno Sour, the Coco-Chata Fire Martini and the Blood Orange Old Fashioned. In addition to the restaurant and lounge, Oak Barrel will also continue to offer catering. “We’ve been catering for about four years now, so we’re opening up our dream,” said Kristina. In brews news, a new 10-barrel, 5,000-squarefoot brewery is planning to open in the Lusk District at 1026 S. La Pointe St. Owned by Jake Black, who previously worked in sales and distribution for Payette Brewing, Lost Grove Brewing will focus on IPAs and kettle sours. Though Black isn’t ready to announce his head brewer, he confirmed that it’s someone who has been “brewing

Oak Barrel of Eagle owners Kristina and Mark Anderson are looking forward to a cocktail program they’re calling “the New School of Classics.”

in the industry for the last five years.” “It’s our goal to create well-crafted beers,” said Black. “I think the brewing community here in Boise has been growing like crazy and I think there’s a lot of really good breweries popping up and I think there’s some that could utilize a little bit of work on their beer. I think the one thing that we’re bringing that’s a little bit different … is that we’ve had brewing experience and have been in the industry.” Lost Grove will boast a 90-100 person tasting room, a dog-friendly front patio and “significant” bike parking. Black plans to self-distribute around Boise to start and will launch with three flagship brews. “We actually just want to make sure that once we start producing a certain product that any of the bars or restaurants that are carrying our products can maintain that beer, if they so choose to,” said Black. Black says the brewery will to give back to community nonprofits through a program called Powerful Pint, similar to Payette’s Kegs4Kause. Black plans to open Lost Grove by the fall of 2016. As for the name, he says it’s a nostalgic nod to childhood. “When I was a kid, one of my good friends and I would go to this field where we would always be running around and playing … It was a place where you could escape from reality and leave things behind,” said Black. “I guess that’s the meaning of Lost Grove, it’s just a space where you can go and relax and be with friends and enjoy yourself.” In other soon-to-open news, Chef Richard Langston, of North End staple Richard’s Café Vicino, is relocating his popular Italian restaurant to the Inn at 500 Capitol. The six-story, 112-room boutique hotel is currently under construction at Capitol Boulevard

and Myrtle Street, in the parking lot adjacent to The Flicks. Obie Development Partners LLC, which owns a similar hotel in Eugene, Ore., broke ground on the property last October. “They came to me several months ago and asked me if I’d be interested in doing it,” said Langston. “So we spent a lot of time and did a lot of research. It’s going to be a beautiful hotel.” Langston said the new space will boast a 70-seat dining room divided into three “vignettes of seating” to maintain the intimate atmosphere Richard’s Café Vicino is known for. There will also be a 28-seat, full-service bar and a 12-seat private dining room on the ground floor, along with a 100-seat banquet room on the second floor and a patio terrace that will seat around 20 people in the warmer months. “We’re going to open that seasonally, probably with a little more casual concept … have a drink, have some appetizers,” said Langston. Though the restaurant will keep the menus from its North End location, it’ll drop “Café Vicino” and go by Richard’s. It’ll also expand its hours to offer breakfast seven days a week and brunch on Sundays. “We are definitely keeping the style and the feel of Richard’s Café Vicino. … At lunch and dinner you probably will not recognize a difference in the menus, except they may get a little bigger because I’ll have a bigger facility to prep in and prepare in,” said Langston. Langston said all of his staff plan to make the transition to the new location, which should be open by Dec. 31. He confirmed there will be dedicated surface parking and said the “transition should be seamless” for his regular customers. “It’s still my food, this is what I’ve done for a long time and people seem to react to it well and appreciate it,” he said. “So that’ll be very much the same.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN TJ THOMSON

Boise City councilman eyes Ada County Commission

LEARN TO PLAY BRIDGE

GEORGE PRENTICE

We welcome new members! Now is your chance to learn the world’s best card game. You have heard of it: now you can play it.

Beginning Bridge Lessons Boise City Councilman TJ Thomson had recently turned in the paperwork necessary to embark on the next chapter of his political career when he sat down to talk about his big decision. “Yes, I’ve just filed to officially run for Ada County Commissioner,” said Thomson, a twoterm city councilman. Before talking about his campaign priorities, he explained the No. 1 reason for seeking the county seat—and it’s personal “I’ve thought about running for county commissioner for some time,” Thomson said. “I have a very forgiving wife, Alisha, and we are still new parents, but at the end of the day, they’re why I’m in the race. Our child came from nothing but gave us everything.” Thomson beamed as he talked about his daughter, Sena, who was abandoned in Ethiopia as a one-month old. After waiting four years for an international adoption, Thomson and his wife were finally able to bring Sena home to Idaho in 2015. In keeping with the theme of change, Thomson will not compete to become an Ada County Commissioner. Councilman, I must admit that I wouldn’t have been surprised to see your political future at the Idaho Statehouse or continuing at Boise City Hall, but your announcement to run for county commissioner caught more than a few people off guard. I’m passionate about local government and I want to be where the rubber meets the road. I’ve been a part of significant change for the city of Boise: a decrease in crime rates, low unemployment, an environment where businesses can thrive and protection of the environment. Have you agreed or disagreed with most of the recent decisions of Ada County commissioners? I think the current commission has the best interests of citizens in mind. I hold them in high esteem. That said, I would say I don’t agree with everything they’ve done. What might you do differently? No. 1, the county has a unique tool to help businesses thrive: property tax relief for new or expanding businesses. But as it stands now, most businesses have to knock on the door of county and ask how they can take advantage of that. SimBOISE WEEKLY.COM

plot or Micron may know how to jump through those hoops, but smaller companies don’t. Are you saying Ada County does not have an economic revitalization plan that specifically uses the tool of property tax relief? That’s right. Our cities are working hard, but they need a partner and Ada County can be the center of that economic hub. My next issue concerns the importance of local control, and the best example of that is the Ada County Courthouse.

Wednesdays, 6 Weeks April 6, 2016-May 11, 2016 6-8pm The Bridge Cooperative of Boise, 5903 W Franklin. $40 For 6 Weeks and Textbook To register, email bridgeco14@gmail.com or phone Kay at (208) 484-2714 Sponsored by Boise Unit 394 of The American Contract Bridge League ACBL BoiseBridge

And the county has been tangled in legal battles for years with a number of cities that haven’t paid for Ada County court services. It’s time to get out of those legal battles. To be clear, are you saying cities shouldn’t have to pay for court services? That’s correct. Doesn’t Ada County need that revenue stream? Right now, it’s a cash cow. Right now, the city of Boise is the only one paying for those court services—they’re paying more than $1 million per year. That’s real money. Once again, are you saying Ada County doesn’t need that revenue? I’m saying that the courthouse was never intended to be a cash cow for Ada County. I don’t believe the county is relying on that money. Plus, there’s a lot of potential in finding taxpayer savings and reducing costs. Tell us where we can shrink country government. Animal control, planning and zoning, standardizing fire and building codes, energy audits. We should be looking for a number of savings opportunities. You’ve been able to run as an incumbent in the city of Boise with a good amount of success. Are you prepared to press the reset button of your political career? I believe that if we look at the issues I’m fighting for, citizens will look beyond party politics. I think the post of county commissioner is unique for my skill sets, interests and passion. BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 21


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REAL ESTATE For Sale - Boise North End House/Condo $265,000 / 2br - 1100 sq. ft. - 1318 N. 10th St.

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BW CAREERS

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MIND BODY SPIRIT

BY DAVID J. KAHN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

37 Czech reformer Jan 38 Press (for) 39 Cut off 40 Request after a breakdown 43 Some cleaners 45 See blurb 50 Billionaire sorts 52 ____ Peninsula 53 Borah Peak locale 54 Part of a foot

22 Sharing word 23 See blurb 26 It may detect a break, for short 27 Hit 2011 animated film 28 Stay here 29 Source of iron 30 An eternity 31 See blurb 35 Crashes badly

1 Spokesperson in TV insurance ads 4 Candidate’s concern 9 Snap 13 “Not ____!” 18 Manhattan developer? 19 Big name in travel guides 20 Track runner 21 “Et tu” follower

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80 Big head 81 Figure in “The Garden of Earthly Delights” 82 Hal, to Henry IV 83 Titania or Oberon, in space 84 Former NBC drama 86 National alternative 88 Getting ready, with “up” 90 See blurb 95 Jazz (up) 96 Place for plaques 97 Dos 98 Bro or sis 100 Mound great 101 Ham 103 See blurb 109 Squeakers 111 Best Foreign Language Film of 2014 112 Fiver 113 Always, to Shakespeare 114 One carrying a toon? 115 See blurb 120 Har-____ (tennis court surface) 121 Part of a legend 122 Hunted for morays 123 Sides of sectors 124 Atypical 125 Lascivious sort 126 Some speedsters, for short 127 Photographer Adams 128 Seedy type?

DOWN 1 Rude thing to drop 2 First lady before Michelle 3 Senate’s president pro tempore after Patrick Leahy 4 Movie co. behind “Boyhood” and “Transamerica” 5 He played Bond seven times 6 Allows in 7 Not follow orders or guidelines 8 Time remembered 9 Phony persona 10 Stumblebum 11 One of two New Testament books 12 Like some old schoolhouses 13 “Scandal” airer 14 Food for Oliver Twist 15 Major Italian highway

16 See 69-Down 17 Modernists, informally 20 Kind of column 24 Giorgio’s god 25 Like comebacks? 32 Brunch pie 33 Food-safety org. 34 Commander’s place 36 Years at the Colosseum 39 Christopher ____, tippler in “The Taming of the Shrew” 41 Earthy color 42 “____ asking?” 43 Singer Anthony 44 Metal marble 46 Duchamp’s movement 47 Sci-fi race 48 It may come in sheets 49 Flaps 50 Fourth parts in series of eight 51 It’s a wrap 56 Reached, numerically 58 Dumas swordsman 59 Arctic weather phenomenon 60 “I Wanna Be Sedated” rockers 63 ____ Jemison, first AfricanAmerican woman in space 64 Tag end? 65 Didn’t move 66 Some newcomers’ study, in brief 69 With 16-Down, what “stet” means 70 Real-time messaging system 71 ____ piccata 72 Move, informally 73 Three-time All-Star Longoria for the Tampa Bay Rays 74 It’s good for the long haul 75 Lottery winner’s cry

76 Mel Blanc, notably 77 Daughter of Nereus 78 Director Lee 79 Sucked dry 85 City on the Brazos River 86 Loretta Lynch and Eric Holder: Abbr. 87 Greek summit 89 Pit-____ 91 Penalty for poor service, maybe 92 Colors 1960s-style 93 Many ski lodges 94 Like Lhasa apsos 99 Lhasa apso and others 102 Like polenta 103 Some electrical plugs 104 First string? L A S T D A B S

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105 Inc. cover subj. 106 “Journey to ____,” recurring segment on “Sesame Street” 107 Unhip 108 Lose, in a way 109 Tousle 110 ____ Empire 116 Pay-view connection 117 Keyboard abbr. 118 Packers’ org.? 119 Up to, briefly Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

A G E S

B A I O Z L E D P T R O O T A D L E M A O L S A S T E F S O S E A S

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N S F R P L A A R E S A T T R I B B O N E R I E R E A L O C K A M O R L I E M I N D A C O K P A E A S M I S O T A R R H A L F O L O O N E X P E

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BW HEALTH & FITNESS ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-244-7149 (M-F 9am-8pm central).

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

CLASSES INTUITION & SPIRITUALITY your personal journey A class designed to help you sharpen and trust your intuition, as well as expand your awareness and spiritual capacity.

March 12, 19 & 26 • 10am-12pm 303 Federal Way (across from the Depot) In the basement $49/person (for all 3 Saturday sessions) Teachers Paula Hull & Christopher Eshbaugh call: (208)-284-2402 or (208)-968-4986

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. Male Only. Private Boise studio. MC/ VISA. massagebyeric.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492. SACRED BODY CARE For Relaxation Call Ami at 208-6976231.

OFFICE HOURS

ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377.

ADOPT-A-PET

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS

COMMUNITY

P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

BW CELEBRATIONS

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IDAHO MARCH FOR BERNIE! Come join your fellow Bernie Sanders supporters as we stand up and march to show our support and love for Senator Sanders! We will be meeting at the Capitol and marching to Ann Morrison. Event takes place 10am-2pm finishing at Ann Morrison, where we will have some food trucks and entertainment available, as well as fundraising opportunities. FB search: Idaho March For Bernie!#boisebernfest and RSVP today!

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

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BW EVENTS STUDENT UNION EXHIBITION SERIES PRESENTS PHENOMENA Phenomena is an exhibition of a new body of work by Boise State alumnus, active local artist, and arts administrator Karl LeClair. Phenomena, he says, are described as experiences and sensations that cannot be explained. In this show, LeClair explores these ideas through engravings,

REX: My sister Nyssa and I are intensely affectionate and make lots of cute meows.

NYSSA: Rex and I would love a lap to snuggle in— it gets our purr machines revving.

ARWEN: I’m a sweet and cute little gal whose snuggling skills will steal your heart.

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DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

* Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

CAREER TRAINING

RATES

BRUTUS: 8-year-old, male, Labrador/pointer mix. Needs someone to put in time and energy. Not good with small dogs or cats. Best with older kids. (Kennel 304 – #30827298)

SCOOTER: 3-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Sweet boy, loves to be petted. Front declawed when he was younger, so he will need to be an indoor cat. (Kennel 2 – #30997861)

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EAT HERE

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DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order. BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 23


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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “He in his madness prays for storms, and dreams that storms will bring him peace,” wrote Leo Tolstoy in his novella The Death of Ivan Ilych. The weird thing is, Aries, that this strategy might actually work for you in the coming days. The storms you pray for could work marvels. They might clear away the emotional congestion, zap the angst, and usher you into a period of dynamic peace. So I say: Dare to be gusty and blustery and turbulent.

a week for six and a half years. According to author William Deresiewicz, many young graphic designers no longer abide by that rule. They regard it as more essential to cultivate a network of connections than to perfect their artistic mastery. I advise you not to use that approach in the coming months, Gemini. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will be better served by improving what you do rather than by increasing how many people you know.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Quoting poet W. H. Auden, author Maura Kelly says there are two kinds of poets: argument-makers and beauty-makers. I think that’s an interesting way to categorize all humans. Which are you? Even if you usually tend to be more of an argument-maker, I urge you to be an intense beauty-maker in the next few weeks. If you’re already a pretty good beauty-maker, I challenge you to become, at least temporarily, a greatbeauty-maker. One more thing: As much as possible, until April 1, choose beauty-makers as your companions.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I sit before flowers, hoping they will train me in the art of opening up,” says poet Shane Koyczan. “I stand on mountain tops believing that avalanches will teach me to let go.” I recommend his strategy to you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Put yourself in the presence of natural forces that will inspire you to do what you need to do. Seek the companionship of people and animals whose wisdom and style you want to absorb. Be sufficiently humble to learn from the whole wide world through the art of imitation.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): To have any hope of becoming an expert in your chosen field, you have to labor for at least 10,000 hours to develop the necessary skills—the equivalent of 30 hours

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The marathon is a long-distance foot race with an official length of more than 26 miles. Adults who are physically fit and well-trained can finish the course in five hours.

24 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

But I want to call your attention to a much longer running event: the Self-Transcendence 3,100Mile Race. It begins every June in Queens, N.Y., and lasts until August. Those who participate do 3,100 miles’ worth of laps around a single city block, or about 100 laps per day. I think that this is an apt metaphor for the work you now have ahead of you. You must cover a lot of ground as you accomplish a big project, but without traveling far and wide. Your task is to be dogged and persistent as you do a little at a time, never risking exhaustion, always pacing yourself. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In old Vietnamese folklore, croaking frogs were a negative symbol. They were thought to resemble dull teachers who go on and on with their boring and pointless lectures. But in many other cultures, frogs have been symbols of regeneration and resurrection due to the dramatic transformations they make from egg to tadpole to full-grown adult. In ancient India, choruses of croaks were a sign of winter’s end, when spring rains arrived to fertilize the earth and bestow a promise of the growth to come. I suspect that the frog will be one of your emblems in the coming weeks, Virgo—for all of the above reasons. Your task is to overcome the boring stories and messages so as to accomplish your lively transformations.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Your anger is a gift.” So proclaims musician and activist Zack de la Rocha, of Rage Against the Machine. That statement is true for him on at least two levels. His fury about the systemic corruption that infects American politics has roused him to create many successful songs and enabled him to earn a very good living. I don’t think anger is always a gift for all of us, however. Too often, especially when it’s motivated by petty issues, it’s a self-indulgent waste of energy that can literally make us sick. Having said that, I do suspect that your anger in the coming week will be more like de la Rocha’s: productive, clarifying, healthy. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Even now, all possible feelings do not yet exist,” says novelist Nicole Krauss. In the coming weeks, I suspect you will provide evidence of her declaration, Scorpio. You may generate an unprecedented number of novel emotions—complex flutters and flows and gyrations that have never before been experienced by anyone in the history of civilization. I think it’s important that you acknowledge and celebrate them as being unique—that you refrain from comparing them to feelings you’ve had in the past or feelings that other people have had. To harvest their full blessing, treat them as marvelous mysteries.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Look at yourself then,” advised author Ray Bradbury. “Consider everything you have fed yourself over the years. Was it a banquet or a starvation diet?” He wasn’t talking about literal food. He was referring to the experiences you provide yourself with, to the people you bring into your life, to the sights and sounds and ideas you allow to pour into your precious imagination. Now would be an excellent time to take inventory of this essential question, Sagittarius. And if you find there is anything lacking in what you feed yourself, make changes. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): According to a report in the journal Science, most of us devote half of our waking time to thinking about something besides the activity we’re actually engaged in. We seem to love to ruminate about what used to be and what might have been and what could possibly be. Would you consider reducing that amount in the next 15 days, Capricorn? If you can manage to cut it down even a little, I bet you will accomplish small feats of magic that stabilize and invigorate your future. Not only that: You will feel stronger and smarter. You’ll have more energy. You’ll have an excellent chance to form an enduring habit of staying more focused on the here and now.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One of the legal financial scams that shattered the world economy in 2008 was a product called a Collateralized Debt Obligation Squared. It was sold widely, even though noted economist Ha-Joon Chang says that potential buyers had to read 1 billion pages of documents if they hoped to understand it. In the coming weeks, I think it’s crucial that you Aquarians avoid getting involved with stuff like that—with anything or anyone requiring such vast amounts of homework. If it’s too complex to evaluate accurately, stay uncommitted, at least for now. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I wish I knew what I desire,” wrote Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish, born under the sign of Pisces. “I wish I knew! I wish I knew!” If he were still alive today, I would have very good news for him, as I do for all of you Pisceans reading this horoscope. The coming weeks will be one of the best times ever—ever—for figuring out what exactly it is you desire. Not just what your ego yearns for. Not just what your body longs for. I’m talking about the whole shebang. You now have the power to home in on and identify what your ego, your body, your heart and your soul want more than anything else in this life.

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drawings and sculptural installation. His imagery takes form through the use of symbols and abstracted spaces - drawing influence from personal experience, alchemical engravings, geology and natural history. Reception: Thursday, March 10th, 2016 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Free. 1700 University Drive on the second floor of the Student Union Building.

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BW KISSES Steve Chesterfield - you are sassy and sharp as a tack. Despite the fact that you are YEARS older than I, this gal is very much enjoying getting to know you. Lets go get lost in the woods. HEY LONNY! Thank you for renewing my faith that there are decent fish in the sea- great to catch up and talk shop. I wish there was another one of you for myself and a few more for all of my dear lady friends. UBER MVP Shout out to my Uber driver for being very cool about letting me out to poop on the side of the road when I could not hold it anymore. You the real mvp!

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly. com or call 344-2055 for a quote. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 2015 17489, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Ryan Meadows Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Francis R. Ferrer, Defendant.

TO: FRANCIS R. FERRER You have been sued by Ryan Meadows Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 2015 17489. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr. Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 22 day of January, 2016. Christopher D. Rich, DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ Rose Wright, Deputy Clerk PUB. DATES: February 17, 24, March 2, 9, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: DJANGO LEE COX. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1602691 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) An Amended Petition to change the

name of DJANGO LEE COX, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to DJANGO LEE LAIGHLÉIS. The reason for the change in name is: Personal. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on April 7, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: February 10, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBBIE NAGELE Deputy Clerk. PUB Feb. 24, Mar. 2, 9, 16, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: ROBERT JAMES SNEIDER and SOPHIA ANN MOORE, Legal Name Case No. CVNC 1602679 NOTICE OF HEARING (Adults)

such a change of name. WITNESS my hand and seal of said District Court this 18th day of Feb., 2016. By: CHRISTOPHER D. RICH and DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk PUB March 09,16,23 and 30, 2016. LINE SALE March 15, 2016 at 12:00 noon at 109 E 41st St, Garden City, ID. 1982 Mercedes 380 Sedan VIN # WDBBA45A1CB009795. LIEN SALE March 15, 2016 at 12:00 noon at 109 E 41st St, Garden City, ID. 1972 Porsche 914 Sedan VIN #4722917824.

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BW YARD SALE ESTATE YARD SALE We have tools, building supplies, household items, collectibles and crystals. There is something for everyone! 1802 Vermont St. in Boise. Fri. 11th 8-4, Sat. 12th 10-4 and Sun. 10-4.

ADULT

A Petition by ROBERT JAMES SNEIDER, who was born May 5, 1989 at Sebastopol, California, and SOPHIA ANN MOORE, who was born January 26, 1978 at Boise, Idaho, both of whom now reside at 201 N. Flume Street, Boise, County of Ada, State of Idaho, have filed with the above-entitled Court a Petition for change of their “Family” surname to MOORE-BRIDGES, and that they hereafter be known as ROBERT JAMES MOORE-BRIDGES and SOPHIA ANN MOORE-BRIDGES, respectively, the reason being that they want to adopt a new combined “family” name, utilizing husband’s grandmother’s maiden name. The Petition for Change of Name will be heard at 130 o’clock p.m. on the 10th day of May, 2016, at the Ada County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Front Street, Boise, Idaho. Objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show the court a good reason against

JEN SORENSEN HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | 25


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

#boiseweeklypic

FIND POLISH MOVIE POSTERS

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

DEAR MINERVA, I am the oldest sister of one bipolar, alcoholic sister and one meth-addicted sister who is obsessed with her young boyfriend. I have been estranged from both of them because I cannot tolerate their lifestyles. They both have three children each, whom I love and still talk to. The problem is, they tell their children that I am judgmental and that I think I am better than everyone because I have a college education (which is kind of just a normal thing these days, am I right?). I never talk about their mothers to them. I’m sick of my sisters bad-mouthing me. What should I do? —Not crazy and Not on Drugs

The formula for American movie posters is simple: Place the acting talent in the center of the poster and the source of dramatic tension in the background. In Poland, movie posters have an abundance of both consonants and artistic talent. The teaser for Lowca Androidow (Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner) was designed by Michal Ksiazek and features a woman in a bikini holding a gun cast only in white space. It’s polishpostershop.com yours for 70 Euro. Leszek Zebrowski’s take on Stanley Kubrick’s Clockwork Orange (Mechaniczna Pomarancza in Polish) shows a man’s face juxtaposed with a howling animal. They share an eye. Sadly, that one’s not currently available but you can sign up for the waiting list. For Krokodyl Dundee, Andrej Pagowski has the eponymous Mr. Dundee, his joyous eyes shadowed by a wide-brimmed hat, holding a terrified child in a nest of multi-colored crocodiles. Save the child for 72 Euro. —Harrison Berry

Taken by instagram user ethanbanta.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

ON THE COVER

Is Daylight Savings Time still necessary? Yes - 29.79%

DEAR NOT, Unfortunately, you cannot control what your sisters say about you. However, I can understand how they might feel judged by you. Within the first two sentences, my readers know that both of your sisters have mental health and addiction issues and lifestyles you cannot “tolerate.” Since they are struggling with these difficult issues, this would lead me to believe that neither of them are currently in their best space emotionally. Depending on how severe these issues are, they may not be capable of reeling it in at this time and, given your estrangement, talking to them seems an unlikely possibility. I commend you for keeping in touch with their children. Maintain a respectful rapport with their children and show them you are not the person others think you are. Best wishes. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

“DIG IN DEEP,” BONNIE RAITT

6.

“THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS,” “BLACKSTAR,” DAVID BOWIE DAVID BOWIE “THE GHOSTS OF HIGHWAY “FOR ALL KINGS,” 20,” LUCINDA WILLIAMS ANTHRAX “THIS UNRULY MESS I’VE “REV,” REVEREND MADE,” MACKLEMORE HORTON HEAT AND RYAN LEWIS “I LIKE IT WHEN YOU “NATHANIEL RATELIFF SLEEP, FOR YOU ARE SO AND THE NIGHT SWEATS,” BEAUTIFUL YET SO UNAWARE NATHANIEL RATELIFF AND THE NIGHT SWEATS OF IT,” THE 1975 . “SUNDOWN OVER GHOST TOWN,” EILEN JEWELL

10

60 MILLION

$1.9 BILLION

21 MILLION

9.9 MILLION

102 MILLION

Estimated lost wages paid to distracted and unproductive workers during March Madness 2015.

Number of viewers for CBS’ coverage of March Madness 2014.

Number of unique viewers who streamed games on NCAA March Madness Live in 2014.

Total number of unique viewers for the entire 2014 NCAA tournament.

(Challenger, Gray & Christmas)

(Challenger, Gray & Christmas)

I don’t know - 2.13%

7. 8. 9.

Number of March Madness brackets believed to have been filled in 2014. (Smithsonian)

No - 68.09%

(Challenger, Gray & Christmas)

(Challenger, Gray & Christmas)

Disclaimer: This online poll i s not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of loc a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l op i ni on.

$10.8 BILLION Value of 14-year deal between NCAA, CBS Sports and Turner Broadcasting for Internet, television and wireless broadcast rights ending in 2024.

“Vintage Bubbles” by Tyrel and Heather Whitt

350 MILLION

33.4 MILLION

Number of March Madness impressions on Facebook and Twitter in 2015.

Number of viewers who tuned in to see Duke defeat Wisconsin in the NCAA National Championship in 2015.

(money.cnn.com)

(money.cnn.com)

(NCAA)

26 | MARCH 9–15, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 38  

Through Their Eyes: Boise’s homeless community turns the camera on itself for photo documentary project

Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 38  

Through Their Eyes: Boise’s homeless community turns the camera on itself for photo documentary project