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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

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“Hungover pancakes.”

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Culture Clash

Frank Church conference tackles terrorism with former CIA Director Leon Panetta

7 Life

VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 3 0

BOOZEHOUND 20

After ‘The Kill Team’

Convicted of war crimes, Andrew Holmes has served his time and returned to Boise, looking to restart his life

INSIDE Outdoorsy

Get the scoop on the Banff Mountain Film Festival FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Ken Fischman, Minerva Jayne, Tara Morgan Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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EDITOR’S NOTE FROM ‘THE KILL TEAM’ TO BOISE Gul Mudin was 15 years old, a farmer working in a poppy field in the tiny village of La Mohammad Kalay in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. Members of the U.S. Army 3rd Platoon, Bravo Company had rolled into the settlement that morning, Jan. 15, 2010, mounted on Stryker armored vehicles. The platoon’s mission was to sweep La Mohammad Kalay and root out anyone found to be supporting the Taliban. Among the soldiers in the platoon was Pfc. Andrew Holmes, then 19, of Boise. Holmes and Spc. Jeremy Morlock, then 21, split off from their fellow soldiers and wandered toward the edge of town. There they saw Gul Mudin, working alone in the field. They shouted to him, telling him to stay still. He complied and Holmes and Morlock killed him with a grenade and gunfire. Images of the kill can be found online. One shows Holmes, kneeling in his high-tech U.S. Army kit, a machine gun slung across his chest and a cigarette in his left hand. In his right hand, a fistful of Gul Mudin’s hair, holding up the boy’s blood smeared head—mouth agape—like a hunting trophy. Blood can be seen spattered on the dirt and running down Gul Mudin’s exposed back—at some point, his pants had been stripped off and piled on his waist. His limbs are willowy and his feet are shoeless. It is plain brutality, clear victimization and casual sadism. Holmes was convicted of war crimes and served five years in prison for the murder. Morlock, who pleaded guilty to three counts of premeditated murder, received 24 years in prison. Other members of the so-called “Kill Team” were also sentenced to prison, including Staff Sgt. Calvin Gibbs, who is serving a life sentence on 15 counts of premeditated murder. On Page 7, former Boise Weekly intern and freelance writer Lizzy Duffy profiles Holmes in his first interview since being released from prison and returning home to Boise in October 2015. Holmes talks about the groupthink that led to the murder and how he is trying to put his life back together. You won’t find that image of Gul Mudin’s body in this story, but I suggest you keep his name in your mind as you read it. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Jennifer Manning TITLE: “Cock-a-doodle-blue, Boise!” MEDIUM: letterpress and collage ARTIST STATEMENT: The Jim’s Coffee chicken is iconic in Boise; it looms large in the impossibly blue skies of summer and feels affectionately familiar. I made a small editor of 12 on 22-inch by 30-inch BFK paper. They are for sale for $150 ea. Contact jennifermanning208@gmail.com

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 3


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OPINION

What you missed this week in the digital world.

DEATH BY GUN THE VIOLENCE POLICY CENTER BASED IN WASHINGTON, D.C ., IS SUED A STARTLING REPORT ON JAN. 12 RE VE ALING MORE PEOPLE DIED IN IDAHO DUE TO GUNS THAN CAR CR ASHES IN 2014—WITH 213 GUN DE ATHS VERSUS 212 MOTOR VEHICLE DE ATHS. IDAHO IS ONE OF 21 STATES WHERE GUN DE ATHS OUTPACE VEHICLE DE ATHS. RE AD MORE ON NE WS/CIT YDESK.

CO-OP FOR CANYON COUNTY The doors will open Jan. 19 at the new Canyon County Co-op, a 2,000-squarefoot space offering local food from 50 local vendors. Already, 1,500 people signed up for a membership. More in Food.

COUNT THE HOMELESS The city of Boise is asking for 100 volunteers to help in a four-day survey of Boise’s homeless population, scheduled for Thursday-Sunday, Jan. 28-31. More on News/ Citydesk.

OPINION

4 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

STATELY Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter delivered his 10th State of the State on Jan. 11. His agenda: increased education funding and more mental health care. Get the details on News/Unda’ the Rotunda.

GAG ON BLITZ

What happens to the hype when the season’s over? BILL COPE Ringaringaring: Hello. This is the Cope residence. At present, there is not a Cope in the house to answer the phone. So you are out of luck unless you wish to leave a message, after which I will play it back and decide then whether or not I should have picked up while you were still on the line. BEEP! Mr. Cope, this is Alanah Bronahnah. Director of the “Trending Now Troop” of G.A.G Media, remember? Sorry to bother you at home, but this is an emergency. I must have the wrong email as I have been trying to reach you online with no reply. Is bcope@takeaflyingf***.org still active, or have you changed it? But it’s too late for that now, anyway. I have to have an answer by Monday morning or my career at G.A.G is toast. See, yesterday morning at our regular meeting of department heads and miscellaneous Vice Presidents, none other than Gorman Armstrong Gluppers, Junior, himself, stormed in and informed us he had just acquired the rights to the word “BLITZ” for the period running from the last game played by the BSU Broncos... whether that happens to be a regular season game or one of those bowl thingies they get into now and then... to the first week in August, when the word goes back into the exclusive domain of The Idaho Statesman. As I’m sure you know, Mr. Gluppers is the current CEO of G.A.G. Media ever since his father, Gorman Armstrong Gluppers, Senior, was lost in that incident with the bulls in Pamplona two years a... BEEP! Ringaringaring: I’ll talk faster this time. See, Mr. Gluppers really, really likes the word “BLITZ,” and when he found out it was available for approximately seven months every year... specifically, those months the Statesman isn’t using it to describe whatever the Broncos are up to... he instructed the G.A.G legal team to snatch up the rights so that we, and only we, can use it for our own purposes. That’s why he showed up at our meeting, to tell us we had until Monday to get the word... as he put it... “infused” into G.A.G programming from top to bottom, or he would find people who could. Honestly, I’m not sure what he likes so much about that word. Between you and me, I think it’s ugly. I had a roommate in school who would go on and on about how “blitzed” she’d gotten at some party or other. Every weekend, all weekend, it was “I was so freaking blitzed, I don’t even know how I got home!” Can you imagine? I was hoping I’d never hear that word ag... BEEP! Ringaringaring: So guess who got it all unloaded on her. Uh-huh. That’s right. Me! That’s what I get for being the newest employee in the room, huh? It happened so quick I didn’t even know what was going on until that stinker Larry

O’Clarry... he’s our Vice President of Content Marketing... he turns to me and says, “Well, Miss Bronahnah. I guess you know what we’ll expect out of your Trending Now Troop. And you’d better make it quick. Gorman Gluppers does not like to be kept waiting.” Trouble is, there’s only three of us in the Trending Now Troop, and Jimmy’s on paternity leave for six weeks and V.J. isn’t good under pressure. As soon as I told him what we were up against, he started crying and sending out resumes to every government agency he could think of. Other than that, it’s just me and the intern Kayla, and all Kayla could think of was that we turn our regular KGAGNews@5&10 shows into KGAG-BLITZ!@5&10. Which is OK I guess, only Larry O’Clarry indicated I’d probably need to come up with at least 30 uses of “BLITZ” a day if I wanted to keep my... BEEP! Ringaringaring: Please can you help, Mr. Cope? I am frantic. Our entire KGAG programming schedule for a typical day amounts to eight hours of infomercials, one hour of local news, and the rest is either syndicated talk shows or reruns of COPS and Everyone Loves Raymond. How do I get “BLITZ” in there 30 times? Gad, I think I’m going to throw up. Please, do you have any ideas? Please please pleeeeeeeze. ••• Tinkletinkletinkle: This is Alanah Bronahnah, Director of the Trending Now Troop of the G.A.G. Media Group. Leave a message and I will get back to you. CHIRP! Alanah, this is Cope returning your calls. Relax, girl, I got you covered. First of all, if you decide to go with that KGAG-BLITZ!@5&10 idea, get yourself one of those printed backdrops like they use at press conferences for sports teams and political events. Only instead of reading “Bronco Nation” or “C-PAC” you plaster “KGAGBLITZ!” all over it. Get what I mean? It’d be like wallpaper with the same thing repeated. Secondly, about half of all the commercials you run on that station are promos for what’s coming on next, right? So instead of saying “Stay with KGAG for six straight episodes of Everyone Loves Raymond,” you say “Stay with KGAG for the Everyone Loves Raymond BLITZ!” Then you can announce how Dr. Phil will BLITZ another negligent dad at 3 p.m. this afternoon, or Ellen will be BLITZing out some dance moves at 4 p.m. Then Emeril Lagasse will be cooking up a Barbacoa fajita BLITZ with Rachael Ray. And of course, during those infomercials, you could just run a tape loop that blurts out “BLITZ” every 30 seconds. It’s like... who’s going to be listening, any... Chirp! BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION A MODEST PROPOSAL One solution to Idaho’s wolf problem KEN FISCHMAN, PH.D. Next spring, Idaho Fish and Game will continue its program to remove wolf pups from dens, equip them with radio collars and replace them in their homes. IDFG says this will enable them to track wolf movements throughout the life cycle of the pups and give them valuable information on a vexing problem that has preoccupied Idaho state government. Wolf advocates however, suspect IDFG has other, clandestine motives. They assume radiocollaring pups will enable agents to more easily track and find wolves in order to kill enough of them to drive down Idaho’s wolf population, close to the minimum legal number of 100 wolves allowed by their agreement with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Keeping tabs on wolf numbers through use of these collars can facilitate IDFG’s ability to do this without inadvertently dropping the wolf population below that number, which is something Idaho officials want to avoid at all costs, as it would trigger a mandated review by USFWS and possible relisting of these animals as an endangered species— again putting them under federal control. Some people consider this conclusion to be paranoid. I suggest, however, that not only could the present program be continued, it might be expanded to provide a solution to Idaho’s perceived problems with wolves. The lowering of the Idaho wolf population to a relict, unimportant and almost invisible number of animals could be accomplished by equipping wolf pups, with permanent radio collars (expandable so as not to choke them to death as they grow). These collars would be furnished with remote scent detectors and strychnine self-injection devices, which could be adjusted in such a manner that if wolves were to approach domestic livestock within a certain distance, (let us say 50 feet), the strychnine injector could be automatically triggered to deliver a lethal dose to the wolf that would kill it within seconds. Thus these devices could prevent any possibility of wolves killing animals that ranchers value. One of the problems with present wolf management in Idaho is there is no sure way to know which of the many wolves that are now being killed in retaliation for livestock deaths are actually responsible for them or just happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. Equipping wolf collars in the foregoing manner would make it virtually certain that only wolves likely to predate livestock would be killed—not in retribution for prior deaths, but in a preventive way. Such methodology would not only be more efficient than sending agents out with rifles or traps, or shooting the wolves from aircraft, but it BOISE WEEKLY.COM

is less likely IDFG would be accused of unethical behavior toward these animals. It would “make the punishment fit the crime.” Alteration of such scent detectors might also make it possible for them to be used to prevent the killing of elk that hunters most value, such as bulls with big racks. This could be done if bulls are found to have a distinct odor. Anti-wolf people say wolves are impacting Idaho’s wildlife. Elk scent detectors in these collars could perhaps be turned on and off from a distance in certain areas so that only wolves residing in or occasionally wandering through places where hunters’ success rates were below the historical 21 percent would be targeted. The CIA is now routinely doing long-distance killing with radio-directed drones. Perhaps Idaho officials can persuade the federal government to share this technology with them for such a crucial task. These devices could be activated on wolves found in the Lolo National Forest where hunters have long claimed they have reduced the elk there, despite the fact that in some areas where wolf numbers are high, elk populations have actually increased. Doing this would enable IDFG to definitively show for the first time that such wolf killing was justified, in their eyes at least, because it had a beneficial effect on elk populations. There are other situations in which these collars might prove valuable. Despite wolves having never killed a single sheep or cow in the Idaho panhandle, they have been targeted there for elimination. There was no official limit placed on wolf killing in the panhandle during the 2013-2014 hunting season. This resulted in the killing of 85 wolves. There will not be a limit this coming year, either. With sufficient technological advances, cattle and sheep sensors could be used in southern Idaho, but remotely turned off in the panhandle. Doing so might persuade the rest of the country that Idahoans are not the bloodthirsty psychotics many believe us to be. Though the program is not likely to be cost-effective, the past few years’ experience has shown this is not a major concern of the Idaho Legislature and Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter. The Wolf Depredation Control Board was appropriated an initial budget of $500,000, passed by both chambers of the Legislature with almost the unanimous vote of Republican legislators. The Depredation Board reported it had recently cost them $43,000 to kill 31 wolves. That is a cost of $4,600 per wolf. That this was accomplished despite the Idaho government’s present shortfall in educational funds for the state, clearly shows where the priorities of our state legislators lie. BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 5


UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA KE L S E Y HAWES

NEWS CRISIS MANAGEMENT

Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s FY 2017 spending plan tops $3.3 billion.

THE (POLITICAL) ENEMIES OF HIS ENEMIES It didn’t take long for Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter to start catching flak from both sides of the political spectrum after delivering his tenth State of the State address Jan. 11. “Incomplete,” said Democratic House and Senate leadership. “A tax-and-spend bonanza,” wrote Idaho Freedom Foundation President Wayne Hoffman. Idaho’s chief executive had just unveiled a proposed $3.3 billion spending plan for Fiscal Year 2017—a 7.3 percent increase over FY 2016. “His budget should be declared dead on arrival,” wrote Hoffman, adding Otter’s speech was “devoid of exciting, bold, innovative and conservative policy ideas.” Otter boasted in his speech that “promoting and constantly improving education for the people of Idaho must be the foundation of our work together,” before saying he would propose a $1.59 billion public school funding package and a return to pre-recession operating levels. That wasn’t nearly enough, according to Statehouse Dems, who added, “We cannot compete in today’s economy if we are still trying to catch up to 2009.” Democrats said the inadequate funding was pushing more Idaho school districts to pass supplemental levies to survive, calling the levies “unfair taxes that residents pass to protect their children. … True leadership would work to correct this unequal educational system in Idaho.” Oddly missing from Otter’s State of the State was his previously announced plan for a $30 million state-funded plan to help plug the Medicaid gap, which has left nearly 78,000 Idahoans without insurance. Democrats have wasted little time in dubbing the plan “Ottercare,” saying the proposal omits hospital care, emergency medical transportation, cancer care, expensive prescriptions and mental health care. “To add to this, Ottercare comes at triple the price,” said the Dems, first by refusing federal dollars to fill the Medicaid gap, secondly by continuing to fund indigent care through local taxes and thirdly by draining $30 million from state coffers. —George Prentice 6 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Frank Church Conference inspires solutions to the planet’s biggest problems GEORGE PRENTICE

Vice presidents, senators, United Nations ambassadors, secretaries of state, secretaries of defense, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency and even a United States president have all stood before Boise audiences at the Frank Church Institute. The Boise State UniversityThe Frank Church Institute, which bears the name of the late-U.S. senator (center) has hosted (clockwise based institute has also hosted some of the from upper right): Al Gore, Shirley Chisholm, He Yafei, Gerald Ford and Gary Hart. planet’s preeminent ambassadors from China, the United Kingdom and even the Kremlin. director of the Center for Middle East Studies at “was pretty realistic about most dead politicians Now in its third decade, the Frank Church the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of not being remembered.” Nonetheless, the Frank Conference is expected to echo the world’s International Studies. Church-River of No Return Wilderness, created headlines in its 2016 iteration—titled ”Clash of “I’m fortunate in that I’m teaching in an area in 1980, and the Frank Church Institute, created Cultures”—as it examines ISIS and the turmoil that’s at the top of the global agenda,” Hashemi in 1982, affirm the legacy of one of Idaho’s most that defines the Middle East. told Boise Weekly. “People are seriously worried distinguished native sons. No less than former Secretary of Defense and and needing to understand why the Middle East “I don’t think that Sen. Church ever would CIA Director Leon Panetta will be participating seems to be imploding and why we seem to be have dreamed about this,” said Wenske. “Our in this year’s event. facing another 9/11 moment.” next big step is that sometime in 2016, we’ll be “Dr. Panetta, he’s a pro. You’ll always get a According to Hashemi, Americans had the creating the Frank and Bethine Church Chair, straight answer,” said Frank Church Institute and that in turn will create a Frank Church Insti- false impression that the U.S. had won the war Executive Director Garry Wenske. “If you’ve on terrorism following the 2011 assassination of tute professor.” paid attention to his remarks over the years, he’s Wenske has little time to wax poetic. He’s usu- al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden. never been afraid to be critical of current or past “But we’re back to square-one,” said Hashemi, ally in the eye of the hurricane, putting together administrations.” who added that the hunger for deeper analysis of what has become the highest-profile foreign relaThe historical significance of Panetta’s apthe crisis is more critical in 2016 as Americans tions events Idaho has to offer. In year’s past, the pearance at the conference shouldn’t be lost on conference has attracted scores of choose a new commander-in-chief. anyone who recalls the “You’ll notice that we weren’t talking about scholars, journalists and statesmid-1970s Church FRANK CHURCH CONFERENCE: international affairs too much—that is, until the men and women, including the Committee hearings, CLASH OF CULTURES late-President Gerald Ford, U.N. terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Caled by late-Idaho Sen. Friday, Jan. 15 and Monday, Jan. 18, 8:30 Ambassador Andrew Young and lif. Now, there’s greater focus on foreign policy in Frank Church, which a.m.-noon, $30-$600. Boise State Simplot Vice Presidents Walter Mondale political debates,” said Hashemi, quickly adding drilled into the CIA’s Ballroom and Stueckle Sky Center, sps. boisestate.edu/frankchurchinstitute. there has also been a fair amount of ignorance in and Al Gore. Gore’s 2006 apalleged misuse of law pearance sold out 10,000 seats at those debates. and power both at “I’m often appalled at the simplicity of analysis Boise State’s Taco Bell Arena. home and abroad. that we hear in the presidential debates,” he said, “Quite frankly, when we secure one highIt was a seminal moment for the nation and “and I have to say, more on the Republican side. for Frank Forrester Church II, of Boise, who rose profile attendee, another attendee follows,” said That’s a deep cause for concern. All the more reaWenske, who has the great fortune of having to become one of the most influential U.S. senadirect emails and phone numbers for some of the son to have conferences such as the Frank Church tors, serving from 1957 to 1981. Institute.” “I remember walking into Sen. Church’s office world’s most distinguished thinkers. Hashemi said he looks forward to engaging For example, this year’s conference will feature in 1964 as if it were yesterday. I was to become an intern,” said Wenske, who would continue his an appearance by Ambassador Thomas Pickering, with audiences on the complexities of Islamic politics and how ISIS flourishes in a climate that who has served as a U.S. ambassador to no fewer friendship with the senator for decades. offers only the option of corrupt tyrannical rule than six nations, including Israel and Russia. “Gosh he was smart, but thoughtful, caring “Once you tell someone that Tom Pickering is or rebellion. and always thinking big thoughts,” Wenske “This is an organization that can be defeated coming to Boise, you get people’s attention,” said added. “Today’s students? A good many of them and will be defeated over time,” said Hashemi. Wenske. don’t really know who Frank Church was, other “But we’ve got to have an intelligent debate on Of particular note at this year’s event will than ‘The Frank,’ and may not even connect the the best strategy to do just that. That’s reason be a panel discussion delving into the topic of Frank Church Wilderness with the man.” enough to come to the conference.” ISIS. Among the guests is Dr. Nader Hashemi, Wenske said Church had no illusions and BOISE WEEKLY.COM


L IZ Z Y D UFF Y

ANDY GOT HIS GUN

An Idaho soldier returns home after serving time for war crimes LIZZ Y DUFF Y

I knew Andrew Holmes as Andy. We were classmates beginning in the fourth grade, when he moved with his mother and siblings from Pocatello to Boise after his parents divorced. We attended our high-school homecoming dance together. I remember his big smile and drooping brown eyes. I also recall him wanting to make sure I had a wonderful time that evening; he was always sweet and kind. We lost touch after graduating high school. Later that year, I went to college in Montana to study journalism as he shipped off to basic training at Fort Benning, Ga., after joining the United States Army. Andy Holmes and Lizzy Duffy attended a 2008 homecoming dance together.

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Andrew Holmes arrived at the Boise Airport on Oct. 25, 2015 on American Airlines flight 572, touching down at 8:16 p.m. It was the first time he had been home since 2010. A burst of cold air greeted him as he stepped outside the airport doors, the first wind chill he had experienced in more than five years. Prior to his journey home, Holmes spent five years, five months and 15 days in a military prison for the murder of an Afghan man and had been convicted of being part of a group of U.S. Army soldiers dubbed “The Kill Team” while deployed in Afghanistan’s Kandahar Province. Holmes also ad-

mitted in a military courtroom to drug use and being in possession of a human finger, which Holmes said had been given to him by his staff sergeant. “Now, I wasn’t so innocent,” said Holmes. “I wasn’t the Andy Holmes that everyone saw as the easygoing, laughing, always smiling kind-of-guy. [But] now you’ll always know, no matter what, that I killed somebody. It was very much a coming of age. I didn’t feel an ounce of remorse for [the victim] or his family because that was how I was trained to be.” A team of military prosecutors said between January and May 2010, Holmes and a least three other American soldiers, part of U. S. Army 3rd Platoon, Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment, 5th Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, had been involved in the killings of three Afghan civilians for sport, and had even gone as far as staging the killings to look as though the victims had been a threat to U.S. forces. Seven others soldiers were ultimately accused of participating in the cover-up. By the time Holmes and his fellow soldiers were convicted in 2012, prosecutors 8 had called the war crimes among the worst in recent memory. BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 7


KIM STARKE Y PH OTOG R APH Y COPYRIGHT 2015

Andy Holmes arrived home at the Boise Airport on Oct. 25, 2015, greeted by his mother Dana (left) and her partner Wendy Vanderford (right).

‘I WANTED TO SERVE’ Growing up in Boise, Holmes said he rarely took anything too seriously, opting to spend free time with friends or playing sports rather than doing homework. Disagreements with his mother, Dana Holmes, about his friends and lifestyle made him eager to get out of the house. Dana, who previously battled alcoholism but has been sober for nearly two decades, didn’t tolerate alcohol or drugs in her home. She insisted on giving her son at-home drug tests, which he failed due to marijuana use. Andy said that’s when Dana barred him from seeing friends he usually smoked with, adding that his mother’s restrictions pushed him to consider joining the Army. “I wanted to serve my country,” said Holmes. “I wanted to be proud of something because I hadn’t really done much at that point that I was really proud of. I wanted to do something so intense and so crazy, and I would look back on that and say, ‘Yeah, I did that.’” Joining up also meant Holmes had to clean up his act. He started volunteering for Habitat for Humanity, got a job at a Boise coffee shop, and he said he quit drugs and alcohol completely. At the time, he said he hoped the Army would give him the discipline he felt he lacked. In the months leading to his enlistment, Holmes said he abided by his mother’s rules, 7

8 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

but there was still friction—Dana said she never wanted her son to join the military. Instead, she pictured him going to Boise State University, starting a family and staying close to home. With less of a long-term plan and more of a short-term solution to his homebound tension, Holmes moved out by his second semester of his senior year. In spring 2008, after barely passing his final math class, Holmes graduated with 400 other Centennial High School seniors—the young men dressed in silver caps and gowns and the women in maroon. Those who planned to serve in the military, including Holmes, were given special recognition during the ceremony. He stood up and shook hands with other classmates who would trade in their caps and gown for uniforms. A few months later, Holmes was heading for basic training and ultimately to Afghanistan, where he was assigned as a squad machine gunner, about one month before his 19th birthday.

‘IT WAS THE CLIMATE OF OUR TRAINING TO DEHUMANIZE’ Private Andrew Holmes’ platoon missions usually included two daily patrols hunting for the Taliban in rural villages near Forward Operating Base Ramrod in Kandahar Province. “I wasn’t ready yet. I had a lot of insecurities about my training,” he said. “The first time I re-

ally rode in a Stryker [armored vehicle] was my [first] mission. The first time I shot my weapon in combat was [when I fired] at somebody.” Holmes said for the first time in his life, he saw dire poverty. His platoon would travel from established cities with lights, cars and shops to remote villages where men rode donkeys and children played near human waste on the side of the road. Holmes said he felt no pity. “It was the climate of our training to dehumanize them as much as possible, especially the ones that we were going to be fighting, so that we wouldn’t have to feel as bad when we had to do what we had to do,” said Holmes. “From day one: ‘Take no prisoners, they’re not real people.’” He said it was a tense environment with the constant threat of combat putting everyone on edge, yet he found camaraderie in his platoon and met others who also joined the Army right after high school. That’s when Holmes said he picked up old habits to unwind—but this time smoking hashish rather than weed after patrol. Holmes said his team leader, Spc. Jeremy Morlock, talked about what he called “scenarios,” involving the possibility of killing Afghan civilians, but no one took him too seriously. “It didn’t even phase me,” said Holmes. “I was mad we were in that country; I was angry because they weren’t letting us perform to the ability that we could have, and [when] the

whole ‘scenario’ thing was brought to me, honestly, I really didn’t have an issue with it.” The “scenario” gained weight in December 2009, when Holmes said Morlock told him a new staff sergeant, Calvin Gibbs, gave Morlock a grenade to kill a noncombatant. Holmes said Gibbs was seen as a likeable person, but there were also dark rumors that Gibbs enjoyed killing for sport and had tattoos to symbolize each life he had taken during his tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. Before the platoon went on patrol Jan. 15, 2010, Holmes said Morlock told him to grab the grenade, saying something might happen. Holmes said he didn’t ask any questions when he retrieved it. During a stop outside a small village, Morlock ordered Holmes to “reposition” when he saw a young Afghan male tending a poppy field from behind a wall. Holmes said he spotted Morlock from the corner of his eye reaching for something, then throwing it over the wall. That “something” Holmes later said was a grenade. That’s when Holmes said Morlock ordered him to fire his weapon at the civilian seconds before the grenade exploded. Morlock later explained to the rest of the platoon that he and Holmes had just encountered an enemy, and Holmes fired in self defense. “For my mental sanity, I had to give [my trust] to [Morlock],” Holmes said. “We were BOISE WEEKLY.COM


COURTESY OF THE HOLMES FAMILY

Pfc. Andrew Holmes: “I wanted to serve my country. I wanted to be proud of something because I hadn’t really done much at that point that I was really proud of.”

walking around bombs; we were getting shot at. Our friends were getting blown up, so in order to have the mental clarity of knowing that no matter what happens, it’s pretty much going to be out of my control, I put my trust in Jeremy Morlock.” Morlock and Holmes had photos taken with the body of the 15-year-old boy, who was later identified as Gul Mudin. As Morlock held up the dead man’s head up by his hair, he gave a thumbs up for the camera. Holmes also held up the man’s head by his hair, holding a cigarette in his other hand, but with no expression.

‘THE MEANS TO KILL’ Holmes recalled that the following day, Gibbs had something to show him, revealing a plastic bag containing a human finger wrapped in cloth. Gibbs told him it was from the kill, and he wanted Holmes to have it. “It is really weird. It’s a very interesting feeling when someone hands you a finger,” said Holmes. “It was more of a proud moment. He made it seem like, ‘You know what, man, you’re a made man now because you killed someone. You saw him, you looked right into his eyes, you pulled the trigger and you killed him. So here’s a little token of that. Take this with you: Remember this moment because it should be a profound moment for you.’” Holmes said he recalled showing the finger BOISE WEEKLY.COM

to a few people during a poker game, but a day later, he threw it in the trash. --In April 2010, Holmes returned to Boise for two weeks. Holmes said his only plans at the time were to “start drinking” and forget about everything that had happened in Afghanistan. When he left for the Army in 2008, Holmes weighed about 200 pounds. But between January and April 2010, he said he had lost nearly 70 pounds after contracting a parasite. His mother said he wouldn’t eat or sleep while in Boise, and spent many nights pacing from room to room in the house. When it came time to drop him off at the Boise Airport, Dana said her son wrapped his arms around her and told her it might be the last time they would see each other. “He hugged me real tight and told me not to be mad when the guys in dress uniforms come to visit because they’re coming,” she said. “And he said it wouldn’t be the Taliban that would kill him. That was the last conversation—the last thing he said to me before he got on the plane to return to Afghanistan.” Holmes said he doesn’t remember that moment as well as his mother. He said he was still drunk from a screwdriver he had that morning. 10 Shortly after Holmes returned to Afghanistan, Morlock learned in early May BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 9


KIM STARKE Y PH OTOG R APH Y COPYRIGHT 2015

Hugs and smiles greeted Andy Holmes when he arrived at the Boise Airport on Oct. 25, 2015.

2010 that a member of the platoon, Spc. Justin Stoner, had complained to 9 leadership about drug use in the platoon. Stoner said in a statement to the U.S. Criminal Investigation Command that Morlock, Gibbs and five other soldiers— though not Holmes—confronted Stoner. Stoner also claimed they beat him. Later, Stoner alleged Morlock and Gibbs returned to his room to reiterate their message, and Gibbs showed him several human fingers. Morlock warned him that if he didn’t keep his mouth shut, Stoner would end up like the person whose fingers were on the floor in front of him. “The reason that I am worried or felt the need to say something is because the platoon has a reputation of going out and finding the right person and finding the means to kill them without reason, specifically the inner circle guys, especially [Morlock],” said Stoner in his statement to CID. “[Morlock] has three prior kills that none of which I believe were actually justified.”

‘MY JOB WAS TO FOLLOW MY ORDERS’ In September 2010, Dana Holmes was walking by a television set in her home when she saw an ABC News report talking about something called “The Kill Team.” 10 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

“[Gibbs] just really doesn’t have any problems with fucking killing these people,” said Morlock on a tape obtained by ABC News, adding that Morlock “laid out the scenario he said [Gibbs] used to make it seem the civilians were killed in action.” During the same report, ABC News displayed mugshots of U.S. soldiers, each accused of being a member of The Kill Team, including the image of Dana Holmes’ youngest son, now an alleged war criminal. Holmes returned to the U.S. that year but this time as a criminal suspect. Instead of returning to Boise, he was shipped to Joint Base Ft. Lewis-McChord outside of Seattle, where Holmes waited in confinement for nearly a year and a half for his day in a military courtroom. Back in Boise, Dana’s phone started ringing nonstop and news crews began parking outside her house. She said there were death threats against her family—she even urged her teenage daughter, Katie, to leave town after a particularly grisly article on The Kill Team appeared in the March 27, 2011 edition of Rolling Stone, featuring photos of Holmes, Morlock and their alleged victim, Gul Mudin. “We had several death threats that were deemed credible, so my home group [from Alcoholic Anonymous] came and picked up Katie and took her to Oregon for a week,” said

Dana. “She didn’t know what was going on.” But Dana continued to answer reporters’ questions, wanting the world to understand that her son came from a normal, loving home. To keep up with friends and supporters, she started a Facebook group, “We stand behind Pfc. Andrew Holmes.” The group’s initial members included friends and former classmates of the accused. It ultimately grew to more than 1,500 people. Dana regularly posted updates about her son, including reminders about court dates and where to send letters, birthday cards, money, books and whatever else he needed. In June 2011, Holmes’ defense team negotiated a supervised release, during which he said he wore an ankle monitor that cost him $153 a week out of pocket as he waited. At his court martial in September 2011, Holmes agreed to a deal in which he pled guilty to charges of murder by performing an inherently dangerous act, possession of a human body part and illegal use of a controlled substance. “Did you know that what Morlock was telling you to do was wrong?” asked Military Judge Kwasi Hawks during Holmes’ court proceedings on Sept. 22, 2011. “Yes, sir,” replied Holmes. “You knew that?” Hawks asked again. “I knew that, sir.”

The following day, Holmes was sentenced to seven years in a military prison and was dishonorably discharged. “People need to understand that I hadn’t been in the Army long enough to think for myself at that time,” Holmes later said. “As a private, my job was to follow my orders regardless, because it wasn’t for me to decide what was right and what was wrong,” he said. “So did I think something bad was going to happen? Yes, but I always thought bad things were going to happen, and that kept me on my toes.” For their roles in The Kill Team, Gibbs was sentenced to life in prison and Morlock was sentenced to 24 years behind bars. Both are currently at the United States Disciplinary Barracks as Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas.

‘I HAVE ENOUGH TO KEEP ME SAD’ In April 2012, Holmes was moved from Joint Base Lewis-McChord to the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks at Ft. Leavenworth to serve the remainder of his sentence. When he entered the maximum security prison, Holmes said he had decided no one was going to tell him what to do, spending most of his time either reading or exercising alone. Holmes said he first sought answers through religion, reading the entire Bible twice and joining a Bible study group. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


KIM STARKE Y PH OTOG R APH Y COPYRIGHT 2015

Andy Holmes (right) was greeted by family, including brother Matt (left) at the Boise Airport on Oct. 25, 2015.

“I was told to keep praying, to keep asking God and he’ll answer your questions in His time,” he said, but quickly concluded organized religion was not for him. Holmes thereafter considered himself an atheist. “I felt a huge sense of relief and calmness when I realized that I don’t have to abide by a certain set of standards that are set in a book,” he said. “This is my life, it’s not anyone else’s but mine. I control my life. I need to start living that way instead of putting off all of my problems on some deity or higher power.” In retrospect, Holmes said he now takes responsibility for his crimes, yet he doesn’t necessarily feel regret or remorse. “It really hit me when I was trying get ready for my parole, like, ‘How would I feel if I was the brother of Gul Mudin or [his] father?’ I would think about that. I would get very sad,” said Holmes. “And I would not want to dwell on that, so I don’t. I try not to. I have enough to keep me sad in this world. It might sound really heartless. I’m sure one day I’ll feel bad for what I did, but for right now, I’m trying to move on with my life because I have a life to move on to.” Holmes’ arrival in Boise on Oct. 25, 2015, where he was met by dozens of family members and friends at the Boise Airport, was much different from his departure in April 2010, when he warned his mother he likely wouldn’t return. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

“Instead of getting drunk and trying to forget what I had done, it was me not wanting to ever forget who was there for me,” he said. “They were all right in front of me.” Holmes quickly found a job at an RV lot near his mother’s home in Garden City, where he works as a technician. He spends his evenings with his family or high school friends or works out at a nearby gym. “I had a lot of seriously lonely moments, a lot of horrible, horrible thoughts over the last five and half years, but I think that comes with the territory of where I’ve been,” he said. “I have a whole new appreciation for life today— just the ability to walk outside, to feel how cold it is outside right now, even though I hate the fucking cold, I can feel it.” Holmes said he hasn’t really considered what will happen next. For so long, his only goal was to return to his family and home in Idaho. He and his family hope to someday close the book on this period of Andrew Holmes’ life. “The only people who have stuck by me were my family,” said Holmes. “I have maybe a handful of friends. The ones who put pen to paper were very few. I appreciated every letter I got. I think I found a lot of faith in humanity again. I lost a lot of that when I was in Afghanistan. I found a lot of it when I was in prison.” BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 11


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JAN. 13 On Stage BCT: LAUREN WEEDMAN’S WHAT WENT WRONG?—Boise fav Lauren Weedman returns with What Went Wrong?, a new collection of stories and a little something extra special. 8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes USING DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHS—You have the camera, you have the photography skills, but what do you do with the pictures? Learn how you can utilize online tools such as Shutterfly to organize your photos and turn them into beautiful displays and gifts. 11 a.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood

St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

Art ANIMALIA IV—Through Feb. 5. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com. CHINESE GARDENS—Through Feb. 14. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. FOLDING PAPER: THE INFINITE POSSIBILITIES OF ORIGAMI— Through Jan. 17. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. GARY KOMARIN: THE FIRST GREEN RUSHING—Through Feb. 5. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com.

THURSDAY-WEDNESDAY, JAN. 14-20

Two dance troupes: one contemporary, one ancient.

KNEELAND GALLERY: LAND OF THE FREE—Through Jan. 30. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5512, kneelandgallery. com. MELISSA ‘SASI’ CHAMBERS: TARPESTRIES—Through Jan. 17. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242, finearts.boisestate.edu. ROLE PLAY: CHANGING IDEAS ABOUT GENDER—Through Feb. 20. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. THEODORE WADDELL: OUT TO PASTURE—Through Feb. 5. 9 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. TVAA: CUISINE ART—Through Jan. 15. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, boisestatepublicradio.org.

Literature IDAHO WRITERS’ COMPENDIUM—Teen and adult writers get tips from published authors F.A. Loomis, Leon Powers and Codi Gary at this program, designed to help promote and share books, from initial conceptual ideas to publishing experiences. 6 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Victory Branch, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208362-0181, adalib.org.

Sports & Fitness BOGUS OPEN—Open daily. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. $20-$54 alpine, $15$25 nights, $3-$14 nordic, $12 tubing hill. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-332-5100, bogusbasin.org. BRUNDAGE OPEN—Open daily. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $16-$62. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800888-7544, brundage.com.

MONDAY, JAN. 18

POMERELLE OPEN—Open daily, with night skiing available 4-9 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $10-$50. Pomerelle Mountain Resort, 961 E. Howell Canyon Road, Malta, 208-673-5555, pomerellemtn.com. SUN VALLEY OPEN—Open daily. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $45-$125. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800-7868259, sunvalley.com. TAMARACK OPEN—Open daily. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $18-$62. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208-3251000. tamarackidaho.com/event/ projected-opening-day.

Citizen IBG SEEKS VOLUNTEERS TO TAKE DOWN LIGHTS—Did you enjoy the dazzling display of holiday lights at the Idaho Botanical Garden? Now your help is needed to take them all down and organize them for next year. Show your appreciation for

this annual festival of lights by contacting Volunteer Coordinator Karen Christeson by email or phone with questions or to sign up today. Most weekdays through January. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

THURSDAY JAN. 14 Festivals & Events BCT 100 WOMEN—Head over to Trailhead to join other dedicated theatergoers (women and men alike) to sup, sip and celebrate before making the two-block walk to Boise Contemporary Theater to catch the new production of Lauren Weedman’s latest one-woman show, What Went Wrong? There’ll be 17 delicious hors d’oeuvres, drinks and great conversa-

TUESDAY, JAN. 19

Calling all dreamers.

Explore without going anywhere.

PROJECT FLUX + MING 2016; SHEN YUN

BOISE STATE MLK LIVING LEGACY CELEBRATION

READING: BOUND FOR THE BACKCOUNTRY

This is a big week for dance. First up, don’t miss Project Flux + Ming 2016. Join dancers Lydia Sakolsky-Basquill, Bayley Brooks, Selby Jenkins, Evan Stevens and Jem Wierenga Thursday, Jan. 14-Saturday, Jan. 16 for a performance inspired by Ming’s February installation, The Museum of Broken Relationships. Next, catch China-based Shen Yun, a globe-trotting troupe with roots in antiquity. Its upcoming performances at the Morrison Center Tuesday, Jan. 19- Wednesday, Jan. 20 promise all the precision, discipline and splendor that comes with its illustrious heritage. Project Flux + Ming 2016: Thursday-Saturday, Jan. 14-16, 8 p.m. $20. Ming Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-972-9028, projectflux.com. Shen Yun: Tuesday-Wednesday, Jan. 20, 7:30 p.m. $60-$150. Morrison Center, 2201 W. Cesar Chavez Ln., Boise, 208-426-1110, shenyunperformingarts.org.

Martin Luther King Jr. hasn’t been with us for going on 48 years, but to honor his legacy, celebrate his achievements and continue his mission, Boise State University will host a march to the Idaho State Capitol on Monday, Jan. 18. The MLK Day of Greatness March and Rally kicks off at 9 a.m. with a poster making session at the Student Union Jordan Ballroom (materials provided). At 10:30 a.m., marchers will depart from the ballroom and make their way to the Capitol steps for speakers and performances until noon, followed by the state celebration of Idaho Human Rights Day under the rotunda. Poster making: 9 a.m., MLK Day march: 10:30 a.m., FREE. Boise State University Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, 208-4265800, mlk.boisestate.edu; Idaho Human Rights Day celebration: noon, FREE. Idaho Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson St., 208-433-9705, capitolcommission.idaho.gov.

It’s easy to miss the great outdoors before everything turned gray, icy and cold. That’s where literature comes in. On Tuesday, Jan. 19, the Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation kicks off a new reading series devoted to Idaho outdoors and conservation. Richard Holm, author of Bound for the Backcountry, will perform a reading at Rediscovered Books at 7 p.m. His book features the history of Idaho’s isolated airstrips, telling stories of homesteaders, boaters, hikers and pilots with more than 1,000 black-and-white photographs. Each reading will feature a local author specializing in Idaho’s best asset: the outdoors. The next reading takes place on Tuesday, March 15 at 7 p.m. and features McCall author Kathy Deinhart Hill, with an excerpt from Spirits of the Salmon River. 7 p.m., FREE, Rediscovered Books, 180 N. 8th Street, Boise, 376-4229, selwaybitterroot.org.

12 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


presented locally by:

BANFFBOISETICKETS.EVENTBRITE.COM BOISE WEEKLY.COM

TICKETS BOISEweekly | 2016 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR | 13


2016

BANFF

MONDAY, JANUARY 25:

THE IMPORTANT PLACES 10 MIN. THE LAST DRAGONS 10 MIN. BLUEHUE 5 MIN. REEL ROCK 10: A LINE ACROSS THE SKY 40 MIN. INTERMISSION

NATURE RX LIVING RIVERS: SURF KROGER’S CANTEEN ECLIPSE UNREAL TOTAL:

2 MIN. 3 MIN. 8 MIN. 32 MIN. 12 MIN. 2:04

TUESDAY, JANUARY 26:

55 HOURS IN MEXICO CURIOSITY SOUNDS OF PARAGLIDING UNBRANDED

9 MIN. 13 MIN. 4 MIN. 46 MIN.

MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR SCHEDULE AND FILM DESCRIPTIONS

BOISE HIGH AUDITORIUM INTERMISSION

DARKLIGHT OPERATION MOFFAT PADDLE FOR THE NORTH PARADISE WAITS

5 MIN. 20 MIN. 26 MIN. 7 MIN.

TOTAL:

2:16

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27:

BUILDER SALWEEN SPRING WOMEN’S SPEED ASCENT VOYAGERS WITHOUT TRACE

9 MIN. 9 MIN. 4 MIN. 46 MIN.

INTERMISSION

NATURE RX DENALI CLIMBING ICE:THE ICELAND TRIFECTA ROCKY MOUNTAINS TRAVERSE WARMTH OF WINTER TOTAL:

2 MIN. 8 MIN 17 MIN. 25 MIN. 6 MIN. 2:06

PRESENTED BY THE BOISE NORDIC FOUNDATION

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: FROM THE FILM THE IMPORTANT PLACES, © GNARLY BAY, FOREST WOODWARD; LIVING RIVERS: SURF, ©MA X LOWE

MONDAY, JANUARY 25, 2016

THE IMPORTANT PLACES 2015, USA, 10 min. Filmmaker: Gnarly Bay, Forest Woodward

Using a mix of old 16mm footage and new visuals, a son rediscovers the necessity of returning to and protecting “the important places”in our lives.

THE LAST DRAGONS

2014, USA, 10 min. Filmmakers: Jeremy Monroe, David Herasimtschuk. www.freshwatersillustrated.org 14 | 2016 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR | BOISEweekly

An intimate glimpse at North America’s Eastern Hellbender, an ancient salamander as mythical as it is real. And in many waters, myths are all that remain of these sentinel stream- dwellers.

BLUEHUE

2015, UK, 5 min. Filmmaker: Natasha Brooks. www.tashbrooks.com

Natasha Brooks swims naked year-round in the cold mountain lakes of Snowdonia, Wales. Through this she finds solitude, grounding and a deep connection to the natural environment. Winner of the British Mountaineering Council’s 2014 Women in Adventure Film Competition.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: FROM THE FILM REEL ROCK 10: A LINE ACROSS THE SKY; ©PETER MORTIMER, JOSH LOWELL, ECLIPSE, ©ANTHONY BONELLO

REEL ROCK 10: A LINE ACROSS THE SKY 2015, USA, 40 min. Filmmakers: Peter Mortimer, Josh Lowell. www.senderfilms.com; www. bigupproductions.com

Imagine a world where you ride the perfect trail perfectly, and sometimes snow isn’t the only stuff that falls from the sky. When you spend all your time at work dreaming about mountain biking, which life is real?

Long thought impossible, coveted by many and attempted by few, the Fitz Traverse has fueled the imaginations of climbers in Patagonia for decades. Tracing the iconic skyline of Cerro Fitz Roy and its six peaks, it spans four miles and 13,000 feet across snow and ice-covered rock, with epic route finding and endless rapelling. Seizing the chance during a rare extended weather window, Tommy Caldwell and Alex Honnold went big. The pair completed the first ascent in a five-day push in February 2014.

55 HOURS IN MEXICO

NATURE RX

Fly to Veracruz on a Friday, rent a car, climb the third-highest peak in North America, ski down and return to your desk Monday. How hard could it be?

Is life a little too mundane or overwhelming? Feeling tired, irritable or stressed out? Maybe Nature Rx is just the ticket.

2014, USA, 13 min. Filmmaker: Aimee Tetreault, Renan Ozturk, Tim Kemple. www. camp4collective.com

2015, USA, 2 min. Filmmaker: Justin Bogardus. www.nature-rx.org

LIVING RIVERS: SURF

2015, USA, 3 min. Filmmaker: Max Lowe. www.maxlowemedia.com

There is a new and emerging river surfing scene in Montana.

KROGER’S CANTEEN

TUESDAY, JANUARY 26,2016

2015, USA, 9 min. Filmmakers: Joey Schusler, Karl Thompson, Thomas Woodson. www. joeyschusler.com

CURIOSITY

How does curiosity inspire ultra-marathoners Rory Bosio, Timothy Olson and Hal Koerner as they prepare for the Ultra-Trail du Mont Blanc? Their artistry gives them lots in common with local artist Andy Parkin.

SOUNDS OF PARAGLIDING 2014, France, 4 min. Filmmaker: Shams. www.shams.fr

2015, South Africa, 8 min. Filmmakers: Greg Fell, Dean Leslie. www.theafricanattachment.com

Listen to nature’s harmony while aerobatic paragliding pilot Théo de Blic dances to the sounds of the sky.

In 2014, Kilian Jornet won the Hardrock 100 mile race through the San Juan’s of Colorado. Along the way he stopped at Kroger’s Canteen–an aid station perched on a tiny ledge, 13,100 ft above sea level. This is a story about that aid station, about the people who make it happen, and about the spirit one can only find at the Hardrock 100.

UNBRANDED

ECLIPSE

Four men and 16 wild mustangs set off on a 5000 kilometre journey across the American West from Mexico to Canada. In the spirit of true adventure, whiskey is drunk, tempers fly, tragedy strikes, and the bonds of friendship hold fast. Can the journey help save the plight of the wild horses roaming on public lands? Only time will tell.

2015, Canada, 32 min Filmmaker: Anthony Bonello, Switchback Entertainment www.switchbackentertainment.com

The odds are low, the risks are high – photographer Reuben Krabbe is determined to capture a photo of a skier in front of the 2015 solar eclipse in Svalbard. But the weather’s bad, the guide is sketchy, the pressure is massive and the skiers just want to ski.

UNREAL

2015, USA, 12min. Filmmaker: Teton Gravity Research. www.tetongravity.com BOISE WEEKLY.COM

2015, USA, 46 min. Filmmaker: Dennis Aig, Phillip Baribeau. www.unbrandedthefilm.com

DARKLIGHT

2015, USA, 5 min. Filmmaker: Rachel Franks, Matt O’Connor, Zac Ramras, Mike Brown. www. sweetgrass-productions.com

In 2014, the award-winning film Afterglow followed skiers down impossibly lit, virgin powder slopes in the dead of night. Get ready for the sequel, this time on two wheels.

BOISEweekly | 2016 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR | 15


PARADISE WAITS

2015, USA, 7 min. Filmmakers: Teton Gravity Research. www.tetongravity.com

How do you celebrate winter when snow finally falls? Freeskier Tim Durtschi takes tram laps at Jackson Hole and big mountain skier Angel Collinson rips up some Alaskan lines. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2016

BUILDER FROM THE FILM BUILDER, © JULIAN COFFEY, SCOTT SECCO

OPERATION MOFFAT

2015, UK, 20 min. Filmmakers: Jen Randall, Claire Carter, Alex Messenger. www. lightshedpictures.com

Operation Moffat takes inspiration and wit from the colorful climbing life of Britain’s first female mountain guide: Gwen Moffat. Writer Claire Carter and filmmaker Jen Randall scramble, swim and barefoot climb through Gwen’s landscapes, grappling with her preference for mountains over people, adventure over security and wilderness over tick lists.

PADDLE FOR THE NORTH

2015, New Zealand, 26 min. Filmmaker: Alexander Behse, Simon Lucas. www.paddleforthenorth.org

On an adventure of a lifetime, six young guys paddle to some of the most remote rivers in North America. It’s a 1,500km, 63-day mission to truly discover the secrets of the north and to show the world why some places are worth preserving before they are changed forever.

2015, Canada, 9 min. Julian Coffey, Scott Secco. www.pinkbike.com/builder

Some people grow up and leave childish things behind. Others just take their childhood dreams and turn them up to 11 as they age. Building trails and tricks for your mountain bike never gets old, no matter your age.

SALWEEN SPRING 2015, USA, 9 min. Filmmaker: Will Stauffer-Norris www.willstauffernorris.com

Travis Winn has been running rivers in China for 15 years. He’s explored first descents but also watched rivers disappear behind dams. Now he’s founded a rafting company to bring Chinese to see their rivers before they’re gone. Salween Spring is Travis’ meditation on change, personal struggle and kayaking along China’s frontier.

WOMEN’S SPEED ASCENT

2015, USA, 4 min. Filmmakers: Keith Ladzinski, Chris Alstrin www.3stringspro.com

Mayan Smith-Gobat and Libby Sauter knew that the women’s speed record for the ascent of The Nose on El Cap was theirs for the taking.

Crushing the old record after just a few days of attempts, Mayan and Libby put their names in the record book of the infamous route in the Yosemite National Park.

VOYAGERS WITHOUT TRACE 2015, USA, 46 min. Filmmaker: Ian McCluskey. www.nwdocumentary.org

In 1938, three Parisians pushed off from a Wyoming riverbank to attempt the first kayak exploration of the notoriously wild Green and Colorado rivers. They recorded their journey, creating the first color adventure film. The reels went unseen for 75 years, until Ian McCluskey spotted the trio on a roadside marker, sending him on his own adventure to discover more.

NATURE RX

FROM THE FILM VOYAGERS WITHOUT TRACE, ©IAN MCCLUSKY

2015, USA, 2 min. Filmmaker: Justin Bogardus. www.nature-rx.org

Is life a little too mundane or overwhelming? Feeling tired, irritable or stressed out? Maybe Nature Rx is just the ticket.

DENALI

2015, USA, 8 min. Filmmakers: Ben Moon, Ben Knight. www.benmoon.com

There’s no easy way to say goodbye to a friend, especially when they’ve supported you through your darkest times. A collaboration between Ben Knight, Skip Armstrong and Ben Moon.

CLIMBING ICE - THE ICELAND TRIFECTA 2015, USA, 17 min. Filmmakers: Chris MacAskill, Anton Lorimer. www.Smugmug.com

Join award-winning photographer Tim Kemple and ice climbers Klemen Premrl and Rahel Schelb for an expedition to Iceland’s Vatnajökull Glacier to discover new ways to push the boundaries of climbing ice.

ROCKY MOUNTAINS TRAVERSE

2015, Canada, 25 min. Filmmakers: Bryan Smith, David Pearson. www.reelwaterproductions.com

When Will Gadd and Gavin McGlurg decided they wanted to define a bold new style in paragliding, they could not have picked a more vegetated, convoluted and downright burly route to test their concept. With one simple rule of only being able to make forward progress in the air, they set off on a 700-kilometer traverse of the Canadian Rockies.

WARMTH OF WINTER

2015, USA, 6 min. Filmmakers: Ben Sturgulewski, Philip Drake, Erme Catino, Stephan Drake. www.sturgefilm.com

Outside, the snow flies and the wind roars. But here, quiet and safe in the candlelight, the warmth and the wood wrap around you like a blanket, and the mind melts into reflections of days gone by. Take shelter from the storm. Sit down by the fire, have a drink and take a load off. There is no warmth like a warmth found in winter.

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16 | 2016 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR | BOISEweekly

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CALENDAR 12

tion. Call the BCT box office at 208-331-9224, ext. 205, to reserve your place at the party. 5:30 p.m. $50. Trailhead, 500 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-5483, bctheater.org.

METAMORPHOSIS ART EXPERIENCE WCA BENEFIT—Enjoy a juried art show and music by Rocci Johnson, plus silent action, live auction, raffle, hors d’oeuvres and wine by Indian Creek Winery. 6-9 p.m. $10. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise. 208-331-3374, facebook.com/Art.Source.Gallery.

On Stage BCT: LAUREN WEEDMAN’S WHAT WENT WRONG?—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS—A cross between traditional Italian commedia and postmodern vaudeville, this new version of Carlo Goldoni’s classic pits the madcap servant Truffaldino

against masters, mistresses, lovers, lawyers and 27 plates of meatballs. Through Jan. 23. 7:30 p.m. $11$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN TYLER BOEH—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: MERCURY RISING—This show is born to be wild with burlesque, aerial acrobatics, modern dance, partner acrobatics, boylesque and more. The Jan. 14 show is a pay-what-youwant preview 9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297. redlightvarietyshow.com.

Sports & Fitness ANTHONY LAKES OPEN—Open Thursday-Sunday. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $10-$35. Anthony Lakes Mountain Resort, 47500 Anthony Lake Hwy., North Powder, 541-856-3277, anthonylakes.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 15 Festivals & Events 6TH ANNUAL BROKEN RESOLUTIONS BALL—Enjoy full bar, Neckar coffee, local art and clothing vendors from across the city at Boise’s longest running post-holiday event. Featuring live music by Interstate, a true Northwest original fresh off releasing “Momentum,” written for the documentary Beat Feet. Plus The Oliphants and Belinda Bowler. Visit the event website for details and tickets. For ages 21 and older. 7:30 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483. brokenresolutionsball.com.

On Stage BCT: LAUREN WEEDMAN’S WHAT WENT WRONG?—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS—8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

COMEDIAN TYLER BOEH—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Boise takes on Sacramento ComedySportz. 7:30 p.m. $9.99. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com. HELL’S BELLES (ALLFEMALE AC/DC TRIBUTE BAND)—If you’re an AC/ DC fan, don’t miss your chance to catch the tribute band tapped by Angus Young himself as the best ever (Blender, 2008). With Defenders of the Faith, and Trigger Itch. 8 p.m. $13-$30. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212. hellsbelles.info. RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: MERCURY RISING—9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297. redlightvarietyshow.com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

STAGE COACH: CAUGHT IN THE NET—If you enjoyed Ray Clooney’s Run for Your Wife, you won’t want to miss the sequel, Caught in the Net. Bigamist taxi driver John Smith’s teenage children, a girl from one family and a boy from the other, have met on the Internet and are anxious to meet in person since they have so much in common. Keeping them apart plunges John into a hell hole of his own making. 8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 17


CALENDAR Food BASQUE MARKET FRIDAY PRIX FIXE DINNER—Choose from appetizer, entree and dessert options, with suggested wine pairings available. Call to make your reservation. 5-8 p.m. $25. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com/friday-night3-course-dinner.

SATURDAY JAN. 16 Festivals & Events IDAHO REMODELING AND DESIGN SHOW—Tour 100-plus exhibits to discover what’s hot in decorating, kitchen and bath renovations, landscaping and more. With the finest professionals all in Also on Sunday, Jan. 17. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $5. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise. 208-376-0464, ibleventsinc.com. KICK START YOUR YEAR VENDOR AND CRAFT SHOW—Check out a dozen vendors ready to help you start off your year in style and begin that journey toward health and well-being. There’ll be refreshments, door prizes and more. Pro-

ceeds benefit the Savvy Networking Ladies scholarship program. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. La Quinta Inn & Suites Boise Towne Square, 7965 W. Emerald St., Boise, 208-3787000. infosavvyladies.wix.com. LOOKOUT JUNCTION MODEL RAILROAD SHOW—Join the Rocky Mountain Hi-Railers and the Train Collectors Association to watch model trains in action while learning about the model railroading hobby. Noon-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208972-8200. rockymountainhirailers. com. OLD PEN $1 DAY—Visit the Old Pen for just $1. Last admission is at 4:15 p.m. 12-5 p.m. $1. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-334-2844, history.idaho.gov/old-idaho-penitentiary. YOUR HEALTH IDAHO ENROLLMENT OPEN HOUSE AND WORKSHOP—Get answers to your questions and learn how to navigate through the Your Health Idaho website. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

On Stage BCT: LAUREN WEEDMAN’S WHAT WENT WRONG?—2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater. org. BLT: THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS—8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. THE CENTER PLAY READING SERIES: CASA VALENTINA—Harvey Fierstein’s 2014 play is set in the 1960s at a discreet venue for men who enjoy dressing up and acting as women. When the opportunity to become an official organization arises, Casa Valentina’s owners must decide whether this would help gain their clientele recognition in society or wreak havoc on their personal lives. 6:30 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-5789122, companyoffools.org. COMEDIAN TYLER BOEH—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10-$12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $9.99. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-9914746, boisecomedy.com. RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: MERCURY RISING—9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, redlightvarietyshow.com. STAGE COACH: CAUGHT IN THE NET—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Workshops & Classes

SUNDAY JAN. 17 Festivals & Events BOISE DEPOT TOURS—Spots are limited; RSVP online. Also on Monday, Jan. 18. 12 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, parks. cityofboise.org. LOOKOUT JUNCTION MODEL RAILROAD SHOW—12-3:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, rockymountainhirailers.com. MYSTERY HOUSE COMICS DRINK AND DRAW—Enjoy the easelto-easel drawing competition, cake, champagne and prizes. For 21 and older. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-918-0597.

On Stage BCT: LAUREN WEEDMAN’S WHAT WENT WRONG?—8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS—2 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIAN TYLER BOEH—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

GRANGER SMITH AND EARL DIBBLES JR.—The country singer-songwriter hits town with his alter-ego to (undoubtedly) perform the hit single “Dirt Road Driveway” from his latest album, 4X4. With Drew Baldridge. 8 p.m. $18-$30. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212. grangersmith.com.

Sports & Fitness OWYHEE MOTORCYCLE CLUB FLAT TRACK RACING—Enjoy indoor flat track racing. Concessions on site. 10 a.m. FREE-$10. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 111 22nd Ave. S., Caldwell, canyoncountyfair.org. 208-571-1846.

MONDAY JAN. 18 Festivals & Events BPL HOLIDAY CLOSURE—All locations of the Boise Public Library will be closed Monday, Jan. 18, in observance of Martin Luther King Birthday/Human Rights Day. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org. NAMI ID WEST REGION CONFERENCE—Are you interested in improving the lives of those living with a mental illness? Join NAMI Idaho for “Advancing Toward Early Intervention and Recovery in Idaho.” Includes dinner at 6 p.m. Registration required; call 208-440-2384 to RSVP. Noon-7:30

p.m. FREE. Red Lion Downtowner, 1800 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, redlion.com, 208-440-2384.

On Stage BCT 5X5 READING SERIES: THE FLICK—Enjoy an exploration of the hilarious and heart-wrenching play The Flick, by superstar playwright Annie Baker. Stay after for a discussion with the cast and director. 7 p.m. $8-$12. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org. COMEDIAN MAT ALANOMARTIN—For one night only, laugh it up with comedians Mat Alano-Martin and local fav Sophie Hughes. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com.

TUESDAY JAN. 19 On Stage SHEN YUN—Through the universal language of music and dance, Shen Yun takes you on a journey through 5,000 years of Chinese culture. Its stunning beauty, purity and tremendous energy leave audiences uplifted and inspired. 7:30 p.m. $60-$150. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261110, shenyun.com/boise.

Literature

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city CAROL DAVIS: WRITING THE PERSONA POEM—Join Surel’s Place January artist-in-residence Carol Davis to learn how to write the persona poem. Register online at persona-poem.eventbrite.com. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-4077529, surelsplace.org.

Sports & Fitness

AUTHOR RICHARD HOLM: BOUND FOR THE BACKCOUNTRY—Join Rediscovered Books and the SelwayBitterroot Frank Church Foundation for a new reading series featuring local authors who specialize in Idaho outdoors and conservation. The first speaker for the new year will be Richard Holm, author of Bound for the Backcountry. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229.

Animals & Pets

STEELHEADS HABITAT FOR HUMANITY NIGHT— Do a good deed while watching the Idaho Steelheads take on the Tulsa Oilers. Your $16 admission includes a hot dog, chips and a Pepsi product, with $5 of every ticket benefiting Boise Valley Habitat for Humanity. To buy tickets, visit igrouptix.com/idahosteelheads and enter username “habitat,” and password “humanity.” 7 p.m. $16. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com.

ZAMZOWS SMALL ANIMAL PRESENTATION—Wondering what small animals need? Curious on how to take care of them? Every third Tuesdsay of the month, meet a new fun animal and learn all there is to know about the small animals you love from a Zamzows expert. In January, you get to meet a Dumbo rat. For all ages. Third Tuesday of every month, 4:15 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4685800, nampalibrary.org.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

18 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY JAN. 13 CAR SEAT HEADREST—With Ersatz. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux CARTER FREEMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JAZ F—5 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LIKE A ROCKET—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel SAVING ABEL—With Breakdown Boulevard, Midline, and The Forgotten. 6:30 p.m. $16-$30. Knitting Factory SK8 NIGHT: UNDERLYFE—With Bullets are the Cure. 8 p.m. FREE. The Shredder STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THURSDAY JAN. 14 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE LUCKY EEJITS—With Camacho, Figure 8, and Jimmy Sinn. 8 p.m. $5. The Shredder NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: MERCURY RISING—9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective

THIS PATCH OF SKY—With Red Hands Black Feet. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: MERCURY RISING—Join Red Light Variety Show and the GREEN ZOO for this performance-art tribute to rock ’n’ roll. 9 p.m. Pay-what-youwant preview. Visual Arts Collective

SPENCER BATT—8 p.m. FREE. Piper

GRANGER SMITH AND EARL DIBBLES JR.—With Drew Baldridge. 8 p.m. $18-$30. Knitting Factory

SATURDAY JAN. 16

NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJ’S—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid

STEVE AND GRACE WALL—With George Johnson. 6 p.m. FREE. Gelato

SMOOTH AVENUE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

SUNDAY JAN. 17

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY JAN. 18

CURTIS SUTTON BAND—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

OPEN MIC WITH CRAIG SLOVER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato

6TH ANNUAL BROKEN RESOLUTIONS BALL—Interstate, The Oliphants and Belinda Bowler. 7:30 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Rose Room

EKALI, NTE OWL AND LOVEGUNZ—10 p.m. $5-$10. Reef

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BRANDON PRITCHETT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

FRANK MARRA— :30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—With Pause For The Cause. 7 p.m. $8$12 adv., $11-$15 door. Sapphire

FRIDAY JAN. 15

HANG ELEVEN—10 p.m. $5. Reef HELL’S BELLES (ALL-FEMALE AC/DC TRIBUTE BAND)—With Defenders of the Faith, and Trigger Itch. 8 p.m. $13-$30. Knitting Factory HYBRID SHEEP ORGANIZER— With Kynoah. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ENCORE—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

JOSHUA TREE—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s KAYLEIGH JACK—8 p.m. FREE. Piper NIKI PRESTON—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue THE PLEWS BROTHERS—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: MERCURY RISING—9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective

LISTEN HERE

TOM TAYLOR—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7-10 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

CYMRY—5 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

OFF KILTER—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TUESDAY JAN. 19 BOURBON DOGS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole CARTER FREEMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: HIHAZEL—With Spiritual Warfare and Corey G. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s SPENCER BATT—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

CAR SEAT HEADREST, JAN. 13, NEUROLUX To say Will Toledo, aka Car Seat Headrest, was discovered overnight would be somewhat inaccurate and definitely a disservice to the prolific, ultra-talented Seattle-based musician. Matador Records founder Chris Lombardi did sign Toledo after hearing his music on CSH’s Bandcamp page (carseatheadrest. bandcamp.com) but unlike other “overnight discoveries,” Toledo’s discography dates back to 2010 and is made up of 11 EPs, fulllengths and fuller-lengths—a couple of the albums, like 2010’s Little Pieces Of Paper With “No” Written On Them, have 20 tracks. As a resume, Toledo’s output reveals a dedicated musician. As a creative endeavor, it shows an innovative artist who consistently delivers, both melodically and lyrically. Toledo’s lo-fi, indie sound is a perfect fit for Matador, which has released work by equally inventive artists like Stephen Malkmus (Pavement, The Jicks), Perfume Genius and Queens of the Stone Age. In a stroke of brilliance, CSH’s first release on the label, Teens of Style (October 2015), is curated from previous releases, providing new listeners with a sense of where Toledo has been and a clue to where he might go on his next album—or, more likely, albums. —Amy Atkins With Ersatz, 7 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 19


BOOZEHOUND CROWN ROYAL VARIETIES

CROWN ROYAL HAND SELECTED BARREL, $54.95 Comprised of one of the 50 whiskies that go into Crown Deluxe, Crown’s Hand Selected Barrel clocks in at 51.5 percent ABV. The heat comes through intensely at first, with some tasters comparing it to White Rain hairspray, but dissipates as it opens up, offering notes of powdered sugar, fig and freshly baked pie. On the palate, it’s equally delightful with cocoa and caramel shining through. CROWN ROYAL NORTHERN HARVEST RYE, $32.95 Named 2016 World Whisky of the Year by whisky writer Jim Murray, Crown’s Northern Harvest Rye is an exceptionally smooth take on the style. On the nose, there are notes of dust, anise and cherry with a sweet underlayer of vanilla—leading to “Luden’s cough drop” comparisons. On the palate, those medicinal flavors remain and combine with hints of pepper and sawdust. The finish is smooth for a rye. CROWN ROYAL MAPLE, $24.95 Though the bottle claims this 40 percent ABV whisky is finished with “maple-toasted oak,” there’s nothing natural about this cloying, overthe-top offering. Likened to “Mrs. Butterworth’s bathwater,” “French Toast Crunch” and “an IHOPscented candle,” Crown Royal Maple features an off-putting fake butter flavor that tasters compared to “hungover pancakes.” —Tara Morgan 20 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

FOOD NEWS

TAR A M O RG A N

Encased in a plush purple sack with gold embellishments, Crown Royal is an iconic Canadian whisky. Made from a blend of 50 whiskies in the town of Gimli, near Manitoba’s Lake Winnipeg, Crown is renowned for its smooth, sweet taste. In addition to its signature Deluxe whisky, Crown offers a number of other options.

CUPPA NEW OPTIONS

Hyde Perk and Slow By Slow open, Kindness closes for dinner TARA MORGAN

Though the shelves lined with dog-eared novels are long gone, fans of Hyde Park Books will find a memento to the used book store in the new coffee shop that occupies 1507 N. 13th St. Hyde Perk repurposed those shelves and used them to cover the walls of the light and airy cafe. “It was a six-month renovation,” said coowner Crystal Clark. “It was a lot of work, construction-wise, to get it torn down and put back together.” Hyde Perk quietly opened its doors on Dec. 10. The space features large front windows that let in streams of light, along with tables topped with repurposed wood. There’s also a large blackand-white mural of 13th Street by local artist Sarah Terrell and framed chalkboards for kids to doodle on. “I just really want a comfy, welcoming environment; cozy for everybody,” said Clark. “I don’t care if it’s moms with kids—I have a kids’ corner—or if it’s people studying in college, I just want everybody to be welcome.” Clark owns the shop with her brother, Levi Jones, and father, Scott Jones. A longtime barista, Clark relocated to Boise from Spokane, Wash., to open the coffee shop. Hyde Perk uses beans from Spokane roaster Waverly’s Coffee and makes an assortment of classic drinks—like lattes, mochas and Americano’s—on its La Marzocco espresso machine. Besides coffee, the cafe also offers pastries and snacks from local artisans, including fresh-baked Heritage scones, Blue Feather Bakery hand-pies in flavors like lemon curd and mixed berry, Sweet Valley cookies and gluten-free treats from Amaru Confections. Hyde Perk is open 5:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Monday through Friday; 6 a.m.-7 p.m., Saturday; and 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday. In other coffee news, BoDo will soon be home to a new multi-roaster coffeeshop, Slow by Slow Coffee Bar, which plans to open Monday, Jan. 23 at 403 S. Eighth St., next to Fresh Off the Hook. “I worked at Flying M Coffeegarage for nine years; I was their roaster,” said Joe Shafer, who co-owns the shop with his wife, Diana. “It’s going to be more of what you would see in a big city with pour-overs; we have a high-end espresso machine—a Synesso Cyncra with wood accents.”

Hyde Perk offers a new gathering place at an old favorite location.

The Shafers, who formerly owned Nampa boutique The White Pine, will source beans from roasters around the country and will also offer Idaho options like Flying M Coffee, Neckar Coffee and Sandpoint’s Evans Brothers. “Our primary roaster is going to be Ritual Roasters from San Francisco, but we’re going to have Heart Roasters from Portland, Ore., which is kind of the national standard right now,” said Joe. “And Elm Roasters from Seattle, they’re upand-coming. All these guys, they roast in ways we could never even imagine in Boise.” Patrons can pick which coffee they’d prefer for their pour-overs and espresso drinks. Slow by Slow will also offer some pastries and a cold case filled with a few high-end prepared drinks, like Cuvee’s nitro cold brew, but the Shafers plan to focus primarily on coffee. “We think that that’s what limits a lot of people when they’re first starting out, and just in general,” said Joe. “Coffee people tend to do all this other stuff—like, ‘let’s do art’—and then the coffee suffers.” Joe says the vibe will be “industrial modern” with brushed steel and “well-cut, clean-looking wood” furniture. “We have open ceilings and wood floors. … Our seating is going to be more cafe-style, where there are big tables that you share with everybody instead of a bunch of little tables,” he said. Overall, the Shafers said they want to add some variety to the local coffee market. “Boise has a very loyalist coffee following— where, ‘Oh, I’m a Dawson Taylor person’ or, ‘I’m

a Flying M person.’ We want to break that and get people to just enjoy coffee no matter where it’s from.” In closing news, Kindness, The Owyhee restaurant known for offering “kicked-up” comfort food classics, closed for dinner Jan. 1. Owners Anna and Michael Tapia plan to continue serving their popular brunch buffet on Saturdays and Sundays through March. After that, the couple will focus completely on their catering business. “Our catering business has grown so much that I can’t really be stretched as thin as I have been,” said Chef Anna. “So for me it’ll work out a lot better. The restaurant will close; I’ll be able to focus on the catering business and the events that we have here at The Owyhee.” According to Anna, the catering business “ended up covering for the shortcomings in the restaurant’s income.” Moving forward, Kindness will also host parties on the building’s penthouse patio. “It’s sad for us to close the restaurant; we really love it,” said Anna. “But it’s also exciting for us as a family and as a business because we’ve grown so big in the catering portion of it. So it’ll be a good change.” Though no tenant is confirmed to take over the high-ceilinged space, Owyhee General Manager Thomas Felter said they are currently in negotiations. “We’re definitely searching for an additional restaurant user to take the space,” said Felter. “We’re pretty open to whatever opportunities arise.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


SCREEN

Room (left), Brooklyn (center) and The Danish Girl (right) are only three of the films competing for screen time at The Flicks in Boise.

SO MANY GREAT FILMS, SO LITTLE TIME The Flicks faces an embarrassment of riches GEORGE PRENTICE Holiday season films are the gifts that keep on giving, particularly at The Flicks. Pound-forpound, nearly every movie booked between November and February at Boise’s go-to film showcase has been a sure-bet Oscar nominee. “That has been the case for a while now,” said Flicks owner Carole Skinner. “Honestly, I wish the movie studios could spread them out a bit. This time of year I wish I had six screens.” What opened with one screen in September 1984 grew to two in 1988 and doubled to four in 1997. Now, between Thanksgiving and Valentine’s Day every year—particularly on weekends—The Flicks is a packed house. The nationally-owned multiplexes may be showing Star Wars VII, but there are still quite a few empty seats at those 20-screen megaplexes. Meanwhile, The Flicks, with its current slate of The Big Short, Brooklyn, Carol, The Danish Girl and Spotlight has been attracting capacity crowds. Each of those films is expected to make Oscar’s shortlist when the Motion Picture Academy reveals its nominees on Thursday, Jan. 14. Sometime between now and Sunday, Feb. 28, the award season’s ebb and flow should reach high tide, and that usually means an embarrassment of riches for The Flicks. More Oscar hopefuls will be on their way to the Flicks in the next few weeks, including 45 Years, Anomalisa, Son of Saul and the much-anticipated bundle of Oscar-nominated short films. “It’s rather hard to keep so many good films. For instance, there’s so much talk about Brooklyn BOISE WEEKLY.COM

and Spotlight right now that I have them sharing the same screen, alternating showtimes,” said Skinner. “Each week, we have to look at the grosses and somehow have to make room for another great film—or perhaps two more.” Skinner’s task was probably never more challenging than when she had to say goodbye to Room, the critically acclaimed drama that has launched its leading lady, Brie Larson, to Hollywood’s A-list. Larson picked up the Golden Globe for best actress in a drama, vaulting her film to the top of moviegoers’ must-see list. “But we ran Room for four full weeks in November to relatively low box office results,” said Skinner. “Now, I have so many people calling to ask, ‘How come you’re not playing Room? I’ve heard it’s an award-winner.’ And my answer is, ‘We played it for four weeks. Where were you?’” Now, Skinner is taking the rare step of making room for Room one more time, bringing the film back to The Flicks, beginning Friday, Jan.15. “That’s how crazy this business is,” Skinner said. Squeezing five or more films onto four screens is only one of Skinner’s latest challenges as she continues to manage an entertainment venue in the shadow of a massive construction project: The Inn at 500 Capitol, a $25 million seven-story hotel being built next door. “They’re saying it will be 108 rooms, but they’ll only have 24 parking spaces. Of course, that means we’re going to have to be much more

vigilant about our parking lot,” said Skinner. “And just a few weeks ago, we lost all of our power for 18 hours because they accidentally blew up a transformer. We had to cancel all of our screenings. But once these new hotels are built [a 10-story hotel is also under construction across Myrtle Street], it gentrifies the neighborhood, so that can’t be all bad.” The big box office surprise of the holiday season, according to Skinner, was probably Brooklyn, the wildly popular romantic drama about a young Irish girl immigrating to America. “I can’t tell you how many people have told us how much they adore Brooklyn,” she said. “But even when a show is sold out, our box office staff is great about recommending another choice. In fact, we try to stagger the screen times in our larger theaters, just in case one show is sold out in a smaller theater. That way, we can say, ‘You’ll probably love this other film, and there are a few seats left for you.’ It always works out.” When Boise Weekly spoke to Skinner, she was in Palm Springs lining up to screen another new film at the resort community’s major annual film festival and continuing to build her slate of coming attractions for 2016. “We’ve seen some pretty great films here and we’re already getting set to book them,” she said as the line got closer to the theater door. “Things are so great for The Flicks right now, and the films just keep coming.” BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 21


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NYT CROSSWORD | POLITICAL PROMISES ACROSS

23 “Unemployment will be a thing of the past!” 25 Publicity, in Variety-speak 26 Back 27 Impose ____ on 28 High season in Hawaii 29 Coding molecules 30 “____ in the Morning” 31 Skedaddle

1 Advisory panels 7 Take down a notch 12 Silverstein who wrote “A Boy Named Sue” 16 Put on a nonpolitical button, say 19 Crack open, in a way 20 Some parade performers 22 Clamor 1

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BY PATRICK MERRELL / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 47 Author whose most famous character is introduced as Edward Bear 51 Some four-year degs. 53 ____-deucey (card game) 54 “I will maintain a strong defense!” 58 Basic car maintenance 59 Car decoration 60 “Silent Spring” spray

86

61 Muffin variety 62 Gives off light, as a 65-Across 65 See 62-Across 67 Bank acct. info 70 One of five rhyming Greek letters 71 Dances accompanied by gourd drums 75 Sitting together at the movies, say 77 “Deficit spending must stop!” 83 Another time 84 When a vampire sleeps 85 Oblong desserts 86 “Poke-____!” (kids’ book series) 87 Film critic Jeffrey 89 120-Across, in Spain 91 Hellion 92 Bridge-table foursome 93 “I’ll slow this country’s spread of drugs!” 100 Next in line 101 Breathing disorder 102 Not much at all 103 Pleasures 105 A Musketeer 108 L.A. gang member 109 Place with expensive mud 112 Tiny tunneler 113 “Education will be my top priority!” 117 It’s found in sheets or, in softer form, blankets 118 Thermometer, e.g. 119 Consolidated 120 89-Across, in France 121 Some 35mm cameras 122 Rogen and Meyers 123 They may be measured by the pound

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33 “You’re looking at the whole department” 35 “No new taxes!” 42 Ornithologist James of whom Ian Fleming was a fan 43 W.W. II arena: Abbr. 44 Dallas sch. 45 Circus prop 46 ____ buco

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1 Shine up 2 Words before “before” 3 Common prefix with phobia 4 ____-com 5 Thought (up) 6 One who’s always getting a pass? 7 Certain game point 8 One piece of a two- piece 9 Archery asset 10 Whole lotta 11 “Billy ____,” 2000 film 12 Abbr. on a stadium ticket 13 Give zero stars, say

14 First name among celebrity chefs 15 Acid 16 Present-day figure 17 Ned’s bride on “The Simpsons” in 2012 18 They’re handled in Asian restaurants 21 Tithing amounts 24 Burkina ____ (Niger neighbor) 29 What a rabble-rouser might be read 30 Needs no further cooking 31 Take root 32 Air-conditioned 34 H.M.O. figures 35 Israelites’ leader after Moses 36 Still in the outbox 37 San ____, Italy 38 Prepare for the afterlife 39 Boot 40 Low-grade?: Abbr. 41 Eye inflammation 42 Greet respectfully 47 Not just theoretical 48 Lhasa ____ (dog breed) 49 Upstream on the Mississippi River, along Miss. 50 Abbr. for those not mentioned 52 Seine-____, department bordering Paris 55 Need (to) 56 Coll. fraternity 57 “What ____!” (“Bummer!”) 63 Question of surprise to a volunteer 64 Total 66 Object of a hunt in “Lord of the Flies” 67 Tool used in the evening? 68 Lackey 69 Some witches like their eyes 70 Great Plains Indians 72 Oven-cleaner ingredient 73 Org. for Duke 74 Like the ocean

76 Forensic facility 77 Hill’s partner 78 First gemstone mentioned in the Bible 79 Novices 80 It might be patted on the back 81 Bambino’s first word 82 Prop for Popeye or Santa 88 Fi preceder 90 John of Fox’s “Grandfathered” 94 Hit the road 95 Treats vengefully 96 Wild 97 What eyes and pedestrians may do 98 Blue-collar and pink-slip 99 Pill type 103 One corner of a Monopoly board 104 Start of a reminiscence L A S T T H A T

R A M A

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C H O S E

APR I

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N T R A

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G E R L I E E N U P E N D S I A T A T A N E D I D T S W E P E JUL S T E B A P E L S E T R E E M S R P E T A R E D C I A I N E

106 Raise 107 Operatives: Abbr. 108 Some med. facilities 109 Story with many chapters 110 Sparrow, to a sparrow hawk 111 Common connectors 113 Monogram on Christian crosses 114 Amphibious W.W. II vessel 115 “Wonderful!” 116 Go wrong

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

L I FEB L A M R A D A I K C L E U S E R N S O T O P A S V A L L E L C O E R U C T S L AUG H O N H A F A T N F S R A N G E L C A S A A L A M A T W O

O I N K

O D O R S

D O S E D O C H R O S S I B A A L R

A D O N I M I N I MAR P E S T E T E S T B I T G A T C A MAY O L I B I D H T C A R L JUN E Y O N R I C M E N R A T Y S U R A SEP T I T E A S H O R N D S H O W E E S S P A R E N I C I A L E W S C O R E I C T A P E DEC K NOV A S T O K E N E D A E D G I E R S T E S T E

S T R S L O G E S C E R T S S S R S

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OFFICE HOURS

PETS

ADOPT-A-PET

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS BENEFIT FOR LIFE’S KITCHEN! The 7th annual Sherman’s Birthday Bash to benefit Life’s Kitchen takes place Feb. 6th from 7-11 p.m at the Rose Room- 718 W. Idaho Street. This is a black tie event! Enjoy live music, silent auction and adult libations. All of the proceeds benefit Life’s Kitchen. For more info and reservations go to: lifeskitchenshermbash.maxgiving.com. OVER-EATERS ANONYMOUS Is your eating affecting your life, your health, your happiness? Do you over-eat or under-eat or control your eating through exercise or purging? There is a community that understands, cares and wants to help: Welcome to Overeaters Anonymous, Treasure Valley 409-1086 or treasurevalleyoa@gmail.com.

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com ELWAY: I’m modest, soft, sweet, gentle and looking for someone who likes to snuggle.

MEMPHIS: I’m a super fun and goofy dude that would love some humans all to myself.

MONIQUE: I’d love to be the queen of your home, with petting and playtime as tribute.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

CAREER TRAINING

DEADLINES*

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. YANKEE: 5-year-old, female, plott hound mix. Independent, playful and cuddly. Needs an intro to new canine housemates. (PetSmart Adoption Center – #30401896)

NOVA: 2-year-old, female, pit bull mix. Loyal and loving. Lots of energy. Needs socialization. Best with older kids. No cats. (Ask for her at the front desk! – #28176068)

ROMMEL: 8-year-old, male, Beagle-Dachshund mix. Can be a little aloof. Loves other dogs. Would do best in a quiet adult home. (PetSmart Adoption Center – #30408043)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT KHAL DROGO: 2 ½-yearold, male, Maine coon mix. Came to the shelter as a stray. Mellow homebody. Loves attention and ear scratches. (Kennel 100 – #30502478)

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SASSY: 4 ½-year-old, female, domestic mediumhair. Came to the shelter front declawed, so needs to be indoor-only. Scared in the shelter. (Kennel 102 – #30522527)

ROCCO: 5-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Came to the shelter as a stray. A bit timid but enjoys a little attention. Curious about his surroundings. (Kennel 5 – #14940594)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 23


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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): You love autonomy. You specialize in getting the freedom and sovereignty you require. You are naturally skilled at securing your independence from influences that might constrain your imagination and limit your self-expression. But here’s a sticking point: If you want the power to help shape group processes, you must give up some of your autonomy. In order to motivate allies to work toward shared goals, you need to practice the art of interdependence. The next test of your ability to do this is coming right up. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Nothing is really work unless you’d rather be doing something else.” So said Taurus writer James M. Barrie (1860-1937), who created the Peter Pan stories. Your challenge and invitation in the coming months is to increase the amount of time you spend that does not qualify as work. In fact, why don’t you see how much and how often you can indulge in outright play? There’ll be no better way to attract grace and generate good fortune. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s my proposal: Get in touch with your madness. And don’t tell me you have no madness. We all do. But listen: When I use the word “madness,” I don’t mean howling rage, hurtful lunacy or out-of-control misbehavior. I’m calling on the experimental part of you that isn’t

always polite and reasonable; the exuberant rebel who is attracted to wild truths rather than calming lies; the imaginative seeker who pines for adventures on the frontiers of your understanding. Now is an excellent time to tap into your inner maverick. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s an excerpt from Dorianne Laux’s poem “Antilamentation”: “Regret nothing. Not the cruel novels you read to the end just to find out who killed the cook. Not the insipid movies that made you cry in the dark. Not the lover you left quivering in a hotel parking lot. Not the nights you called god names and cursed your mother, sunk like a dog in the living room couch, chewing your nails.” I’m giving you a good dose of Laux’s purifying rant in the hope that it will incite you to unleash your own. The time is favorable to summon an expanded appreciation for the twists and tweaks of your past, even those that seemed torturous in the moment. Laux doesn’t regret the TV set she threw out the upstairs window or the stuck onion rings she had to sweep off the dirty restaurant floor, and I hope you will be that inclusive. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Modesty is the art of drawing attention to whatever it is you’re being humble about,” said Alfred E. Neuman, the fictitious absurdist whose likeness often appears on

24 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

the cover of Mad magazine. I’m here to tell you, Leo, that now is an excellent time to embody this aphorism. You are in a perfect position to launch a charm offensive by being outrageously unassuming. The less you brag about yourself and the more you praise other people, the better able you will be to get exactly what you want. Being unegotistical and non-narcissistic is an excellent strategy for serving your selfish needs. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “To go wrong in one’s own way is better than to go right in someone else’s,” says a character in Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel Crime and Punishment. I don’t agree with that idea 100 percent of the time. Sometimes our wrong ideas are so delusional that we’re better off getting interrupted and redirected by the wiser insights of others. But for the near future, Virgo, I recommend Dostoyevsky’s prescription for your use. One of your key principles will be to brandish your unique perspectives. Even if they’re not entirely right and reasonable, they will lead you to what you need to learn next. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I love kissing,” testifies singersongwriter Sufjan Stevens. “If I could kiss all day, I would. I can’t stop thinking about kissing. I like kissing more than sex because there’s no end to it. You can kiss forever. You can kiss yourself into

oblivion. You can kiss all over the body. You can kiss yourself to sleep.” I invite you to temporarily adopt this expansive obsession, Libra. The astrological omens suggest that you need more sweet slippery sensual tender interaction than usual. Why? Because it will unleash sweet slippery sensual tender emotions and sweet slippery sensual tender thoughts, all of which will awaken a surge of dormant creativity. Which you also need very much. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Everything has been said before,” said French author André Gide, “but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again.” I am happy to inform you that you’re about to be temporarily exempt from this cynical formulation. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will be able to drive home certain points that you have been trying to make over and over again for quite a while. The people who most need to hear them will finally be able to register your meaning. (P.S. This breakthrough will generate optimal results if you don’t gloat. Be grateful and understated.) SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Do you want more money, Sagittarius? Are there treasures you wish you could have, but you can’t afford them? Do any exciting experiences and life-enhancing

adventures remain off-limits because of limited resources? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, now would be an excellent time to formulate plans and take action to gather increased wealth. I don’t guarantee total success if you do, but I promise that your chance to make progress will be higher than usual. Cosmic tendencies are leaning in the direction of you getting richer quicker, and if you collaborate with those tendencies, financial magic could materialize. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “It’s a terrible thing to wait until you’re ready,” proclaims actor Hugh Laurie. He goes even further: “No one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready.” His counsel is too extreme for my tastes. I believe that proper preparation is often essential. We’ve got to get educated about the challenges we want to take on. We need to develop at least some skills to help us master our beloved goals. On the other hand, it’s impossible to ever be perfectly prepared and educated and skilled. If you postpone your quantum leaps of faith until every contingency has been accounted for, you’ll never leap. Right now, Capricorn, Laurie’s view is good advice. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Fate has transformed a part of your life that you didn’t feel ready

to have transformed. I won’t offer my condolences, though, because I’ve guessed a secret that you don’t know about yet. The mythic fact, as I see it, is that whatever you imagine you have had to let go of will ultimately come back to you in a revised and revivified form -- maybe sooner than you think. Endings and beginnings are weaving their mysteries together in unforeseen ways. Be receptive to enigmatic surprises. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Good news: Your eagerness to think big is one of your superpowers. Bad news: It’s also one of your liabilities. Although it enables you to see how everything fits together, it may cause you to overlook details about what’s undermining you. Good news: Your capacity for intense empathy is a healing balm for both others and yourself. At least potentially, it means you can be a genius of intimacy. Bad news: Your intense empathy can make you fall prey to the emotional manipulation of people with whom you empathize. Good news: Your willingness to explore darkness is what makes your intelligence so profound. Bad news: But that’s also why you have to wrestle so fiercely with fear. Good news: In the next four weeks, the positive aspects of all the above qualities will be ascendant.

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: EVERETT ALLEN HARTY. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 2015-20671 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Everett Allen Harty, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Evelyn Anna Harty. The reason for the change in name is: that she has undergone a change in gender . A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on February 18, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: December 10, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Debbie Nagele Deputy Clerk PUB December 23, 30, 2015 and January 6, 13, 2016. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV 14 7903, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CANYON, Kingsveiw Estates Subdivision Neighborhood Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Jeff Mitchell and Shannon Mitchell, Defendant. TO: JEFF MITCHELL AND SHANNON MITCHELL You have been sued by Kingsveiw Estates Subdivision Neighborhood Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Third Judicial District in and for Canyon County, Idaho, Case No. CV 14 7903.

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The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Canyon County Courthouse, 1115 Albany, Caldwell, Idaho 83605 Telephone: (208) 454-7300 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr. Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 14th day of December, 2015. CHRIS YAMAMOTO, DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ T CRAWFORD, Deputy Clerk PUB. DATES: Dec. 23, 30, 2015 and Jan. 6, 13, 2016. NOTICE TO CREDITORS CV IE 1521174 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the matter of the Estate of MAXINE M. BAXTER, deceased Notice is hereby given that Tamara Geisler has been appointed personal representative for the abovenamed decedent. All persons having claims against said deceased or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to Tamara Geisler, Personal Representative, c/o IVER J. LONGETEIG, 5304 N. Turret Boise,

ID 83703, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. December 30, 2015. Published: January 13, 20 and 27, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: LANE DEE JOHNSON. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1521472 NOTICE OF HEARING A Petition to change the name of Lane Dee Johnson, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The petition proposes that his/her name be changed to Lane Dee Seward because that is the name he has been known by all his life. The petition will be heard on the 1st day of March, 2016, at the hour of 1:30 p.m. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. WITNESS my hand and seal of said District Court this 29 day of December, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk. PUB January 13, 20, 27, and February 03, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Blair Ellis Budine. Legal Name

o’clock p.m. on March 1, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: December 29, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk PUB January 13, 20, 27 and February 2 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Shelley Donise Knudson Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1521335 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Shelley Donise Knudson, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Shelley Donise Matthews. The reason for the change in name is: I would like to use my first married name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on March 1, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Dec. 29, 2015 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Jan. 13, 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2016.

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Case No. CV NC 1521603 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Blair Ellis Budine, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Blair Ellis Leonard. The reason for the change in name is: Leonard is the name of my mother who raised me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 25


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

#boiseweeklypic

FIND THE RISE OF DAVID BOWIE 1972-1973

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

DEAR MINERVA, I found out a guy I was seeing visited a prostitute while dating me. I broke things off but I still have burning questions. Why would a guy pay for sex when a freebie with an adoring lady awaits? Is it kind of like taking a few drinks before the party? Is it hard to break the prostitute habit? Should I assume he’s a sex addict and encourage him to seek help? And where on Earth are these Boise prostitutes hanging out? Just curious. —Milk for Free

DEAR MILK, This is the second time someone has written me about a situation involving prostitutes in Boise. Quite frankly, if you have rid your life of him, then I wouldn’t try to answer any of those “burning questions”—and if anything else is “burning,” see your doctor. I wouldn’t assume anything with regard to his motivations. There are as many reasons that people do things as there are people doing them. People are sexual beings and with sexual boundaries being redefined, it wouldn’t surprise me if some people prefer a transactional approach to carnal fulfillment. Not knowing the man, I can’t say what his motivation is. Human beings are sexual. While I may look like Mona Stangley from The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, I assure you, I don’t know where the prostitutes are hanging out.

If you’re a lover of art, music and general fabulousness, you probably took the news of David Bowie’s Jan. 10 death pretty hard. At 69, the icon of song and style was still every bit as groundbreaking as he was in his 1970s heyday—he even released a new album, Blackstar (ISO Records), on his birthday, Jan. 8, 2016. Bowie’s passing will inspire no shortage of memorials and reminiscences, magazine think pieces and retrospective biographies. The definitive piece of Bowie-alia, however, is already out there: the gloriously appointed, limited edition, 310-page book filled with photos by Mick Rock, Ziggy Stardust’s official photographer 1972-1973. Limited to a run of 1,972 numbered copies and signed by both Bowie and Rock, The Rise of David Bowie 1972-1973 (Taschen, 2015) fea$2,500, taschen.com tures stage shots, backstage portraits, press photos, album jackets, stills from promo movies and as many as 50 never-before-seen images. Bound with a hologram cover and encased in a turquoise-colored clamshell, The Rise will be available for purchase in February for $2,500. The price tag is steep, but that’s true to form: Bowie never did anything halfway and if you’re a superfan, it’s a small price to pay for a piece of his legendary life. —Zach Hagadone

Taken by instagram user benjaben

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT “If you made a new year’s resolution for 2016, have you broken it?”

Yes: 0%

QUOTABLE

No: 50% I didn’t make any new year’s resolutions: 50%

“Make the best of ever y moment. We’re not evolving. We’re not going anywhere.” —DAVID BOWIE IN A 2004 INTERVIEW WITH ESQUIRE MAGA ZINE.

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

Disclaimer: This online poll is not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

69

JAN. 8, 1947

12

1967

JAN. 8, 2016

140 MILLION

11

4TH

Number of birthdays celebrated by David Bowie before his death from cancer on Jan. 10

Birth date of David Robert Jones, aka David Bowie, born in London

Age at which David Bowie started playing the saxophone

Year David Bowie released his first album: David Bowie

Release date of David Bowie’s final album, Blackstar

(BBC)

(BBC)

(BBC)

(Billboard)

Estimated number of albums sold by David Bowie over the course of his career

Number of minutes it would have taken to download David Bowie’s Internet-only single, Telling Lies, released in September 1996 via dialup connection

Rank given to David Bowie by voters in the 2006 BBC Culture Show public vote to determine Britain’s greatest living icons

(BBC)

(BBC)

(BBC)

26 | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | BOISEweekly

(BBC)

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 13–19, 2016 | 27


Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue  

7 Life After ‘The Kill Team’: Convicted of war crimes, Andrew Holmes has served his time and returned to Boise, looking to restart his life

Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue  

7 Life After ‘The Kill Team’: Convicted of war crimes, Andrew Holmes has served his time and returned to Boise, looking to restart his life