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BOISE WEEKLY F E B R UA RY 1 7 – 2 3 , 2 0 1 6

LOCA L A N D I N DE PE N DE N T

“Sometimes it’s our fault; sometimes we have an accident.”

9

Empty Wallet

The state has a fund to fight homelessness, but no one ever bothered to put any money in it

14

Trailing Behind

As maintenance for Idaho’s backcountry trails falls by the wayside, funding dries up, too

VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 3 5

NEWS 8

18

Oscar Madness

Pick the Oscar winners in the Red Carpet Movie Awards and maybe win a pile of prizes

FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick Interns: Patrick Adcock, Jonathan Reff Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Ryan Johnson, Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Laurie Pearman, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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EDITOR’S NOTE RED CARPET TREATMENT The first film to win a Best Picture Oscar was the World War I romantic action-drama Wings, starring Clara Bow. Though it was released to theaters in 1927, the first Academy Award ceremony didn’t take place until spring 1929. Bow received the statuette— which hadn’t been named “Oscar” yet—from Douglas Fairbanks. Strangely, no one seems to know how the 13 ½-inch, 8-pound gold figure got its name other than the possibly apocryphal story that an early Academy member thought it looked like her uncle Oscar. Regardless, 2,947 Academy Award of Merits (as they are officially called) have been handed out and, this year, that number will break 3,000. Guessing who will go home with Oscar is an annual national pastime with notorious upsets, like the time Rocky bested All the President’s Men, Taxi Driver and Network in 1977; or when Marisa Tomei won Best Supporting Actress for My Cousin Vinny in 1992; and—horror of horrors—when Shakespeare in Love trumped Saving Private Ryan in 1999. Make your picks for the 2016 Academy Awards by entering the Boise Weekly Red Carpet Movie Awards contest, presented by The Balcony Club and The Flicks. Fill out the form at redcarpetballot.boiseweekly.com and be eligible for a host of prizes, including unlimited admission to The Flicks for a year; a $75 bar tab at The Balcony; an overnight package at Cactus Pete’s in Jackpot, Nev.; a $250 Amazon gift card; and more. Better yet, you are cordially invited to a live broadcast viewing party of the Academy Awards Sunday, Feb. 28 at The Balcony. Red carpet arrivals begin at 6 p.m., followed by the broadcast at 7 p.m. The Balcony will feature drink specials and movie trivia. The BW Red Carpet Movie Awards contest is free to enter and if you have trouble making your picks, BW screen guru George Prentice has some tips on likely winners on Page 18. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Sam Parry TITLE: “Shallow wheel thrown fruit bowl” MEDIUM: Ceramics ARTIST STATEMENT: Throwing on the wheel has been a passion of mine since high school. Making art that is both functional and beautiful is my ultimate goal. Knowing that someone uses my art in their daily lives is what I love about making pottery.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

SURVEY SAYS... A NE W SURVE Y FROM THE BOISE STATE UNIVERSIT Y SC HOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE POLLED 1,000 IDAHOANS ON A R ANGE OF IS SUES, INCLUDING EDUCATION, THE EC ONOMY, HE ALTH CARE AND TR ANSPORTATION. AMONG THE MANY TAKE AWAYS : NE ARLY 48 PERCENT OF IDAHOANS THINK IMMIGR ATION IS A NE T BENEFIT TO THE STATE. GE T MORE AT NE WS/UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA .

PLENTI{FULL}

At Touchmark, residents say they: Exercise more.

Health & Fitness Club for adults 40-plus located in our new Elkhorn Lodge.

Club amenities include: • • •

NeuroCom® Balance Master® Indoor heated pool Personal training sessions

• • •

Wide range of fitness classes Health and wellness screening Bistro/juice bar

TOUCHMARK HEALTH & FITNESS CLUB 625 S Arbor Lane · Meridian, ID 83642

WAGE WAR An Idaho House committee has recommended passage of a bill that would prohibit cities from raising their own minimum wage rates. Read more details at News/Unda’ the Rotunda.

(NO) WORK ZONE As construction continues to replace the Broadway Bridge, surrounding businesses—especially restaurants—are feeling the pinch. Read how bad it is at Food/Food News.

DEADPOOL Boise Weekly staff writer Harrison Berry said “it’s been a long time since I felt that good” after watching Deadpool. If you know Harrison, that’s a big deal. Read his review at Screen/Film Reviews.

Learn more: 208-358-9862 · TouchmarkMeridian.com/info 1512158 © Touchmark, LLC, all rights reserved

OPINION

4 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

IN THE STATE OF IDAHO, YOU’RE NOT AL LOWE D TO D RI N K B E E R A ND LO O K AT THIS COVER ART.” —Andrew Hahn (via Facebook, “Cover art by Emily Wenner,” Feb. 10, 2016)

MAIL PENSION SPIKING Dear Editor, Under present retirement rules, any appointed or elected officials under the same job/ HR description as the state legislators (mayors, city council members, county commissioners, etc.) would be treated differently under retirement than said legislators, as in the following sample scenarios. A county commissioner, making $17,000 per year, serves for 26 years, and then is appointed to a $106,000 state position by the governor, where he serves for five years. His retirement would be calculated on a split basis, and when he reaches full retirement age he would receive $8,840 per year for his county service and $10,600 per year for his state service, for a total of $19,400 per year. A state legislator, making $17,000 per year, serves for 26 years and then is appointed to a $106,000 state position by the governor, where he serves for five years. Since he is exempted from the split calculation, his retirement would be figured as if his entire 31 years of service was at the higher paying position, resulting, when he reaches full

retirement age, in a retirement of $65,720 per year. The difference over a 24-year life expectancy, after retirement, would be over $1.1 million—a difference of approximately $45,000 per year. The purpose of the split calculation is to prevent “pension spiking,” but the Legislature (and only the Legislature) is exempt from the rule. In my way of thinking, this is abhorrent and totally wrong. However, efforts to correct it have seldom gotten out of committee and been voted down when they have. For a group that prides itself on doing “right,” even in cases that may adversely affect the health of other Idahoans, to allow this exemption to continue is grossly hypocritical. My message to the Legislature: Make it right. —Jim Haddock Meridian

IN SUPPORT OF THE OREGON OCCUPATION Dear Editor, OK, so maybe moving in and taking over the Malheur Wildlife refuge in Oregon wasn’t the wisest, best approach for patriotic justice seekers to use to show support for their

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

imprisoned brothers, nor in any other attempts to appeal to those far-more-permanent government occupiers for “redress of grievances,” a right secured and guaranteed to us all within our founding documents. At any rate—and much more importantly—I ask we compare these folks’ audacious “crime,” carried out non-violently, even respectfully, to what was soon to come against them from a conspiring cadre of paid “public servants” from the FBI and many Oregon state, county and local officials. Is there any possible, fair comparison between the courageous (even if misguided) actions of this unorganized citizen group and the murderous, conniving thuggery that took place at the massive highway stake-out, the totally unprovoked and unnecessary execution of an entrapped citizen there in the snow. (And rogue government agencies like this preach to us about evil terrorism?) May Heaven deliver us all, as I believe it certainly did the survivors of this latest, demonic assault. Just when will be the right and efficacious time for the people of this land to begin to rein in and hold accountable these types of out-of-control “authorities,” obviously drunk with power and bent on destroying our lives and livelihood? —Carol Asher Kamiah

YOU’RE INVITED TO THE

QIN BAILAN ART EXHIBITION

Chinese Women and Children from History and Folklore

FEBRUARY 16-19 THE IDAHO WATER CENTER Free and open to the public

For more infor mation, please visit:

UIDAHO.EDU/QIN-BAILAN BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 5


OPINION YOUR BRAIN ON Bᅈ

Advantages of not using your skull as a battering ram BILL COPE To all the musicians I have ever known, going back to Mr. Cherry’s sixth-grade band class, I invite you to join me and donate your brains to science. I feel it is our obligation to future sixthgraders. They need to know what doesn’t happen to the brains of those who choose clarinets over cleats, French horns over football helmets... running scales over running scrimmages. I’ve been writing about the advantages of playing music for years. And before we go any further, let me make it clear that by “playing music,” I do not mean plugging in your ear buds and humming along to Adele while you vacuum or do whatever it is you do on the Greenbelt. No, I mean making music. And I don’t believe the venue one chooses or the level one achieves is that important. Picking an instrument, as is playing a sport, is one of the few educational decisions a kid makes in his or her early years that is his or hers alone, and every year he or she decides to stick with it is confirmation of his or her commitment to, and satisfaction with, that decision. There is a growing body of evidence that active involvement with music comes with multiple benefits to youngsters. Intellectually, emotionally, socially and creatively, the child expands, and that expansion carries over to the adult. In one of my earliest columns, I suggested someone take a survey among penitentiary inmates to see how many had ever played in a high school band, been part of a string quartet or one of those funky OktoberFest tuba ensembles, even a bagpipes band or a zither circle. My hunch was then and still is, you would find few old piano students or lapsed flutists on death row. With the social benefits of music instruction in mind, I maintain we are doing a disservice not only to kids, but to society as a whole when music programs are cut from public school budgets. Of course, the argument has fallen on tone deaf ears. School boards and legislatures, particularly in hickacratic zones like Idaho, are often comprised of spiritually-monotonous drones for whom creativity is viewed as unnecessary, especially in an atmosphere where education is rapidly becoming a process not to turn out well-rounded, emotionally-fulfilled individuals, but to turn out replacement parts for economic engines. Yet there is an aspect, advantageous to both individuals and society, of providing youth the opportunity to participate in the act of making music that has not been explored. It occurred to me after reading an article on Ken Stabler, the ’70s/early ’80s football star who died last summer after years of deteriorating mental facilities. He knew something had gone wrong with his brain, that it was getting worse, and he donated the 6 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

organ to researchers that they might look for any relationship between his mental degeneration and his 28 years of taking it on the bean, from age 9 to age 37, as a football player. What they found was chronic trauma encephalopathy— ”concussion disease”—the condition that, after decades of being a largely unrecognized plague among ex-footballers, has now become boiling news. Up to 100 ex-NFLers have been diagnosed with CTE, and as such a diagnosis can’t be made currently except through autopsy, that number comes only from those who have donated their brains to post-mortem research. For the last 10 years of his life—he was 69 when he died—Stabler had experienced cognitive impairments common among victims of CTE. These symptoms range from memory loss to suicidal tendencies, from aggression to depression, chronic headaches, problems with judgment and concentration, anxiety, a proclivity towards Parkinson’s and early dementia. Problems might not show up for decades after the football career has ended, and the specter of CTE must be terrifying to the thousands of ex-pro, ex-college, perhaps even ex-high school players waiting to find out if there is such debilitation awaiting them. I was impressed with Ken Stabler’s decision to donate his brain to further the understanding of this affliction, and I was inspired. It was clear he made the decision in the interests of other football players, both past and future. And while reading about the misery he experienced, I found myself thinking, I bet none of that would have happened had he picked up a trombone all those years ago instead of shoulder pads. This isn’t to suggest that aging trombonists have no problem with forgetfulness or lapses in concentration. But mental deterioration is terrifying enough just as a natural accompaniment to aging. The thought that anyone would increase his chances for such deterioration if he were fully aware of what he might be doing to himself is almost beyond my comprehension. So with Ken Stabler’s example in mind, I intend to donate my brain to science in hopes researchers might learn more about the absence of damage that’s done to a brain when it spends football games in the stands, playing the school fight song, or lining up on the sidelines in preparation for the halftime show. And if generations of future children benefit from the example of a youth spent not crashing craniums together as forcefully as possible, it will be well worth having my brain spend the afterlife soaking in a bath of formaldehyde. Join me, fellow band geeks. And who knows? Perhaps we can finally get some of that attention that always went to the jocks. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION FROM THE FAR MARGINS What can be done NICOLE LEFAVOUR I’m not a fan of pragmatists. Pragmatists live in tiny worlds where hope is dangerous and low expectations are worn like armor. I don’t think anyone’s heroes were pragmatists. Heroes do what pragmatists say can’t be done. That’s all. And when heroes succeed, pragmatists get to breathe a momentary sigh of relief and say to themselves, “Well, today I was not disappointed. The world was not uglier than I hoped.” As for the rest of us, we have spent months telling the pragmatists to stick a sock in it because they are making all our volunteers, voters, donors and young activists fall into despair. It’s like hope scares pragmatists as much as it inspires dreamers. I don’t like doing extreme things like asking people to go to jail for a cause. It’s an ugly thing that can ruin careers and cost jobs, apartments, income, time, relationships and credibility. Some don’t see standing in a street, statehouse or in the midst of giant cacti at a nuclear testing facility as heroic. They see it as foolish. I get that. They are realists. We may or may not have called attention to racism or income disparity, or contributed to the end of nuclear weapons testing. We may or may not have gotten the Idaho Legislature to at least act like it is considering including gay and transgender people in Idaho’s nondiscrimination laws. But we dared hope it would. There is pragmatism for self protection and pragmatism for political purposes. America’s entrenched two-party system forces lawmakers to focus on winning more than on policy. A person can accept this state of politics as eternal and unchangeable, or one can decide it is unacceptable and work to educate people and change it. I am one of the 9 million uninsured people who Bernie Sanders talks about. If you’re uninsured or struggle financially, these issues are not political. They are personal. So yes, the comfortable might be a little less passionate than the struggling. The old might be a bit more resigned than the young. Hasn’t it been this way forever? I do not have a good enough memory to be a pragmatist. I have a hard time retaining information that might tell me why what I am doing will end in pain or disappointment. This may be why I was surprised when Hillary Clinton disparaged the idea of Bernie Sanders’ “Medicare for All” universal health care system. Her camp maintains it is unrealistic and unattainable in the current political environment for Americans to pay taxes instead of premiums to access health care—as if that environment will not change radically in the next eight years as it did over the past eight years during President Barack Obama’s term. I feel bad for Obama. The health care system called “Obamacare” is not the plan he argued for BOISE WEEKLY.COM

as a presidential candidate, nor the one he negotiated to get from a then-Democratic Congress. What we have was essentially designed by Mitt Romney in Massachusetts. It looks more like his presidential primary opponent’s—that is to say, Hillary Clinton’s—plan than like our president’s because our president strongly advocated for a public option or federal government-sponsored coverage for all those under a certain income. This is exactly what Republicans in states like Idaho so easily destroyed within “Obamacare” after it passed into law. I have no insurance because the Legislature chooses not to let lowincome people have coverage under Medicaid. And because Mitt Romney and all the Democrats and Republicans took money from the insurance industry—and refused to call attention to how much they took when they were debating whether or not to eliminate the insurance industry, partially or wholly, from American health care. That’s what Sanders wants to do: stop that trillion-dollar industry from acting as an inflationary middleman in our system of billing and care. Clinton, the single largest recipient of insurance industry campaign donations, chooses to be a pragmatist rather than recognizing these donations are the cause of the political reality that will make such a plan, as she says, impossible. Clinton’s statement that we cannot provide health coverage to all citizens, as developed countries do worldwide, was followed by Gloria Steinem telling us that young women want to vote for Sanders because that’s where all the guys are. This has been followed by the unreality of questions about Sanders’ support for women—as if college debt, medical bills, insurance costs and poverty are not some of the most pressing women’s issues of our time. Sanders was lauded for his work on choice and women’s issues and was called an “honorary woman” by Steinem 10 years ago, now anyone who votes for him is failing to support women. And we wonder why people refuse to participate in politics because it feels so dirty or pointless. I participate in politics, I vote and caucus and work for candidates because I will not cede my country to the angry and the hateful. If I give up and do not vote and do not participate, then the greedy grow more powerful and the pragmatists keep themselves safe but destroy the work of the hopeful with their cynicism. I vote and try with every fiber of my being to inspire others because words matter, words like: “Yes. Yes we can.” Nicole LeFavour is an educator, activist, former Boise Weekly reporter, and served in the Idaho House of Representatives and Idaho Senate. BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 7


UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

NEWS J EFF LOWE

THE NOT-SOCHEAP FIX

Repair costs escalating for Boise government-owned vehicles GEORGE PRENTICE

THREATENED WITH LAWSUIT, IDAHO PRISONS WORKING ON SAME-SEX WEDDING POLICY The Idaho Department of Correction is facing added urgency to rewrite its policies regarding same-sex marriages, as Boise Weekly has learned a court battle was threatened to challenge the agency’s noncompliance with a 2015 federal ruling that legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states. IDOC spokesman Jeff Ray told BW earlier this month that same-sex marriage requests from inmates “are on hold until a new policy can be developed by this spring.” Now, prison officials are promising to have a new policy in place on or before Tuesday, March 1. “IDOC has represented to us that the policy will change by that date,” said Boisebased attorney Deborah Ferguson. “Our outside time limit was four weeks to get it done.” Ferguson sat across the table from IDOC Director Kevin Kempf and Idaho Lead Deputy Attorney General Mark Kubinski on Jan. 28 and said her client, a female inmate at the South Boise Women’s Correctional Center, had requested but been denied permission to marry a female partner who is not incarcerated. “In order to bring a lawsuit, an inmate must first exhaust any possible administrative remedies and go through a three-step internal grievance procedure,” said Ferguson. “My client did exactly that but with no success.” Ferguson said she had been contacted by various incarcerated individuals on the same issue. Similar letters were addressed to BW from a number of inmates at IDOC’s prison complex south of Boise, all saying they had been denied a same-sex wedding by prison authorities, including Idaho State Correctional Institution Warden Keith Yordy, the man in charge of the state’s largest prison facility. “Because of the intricacies of IDOC’s grievance process—and each case has to go through those three levels of grievance to be ripe for a legal challenge—we only needed one case to file suit against 9 IDOC,” said Ferguson. “We told them, ‘We’re ready to go with the lawsuit. 8 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

American automobiles are significantly safer since Ralph Nader published his landmark 1965 expose, “Unsafe at Any Speed,” a crusade for the creation of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. While motorists in the United States are surviving tens of thousands of collisions each year, repair costs inflate as quickly as an air bag. As collision repair costs skyrocket, particularly among government-owned vehicles, taxpayers get hit as well. “Once upon a time, if the repair costs exceeded 75 percent of the expected value of the car, the vehicle would be considered totaled,” said Craig Croner, administrative services manager of the Boise city clerk’s office. “The trend across the nation, not just in Boise, is that insurance companies say more vehicles should be fixed that weren’t normally fixed before.” People’s exhibit No. 1 is Boise’s growing pile of repair bills for its automotive fleet, which includes more than 1,500 vehicles for public safety, maintenance and administration. The Boise City Council has been asked twice in the past five months to approve an 80 percent increase to pay for bodywork and painting. A closer inspection of the logs from Harold’s Auto Body, the vendor contracted to fix the city’s fleet, reveals of 93 repair jobs, 76 involved police vehicles and 40 were deemed accidents. Repair costs ran to $126,818—76 percent of the total 2015 bill of $167,686. That’s significantly more than the $100,000 amount budgeted for 12 months worth of repairs at Harold’s Auto Body. In November 2015, Croner, who oversees the city’s fleet, told the council it should increase the repair budget to $165,000. Earlier this month, Croner returned to suggest another $15,000 increase. “The contract comes up for renewal in March, so yes, we’re expecting to leave it at the $180,000 level,” he said. Croner was quick to add that the city is diligent about filing insurance claims to recover some of those expenses. A review of the logs indicated 50 of 93 incidents involved claims being filed. “But the subrogation of some of those claims can take months and months and months. We still have to get the vehicles fixed,” said Croner. While many of the repairs hover around $2,000, a good number of the fixes—particularly involving Boise Police Department vehicles—top $10,000. Public safety vehicles are better made, said city officials, but they cost much more to fix. For example, a February 2015 collision involving three vehicles required nearly $24,000 in repairs. Another incident, in which the left front end of a police vehicle was damaged, required $13,474 in repairs, yet no insurance claim was filed. “Sometimes it’s our fault; sometimes we have an accident,” said Croner. “It’s important to note that we can’t recover money from criminals.” As for the future, Croner said city officials “will keep an eye on that trend. But for now, we’re leaving the repair costs at that higher number.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


NEWS

UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

IDAHO’S EMPTY HOUSING TRUST FUND Boise builds a homelessness strategy while the Legislature twiddles its thumbs HARRISON BERRY Passed during the 1992 legislative session, the Idaho Housing Trust Fund was designed to help low-income Idahoans find safe, affordable housing by funneling state and matching federal dollars into local governments and nonprofits. In the last quarter-century, the Idaho Legislature hasn’t put a dime into it. For some, it signifies a missed opportunity for the state of Idaho to take a leadership role in addressing homelessness and housing insecurity. “[Tackling these problems] requires the state, the city and the county coming together and putting tools on the table,” said Idaho Rep. Mat Erpelding. “The state, currently, is the only one that has put almost nothing on the table to deal with the situation.” What had been designed as a source of state dollars that could be used to help “low-income and very low-income citizens in meeting their basic housing needs” through a wide variety of lowincome housing programs has never been given a funding source or allocations to achieve its purpose. Few expect that funding to come any time soon. Erpelding came across the neglected trust fund while researching resources for workforce housing. For Boise city leaders, it could be a potential resource in its recently announced “Housing First” strategy to battle chronic homelessness. At a Feb. 9 press event, the city unveiled its plan to house homeless Boiseans in scattered-site and single-location housing, then provide them with mental health, substance abuse and other city services. The city’s plan includes partnering with a wide variety of stakeholders, including the Idaho Housing and Finance Administration, CATCH, the Boise City/Ada County Housing Authority and Terry Reilly Health Services. Together, they will build a single-site housing complex, using approximately $1 million in one-time funds from the city of Boise and $5.5 million in LowIncome Housing Tax Credits from the IHFA. For scattered-site housing, they’ll use funds from Boise city stock, BCACHA and private landlords. “The best alternative is to get someone a safe, BOISE WEEKLY.COM

clean place to live first,” Bieter said. “Only then can you get to the root cause of homelessness.” According to a study compiled by Vanessa Fry, project coordinator for the Public Policy Research Center at Boise State University, Boise’s approximately 100 chronically homeless people cost the city more than $5.3 million each year, including $3.8 million for emergency medical services and $750,000 to the Ada County Jail. Boise’s housing-first strategy is expected to cost the city approximately $1.6 million and city leaders have already echoed Erpelding’s observation about the state’s lack of commitment when it comes to urban issues like homelessness. “There’s a housing fund at the state level. There’s no money in it,” said city of Boise Director of Community Partnerships Diana Lachiondo at a City Club forum on homeless services Feb. 10.

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Housing-first programs have been successful elsewhere—notably in Utah, which experienced a 74 percent drop in homelessness— but Utah’s program included strong support from its legislature and its lieutenant governor, who served as chairman of its homelessness coordinating committee. In a 2014 interview with Boise Weekly, Lloyd Pendleton, who once worked in the welfare department of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, explained how important that support is. “When you have the state supporting your effort, it becomes a whole lot easier because counties and cities line up after,” said Pendleton, who was also a Ford Motor Company executive and adviser for the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness.

In the early 1990s, the Idaho Legislature recognized the housing needs of low-income families and individuals weren’t being met, and determined a trust fund could be used to attract matching federal dollars that could then be distributed to cities, counties and other organizations. The Idaho Housing Trust Fund cleared the Legislature, but lawmakers couldn’t agree on a funding mechanism for the program. An advisory board was created to solve the problem but money never materialized. “There was just no success,” said IHFA Executive Director Gerald Hunter. “We couldn’t get success in terms of funding, and in consequence it finally just evaporated, and at that point there were no new board members because it had failed. That’s where it’s been ever since.” Hunter added that doesn’t mean federal or state funds are being left on the table when it comes to housing initiatives for Idaho cities. In addressing chronic homelessness in Boise, he said there will likely be plenty of “interplay” between the city and state agencies like the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, particularly when it comes to the services side of the city’s plan. He doesn’t expect money for housing to come from the state, however. “[Affordable housing] is not something the state has funded over time,” he said. For him, affordable housing solutions, whether for homelessness programs or workforce housing, fall into an urban category of spending that doesn’t jibe with many of Idaho’s rurally oriented legislators. “Any form of public transit support, the Idaho Housing Trust Fund, local option tax, opportunities, development tools for bonding— they’re not even on the radar in that body,” he said.

We’re at that point.’ But honestly, we think it’s an unnecessary lawsuit because it’s quite clear that they’re governed by the Supreme Court and constitutional rights are being violated.” Ferguson should know. Winner of the Exemplary Lawyer Award from the Idaho Chapter of the Federal Bar Association, she was part of the legal team that successfully sued the state of Idaho over its ban of same-sex unions, arguing Idaho’s ban violated equal protection and due process guarantees. The first ruling came down May 2014 from U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy Dale and was upheld in October of that year by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The state of Idaho racked up more than $800,000 in legal bills for its unsuccessful defense. Ferguson also successfully defended Idaho Navy veteran Madelynn Taylor, who fought for the right to have her same-sex spouse interred at the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery. In November 2014, Taylor and Ferguson stood side-by-side as the ashes of Taylor’s spouse were brought to a final resting place at the state cemetery. In June 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-4 that same-sex marriage was legal across the country, triggering scores of same-sex marriage applications at courthouses throughout Idaho. “All this time later, we’re still talking about denial of constitutional rights, this time at IDOC,” said Ferguson. When asked earlier this month what was taking so long to put in a place a same-sex marriage policy, IDOC spokesman Jeff Ray said, “When we develop any policy, we take into account how it might impact the safe and secure operation of IDOC facilities,” but conceded, “as a result of last summer’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling, state-level bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional.” Ferguson admitted IDOC can “move slowly” when changing or updating policy. But added her client was keeping a close eye on the calendar. “I think my client will move forward as soon as she’s given permission to do so,” said Ferguson. “We’re waiting for the policy change on March 1.” 8

—George Prentice BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 9


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY FEB. 17

the infinite possibilities of love. Through March 5. 8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Festivals & Events

COF: ALMOST, MAINE— This rom-com by John Cariani takes you to a Maine town, where residents find themselves falling in and out of love in the strangest ways. Feb. 17 is a pay-what-you-feel preview. Through March 5. 7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey. 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org.

GLOBAL IMPACT: CELEBRATING BOISE STATE, THE HULT PRIZE AND SOCIAL ENTERPRISE—Watch Boise State students competing for a million dollars to launch businesses eliminating poverty in urban areas pitch their ideas before heading to Shanghai and San Francisco. Tara Russell, president of Carnival’s Fathom impact-travel cruise line, will keynote. Plus community entrepreneurship experts. 5:307:30 p.m. FREE. Trailhead, 500 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-5483. hultprizeatboisestate.org.

On Stage BCT: CONSTELLATIONS—This new play by Nick Payne is the story of a brilliant physicist, her chance encounter with a beekeeper and

IDAHO COMMISSION ON THE ARTS FELLOWSHIP EXHIBITION—Through Feb. 18. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art. boisestate.edu/visualartscenter.

p.m. FREE. Friesen Gallery, 320 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-7264174, friesengallery.com.

INSIGHT: 2016 ANNUAL BOISE STATE STUDENT JURIED EXHIBITION—Through March 18. 10 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art. boisestate.edu/visualartscenter.

PEGAN BROOKE: NEW PAINTINGS—Check out the opening reception for this exhibit, which runs through April 30, by appointment. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-726-8746, ochigallery.com.

OSCAR-NOMINATED DOCUMENTARY SHORTS—7 p.m. $10-$12. Magic Lantern Cinemas, 100 E. 2nd St., Ketchum, 208-726-3308, sunvalleycenter.org.

JIM BRITT: THE ECLECTIC PORTRAIT—Through April 15. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-3493, thecommunitylibrary.org.

QIN BAILAN: CHINESE WOMEN AND CHILDREN FROM HISTORY AND FOLKLORE—The University of Idaho Confucius Institute presents this exhibition of silk scroll paintings by the world-renowned painter who was named one of China’s “Ten Major Art Masters” in 2005. Daily through Feb. 19. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. University of Idaho Water Center, 322 E. Front St., Boise, 208-484-9898, uidaho.edu.

Art

JOSEPHINE FORRESTER: N MIRROR CREEK PL—Through Feb. 28. 7 a.m.-11:45 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4261242, finearts.boisestate.edu.

ROLE PLAY: CHANGING IDEAS ABOUT GENDER—Through Feb. 20. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

LINO TAGLIAPIETRA: IL MAESTRO—Through March 5. 10 a.m.-6

TVAA: THIS AMERICAN LIFE— Through April 8. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

ADONNA KHARE: THE KINGDOM—Through May 29. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CFREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

THURSDAY-THURSDAY, FEB. 18-25

Feminism and film.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, FEB. 19-21

A brrrrrr-illiant way to spend the weekend

FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org. WILLIAM LEWIS: CITY LIMITS— Through Feb. 29. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Cinder Winery, 107 E.44th St., Garden City, 208-376-4023. surelsplace.org/surelsotherplace.

Calls to Artists BOISE ART MUSEUM ART IN THE PARK 2016—The Boise Art Museum is now accepting artist applications for Art in the Park 2016, to be held Sept. 9-11. Now celebrating its 62nd year, this open-air festival offers a variety of contemporary arts and crafts, along with live entertainment, food and hands-on activities for children. Visit the Artist Information Center on BAM’s website for details and to apply. Through March 14. $35. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330. boiseartmuseum.org.

BOSCO CALL TO ARTISTS—Boise Open Studios Collective is now accepting applications for new members for 2016, open to working artists with studios in the greater Boise metro area (Ada, Boise and Canyon counties). Their primary activity is one open studio weekend per year (Oct. 7-9, 2016), with an opening show at a central location. Through March 31. $25-$150, boiseopenstudios.com.

Talks & Lectures QIN BAILAN: INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE CLASSIC DRAWING AND PAINTING—World-renowned artist Qin Bailan talks about and demonstrates the techniques she uses in her art. 6 p.m. FREE. University of Idaho Water Center, 322 E. Front St., Boise, 208-484-9898, uidaho.edu/boise.

Sports & Fitness

SATURDAY, FEB. 20

Go back to the future with these modernist masterpieces.

ROXANE GAY; FAMILY OF WOMAN FILM FESTIVAL

STANLEY-SAWTOOTH WINTERFEST

BOISE PHILHARMONIC: CHAMBER 360°

Author and social critic Roxane Gay exploded onto the scene in 2014, with her novel An Untamed State and essay collection Bad Feminist. So much so, a review in Time magazine dubbed 2014 “the year of Roxane Gay.” She visits Boise Thursday, Feb. 18, for a lecture on topics covered in Bad Feminist, as well as a book signing at the Boise State Student Union. A few days later (Tuesday, Feb. 23-Thursday, Feb. 25) a mini film-festival comprised of three entries from the 2016 Family of Woman Film Festival will be screened at the Boise State Special Events Center. Each screening begins at 6:30 p.m. Roxane Gay: 6 p.m.; FREE. Boise State SUB, 1910 University Dr., 208-426-1677, womenscenter.boisestate.edu. Family of Woman Films: 6:30 p.m., FREE. Boise State SPEC, 1800 University Dr., sub.boisestate.edu.

There is no better way to spend your weekend than at the base of the craggy Sawtooth Mountains for the seventh annual StanleySawtooth Winterfest. The party kicks off at 7 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 19 with the Glow in the Dark pub crawl and parade. Piles of snow and subfreezing temperatures don’t stop the Mountain Village Resort from hosting its annual Beach Party at 9 p.m. Saturday’s adventures include a Fat Bike Gran Fondo, bonfire lightings and three worldfamous Olympic-qualifying races including the “Wild and Woolley” drag race, Outhouse Race and Three-Legged Race. The weekend features free music by Matt Hires, Quenby and the West of Wayland, Boise Rock/Stanley Kids, and Tylor Bushman and the Train Robbers. Various times and locations, FREE. Stanley. For a full schedule, visit stanleycc.org.

Between the end of the age of classical music in the mid-19th century and the birth of jazz in the early 20th century, the western world was transfixed by cultural, artistic and scientific modernism. The music of Darius Milhaud, Rene Jacques Ibert and CharlesEdouard Lefebvre features elements of both jazz and classical music with long, sweeping songs that feel like the soundtracks to movies that have never been made. Catch the Boise Philharmonic Woodwind Quintet as it performs Milhaud’s La cheminee du roi, Ibert’s Three Short Pieces and Lefebvre’s Suite no. 1, Op. 57 at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, at the acoustically magnificent St. Michael’s Episcopal Cathedral as part of Boise Philharmonic’s Chamber 360 series. 11 a.m.; $15 adv., $20 door. St. Michael’s Episcopal Cathedral, 518 N. Eighth St., 208-342-5601, boisephil.org.

10 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR BOGUS BASIN 2016-17 SEASON PASS SALE—Take advantage of the lowest prices of the year for Bogus Basin 2016-17 season passes. You have three ways to buy: online, phone or at the corporate offices. Through Feb. 21. $29-$999. Bogus Basin Corporate Offices, 2600 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise. 208-3325162, bogusbasin.org. BRUNDAGE 2016-17 SEASON PASS SALE—Discounted prices on 2016-17 season passes are good through Feb. 29. Buyers ski the rest of the current season for FREE. $15-$999. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800-888-7544, brundage.com. TAMARACK 2016-17 SEASON PASS SALE—Buy a 2016-17 season pass and receive two FREE night skiing tickets to Bogus Basin. Discounted prices good through Feb. 29. $15-$899. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208-325-1000, tamarackidaho.com.

THURSDAY FEB. 18 Festivals & Events ADA COUNTY LINCOLN DAY ASSOCIATION ANNUAL BANQUET—Hear keynote speaker Mike Baker, a former CIA covert operations officer. Visit the website to purchase tickets. 6-9 p.m. $65. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise. 208-8906425, adacountylincolnday.org.

On Stage BCT: CONSTELLATIONS—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org. COF: ALMOST, MAINE—7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey. 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org.

COMEDIAN SHANE TORRES—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. OSCAR-NOMINATED DOCUMENTARY SHORTS—7 p.m. $10-$12. Magic Lantern Cinemas, 100 E. 2nd St., Ketchum, 208-726-3308. sunvalleycenter.org. TIMBERLINE ORCHESTRA QUADRANT CONCERT, SILENT AUCTION AND BAKE SALE—Enjoy performances by junior-high and high-school orchestras following a silent auction and bake sale. 5:30-9 p.m. FREE. Timberline High School, 701 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-854-6230.

Literature AUTHOR ROXANE GAY TALK AND BOOK SIGNING—What is a bad feminist? Author Roxane Gay addresses just how empowering it can be to redefine what it means to be a feminist in our complicated world. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Hatch Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1677. womenscenter.boisestate.edu.

MONDAY, FEB. 22 Talks & Lectures IDAWRA DINNER MEETING: MINING IN 21ST CENTURY IDAHO—Join the Idaho Section of the American Water Resources Association for a discussion of Idaho mining in the 21st century, with federal and state regulators and spokesmen for the mining industry. 5-8 p.m. $25-$30, $5 panel only. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871. state.awra.org/idaho.

Citizen

Sweet Georgia Brown.

HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS 90TH ANNIVERSARY WORLD TOUR March Madness has nothing on the madcap antics of the Harlem Globetrotters, now in their 90th year as the clown princes and princesses of basketball. Long before the creation of the NBA, the Globetrotters were considered to be the greatest group of b-ballers on the planet. They performed in Russia during the 1950s, thrilled thousands of American troops in war zones across the globe and performed to an audience of one: Pope Francis in 2015—His Holiness has since been named an honorary Globetrotter. The Globetrotters take on the Washington Generals (the last time they beat the ’Trotters was 1971) when they hit the hardcourt of CenturyLink Arena, Monday, Feb. 23. 7 p.m., $22-$85. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., 208424-2200, centurylinkarenaboise.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

7TH ANNUAL EXPEDITION INSPIRATION “BE INSPIRED FOR BREAST CANCER RESEARCH” DINNER AND AUCTION—Justin Skeesuck and Patrick Gray will share their incredible story of friendship, love, courage and sacrifice on the 500-mile Camino de Santiago in northern Spain. 5:30 p.m. $35$50. Stueckle Sky Center, Boise State Broncos Albertsons Football Stadium, 1910 University Drive, Boise. expeditioninspiration.org.

FRIDAY FEB. 19 Festivals & Events 7TH ANNUAL STANLEYSAWTOOTH WINTERFEST—The Seventh Annual Stanley-Sawtooth Winterfest has events for everyone. Visit the event website for a full schedule of events. 7 p.m. FREE. Stanley, 1-800-878-7950, stanleycc.org.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 11


CALENDAR On Stage ALLEY REP: VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE—Laugh it up at this Tony Award-winning comedy by Christopher Durang, who takes a hilarious look at coping with familial dysfunction and staring down middle age. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org. BALLET IDAHO: SINATRA AND MORE—Don’t miss the Idaho premiere of Twyla Tharp’s Nine Sinatra Songs, with costumes by Oscar de la Renta. Plus George Balanchine’s Valse Fantaisie, Peter Anastos’ jazz-inspired Ravel Piano Concerto, and Alex Ossadnik’s contemporary Scheherazade. 8 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110. balletidaho. org. BCT: CONSTELLATIONS—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224. bctheater.org. COF: ALMOST, MAINE—8 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey. 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org.

COMEDIAN SHANE TORRES—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com. ENCORE THEATRE: TONS OF MONEY—Enjoy this hysterical romp that will keep the audience rolling with laughter. 7:30 p.m. $10. Northwest Nazarene University Little Theatre, 550 Holly St., Nampa. 208-861-8839, home. encoreetc.org. IDAHO JAZZ SOCIETY: SARA GAZAREK—Don’t miss your chance to hear the vocalist the LA Times calls “the next important jazz singer.” With Josh Nelson. Proceeds benefit the IJS Scholarship Fund. 7 p.m. $20$25 adv., $25-$30 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208343-1871. idahojazzsociety.org. LETTERS ALOUD—Enjoy this riotously funny, poignant and thoughtprovoking experience that uses the personal letters of some of history’s most famous, and infamous, celebrities to examine the high price of fame and how it has both evolved and devolved over the years. 7 p.m.

MILD ABANDON

$31. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com. TREBELLE PIANO TRIO: LA BELLE ÉPOQUE—Violinist Jennifer Dunn, cellist Heidi Nagel and pianist Robyn Wells perform the music of French composers Claude Debussy and Ernest Chausson. 7:30 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116. trebellepianotrio.org.

Art REBECCA WELTI EXHIBITION AND ART TALK: MY PERSONAL PLANKTON—Join Surel’s Place February artist-in-residence at this opening reception featuring new work and an art talk about her work and processes. 7 p.m. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-407-7529. surelsplace.org/welti.

Literature IDAHO REVIEW LAUNCH PARTY—Book lovers unite for the release of the latest anthology featuring a plethora of authors you know and love, as well as some remarkable new talents. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229. idahoreview.org.

By E.J. Pettinger

Food ST. MICHAEL’S LENTEN LUNCHES—Serving soups, salad, cheese bread and homemade pies Fridays through March 18. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $7, $2.50 pie. St. Michael’s Episcopal Cathedral, 518 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-5601.

GLOBAL COMMUNITY MARKET— Head to the Global Community Market for a taste of the world in the heart of downtown. Saturdays through Feb. 25. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Trailhead, 500 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-5483. MERIWETHER CIDER’S TAPROOM GRAND OPENING—Don’t miss the grand opening party, with five ciders on tap, live music by Curtis Sutton and the Scavengers, B-Town Bistro slinging amazing food, sweet raffles and more. For 21 and older. 2-10 p.m. $5-$6. Meriwether Cider Co., 5242 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208972-6725, meriwethercider.com. TREASURE VALLEY FLEA MARKET—9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$2. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, treasurevalleyfleamarket.com.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC: CHAMBER 360°—Join host Jamey Lamar with the Boise Philharmonic Woodwind Quintet for a walk through the minds of composers Darius Milhaud, Rene Jacques Ibert and Charles-Edouard Lefebvre in conjunction with a performance by the quintet. 11 a.m. $15 adv., $20 door. St. Michael’s Episcopal Cathedral, 518 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-5601, boisephil.org. BUILT FOR SLOW—Don’t miss your chance to witness this one-man rock band from Ethiopia. 7 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe, 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-429-1911, builtforslow.com. COF: ALMOST, MAINE—8 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey. 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org.

On Stage

COMEDIAN SHANE TORRES—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

ALLEY REP: VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE—8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208424-8297, alleyrep.org.

COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $9.99. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208991-4746, boisecomedy.com.

BALLET IDAHO: SINATRA AND MORE—8 p.m. $38-$58. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, balletidaho.org.

ENCORE THEATRE: TONS OF MONEY—2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $10. Northwest Nazarene University Little Theatre, 550 Holly St., Nampa. 208-861-8839, home. encoreetc.org.

BCT: CONSTELLATIONS—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater. org.

THE FLY FISHING FILM TOUR— The original and preeminent exhibition of fly fishing cinema, The F3T is a one-of-a-kind experience. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. $14-$16. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-3871273, flyfilmtour.com.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

WINE TASTING WITH WILLIAMSON VINEYARDS—Drop by the Boise Co-op Wine Shop to sample some of Williamson’s great wines. 4:30-6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Co-op Wine Shop, 915 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-459-7333, boisecoopwineshop.com.

MICAH STEVENS QUINTET AND NOAH JESSEE’S BROCCOLI EXPERIMENT—Enjoy a night of modern jazz, exploring composition and improvisation to create unique musical landscapes. 7 p.m. $10, $8 for students. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3459116. SATURDAY NIGHT IMPROV— Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $5-$25. Treasure Valley Children’s Theater, 703 N. Main St., Meridian. 208-991-4476.

Calls to Artists FEATURE FILM CASTING CALL AND AUDITIONS: TWELFTH NIGHT—Producers are looking for both principal and extra roles to fill for the shooting of this film. If interested, email twelfthnightfilm2016@gmail.com. Auditions will be held at NNU’s Wiley Learning Center. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Northwest Nazarene University, 623 S. University Blvd., Nampa, 208-467-8011, facebook.com/ twelfthnight2016.

Citizen ADA COUNTY MOCK ELECTION—Get acquainted with Ada County’s new voting technology prior to the next election, the March 8 presidential primary. In addition to the Boise Public Library’s downtown main branch, you can vote at the following locations: Garden City Library, 6015 N Glenwood St.; Kuna High School, 637 E. Deer Flat Road; Meridian Library Cherry Lane Branch, 1326 W. Cherry Lane; Eagle Library, 100 N. Stierman Way; and Ada Community Library Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208-287-6860, adacounty.id.gov/elections.

Food BREAKFAST WITH THE BROTHERS AND BRIDES—Enjoy a good old mountain man breakfast of flapjacks, biscuits and gravy, and sausage. Cast members will be performing a sneak peak from the musical at 9:30 a.m. For tickets, call or text Rhonda Johnson (208869-5966) or Melissa Warnick (208-602-8891). 8:30-11 a.m. $5, $20 family (up to 6). Kuna High School, 637 E. Deer Flat Road, Kuna, 208-869-5966 or 208-602-8891, kunaperformingartscenter.org.

SATURDAY FEB. 20 Festivals & Events 7TH ANNUAL STANLEY-SAWTOOTH WINTERFEST—10 a.m. FREE. Stanley, 1-800-878-7950. stanleycc.org.

WINE TASTING WITH WILLIAMSON VINEYARDS—2-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Co-op Wine Shop, 915 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-459-7333, boisecoopwineshop.com.

BLM WILD HORSE CORRAL TOUR—Join the Nampa Recreation Department on a tour of the BLM’s Wild Horse Corrals and witness the 4-H program’s adoption process. Depart and return Nampa Rec Center. 9 a.m.-noon. $15. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

12 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR SUNDAY FEB. 21 Festivals & Events 7TH ANNUAL STANLEY-SAWTOOTH WINTERFEST—11 a.m. FREE. Stanley, 1-800-878-7950, stanleycc.org.

On Stage COF: ALMOST, MAINE—3 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey. 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter.org. COMEDIAN SHANE TORRES—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. TREBELLE PIANO TRIO: LA BELLE ÉPOQUE—Violinist Jennifer Dunn, cellist Heidi Nagel and pianist Robyn Wells perform French music by Claude Debussy and Ernest Chausson. 3 p.m. $10 sugested donation. Eagle United Methodist Church, 651 N. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-939-0108, trebellepianotrio.org.

Food

Odds & Ends

FLYING PIE GRAND OPENING CHARITY NIGHT—Get a first look at the new restaurant, enjoy limitless samples and sip on a few Sockeye brews, all while supporting Life’s Kitchen. 6-7 p.m., 7-8 p.m. and 8-9 p.m. $10. Flying Pie Pizzaria-Broadway, 1326 Broadway Ave., Boise. 208-345-0000.

COLOR ME CALM—Relax and create at the library’s new adults-only coloring program. Intricate coloring sheets, colored pencils, soothing music and a light snack will be provided. For ages 18 and older. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org/victory.

MONDAY FEB. 22

TUESDAY FEB. 23

On Stage

Festivals & Events

WESTERN DAUGHTER EP RELEASE SHOW—Join Western Daughter to celebrate the release of their new EP, As the Sun Went Down, with Ghost Tours and Telescopes as Time Machines. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic, 1009 Main St., Boise, 208-342-0176.

HEALTH CARE JOB AND CAREER FAIR—If you’re looking for a career in the health care sector, then you won’t want to miss this job fair, featuring a wide variety of employers and opportunities. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Carrington College, 1122 N. Liberty St., Boise, 208-779-3100, carrington.edu.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

On Stage

| SUDOKU

HOMEGROWN THEATRE: BLIP READING SERIES— Join Homegrown Theatre for the monthly reading series that features work by local playwrights. This month’s play is The Gods Live in Cleveland, by Dane Bollinger. 7-9 p.m. By donation. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229.

Talks & Lectures IDAHO RIVERS LECTURE SERIES—Join noted Idaho explorer Marty Morache for a tour of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City. 208-343-7481, idahorivers.org.

Odds & Ends BREAST AND GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER SUPPORT GROUP—This group is for women who have been diagnosed with breast or gynecological cancers, from first diagnosis to up to three years post treatment. Noon. FREE. The Cancer Connection Idaho, 2504 Kootenai St., Boise, 208-345-1145, cancerconnectionidaho.org/support.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Food FLYING PIE BROADWAY LOCATION GRAND OPENING—Help Flying Pie Pizzaria celebrate the opening of their fourth Treasure Valley location in the Boise State neighborhood. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Flying Pie Pizzaria-Broadway, 1326 Broadway Ave., Boise. 208345-0000, flyingpie.com.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 13


JES SICA MURRI

RECREATION SAVING TRAILS

LEARN TO PLAY BRIDGE We welcome new members! Now is your chance to learn the world’s best card game. You have heard of it: now you can play it.

Beginning Bridge Lessons Wednesdays, 6 Weeks April 6, 2016-May 11, 2016 6-8pm The Bridge Cooperative of Boise, 5903 W Franklin. $40 For 6 Weeks and Textbook To register, email bridgeco14@gmail.com or phone Kay at (208) 484-2714 Sponsored by Boise Unit 394 of The American Contract Bridge League ACBL BoiseBridge

14 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Idaho Parks and Rec looks for a way to fund Idaho’s trails before they’re gone JESSICA MURRI Only a handful of people have hiked the entirety of the Idaho Centennial Trail, which runs from the Idaho-Nevada border to Priest Lake, near the United States-Canada border. As if hiking 900 miles through Idaho’s rugged backcountry isn’t enough, thru-hikers deal with hundreds of miles of trails that haven’t been maintained for more than a decade. In the summer of 2015, a group of Boise hikers experienced the trail border-to-border. Backpacking through a remote portion of the Sawtooth Mountains, they came upon a squareacre-sized avalanche field one afternoon. The snow had long since melted, leaving behind hundreds of fallen trees, brush and boulders—the trail completely invisible underneath. The hikers picked through the debris, taking care not to twist ankles or snag backpacks. Scratches and bruises were inevitable. Leo Hennessy, the non-motorized trails program manager for Idaho Parks and Recreation, is worried about trails like the ICT. “Once those trails have logs on them, the logs stay until a crew comes through and clears them,” Hennessy said. “If the trail crew misses a year, you physically cannot walk on those trails anymore. Then the grass grows over it and after five years, the U.S. Forest Service takes it off the map. We lose them forever.” Hennessy has been the non-motorized trail coordinator for nearly 30 years. Every year, he is losing more trails in the backcountry because of the lack of funds for trail maintenance. “For wilderness trails, this is the worst it’s ever been,” he said. In an effort to generate ideas to fund maintenance and save the networks of trails, Hennessy facilitated the first-ever Non-Motorized Trail Recreation in Idaho Summit Feb. 12 at the Andrus Center. John Freemuth, a professor of public policy at Boise State University, moderated the conversation between the Idaho Outfitters and Guide Association, Idaho Parks and Recreation and the U.S. Forest Service, as well as with more than 100 trail users and stakeholders from around the state. “We were expecting around 30 people,” Freemuth said to the large crowd.

Clay Lindquist (left) and Clay Jacobson (right) battled an avalanche field while hiking the Idaho Centennial Trail last summer. If Idaho Parks and Rec can’t find more funding, the problem will only grow.

The experts described how bad conditions have become for Idaho’s backcountry trails. David Claycomb, recreation programs bureau chief, said trail maintenance costs between $100 and $200 per trail mile. Idaho has 19,000 miles of trails. Meanwhile, Andy Brunelle, Idaho coordinator for the U.S. Forest Service, said his agency is only allotted $81.9 million nationwide for trail work, but they need $523.7 million for operations, capital improvements, annual maintenance and the ever-growing expense of deferred maintenance. Making matters worse, wildfire suppression costs continue to eat away at maintenance funds. Brunelle said he’s expecting a 10 percent cut per year for the next three years for Region 1, which affects the northern half of Idaho. “We are not in a good position right now,” Hennessy said. The evening turned into a brainstorming session in which audience members took turns with the microphone. Ideas included an “Adopt a Trail” program, trail work from prison crews and those in the juvenile justice system, a rise in the gas tax, a parking permit for trailheads and more. “We could try to get AmeriCorps volunteers out there,” said Betsy Hammar, a member of the 3,700-strong Boise Trail Heads Meetup group. “That would bring youth to our state and give them a real Western, mountain experience.” Jeff Halligan is the executive director of the Idaho Trails Association, which uses volunteers to tackle 45 miles of trail per year. He spoke up about the challenges that brings. “It takes money to get volunteers,” he said.

“They can’t do it on their own. We get them to the location and feed them and teach them how to use cross-cut saws, but land managers need to use professional trail maintenance teams, as well. It’s more than just cutting trees out of there.” Another trail user recommended allowing chainsaws in wilderness-designated areas to make trail work more efficient. That comment received applause from half the attendees, while the other half shook their heads against the idea. One user group that has figured out how to raise money and organize trail maintenance in Idaho is the off-highway motorized trail users. Each person with an ATV or dirt bike pays $12 to Idaho Parks and Rec for a sticker to be affixed to the vehicle. That money goes toward construction and maintenance of motorized trails. The problem with a similar sticker program for non-motorized trail users, Hennessy said, is that people don’t want to pay for it. “People will say, ‘I want my God-given right to go onto Forest Service land for free,’ but they’ll get to the Idaho Centennial Trail and they’ll see that it’s not there,” he said. The summit ended after two hours with a long list of ideas. Hennessy’s colleagues will try to host more conversations, but he said it’s up to the public to spearhead finding a funding source. Hennessy said he hopes to buy a little more time to keep these trails accessible. “Even if we can keep up minimal maintenance, just enough to keep them open for a couple more years,” Hennessy said. “Then it still stays on the Forest Service inventory. Once we lose more trails, we’ll get even less money to maintain what exists now.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


Check out dance, mementos, giant birds, murals and more

It’s time to start ticking off the days until Treefort.

I GOT THE MUSIC IN ME

AMY ATKINS In a little more than a month, thousands of eyes and ears—and, now, mouths (see Page 20)—will be on Treefort Music Fest 2016, but you don’t have to sit around doing nothing until then. As anyone who has lived in the Treasure Valley for more than a few days can attest, there’s always something to see, hear, eat or drink, and below are a few ways to stimulate your senses whether you’re jonesing for Treefort or not. Idaho Dance Theatre performs a tribute to famed choreographer Alvin Ailey at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, at Centurylink Arena. During halftime in the showdown between the Idaho Stampede and the Rio Grande Valley Vipers, IDT dancers will do their thing and local painter Patcasso will create a work of art based on their moves. More info at idahodancetheatre.org. In more dance news, Caldwell Fine Arts welcomes the Brigham Young University International Folk Dance Ensemble to the Jewett Auditorium on Friday, Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. With its new show Journey, the BYUIFDE will perform “Irish hard shoe, American clogging, Ukrainian Hopak” and more. Get info and tickets at caldwellfinearts.org. From movement to memory, we head to Ming Studios where the Museum of Broken Relationships exhibit of the same name gets refreshed. Of the 50 local items submitted, 25 were displayed during the first half of the exhibit, which runs through Thursday, March 3; the other 25 take their place for the last. Visit mingstudios.org for info and hours. Speaking of damaged relationships, we almost lost the majestic California condor to extinction—by the early 1980s, the population had plummeted to 22. Since then, the condor has been reintroduced to a few Western states and Mexico, but the giant carrion feeder remains an endangered species and conservation efforts are still an integral part of its BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Top left: Tarmo Watia; top right: BYU International Folk Dance Ensemble; bottom right: Ellen DeAngelis (rendering); bottom left: Fred “Uncle Fred” Choate.

survival. As part of that effort, local artist and Boise Weekly staffer Ellen DeAngelis and the Peregrine Fund World Center for Birds of Prey will unveil a massive installation: 22 life-size California condor silhouettes perched atop the Hitchcock Building (corner of 12th and Idaho streets). In conjunction with The Record Exchange and the Boise City Department of Arts and History, The 22, which runs through April, will help “bring awareness to Boise’s continued conservation efforts.” During the unveiling on Saturday, March 12, 1-4 p.m., DeAngelis and representatives from the Peregrine Fund will be on hand to answer questions. Speaking of the Hitchcock Building, its charm comes not only from what’s inside— The Record Exchange and The Edge—but the outside, as well. The murals on the building have become as iconic as its residents, though the painter isn’t quite as well known. During the past few decades, local muralist/artist Fred Choate (known to this writer as Uncle Fred) has painted or designed and painted exterior and interior murals in private homes and hundreds of businesses, including the RX, the Pioneer Building, Cafe Ole and Chicago Connection, to name a few. Choate is also a consummate plein air painter, capturing the light and color of scenic outdoor Idaho. Now, around 30 of the prolific painter’s landscapes

will be on permanent display at the downtown Dawson Taylor (219 N. Eighth St.). The work will be for sale, and Choate said he’ll rotate the pieces in the exhibit (seriously, he is prolific), which he’s calling Backcountry Blend. See examples of all of Choate’s work at fredchoate. com. Speaking of permanent displays, a new BoDo art gallery, LaBry Fine Art, opened its doors in mid-December 2015. It was founded by John LaBry (la-BREE), who has been a patron/collector/dealer of fine art for much of his life. LaBry, who works at Micron Technology, said two things caused him to open the gallery. “One, I have a passion for art,” LaBry said. “As I made my way around the galleries here, I noticed it was such a mix of a combination of some good things, some craft things and some amateur work. It seemed like there was a missing player. The other thing was, I know this is a tougher market. People who buy higher-end art probably go to Sun Valley or Seattle or San Francisco, but people also told me they get asked often if there’s any place to buy high-end art here. Also, with the hotels going in, there’s an uptick in business … that’s a good thing.” Among its artists, LaBry Fine Art carries work by Colombian-born painter/sculptor Guilloume Perez-Zapata and local artist Tarmo Watia. Visit facebook.com/LaBry-FineArt for info and hours.

The genesis of the annual Treefort Music Fest is right in the name: music. Though the fest has branched out into even more cultural experiences—film, technology, comedy, beer, performance art, storytelling, yoga and food—the music is still the siren song beckoning thousands to downtown Boise. In this, Treefort’s fifth year, there are more than 400 bands and musicians on the lineup and, while we can’t catch every show, below are some acts whose call we’ll definitely TREEFORT MUSIC FEST heed. Wednesday, March We’re 23-Sunday, March 27 crazy proud of Various times, prices and the locally born locations. Visit treefortor based bands musicfest.com for full on the Treefort schedule. roster because they kick some serious musical ass. We can’t wait to see Built to Spill, Magic Sword, Wolvserpent (and Aelter IV), Youth Lagoon, Finn Riggins, Hollow Wood, Clarke and the Himselfs, Jeff Crosby and the Refugees, Oso Negro and With Child, as well as the other Idaho gems. California is sending us some of its finest, like Yacht, Chelsea Wolfe, Cy Dune, La Luz, Street Fever, Tara Brooks, Teeph and the not-to-be-missed Thundercat. It’s also important to note acts come from across the globe to play Treefort (good on ya, Treefort organizers). Sure, some of them are on tours that put them in our proximity, but they could chosen to bypass Boise for a couple of days off between shows. So, big thanks to Charles Bradley and His Extraordinaires (Brooklyn), White Denim (Austin), Diarrhea Planet (Nashville), French Horn Rebellion (Brooklyn), Into It. Over It. (Chicago), Methyl Ethel (Perth, Australia) and all the other bands and musicians heading our way to rock our world. —Amy Atkins BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 15

JENNY BOWLER

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST S

THERE ART ALWAYS THINGS TO DO

ARTS & CULTURE

CULTURE NEWS


LISTEN HERE

SUMMERFIELD CONCERTS, MAY-AUGUST 2016, MEMORIAL STADIUM This summer, Memorial Stadium, home to the Boise Hawks, will play host to a new concert series that is sure to… hit a homerun. It starts Monday, May 30, with Leon Bridges (above), whose Coming Home (Columbia, 2015) was nominated for Best R&B Album—he didn’t win, but there’s no shame in losing to D’Angelo’s incredible Black Messiah (RCA, 2014). Andra Day opens the show. On Tuesday, July 12, 40-somethings can feel 20-something again with a triple header: synth-pop acts OMD and Howard Jones open for rockers Barenaked Ladies. The series wraps up with Los Angeles-based indie folk band Lord Huron, which has blown up since its 2012 debut Lonesome Dreams (Iamsound). Opening for Lord Huron is bluegrass-folk group Trampled By Turtles, known for playing at breakneck speed but whose seventh studio release Wild Animals (Banjodad Records, 2014) was called a “thoughtful, stately grower of a record” by NPR. —Amy Atkins Various times and prices. Memorial Stadium, 5600 Glenwood St., Garden City. Visit ticketweb.com for tickets.

16 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY FEB. 17

THURSDAY FEB. 18

FRIDAY FEB. 19

BREAD AND CIRCUS—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

THE BUDOS BAND—7 p.m. $18 adv., $20 door. Neurolux

BRETT REID—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

DAN COSTELLO TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DIANE COFFEE—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

DJ ZUZ—9 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s

DYING FAMOUS—With Wayland, Faded Leroy and The Forgotten. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

BLACK TOOTH GRIN—With Final Underground, We Were Giants, Mariana and The Good Guys. 7:30 p.m. $6-$12. Knitting Factory

JAMES MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato JAZ FAGAN—5 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LIKE A ROCKET—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY— Electronic live music and DJs. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid RED SWEATER LULLABY—With Terrible Light. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM WITH THE BLIND MICE—8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LONE TREE RIVER—With The Regulars and Sloth Patrol. 7:30 p.m. FREE. The District

EMILY TIPTON—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub

CRITTER SOUP AND NEW TRANSIT—10 p.m. FREE. The Olympic

FML EDM DJS—9 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s

CYMRY—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten

OLD DEATH WHISPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DEFJAK—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

THE OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND MOSQUITOES—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s STEVE AND GRACE WALL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato THIRSTY THURSDAY LIVE MUSIC—6-9 p.m. FREE. Rice

DIMOND SAINTS—10 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Reef EMILY TIPTON—8 p.m. FREE. Piper FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers IDAHO JAZZ SOCIETY: SARA GAZAREK—With Josh Nelson. Proceeds benefit the IJS Scholarship Fund. 7 p.m. $20-$25 adv., $25-$30 door. Sapphire

Old Death Whisper

ROTATING LIVE DJS—9 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s TAMBALKA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TREBELLE PIANO TRIO—7:30 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy TYGA—With Bonaphied, Lee Haze, and Young Verb. 8 p.m. $35-$65. Revolution

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE THE WOOLYBUGGERS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

SATURDAY FEB. 20

STRFKR—With Com Truise, and Fake Drugs. 8 p.m. $17-$45. Knitting Factory

TUESDAY FEB. 23

MONDAY FEB. 22

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

AUTHENTIC IMITATION—7:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Sapphire

1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THE IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION FORUM—6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

THE BACKUPS—With Lakoda. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

DAN COSTELLO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JOEL KASSERMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

BILLY BRAUN—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

ELLE KING—With Horse Thief. 8 p.m. $18-$30. Knitting Factory

OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

BUILT FOR SLOW—One-man rock band from Ethiopia. 7 p.m. FREE. High Note

OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

DAPPER DOYLE BURLESQUE—8 p.m. $10. Shredder CYMRY—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten DJ STARDUST LOUNGE—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux DJ ZUZ—9 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s DOUGLAS CAMERON—8 p.m. FREE. Piper FIONA LURAY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

REBECCA SCOTT TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

JOHN JONES TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KENT PERSONS AND FRIENDS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s THE LOCHNESS MOBSTERS— With Atomic Moses. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

MICHAELA FRENCH—1 p.m. FREE. Artistblue OLD DEATH WHISPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s SALSA FIESTA—DJ Giovanni. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. $8. Knitting Factory SYNRGY—10 p.m. $5. Reef

SUNDAY FEB. 21 LOS TEMERARIOS—With Industria del Amor and Los Fugitivos. 8 p.m. $45-$75. Revolution NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJ’S—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

•Custom Sheepskin and Cloth Seat Covers •Sheepskin Slippers ers •Rugs and Sheepskin skin Accessories

LOCAL & MOBILEE SERVICE U! WE COME TO YOU! CALL FOR APPOINTMENT NTMENT

Boise 407-9498

MARTHA REDBONE ROOTS PROJECT—7 p.m. $15-$60. Sun Valley Opera House MICAH STEVENS QUINTET AND NOAH JESSEE’S BROCCOLI EXPERIMENT—7 p.m. $8-$10. Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy

The Sheepskin Specialist

WESTERN DAUGHTER EP RELEASE SHOW—With Ghost Tours and Telescopes as Time Machines. 7 p.m. $5. The Olympic

L ARRY BUSACCA

JIM LEWIS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

OPEN MIC WITH CRAIG SLOVER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: SLEEPY SEAHORSE—With Revolt Revolt. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

TONY BENNETT, JUNE 2, OUTLAW FIELD At 89 years old, no one would fault Tony Bennett for spending his days napping and waiting for Jeopardy to air. Instead, the 18-time Grammy Award winner is not only still singing, he remains relevant— even to younger audiences—thanks, in part, to a handful releases. On Duets: An American Classic (Sony, 2006), Bennett was joined by singers like Bono, Celine Dion and Tim McGraw. On Duets II (Columbia, 2011), his singing partners included Mariah Carey, Queen Latifah, John Mayer, Carrie Underwood, Amy Winehouse and Lady Gaga. Working with Mother Monster must have been magical because in 2014, Bennett and Gaga released Cheek to Cheek (Columbia), a collection of classics from songwriters such as Irving Berlin and Cole Porter. It confirmed Gaga was no mere novelty in a meat dress and brought a gaggle of new fans to the Bennett camp. The veteran crooner heads to Boise Thursday, June 2, and though that’s a long way out, be like Bennett: Don’t wait until it’s too late. —Amy Atkins 7 p.m., $58-$102. Outlaw Field at the Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. Tickets available via ticketmaster.com. BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 17


REDCARPET MOVIE AWARDS 2016

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BEST PICTURE We’ve always considered Boise Weekly readers to be Oscar-caliber. But this year, along with our friends at The Balcony and The Flicks, BW is offering a bit of our own red carpet revelry with the 2016 Red Carpet Movie Awards. First prize is an amazing unlimited movie pass to the Flicks for a full year; second prize is an overnight stay at Cactus Pete’s in Jackpot, Nev.; third prize is a $75 bar tab at The Balcony; fourth prize is a 10-admission movie pass to The Flicks; and fifth prize includes two movie tickets to any show at The Flicks.

WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)

Bridge of Spies

Bridge of Spies

Brooklyn

Ex Machina

Mad Max: Fury Road

Inside Out

Room

Spotlight

Spotlight

Straight Outta Compton

The Big Short The Martian The Revenant

WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY) Brooklyn Carol

DIRECTING

Room

Mad Max: Fury Road - George Miller

The Big Short

Room - Lenny Abrahamson

The Martian

Spotlight - Tom McCarthy The Big Short - Adam McKay The Revenant - Alejandro G. Inarritu

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG) “Earned It” - Fifty Shades of Grey “Manta Ray” - Racing Extinction

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Entry is very simple. Register at redcarpetballot. boiseweekly.com, You can also text “boiseweekly” at 77948 and have the ballot sent to your smartphone. Make your picks (and share them with your friends). That’s it. Voting is open until 5 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 28. Enjoy the show, or join the fun at The Balcony’s own Red Carpet extravaganza, starting about one hour before the ceremony and continuing through the night.

“Simple Song #3” - Youth

Bryan Cranston - Trumbo

“Til It Happens To You” - The Hunting Ground

Eddie Redmayne - The Danish Girl

“Writing’s On The Wall” - Spectre

Leonardo DiCaprio - The Revenant Matt Damon - The Martian Michael Fassbender - Steve Jobs

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM Anomalisa Boy and the World

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

The Flicks continues to be your Oscar headquarters. Many of this year’s nominees are currently screening (The Big Short, Brooklyn, 45 Years) and even more Oscar nominees are heading to The Flicks in the coming week, including Theeb, Son of Saul, Mustang and Embrace of the Serpent (all nominated for Best Foreign Film).

Inside Out

Brie Larson - Room

Shaun the Sheep Movie

Cate Blanchett - Carol

When Marnie Was There

Join the fun at The Balcony Club’s Oscar viewing party. Sunday, Feb. 28, getting underway at 6 p.m. and continuing through the night.

Charlotte Rampling - 45 Years Jennifer Lawrence - Joy Saoirse Ronan - Brooklyn

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM A War - Denmark Embrace of the Serpent - Colombia

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Mustang - France

Christian Bale - The Big Short

Son of Saul - Hungary

Mark Ruffalo - Spotlight

Theeb - Jordan

Mark Rylance - Bridge of Spies

Need some help on some of the tougher categories? I’ve made my own picks on a sample ballot to the right (feel free to use any of them). But honestly, your guess is as good as mine. —George Prentice

Sylvester Stallone - Creed

TIE BREAKER:

Tom Hardy - The Revenant

How many of its nominated Oscars will The Revenant win?

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Alicia Vikander - The Danish Girl Jennifer Jason Leigh - The Hateful Eight Kate Winslet - Steve Jobs Rachel McAdams - Spotlight Rooney Mara - Carol

18 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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SCREEN TWO MEN, A LADY AND A VAN Hitchcock, Truffaut and Maggie Smith prove truth is more interesting than fiction GEORGE PRENTICE Racial diversity wasn’t the only thing kicked to the curb by the Motion Picture Academy this year. Also lacking nominations are two films opening this week in Boise: The Lady in the Van and Hitchcock/Truffaut. The latter is for anyone who loves classic cinema, and the former for anyone who loves Maggie Smith— that just about includes everyone, doesn’t it? The Lady in the Van, is based on a true story. Dame Maggie, already a two-time Oscar winner, is glorious as a mysterious lady with an equally mysterious van. More important, the film elevates the ripped-from-the-headlines conversation about homelessness and Caution: geniuses at work. Maggie Smith (left), Francois Truffaut (center) and Alfred Hitchcock (right). occupies rarefied air: being socially and culturally relevant while also being a cracking good evening of entertainment. deconstructs scenes from Psycho—particularly The “lady” was Mary Shepherd, who, unin- accident. The film is a brilliant reminder that vited, parked her van in the London driveway everyone, no matter their economic status, has a pedestrian shot of Janet Leigh driving a car—it feels like stepping into an exclusive a story. of Alan Bennett and remained there for 15 film school. Which leads us to the master of suspense, years. Little did Shepherd know Bennett was With scenes from Psycho, Vertigo and Alfred Hitchcock, who chose to tell his story an acclaimed playwright. Several years after other Hitchcock classics, Hitchcock/Truffaut to fellow filmmaker Francois Truffaut. In Shepherd passed, Bennett not only wrote The sharpens the focus in a new and refreshing Lady in the Van, he played himself on the Lon- recording sessions spread out over eight days in 1962, Truffaut (The 400 Blows, way. If you’re not anxious to re-watch Vertigo don stage opposite Smith. or Psycho after screenJules et Jim) sat with a It took 15 years to bring ing Hitchcock/Truffaut, willing Hitchcock and the story to the screen, but LADY IN THE VAN (PG-13) HITCHCOCK/TRUFFAUT (PG-13) you’re not paying attendrilled into the master’s it was worth the wait. Starring Maggie Smith, Jim Starring Alfred Hitchcock and tion. career. A full 33 years Shepherd’s van set new Broadbent, James Corden Francois Truffaut We discover many Hitchcock’s junior, standards in hoarding: surprises in Hitchcock/ Truffaut worshiped clothes, newspapers and Directed by Nicholas Hytner Directed by Kent Jones Truffaut including that the director and went food (she had a particular Open Friday, Feb. 19, at The Open Friday, Feb. 19, at The the two men shared a to each interview affection for onions) were Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., 208Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., 208342-4288, theflicksboise.com. childhood trauma: both fully prepared. What all askew. Shepherd was 342-4288, theflicksboise.com. were imprisoned by resulted was Hitchcock also especially cantankertheir fathers as a form of by Truffaut, a book ous. punishment for a minor considered a definitive “Shut the door,” she offense; and even though the directors were would shout at the neighbors who brought her study of filmmaking that includes detailed separated by more than three decades, they insight from two legendary directors. Martin blankets, food and even Christmas presents. Scorsese, Wes Anderson and more great direc- died within four years of one another—Truf“I’m a busy woman.” Shepherd was anything but “busy,” but she tors appear in the new documentary, confirm- faut at 52, Hitchcock at 80. We will never see the likes of them again, but we revisit their ing the book is still a “bible” and what the was a woman of many secrets and The Lady film’s narration calls “one of the few indispens- masterworks time and again. Hitchcock/Trufin the Van peels away the layers, uncovering a faut urges us to do that sooner than later. able books about movies.” When Scorsese seaside cottage, a convent and an automobile BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 19


BEERGUZZLER BARLEY WINE

STONE OLD GUARDIAN BARLEY WINE STYLE ALE, $8-$10 This one is bright amber in the glass and topped by a decent head that fades quickly. Assertive hop aromas dominate, along with hints of citrus and mint. The palate is a round and complex mix of peach, tangerine, toffee, smooth hops and creamy chocolate. There is some heat, but it’s mostly on the finish. SIERRA NEVADA BIGFOOT BARLEYWINE STYLE ALE, $2.50-$3 The mocha head on this dark amber pour collapses quickly but leaves a nice lacing. It opens with fruity aromas that blend with the creamy malt and hops that are anything but subtle on the palate, where they add crisp bitterness from start to finish. Orange, apricot and fig flavors lurk in the background with the malt. WOODLAND EMPIRE CHAPTER TWO: FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN ENGLISH-STYLE BARLEYWINE, $9-$11 This barley wine, which should be in the running for “Longest Brew Name,” is a dark tan with a thin, porous head. Definitely English in style, it has light hops, caramel laced malt and a boozy finish. Aromas are a mix of fruit and toasted grain while the flavors are toffee, candied peach and sweet coffee with cream. It’s a great offering from this local brewery. —David Kirkpatrick 20 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

FOOD

L AURIE PE ARMAN

The name “barley wine” dates back to ancient Greece, where fermented grain drinks were called krithinos oinos, or barley wine (thanks, Wikipedia). Barley wine is brewed like any other beer, but it achieves high alcohol levels more typical of wine. Also, like wine, they are age-worthy, evolving beautifully with a few years in the cellar. All but the Sierra Nevada are bottled in 22-ounce bombers.

PULP NON-FICTION

Colbi Stone went with her gut and founded Boise Juice JESSICA MURRI The impetus for Boise Juice began in Colbi Stone’s stomach. The 29-year-old Boise native was diagnosed three years ago with gastroparesis, meaning her stomach muscles stopped working properly to move the food she ate through her digestive system. Instead, meals would sit in her stomach for hours, leaving her fatigued, in pain and ultimately malnourished. “I just kept getting sicker and sicker,” Stone said. “Those were some very dark years.” She bought a cold-press juicer and started making her own concoctions, which she said helped her gain back strength, energy and health. “The juice was allowing me to get all those vital nutrients that I’d been missing for more than a year,” she said. “I recovered and I was able to get off medications. It was like a second chance at life.” She took that second chance and founded Boise Juice with her mom. Mother and daughter spent hours washing, chopping and juicing fruits and vegetables from organic farms around the valley and sold their product at the Capitol City Market for the first time in August. The juice was a hit. Six months later, the 16-ounce bottles are now available at Wild Root Cafe and Market, Guru Donuts, Big City Coffee and the Glo Boise spa, as well as for home delivery. Bottles sell for around $8. Stone now has her sights set on the Boise Co-op and Whole Foods. She upgraded to a $25,000 cold-press juicer, in which she loads

Boise Juice offers several flavors that incorporate fresh apples, beets, kale, chia seeds and coconut water.

25 pounds worth of fruits and vegetables at a time. She pushes them through a grinder spinning at about 60 miles per hour, then the pulp is pressed with more than 2,000 pounds of hydraulic pressure. She adds no heat, sugar, chemicals or water. Stone and her employees produce 200 bottles per week. Their flavors include The Holy Kale, City of Greens, TropiKALE, Turn Up the Beet, Nice Melons!, Pineapple Chia, Electrolyte and Good Hydrations. The City of Greens features cucumber, fennel, green apple, kale, spinach and ginger, while the Pineapple Chia uses pineapple, pear and chia seeds. The Good Hydrations summer seasonal includes watermelon, coconut water, basil, lime and Himalayan sea salt. Stone said she’s also working on a new drink with almond milk and chai flavors. Her budding company also offers one-, three- and

six-day cleanses (drinking six juices per day and eating nothing during the cleanse), which “detoxify and reboot the system.” Stone said she couldn’t believe the number of orders that came in after New Year’s. She held up an entire delivery day because they ran out of bottles. “We also had a weekend recovery pack that we offered in the summer that did really well, for people who drank too much over the weekend,” Stone said. “We offer an immunity pack for cold and flu season.” Now, Stone is going to school to get a master’s degree in nutrition. Ultimately, her illness changed the course of her life. “The company kicked off from there. I wanted to help other people with similar digestive disorders,” she said. “It’s had such a huge and positive response. It took us by surprise.”

FOOD/NEWS TREEFORT MUSIC FEST MAKES A FORAY INTO FOOD Treefort Music Fest adds new forts like Netflix adds original programs. Like new Netflix shows, each fort fits the Treefort formula and brings with it another experience level. The newest member of the fest family is Foodfort (it will be paired with Alefort, natch). Boise Weekly food writer Tara Morgan was tapped to dish up the new venture, described in a press release as a “meeting of hungry minds and adventurous stomachs,” and which contains two main ingredients: Tastes and Talks. For Tastes, local chefs will share their gastronomical gifts by creating innovative “small bites” for sale: beer-braised duck and heirloom tomato jam on polenta from Cafe Vicino’s Richard Langston; kurobuta pork shoulder and kale with red beans and rice from Aaron Wermerskirchen at Juniper;

and potato gnocchi with mushrooms and truffle butter from Wild Plum Events and Eats, a new catering venture by Morgan and her husband, Alex Cardoza. At Talks, hear about Idaho’s wine industry; see award-winning documentary Just Eat It; learn about the “third wave” coffee movement; and hear what farmers, restaurateurs and food industry leaders have to say about “local” during a panel discussion moderated by reporter and writer Jeff Chu. There will also be Talks on food photos, grains, charcuterie and more. For a full schedule of Tastes and Talks, visit treefortmusicfest.com/ foodfort. —Amy Atkins BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN DR. CHUCK STABEN

The president of the University of Idaho talks affordability, football and the future GEORGE PRENTICE As Confucius said, “May you live in interesting times.” It’s an appropriate quote here, considering the recent expansion of the University of Idaho Confucius Institute. As the 18th president of Idaho’s oldest public university, Dr. Chuck Staben oversees U of I facilities in Boise, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho Falls and the 1,585-acre main campus in Moscow. When Staben sat down with Boise Weekly, it was to talk about the future: attracting the next generation of students, the fate of the university’s football program and how long he expects to remain on the job. Other than yourself, who’s the best college president in the U.S.? Thanks for wording the question that way. It’s Michael Crow at Arizona State University—he authored a fairly influential book, Designing the New American University. A great research university can serve its state best by assuring qualified students have access to a transformative education. So, let’s talk about that access. I’m sure you’ve heard of the recent survey of Idaho teens, particularly boys, who questioned the value of a college education. I think there were people in the study who question accessibility and affordability of a college education, but I don’t think that’s so true in Idaho, particularly at public institutions. But that perception can’t be ignored, especially the gender gap. If you look at developed economies around the world, women are increasingly becoming educated and men less so. Drill into that. Where is that coming from, particularly in western cultures? Men might think there’s an abundance of high-paying positions that don’t require too much higher education; but those old middle- and higher-income blue-collar jobs at sawmills, logging camps or mines have gone away. Idaho has spent a fair amount of time and energy on the Go On campaign, encouraging college education. Quite frankly, that hasn’t been overly successful. I’m not sure those ads are reaching the people BOISE WEEKLY.COM

who need to hear that message. How might you better reach out to those male teens? About two-thirds of our students graduate with about $25,000 in debt … in time, the return pays off handsomely with a college degree. But a teenager or 20-something is looking for more of a short-term return. Instant gratification. There are things that are more effective with young males. For example, video games work really well. Let’s talk about a different type of game: football. On Feb. 15, you made a critical presentation to the Sun Belt Conference trying to convince them to keep the U of I in the conference for Division I football. The options are whether we stay with the Sun Belt, play as an independent or possibly join the Big Sky Conference. There is considerably less revenue from a Big Sky relationship. Can I assume that you hear as much about this from alumni as anything else? You are correct. I take input from everyone. Do you think the U of I should renew a regular seasonal rivalry with Boise State? We’d love to in football, basketball or both. Are you talking to your counterpart about it? Yes, I’ve talked with [Boise State President] Dr. [Bob] Kustra. I don’t think it’s very likely that we’ll renew a football rivalry anytime soon. How long do you expect to remain in this job? I have a multi-year contract. We’ve seen four different U of I presidents since 2000, seven including interim presidents. It’s my intent to stay here 10 to 12 years. We’re crafting a long-term plan, 2015-2025, and that’s what I’m considering to be the bulk of my presidency. I’m having a great time, and I’ll do this as well and as long as I can. BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 21


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NYT CROSSWORD | ALL YOU NEED ACROSS 1 The Beatles’ first single, 1962 6 Cold-shoulder 10 Not fight all-out 14 1951 #1 Mario Lanza hit with lyrics written by 36-Down 19 Containing element #56 20 Jerry-rigging material 21 Musical lead-in to -smith 1

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66 Ones doing needlework? 67 Here, on une carte 68 Smooth over 71 Much I.R.S. mail 72 1990s-2000s tennis champ nicknamed “The Punisher” 75 Hit song title for Bob Marley, Whitesnake and Survivor 77 Symptoms 78 2010 R. Kelly top 10 album 79 Like some care 81 Basic ones are above 7” 82 Eyes impolitely 83 G.M.’s Mary Barra, for one 85 Opposite of vert. 86 1990 #1 hit for Mariah Carey 93 1967 #1 hit for Lulu 100 One of two circuit court characters? 101 Quiet coastal spot 103 Spirited horse 104 Foreign currency unit worth about a third of a dollar 105 Relative of ecru 106 Where Pamplona is located 107 Overrule 108 Breast implant filler 109 Inflate 110 Former telecom giant 111 The pack in a six-pack 112 “Well, whaddya know!” 113 Bad beginning? 114 Eyes impolitely 115 Court call 116 Mars from the vantage point of Earth, e.g. 117 Hindu honorific 118 Comedian Poehler 119 Approximates 120 Shogun capital 121 Where there may be openings in the medical field?

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33 Belittled 37 Scapegoat for the Fab Four breakup 38 ____ criminal 43 “Enough!,” in Ensenada 44 Mil. authority 47 One waiting in line at an airport? 50 Get back together, as 57-Acrosses 51 Camera feature

22 “See ya!” 23 Inappropriate 24 Kind of arch 25 Pelvic bones 26 Watch 10 episodes in a row, say 27 Circulates 29 Comment accompanying “That’s your problem, not mine” 31 Romantic date

BW CAREERS

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1 Insect also called a honeymoon fly 2 Stable locks? 3 Q.E.F. part 4 Showy ballroom moves 5 A piano has seven of them 6 Bar fixture

7 ____ Tribunal 8 Wharton’s sch. 9 Must 10 Declined 11 Martinique volcano 12 Met expectations? 13 Explorer Amundsen 14 Commemorative Yevtushenko poem 15 Change one’s story? 16 Ho Chi ____ City 17 One seeking enlightenment 18 6-0 28 “Sweet!” 30 Female W.W. II enlistee 32 Smitten 33 Soldier from Down Under 34 When doubled, an old college cry 35 Totals 36 See 14-Across 39 Copy 40 Kirk Douglas, Robert Wagner and Gregory Peck, for Frank Sinatra 41 Methuselah’s father 42 Transplant 44 Skill 45 Like some stud piercings 46 X’s 47 Turns at high speed 48 Aesthetes 49 Borscht base 52 ____-ray 53 What’s the point of marking things? 54 Renders harmless, as a bull 55 Brit. honor 62 Amor vincit ____ 63 Sending a child to military camp, say 64 River to the Gulf of Guinea 68 ____ Tin Tin 69 Reverse of WNW

70 Summer hrs. 72 Resembling 73 Antarctica’s Amundsen ____ 74 N.Y.C. subway line 76 2003 Hugh Grant romantic comedy 78 Rick, Ilsa and Victor, in “Casablanca” 80 Hawaiian Airlines extra 82 It has three dashes in the middle 84 Head of Olympus? 85 Spectacularly disordered sort 86 Serenades, e.g. 87 Like each line of an eye chart vis-à-vis the one above 88 ____ Kosygin, longtime Soviet premier 89 Nickelodeon’s “Kenan & ____” L A S T T A D A

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90 Perplexity 91 Follower of live or down 92 Bring to a boil 93 Come-on 94 Risqué, say 95 Silently greet 96 Basketball Hall-of-Famer Hank 97 Rant 98 Hold, as secret feelings 99 Tryst sites 102 Bizet priestess Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

F I N O N A R E D I A R A B L E R A F A B O U L A Y S S L E D I S B A S T U B H A L E E L L I L E S T U O D I S L I N E A K D T E T E S O

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Please call or email with questions: Ellen DeAngelis, Classifieds Manager 208-344.2055 ext. 3010 • ellen@boiseweekly.com

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BW ANNOUNCEMENTS ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS If you want to drink that’s your business. If you want to quit, that’s our business. www.idahoarea18aa. org (208)344-6611. CALL FOR ARTISTS We invite you to enter Smith & Coelho’s Show Off! 2015 Spring Fine Art Show, April 29, 4-9 p.m. 1151 East Iron Eagle Dr., Eagle. Now in our 10th year, Show Off! enjoys valley-wide recognition & publicity. Last spring over 350 enthusiasts attended an evening filled with art, music, refreshments, flowers and fun. This is our invitation to fine artists to participate in the 10th year of this event. Email an entry form to: showoffartshow@gmail.com. JOURNEY: A HEARTBEAT OF WORLD CULTURE The College of Idaho and Caldwell Fine Arts invite audiences to entertain their wanderlust with an evening of dance and music presented by the BYU International Folk Dance Ensemble. This new show is a 90-minute voyage of dance and music through the heartbeat of the world’s cultures. Friday, Feb. 26 at 7:00 pm. Order tickets at caldwellfinearts.org or 459-5275. TRIBUTE CONCERT FOR TT MILLER Cinder Wines is excited to have the Idaho Songwriters Tribute Concert to TT Miller at our winery. Enjoy a great evening of Music, Food and Cinder Wine. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Get more info and your tickets at: brownpapertickets.com/ event/2492398.

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ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

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E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com WARREN: Sweet, snuggly and chatty dude looking for a family to love. I play like a kitten.

TWILIGHT: I’m tons of fun, affection and energy, and I’m the only cat you’ll ever need.

ELWAY: I’m sweet, gentle and have an adorable smile. I’m looking for patience and snuggles.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

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LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

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KIA: 10-month-old, female, great Pyrenees mix. People-friendly, knows several commands. Needs a home without cats or young kids. (Kennel 322 – #30676059)

LINK: 5-year-old, male, dachshund mix. Happy lap-sitter but loves playing. Needs a home with adults or older kids. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #30520233)

COWBOY: 4-year-old, male, border collie/ greyhound mix. May never be cuddly but likes gentle petting. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #30231556)

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MINKA: 6-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Was surrendered by her previous owner. Frontdeclawed, so she will need to be an indoor cat. (Kennel 108 – #30743410)

MICKEY: 10-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Gentle giant will make a calm companion. Needs a home with adults or older, respectful kids. (Kennel 27 – #30707817)

SIMONAH: 2-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Found as a stray. Social but would prefer to be an only pet. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #30626856)

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BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 23


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MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Enjoy a relaxing massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard, Applepay & Googlepay. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492. ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377.

MUSIC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION PIANO LESSONS! Dedicated piano teacher seeking new students. Located off Marigold in Garden City, Beginner-Intermediate. Contact Peggy: 9414080 or pianopeggy0@gmail. com.

BW YOGA SHINE YOGA COLLECTIVE GRAND OPENING Come celebrate and enjoy the new studio space. 22 spots are available for our kick-off class, so register for this amazing grand opening class NOW!! Doors open at 11:30 AM- stay for refreshments afterwards. All new students can take advantage of receiving the first class free, and have the opportunity to purchase their first month of unlimited yoga for only $30! 123 Broadway st. www. shineboise.com.

AUTOMOTIVE BW 4 WHEELS CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! We Buy Like New or Damaged. Running or Not. Get Paid! Free Towing! We’re Local! Call For Quote: 1-888-420-3808.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Old paint on a canvas, as it ages, sometimes becomes transparent,” said playwright Lillian Hellman. “When that happens, it is possible to see the original lines: a tree will show through a woman’s dress, a child makes way for a dog, a large boat is no longer on an open sea.” Why does this happen? Because the painter changed his or her mind. Early images were replaced, painted over. I suspect that a metaphorical version of this is under way in your life. Certain choices you made in the past got supplanted by choices you made later. They disappeared from view. But now those older possibilities are re-emerging for your consideration. I’m not saying what you should do about them. I simply want to alert you to their ghostly presence so they don’t cause confusion. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Let’s talk about your mouth. Since your words flow out of it, you use it to create and shape a lot of your experiences. Your mouth is also the place where food and drink enter your body, as well as some of the air you breathe. So it’s crucial to fueling every move you make. You experience the beloved sense of taste in your mouth. You use your mouth for kissing and other amorous activities. With its help, you sing, moan, shout and laugh. It’s quite expressive, too. As you move its many muscles, you send

out an array of emotional signals. I’ve provided this summary in the hope of inspiring you to celebrate your mouth, Taurus. It’s prime time to enhance your appreciation of its blessings. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Coloring books for adults are bestsellers. Tightly-wound folks relieve their stress by using crayons and markers to brighten up blackand-white drawings of butterflies, flowers, mandalas and pretty fish. I highly recommend you avoid this type of recreation in the next three weeks, as it would send the wrong message to your subconscious. You should expend as little energy as possible working within frameworks that others have made. You need to focus on designing and constructing your own frameworks. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Old Testament book of Leviticus presents a long list of forbidden activities and declares that anyone who commits them should be punished. You’re not supposed to get tattoos; have messy hair; consult oracles; work on Sunday; wear clothes that blend wool and linen; plant different seeds in the same field; or eat snails, prawns, pigs and crabs. (It’s OK to buy slaves, though.) We laugh at how absurd it would be for us to obey these outdated rules and prohibitions, yet many of us retain a superstitious loyalty toward guide-

24 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

lines and beliefs that are almost equally obsolete. Here’s the good news, Cancerian: Now is an excellent time to dismantle or purge your own fossilized formulas.

favorable time to gather information about riddles and mysteries that have perplexed you for a long time. Be super-receptive and extra wide-eyed.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I would not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well,” said the philosopher and naturalist Henry David Thoreau. In accordance with your astrological constitution, Leo, I authorize you to use this declaration as your own almost any time you feel like it, but I do suggest that you make an exception to the rule during the next four weeks. In my opinion, it will be time to focus on increasing your understanding of the people you care about— even if that effort takes time and energy away from your quest for ultimate self-knowledge. Don’t worry: You can return to emphasizing Thoreau’s perspective by the equinox.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Poet Barbara Hamby says the Russian word ostyt can be used to describe “a cup of tea that is too hot, but after you walk to the next room, and return, it is too cool.” A little birdie told me this may be an apt metaphor for a current situation in your life. I completely understand if you wish the tea had lost less of its original warmth, and was exactly the temperature you like, neither burning nor tepid. But that won’t happen unless you try to reheat it, which would change the taste. So what should you do? One way or the other, a compromise will be necessary. Do you want the lukewarm tea or the hot tea with a different flavor?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You are entering the inquisitive phase of your astrological cycle. One of the best ways to thrive during the coming weeks will be to ask more questions than you have asked since you were five years old. Curiosity and good listening skills will be superpowers that you should you strive to activate. For now, what matters most is not what you already know but rather what you need to find out. It’s a

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Russian writer Ivan Turgenev was a Scorpio. Midway through his first novel Rudin, his main character Dmitrii Nikolaevich Rudin alludes to a problem that affects many Scorpios. “Do you see that apple tree?” Rudin asks a woman companion. “It is broken by the weight and abundance of its own fruit.” Ouch. I want very much for you Scorpios to be spared a fate like that in the coming weeks. That’s why I propose you scheme about

how you will express the immense creativity that will be welling up in you. Don’t let your lush and succulent output go to waste. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Asking you Sagittarians to be patient may be akin to ordering a bonfire to burn more politely, but it’s my duty to inform you of the cosmic tendencies, so I will request your forbearance for now. How about some nuances to make it more palatable? Here’s a quote from author David G. Allen: “Patience is the calm acceptance that things can happen in a different order than the one you have in mind.” Novelist Gustave Flaubert: “Talent is a long patience.” French playwright Moliere: “Trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit.” Writer Anne Lamott: “Hope is a revolutionary patience.” I’ve saved the best for last, from Russian novelist Irene Nemirovsky: “Waiting is erotic.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “If you ask for help it comes, but not in any way you’d ever know.” Poet Gary Snyder said that, and now I’m passing it on to you, Capricorn. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to think deeply about the precise kinds of help you would most benefit from—even as you loosen up your expectations about how your requests for aid might be fulfilled. Be aggressive in seeking assis-

tance, but ready and willing to be surprised as it arrives. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): For a limited time only, 153 is your lucky number. Mauve and olive are your colors of destiny, the platypus is your power animal and torn burlap mended with silk thread is your magic texture. I realize that all of this may sound odd, but it’s the straightup truth. The nature of the cosmic rhythms are rather erratic right now. To be in maximum alignment with the irregular opportunities that are headed your way, you should probably make yourself magnificently mysterious, even to yourself. To quote an old teacher, this might be a good time to be “so unpredictable that not even you yourself knows what’s going to happen.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the long-running TV show M*A*S*H, the character Dr. Sidney Freedman was a psychiatrist who did his best to nurture the mental health of the soldiers in his care. He sometimes departed from conventional therapeutic approaches. In the series finale, he delivered the following speech, which I believe is highly pertinent to your current quest for good mental hygiene: “I told you people something a long time ago, and it’s just as pertinent today as it was then. Ladies and gentlemen, take my advice: Pull down your pants, and slide on the ice.”

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly. com or call 344-2055 for a quote. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 2014 21988, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Fiddler’s Glen Subdivision, Plaintiff, v. Noel Hust, Defendant. TO: NOEL HUST You have been sued by Fiddler’s Glen Subdivision, the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 2014 21988. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-6294567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

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or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 14 day of January, 2016. DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ ROSE WRIGHT, Deputy Clerk PUB. DATES: Feb 3, 10, 17 and 24th, 2016. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 2015 17489, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Ryan Meadows Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Francis R. Ferrer, Defendant. TO: FRANCIS R. FERRER You have been sued by Ryan Meadows Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 2015 17489. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr. Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-6294567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should

immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 22 day of January, 2016. Christopher D. Rich, DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ Rose Wright, Deputy Clerk PUB. DATES: February 17, 24, March 2, 9, 2016.

PEN PALS BW PEN PALS 58 yr old lonely female hzl eyes, 5’4, brown hair looking for male or female pen pal. If interested in knowing more about myself please write Charlotte Mygrant #80710 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. My name is Belinda Leverich IDOC 80590. I’m currently incarcerated at PWCC. I’m doing a Ryder. I’m 28 years old, blue eyes, blonde hair. I’m looking for someone 2 write me that likes 2 have fun. My name is Krystalee Lomas IDOC #90238. I have long black hair, brown eyes, and I am 5’9”. I looking for a friend & pen pals to write me. I am also looking for someone fun and outgoing. My full term release date is 2/25/2017. I am in PWCC. SWF, 31, curvy-light brown hair, shoulder length, blue eyes. I’ve been in prison for 4 years and am looking for someone to correspond with. I should be release with-in the next 6 months or so, I’m form the Boise area. I’m easy to talk to and love to write, so don’t be shy. I’ll be waiting to hear from you. Write to Amanda

Stolp c/o Elmore County Jail 2255 East 8th North, Mountain Home, ID 83647. I am a single white female 35 years old blonde hair blue eyes 5’6” and 135 pounds. I have two wonderful children both boys ages 12 and 1 ½ years old. I am currently being held in Ada County Jail and would really like someone to write to and maybe connect to. I am looking for men ages 25-55 or woman ages 25-40. Jennifer Thomas #529506 Ada County Jail 7210 Barrister Dr Boise, ID 83704. Fun, sexy and very down to earth 50 y/o female looking for some new fun and exciting people to spice up my life. If you’re interested in learning more about me, write me at: Lisa Bilquist #71518 PWCC unit 2 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. My name is Kayla Dugger I am currently incarcerated at PWCC in Pocatello Idaho. I am looking for a pen pal, I am 27 years old, I have light brown hair, hazel eyes, weight 106. I like to hunt, fish, camp, snow machines, dirt bike, I love the outdoors, I am looking for people that enjoy the same and like adventure, I am looking for companionship. Please write to me: Kayla Dugger IDOC #90991 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204.

Hello. My name is Gabrielle Gould. I am 30 years old. 5’5 and about 150 pounds. My hobbies include: music, tattoos, drawing, writing, poetry, photography, water skiing, boating, nature, BBQing, etc. If you are interested. Please feel free to write me at Gabrielle Gould #90152 Unit 1 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. Age & race not important may send picture when replied to.

pal, size does noot matter would just like a friend may bee moving soon, my formal address on IDOC web site. Plus I’m a ginger, love cubby woman age 18-35. SWF Inmate, strong, beautiful and fun-loving. Looking for “mature” male pen pal- relationship now and maybe more later. Dawn Johnson #92608 U-5 1451 Fore Road PWCC Pocatello, ID 83204.

My name is Jessica Brown. I’m 24 years old, with curly brown hair, blue eyes, and a dancers body. I’m adventurous and spontaneous. I’m currently at Madison County Jail at 15 N 2nd E Rexbury, ID 83440. I’m looking for pen pals to create new friendships. Want to know more? Write me! Hello I’m Kenneth Strong #95094 ISCI 10C 68B Po Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Looking for a f/m pen

Free to good home: think Abercrombie and fitch model with a little less aber and none of the fitch. But seriously, I’m a good looking guy and just bored out here in my cage. If you love to laugh hit me up, Charles Reed Walters #76805, ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. And if you’re Megan, hit me up! I’ve been trying to get a hold of you like a crazy person Megan!

ADULT

My name is Juliet Summers IDOC #87208, I’m 45 yrs at PWCC doing sometime would love to have someone to write. If interested and would like to write, write to 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204. SWF, a babe behind bars. 5’2”, 120lbs, green gold eyes. Looking for interesting people from my hometown to talk to! Write Wendy Hiser 88392 @ PWCC 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204.

JEN SORENSEN HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 25


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

#boiseweeklypic

FIND SCANDINAVIAN SWIMMERS FROM TRADER JOE’S

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

DEAR MINERVA, I think recreational drugs can be taken responsibly. I think it’s a fun and affordable luxury for most people when the weekend finally comes. I have a friend who is struggling with addiction and is failing at that struggle. I want my homegirl to stop doing the drugs because they’re messing her life up. How do I share this legit concern when I still do drugs? —White Rabbit

Swedish fish are the bottomfeeders that probably lurked in the depths of Willy Wonka’s chocolate river. Among their other haunts was your parents’ candy dish—an environment they soon dominated as candy’s natural predator (people), devoured more edible treats. Eventually, they became rigid enough to peen steel, and were only thrown out when somebody cracked a tooth on one. Trader Joe’s Scandinavian Swimmers mean the days of Swedish Fish might be limited. Infused with lively, fruity $2.99, Trader Joe’s flavors and soft, gummy texture, these chewy lobsters, fish, seahorses and dolphins make Swedish Fish look and taste like last week’s mackerel. Scandinavian Swimmers are so delightful, they’ll be gone ages before words like “stale” or “dangerous” ever apply.

DEAR WHITE RABBIT,

—Harrison Berry

Addiction is a very serious issue. While some people don’t struggle at all with recreational drug use and can stay in “control of their party,” for some people that is simply not a realistic expectation. I am not casting judgment on anyone’s choices, but if your friend’s drug use is not manageable, it could set her up for a series of events that could destroy her relationships, future and freedom, not to mention that it ultimately could take her life. Before she hits rock bottom, organize an intervention or seek the services of a drug and alcohol counselor. You absolutely should share your concern, even if you choose to continue using drugs. Everyone is different, as is their genetic predisposition to addiction and their tolerance for various substances, including sugar, alcohol or drugs. Don’t expect any of this to be easy. After all, people only change when they are ready to. Good luck.

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

1.

BELA FLECK AND ABIGAIL WASHBURN, BELA FLECK AND ABIGAIL WASHBURN

2. 3. 4. 5.

12.5 MILLION

1841

160

Number of Africans shipped to the New World 1525-1866 during the transatlantic slave trade

Year the first photo was taken of ex-slave/abolitionist/writer Frederick Douglass (1818-1895)

Number of photographs taken of Frederick Douglass 1841-1895, making him the most photographed American of the 19th century.

(Transatlantic Slave Trade Database)

(John Stauffer, author of 2015’s Picturing Frederick Douglass)

(John Stauffer)

THE GHOSTS OF HIGHWAY 20, LUCINDA WILLIAMS BLACKSTAR, DAVID BOWIE IS THE IS ARE, DIIV 25, ADELE

6. 7. 8.

President’s Day at Bogus Basin. Taken by instagram user chuck334455.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT LOUISIANA SUN, LEON BRIDGES

Do you approve of how the FBI handled the Malheur Wildlife Refuge occupation?

TRUMPET VINE, BELINDA BOWLER

Yes: 79.37%

NATHANIEL RATELIFF AND THE NIGHT SWEATS, NATHANIEL RATELIFF AND THE NIGHT SWEATS

9. 10.

No: 17.46% No opinion: 3.17%

ANTI, RIHANNA CAYAMO SESSIONS AT SEA, BUDDY MILLER

FEBRUARY 1926

FEBRUARY 1976

Year historian and author Carter G. Woodson developed Negro History Week, which would become Black History Month

Year then-President Gerald Ford made Black History Month a federally recognized month

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to b e a s c i e n ti f i c s a mp l e o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r nati onal op i ni on.

13.2%

0.8%

11.4%

Population percentage of black citizens in the United States in 2015

Population percentage of black citizens in Idaho in 2014.

Percentage of black American military veterans as of 2014

(census.gov)

(census.gov)

(census.gov)

(history.com)

(NAACP.org)

26 | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 17–23, 2016 | 27


Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 35  

Trailing Behind As maintenance for Idaho’s backcountry trails falls by the wayside, funding dries up, too

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