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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

D E C E M B E R 3 0 , 2 0 1 5 – J A N UA RY 5 , 2 0 1 6

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“To all of our 2015 citizens and every Idahoan who embraces citizenship as a privilege, our wish is for a happy, healthy and engaging new year.”

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Social Animals

Locally designed smartphone app aims to serve as the Pandora of events

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Old Acquaintance Boise Weekly looks back at the top 15 stories of 2015

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CITIZEN 7

Hot Potato

Everything you need to know about the 2015 New Year’s Eve Idaho Potato Drop FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Tara Morgan Interns: Conner Jackson Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2015 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE STORY TIME Well, here we go again. We’ve spun around the sun, and the axial tilt of the planet means the days can’t get any shorter for another 350 days or so. As has become our tradition at Boise Weekly, we have published a retrospective of the year’s big stories—at least according to us. From Treefort’s first year of financial success to the controversy over punishment cells and prisoner mistreatment in Idaho’s prison system to the big win of the new foothills levy, we recap the 15 of ’15 on Page 9. Of course, our idea of the top stories of the year isn’t necessarily the same as our readers. On Page 4, where we usually tip you off to things you might have missed on boiseweekly.com, we put together our Top 10 stories based on the traffic they received online. Judging from that list, the biggest news of the year happened in the past month, and it happened at the former tent city near the I-184 Connector. Called Cooper Court, the controversial encampment of homeless people had been growing since the summer and, by November—just in time for local elections—had become a full-blown crisis. A number of solutions were put forward, from tiny houses to a public-private partnership intended to provide a pathway to housing but on Dec. 4, the Boise Police Department cleared out Cooper Court. Those who had been living there were given a night of shelter at Fort Boise and various homelessness resources were made available them. Since the sweep, the issue has fallen from the front pages, but it’s still very much alive. As we look back at the biggest stories of 2015, it’s vital we transcend the news cycle and remember most of them are still being written. We look forward to being here after the calendar turns to help tell those stories. From all of us at BW, we wish you a happy, healthy new year. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Katherine Grey TITLE: “Bison in Snow” MEDIUM: Linocut ARTIST STATEMENT: Katherine Grey is a printmaker known for her depictions of the landscape and animals of Idaho and the Pacific Coast. Her images elicit the essence of her subjects with simple lines and strong contrast. Find Grey at the Capital City Public Market or etsy.com/shop/ TheGreyFoxStudio.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM

QUOTE OF THE YEAR

What you missed this week in the digital world.

MOST-READ STORIES OF 2015 ON BOISEWEEKLY.COM 1.

“SCENES FROM THE POLICE SWEEP OF BOISE’S COOPER COURT,” DEC. 4

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“POLL: DO YOU THINK STRICTER GUN REGUL ATIONS WOULD HELP CURB MASS SHOOTINGS?,” DEC. 6

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“CIT Y OF BOISE MOVING HOMELESS FROM TENT CIT Y TO NEW EMERGENCY SHELTER,” DEC. 4

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“BOISE POLICE NEED HELP FINDING MISSING GIRL WHO MAY BE IN DANGER,” NOV. 25

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“SLIDESHOW: WINS AND LOSSES DURING CLEAN UP AT COOPER COURT,” NOV. 23

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“BOISE MAYOR DAVE BIETER SHUTS DOWN CIT Y COUNCIL MEETING OVER COOPER COURT PROTESTS,” DEC. 9

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“IDAHO LUNCH L ADY FACES DISMISSAL OVER GIVING FREE LUNCH TO STUDENT,” DEC. 20

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“WHERE TO EAT OUT IN BOISE ON THANKSGIVING,” NOV. 14

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“DEMONSTRATORS RALLY TO PROTEST EVICTIONS FROM BOISE TENT CIT Y,” DEC. 4

10. “POLL: DO YOU AGREE WITH GOV. OT TER THAT THE U.S. SHOULD HALT ITS REFUGEE RESET TLEMENT PROGRAM PENDING REVIEW?,” DEC. 18

OPINION

FUCK YOU. FUCK YO U. PRINT THAT. FUCK YO U.”

—Bob Cooper, owner of the now defunct Crux, responding to Boise Weekly staff writer Harrison

Berry’s on whether tax issues at the once popular all-ages music venue and coffee shop resulted in its loss of a beer and wine license.

MAIL DON’T BE TOO QUICK TO JUMP ON THE BANWAGON GMOs, I know you’ve heard this term before but before you think it’s another BAN-wagon argument, hear me out. As critical as it is to examine the cons of GMOs it is equally crucial to weigh their benefits and not to let phobias turn us away from potential environmental benefits they offer in food production. GMOs can be used to grow industrial crop yields with vast reductions in pesticides, fresh water and artificial fertilizers. They can lower food costs while retaining nutritional value. These overshadowed benefits should be included in a balanced manner when we evaluate GMOs in our agricultural system. Since a complete ban on GMOs is unlikely given their pervasiveness, consumers should opt to make decisions based on research and facts of GMOs. The passing of the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2015 allows states to voluntarily label products containing GMOs. This act helps consumers identify and retain power over their food choices. While GMOs remain a topic

S U B M I T

of controversy, the decision to label them serves the consumer today and makes the conversation of how we’ll continue to grow food in light of environmental changes all that more important. —Jeanette Ayala

MAN, OH MAN BUNS The top five comments on the most-read post on our Facebook feed this year, “BYU-Idaho Bans Man Buns On Campus,” Sept. 25: Idaho: Where you can come to class with a handgun but get kicked out with a man bun. —Bob Salsbury Man buns are sexy! Besides, in this day and age who the hell cares was a paerson does with their hair!? Oh right… Mormons. —Mystii Young

GAGGED The top five comments on the most-hidden post on our Facebook feed this year, “U.S. Court Strikes Down Idaho Ag-Gag Law: ‘The Remedy is More Speech, Not Enforced Silence,’” Aug. 3: Way to go Idaho lawmakers… waste time passing an unconstitutional law, just to kiss [the] ass of a few dairy farmers that didn’t want their shame filmed. —Don Allan Idaho didn’t do something good, a federal judge did! —Kevin Lewis

Literally the dumbest thing I’ve read all day… Is this for real? Smh. —Tiffany Rose Chaney

Bets on how much Otter will spend to appeal the ruling? —Chelsea Gaona Lincoln

BYU-Idaho. Where you go when you’re not Mormon enough to attend the one in Utah. —Alex Evanich

Another constitutional kick in the sack to Idaho’s corrupt lawmakers, Governor Otter and their cronies. Too bad it’s at the taxpayers’ expense. —Robert Phelps

Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

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So if the long-haired Jesus depicted in most LDS art returned and chose to wear his long hair in a “man bun” they would have a problem with it? Absurd. —Steven A. Eckerman

Idaho, last in the nation in education. First in the # of minimum wage jobs (per capita). Thank you Idaho lawmakers. We’re number 1… —Andrew Blunt

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION DIDN’T SEE IT COMING

Nostril Bill’s retro-foretellings for 2015—Part One BILL COPE Predicting is easy. Just ask Nostril Bill. He’s been making predictions for years, and he’ll be the first to tell you all you do is take a known personality, combine it with a known proclivity, add a dash of speculation and... voila!... a prediction. Example: “In the coming year, Adam Sandler will star in a crappy movie.” Or, “In the coming year, Sarah Palin will say something so dumb it will make our teeth rattle.” Furthermore, there is no shame in making a prediction that doesn’t come true. Weather forecasters do it all the time—as do politicians, preachers, plumbers writing up estimates for a home repair and maitre d’s in busy restaurants telling us how long it will be until a table opens up—and we see no shame from them when they get it wrong, do we? No, we have come to expect meaningless predictions from such sources. Actually, it seems to be those things you don’t predict that come back to haunt you. For instance, if, say, a lawn mower manufacturer doesn’t see beforehand that somebody might be stupid enough to try to clean off the blade while the machine is running, then it’s predictable that a lawsuit is coming. If the jury turns out to be 12 individuals with an average of six fingers each, it could cost them millions of dollars—all because they didn’t correctly prophesize the value of 38 cents worth of warning labels. With this in mind, your Nostril Bill—rather than doing his normal end-of-year run-down of future events—is turning his clairvoyance backwards and reviewing a few of the more notable items from 2015 that he feels somewhat remiss for not having prognosticated. He does this not only because he hates loose strings from the past dangling about in the present like a hair in a bowl of minestrone, but also because if there’s a future legal action with his name on it for not issuing an early warning, he’d rather nip it in the bud before it even crosses the litigator’s mind to sue. So tough luck, lawyers—Nostril Bill thought of it before you did, and that’s what makes him the soothsayer that you aren’t. Onward to what N.B. should have seen last year: •No one can fault Nostril for not seeing a ton of Ted Cruz in the early months of 2015. Even amateur prophets could see him coming. His joining the presidential race was like the shady looking character coming at you on the subway wearing a long trench coat, beneath which are no visible socks or pants legs; any observant person would know exactly what to expect when he throws open his coat—and that is Ted Cruz. But even old Nostril Damus himself could not have predicted Donald Trump or Ben Carson. Twelve months ago, the forethought that anyone would take either one of those jackasses seriously as a candidate for president—let alone that they BOISE WEEKLY.COM

would hold dominant positions in the race—is akin to predicting Taylor Swift would make a public appearance where she didn’t behave like a cartoon character. (In a similar vein, Nostril Bill did not pre-see the rise of Bernie Sanders, either. So there was no possibility of him knowing beforehand how happy he would be that Bernie would be doing so well.) •Understandably, N.B. does not spend a lot of his valuable prognosticating time trying to foretell who will be exposed as a child molester. So who can blame him for not spotting Jared Fogle and Josh Duggar coming down the pedophile pike. He feels badly about it in hindsight, but if those two could turn out to be disgusting deviants, he has to wonder Who’s next?... Justin Bieber? Mike Huckabee? (Disclaimer: N.B. wants to make it clear that any mention of Bieber and Huckabee in the same context of Fogle and Duggar does not qualify as an official prediction.) •Nostril insists he knew well ahead of time that sooner or later, in one backwoods hillbilly shithole or another, some municipal official or county clerk or random sanctimonious dick with a government job would make a big show of denying gay couples access to marriage licenses. What he didn’t portend was that the backwoods hillbilly shithole would turn out to be in Kentucky, and that the sanctimonious dick would turn out to be Kim Davis. Nor did his crystal ball show him how extremely unpleasant this particular dick would be to behold. •N.B. also insists he could see the scandal of Tom Brady and the deflated balls coming from a mile away. He just didn’t think it was important enough to mention, that’s all. •Why N.B. couldn’t predict Bill O’Reilly would be definitively identified as a self-aggrandizing liar may seem to be one of the bigger mysteries of the year. Nostril excuses it thus: “The deal is, see, like everyone else with an ounce of sense, I’ve known O’Reilly has been lying ever since he first plopped his stringy ass down in a Fox News anchor chair 20 years ago. How was I to know this one year, out of all the others, he’d get caught at it?” •Nostril wants everyone to know he was 100 percent correct in predicting Chicago would not win the 2015 World Series. However, he is a tad embarrassed that his extraordinary gift wasn’t extraordinary enough to show him beforehand how the Cubbies would make it all the way to the playoffs before blowing it out their asses, as opposed to blowing it out their asses from the beginning of the season, per usual. •(To be continued next week.)

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CITYDESK

RELE VENT CIT Y

GU Y HAND/COURTESE Y CIT Y OF BOISE

NEWS APP FROM SCRATCH

An Energize Our Neighborhoods update is heading to Vista Neighborhood residents in 2016.

CITY TO VISTA NEIGHBORHOOD: CHANGE IS ‘A PROCESS,’ AND IT’S ‘NOT IMPOSSIBLE’ Early in 2016, shortly after the holiday break, school kids in Boise’s Vista neighborhood will be bringing home a report card to their parents—but it won’t contain grades. It’s a report card from the city of Boise to Vista residents on what the city has accomplished in its Energize Our Neighborhoods initiative and, more important, what’s still to come. “We’ll be sending them home with every student from Hawthorne and Whitney elementary schools and South Junior High,” said Melinda McGoldrick, Boise’s new Energize Our Neighborhoods coordinator. Vista neighbors packed the community center at Whitney Elementary in June 2014 to first hear about the new initiative, which city officials promised would have “huge potential.” In short order, neighbors identified eight focus areas that need greater attention, including children and youth, economic development, housing, public safety, sustainability and transportation. “But change needs to be resident-driven,” said McGoldrick. The highest-profile change, to date, in Vista came in the form of free pre-kindergarten sessions at Hawthorne and Whitney elementary schools. In kicking off the first day of a unique partnership with the Boise Independent School District, Mayor Dave Bieter called it a “watershed day for our city and maybe our state.” Other changes to the Vista neighborhood haven’t gotten much of media attention, yet are still significant to some residents: new sidewalks and stop signs. “They’re smaller in scale, but they’re a big deal to the neighborhood,” said McGoldrick, adding the transportation and public safety committees have worked with the Ada County Highway District to install stop signs and sidewalks to areas throughout the neighborhood.. In 2016, the city also intends to embark on a first-of-its kind partnership with the Treasure Valley YMCA and Boys and Girls Clubs to expand youth activities at neighborhood schools. It’s something McGoldrick said would be “pretty monumental.” “We’ll be pretty busy in the coming year,” she added. “Yes, it’s definitely a process. But change isn’t impossible.” —George Prentice 6 | DECEMBER 30 – JANUARY 5, 2015 | BOISEweekly

Three strangers joined forces to create RelEVENT City JESSICA MURRI It took two glasses of wine at a Christmas party in 2014 to convince Stacey Donahue to sign up for the B-Launched (blaunched.com) competition through the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce. She thought it would mean attending a project meeting every other week and maybe a little work beyond that. “I did not think I would become the CEO of a start-up app,” Donahue said. Now in its fourth year, B-Launched is a “startup training program for young entrepreneurs.” Each year, aspiring young professionals from varying backgrounds and work experience enter the competition and are grouped into teams—usually with people they’ve never met—and partnered with experienced mentors. Donahue, a utilities analyst at the Idaho Public Utilities Commission, was partnered with Jeff Heath, marketing coordinator at Business Interiors of Idaho, and Sean MacLachlan, a former HP employee who wrote firmware for laser jet printers. They also had the help of two mentors who had experience in start-ups and market trends. Donahue’s team came together in February with few guidelines other than to create a start-up that could scale up to $10 million per year. They were vying against three other teams for $20,000 in funding and free legal services. Coming up with the perfect start-up quickly became the most challenging part. “We had some pretty goofy ideas,” said Heath, who serves as chief marketing officer for the team. “One of them was funny cards.” “It was like the anti-greeting card,” Donahue said. “Kind of like MadLibs. It would give someone the assist to write something clever and funny, because people like to send cards, but saying ‘Happy Birthday’ or ‘Congratulations’ is lame.” They also kicked around the idea of a water filtration company. “It would provide a lightweight, portable, human-powered water filtration system for disaster relief areas or developing areas that don’t have sustainable, working water filtration,” Heath said. Agreeing on an idea was harder than thinking one up. Donahue was passionate about the card concept. Heath let go of the water filtration idea. “In the beginning, we were trying to be polite but let people know their idea wasn’t the best,” Heath said. “The politics of normal social behavior and trying to overcome that to get things done

RelEVENT City is like the Pandora Radio of local happenings: It makes suggestions based on users’ likes.

and MacLachlan put the finishing touches on quickly and efficiently—some of our meetings their 11-minute pitch, which they presented to a were really long because of that.” panel of 15 judges, including Boise Mayor Dave Ultimately, in April, it was MacLachlan who Bieter; a few members of the chamber of comsuggested the winning idea. He envisioned a merce; former Idaho Statesman Publisher Mike phone app that would catalog users’ interests Jung, founder and former CEO of Cloud.com and suggest events around town based on those Sheng Liang, and some founding members of interests—something like the Pandora Radio of local business incubator Trailhead. event calendars. RelEVENT City (releventcity. RelEVENT City won first place in the Bcom) was born Launched competition, followed by a beacon RelEVENT City offers several categories to technology that lets waiters in restaurants see choose from, such as sports, music, conferences, how long guests have been waiting, a nutritional art, education, religion, animals, comedy, clubs, energy bar made from hemp books and family. The user and a discount prescription then selects parameters, such as To be a RelEVENT City beta tester aggregator. distance and dates. The app then in January 2016, email Now that the app has suggests nearby events, and the stacey@releventcity.com. secured a $20,000 boost, user can either “thumbs up” or Testers must have an iPhone. MacLachlan works on it on “thumbs down.” The algorithm full-time and the other team becomes smarter, selecting events members’ involvement remains strong. They’re better suited to the user, solving the problem of currently looking for iPhone beta testers to try out sifting through endless community calendars the app in January 2016. They hope to officially with hundreds of events that don’t interest many launch for both iPhone and Android in March people. 2016. (To be a beta tester, email stacey@releventcNo one on the team had ever built an app before, and they had until May 15 to figure it out. ity.com.) The team has its sights set on expanding to Salt They turned to MacLachlan, who had the Lake City; Seattle; and Portland, Ore. most coding experience. Even though the project unfolded into some“I had never built an app or a recommendathing larger than Donahue imagined, she said tion system, or used these computer languages,” she’s not only looking forward to her future with he said. “It’s been a major learning curve. I did it the app, but she also enjoys its potential now. with a strong will and lots of Google searching.” “Even since just messing around with the app The team met twice a week for several hours, at home, I’ve found all kinds of interesting events learning how to construct an app and how to I wouldn’t have known about, like two really function as a team. Donahue learned that Heath interesting educational seminars and some fundstarts to “claw [his] eyeballs out and cry” after 11 raisers for different social causes,” Donahue said. p.m. and Heath learned Donahue doesn’t hate “Unfortunately, I’m too busy with this start-up him as much as he thought she did. MacLachlan to actually go to any of them, but now I know. It learned how to code. Days before the deadline, the Donahue, Heath gives me the sense that Boise is very vibrant.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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CITIZENS OF THE YEAR Some parting words from the class of 2015 GEORGE PRENTICE Each week, Boise Weekly presents a long-form question-and-answer session with persons of note from the Treasure Valley and beyond. Among our “Citizen” interviews in 2015, the advocates, athletes, caregivers, performers, teachers and more were an impressive bunch, so before we usher in the new year, we would be remiss if we didn’t look back at some of 2015’s luminaries. We met one of the coolest guys in town, Tim Johnson, on one of the hottest days of the year. It was a particularly sweltering July afternoon when we stepped into the offices of Boise Cold Storage, where Johnson told us his staff likes to keep the thermostat set to what he officially called “too damn cold.” Among the things we learned is that smack dab in the middle of Boise Cold Storage, founded in 1903, is a 630-foot-deep artesian well. “When we took over the business they had all of this equipment introducing chemicals to keep the cooling towers clean,” said Johnson. “We thought that was crazy. We shut them down; ripped out all of the chemical treatments. The only thing we use city water for is to hose off our loading docks but when we’re producing ice, it’s crystal-clean artesian water.” Someone else who spent a lot of time on ice—and snow—is Hailey Duke. On another warm summer day, we talked with the Olympic skier and Boise native about her decision to step away from the World Cup circuit and go back to college. “Sometimes you’re on the cool list, sometimes BOISE WEEKLY.COM

you’re not,” said Duke. “I’ve done exactly what I wanted to do… and then some… and then some more. And I was finally good with that.” When we spoke to Oscar nominee Bruce Dern last winter, he was in the Colorado mountains on the set of director Quentin Tarantino’s new film, The Hateful Eight, which is currently one of the most buzzed about movies in Hollywood. “We’re shooting at 10,400 feet, right above Telluride, Colo.,” Dern said. “It’s actually more like an opera and, as far as I’m concerned, Quentin finally has the huge canvas that he has always deserved.” Dern was one of a long list of performers we spoke with in 2015, some of them veterans, some of them newcomers, like 11-year-old Giovanna Layne, a Cleveland, Ohio, native who spent her summer in Boise as the leading lady in Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s musical The Secret Garden. “I’ve never really been away from home before, except on a family trip,” said Layne. “I think I’ve done 13 shows. I don’t really keep track. When they’re over, they’re over. But they have already taken me quite far. If that continues, I can see this as a career.” We spoke with another musical performer, Cecilia Violetta Lopez, who had a careerchanging 2015. Shortly after we talked to Lopez in February, she was offered a contract with the Metropolitan Opera to cover the role of Sylviane in the Met’s spring production of The Merry

Widow. She appeared this year in other productions in New York, Virginia and Minnesota, and she’s scheduled to return to her home state on Jan. 29 and Jan. 31, 2016 when she’ll sing the role of Violetta Valery for Opera Idaho’s production of La Traviata. “The first time I heard opera was when I watched Sesame Street as a kid—and that’s how I learned English. Sesame Street used to have opera singers make cameo appearances back then,” Lopez said, adding that it wasn’t until many years later, while attending college, that her husband told her, “You should pursue a career in music. That’s what you love to do. Why don’t you do it?” Another singer, Ingrid Michaelson, found modest success with her debut album in 2005. When her songs started popping up in episodes of ABC’s hit drama Grey’s Anatomy, however, she found what she called “crazy success.” “You’re never really prepared,” Michaelson said. “You think you are, but everything ebbs and flows. There was a huge buzz that happened immediately, and then it came down a bit, and then it was back up again. It was a surreal experience.” Author Elizabeth Gilbert also talked about the ups and downs of her professional life, especially following the publication of her wildly successful 2006 memoir Eat, Pray, Love. “It goes from one end of the spectrum, where people write letters saying ‘I detest you,’ to letters saying ‘You’ve written my bible,’” said Gilbert. “But somewhere in the middle, people said, BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | 7


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‘Wow, I had forgotten that my life belonged to me, and thank you for reminding me that my life is mine.’ The book became a giant screen on which people projected their own emotions, feelings and opinions.” Feelings and opinions were the order of the day through much of January, February and March, as the Idaho Legislature was up to its usual shenanigans, but we were impressed by three freshmen lawmakers: Democratic House members Paulette Jordan, of Plummer; John McCrostie, of Garden City; and Melissa Wintrow, of Boise. “I wasn’t veering into politics purposefully,” said Jordan. “There was a need. When you have ideas, people want you to play those ideas out.” In spite of being part of a slim minority at the Statehouse, McCrostie remained optimistic about the future for Idaho Democrats. “Democrats were able to get one more seat in the Legislature in spite of Republicans taking all of the top state offices,” he said. “I really think there are some more seats that we take from the GOP.” Shortly after taking over a House seat in Boise’s District 19, Wintrow said, “If there’s a theme in my life, it’s advocacy. Even as a child, when I saw someone being picked on, I would step in. Unfortunately, in my early life, I had a tussle or two. “I think Democrats have a more collectivistic notion, and Republicans have a more individualistic notion of responsibility. Our social-mindedness is different in how we choose to create a community.” Some of most influential people in Gem State politics in 2015 weren’t members of the Idaho House or Senate. John Reuter, for example, a preeminent environmental activist, fundraiser and all-around political animal, stepped down as executive director of Conservation Voters for Idaho. He shared some parting thoughts as he left 8 | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

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his CVI post to move to Seattle, where he’s now the director of Local and Bipartisan Strategies for the League of Conservation Voters. “A mentor taught me that game-changing gifts require a game-changing program,” said Reuter when asked about the key to successful fundraising. “If you want people to invest, then you have to have a vision and a plan to get there. You’re building a community, not just raking in money at fundraisers. The real question is: How do you build a community that shares a united sense of values? The money usually follows.” One of the most sobering conversations we had in 2015 was with Boise State University political scientist Dr. Michael Allen, as he discussed the growth of the terror exported by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, aka ISIS. “They’re quite savvy with social media and they certainly have a sense of how much they’re being covered by Western media. Look at how their escalated atrocities get so much free coverage,” Allen said. “I would be very interested to learn more about the levels of support that they’re gaining in places that they’ve taken over, but there’s not a lot of media that is present. They capture reporters, or kidnap them.” In a lengthy conversation in July, Boise Police Chief Bill Bones spoke about his 22 years in the Boise Police Department, the need to encourage more women and minorities to join his ranks, and his desire to equip all of his patrol officers with body cameras—which will become a reality this coming spring. “I’m asked about them all the time. And more than a few people are shocked when I say I absolutely love them. They’re an incredible tool for accountability and training,” said Bones, adding that he shares the public’s concerns when it comes to privacy protections. “Idaho is one of the states

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that hasn’t been too progressive on this. Yes, we should release information, but we shouldn’t be compromising the privacy of someone caught in a bathrobe when they answer the door.” Saving the best for last, two of the nicest people we spent time with in 2015 were a pair of individuals that we had been trying to agree to long-form conversations for quite some time. We had the rare opportunity to sit down with Bruce Reichert, host and executive producer of Idaho Public Television’s Outdoor Idaho, and we asked him to share his insight into the current national strategy to let wildfires burn in the shadow of one of the worst wildfire seasons in history. “I live among large ponderosa pines and Douglas firs. I’m a big believer in managing forests,” said Reichert, who still commutes to Boise from his cabin in Idaho City. “I have a hunch, especially after this past year, that it’s going to become a lot harder for Idaho’s environmental community to push for leaving forests alone from management.” Unfortunately, the occasions for our conversation with Jim Everett was his retirement as CEO of the Treasure Valley YMCA. After first walking through the Boise Y’s doors in 1977 to become a swim coach, Everett exited through those same doors in December as the man who helped grow the Y’s membership base from about 3,000 to 53,000. Additionally, it is estimated that as many as 100,000 people access the Y’s community programs each year. “If I have half as much fun in the next 30 years as the last 30, I’ll be a lucky man,” said Everett. “I always thought I had the best job in the world, but it turns out that the best in the world is being grandpa.” To all of our 2015 citizens and every Idahoan who embraces citizenship as a privilege, our wish is for a happy, healthy and engaging new year. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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YEAR IN REVIEW THE TOP 15 STORIES OF ’15 —BW STAFF

JAN. 1: CITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION: BOISE’S BUILDING BOOM It’s hard to keep track of how many construction projects are ongoing in downtown Boise. There are the obvious ones: the City Center Plaza on the Grove; JUMP rising up west of BoDo; the pair of hotels planned for Capitol Boulevard; and the other two hotels being built on the parcel of land bounded by 13th, Front, 11th and Myrtle streets. There are also plenty of projects that are only now getting started, such as the remaking of the Central Addition neighborhood—which will be home to mixed-use commercial and residential developments—and a live/work apartment building on the site of the Watercooler. Don’t forget to wear your hardhat in 2016. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

W

e all know the Chinese phrase “may you live in interesting times” is meant to be a curse, the idea being that no news is good news. Of course, we don’t really see it that way in the news business, and 2015 was a newsy S.O.B. As we do every year, Boise Weekly takes a stroll down memory lane to highlight some of the stories we thought were most important—whether that means they had the most impact, were the most interesting, most fun to read or report, or signify something we’re sure we’ll be spending 2016 exploring. We hope your 2015 was interesting in the best way(s) possible.

MARCH 25: TREEFORT COMES OF AGE Treefort Music Fest’s road to success has been steep. Titanically popular among locals from the start, the festival grew quickly from featuring 137 bands in 2012 to 430 bands in 2015—the year the festival broke even financially and attained nonprofit B status. Every year, Treefort bumps up the number of forts as well as the number of ticket holders hailing from somewhere other than Boise, and Hackfort even got a nod from President Barack Obama during his visit to the City of Trees in January (also a big story). By every metric, Treefort has come into its own.

APRIL 24: COLLEGE OF WESTERN IDAHO BUYS WATERFRONT PROPERTY In April, the College of Western Idaho announced it had entered into a purchase agreement to buy 10 acres of land along the Boise River. The community college said the land would be the perfect site for its Boise campus, but the public was shocked to learn the college would pay $8.8 million for a parcel assessed at $3.6 million without having conducted its own assessment first. CWI rode out the storm until July, when an independent appraisal of the land pegged its value at $8.9 million, vindicating CWI.

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JUNE 10:OLYMPIC VENUE GETS GOLD-STAR MAKEOVER On a warm day in June, the midday sun shone through spotless new windows and bounced off high-polished wooden tables in a space where old broken glass and bird guano once covered the floor. The Olympic was ready for its grand opening. When Alicia Wagner bought Mulligan’s Pub and the long dormant Olympic Hotel above the popular downtown spot, she thought about turning the Olympic into a bar/eatery, but she said she “didn’t want to detract from Mulligan’s,” instead turning it into a special-events center. She made sure the Olympic would retain some of its old charm by using reclaimed timber to build tables and supports and having local neon artist Wil Kirkman restore the original Olympic Hotel sign.

JULY 1: COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN IDAHO REFUGEE CENTER FIGHTS TO KEEP ITS DOORS OPEN For 30 years, the College of Southern Idaho Refugee Center has helped thousands of refugees find footing in their new country, but two referenda in Twin Falls County are seeking to put an end to it. Proponents of the referenda say the center is an open door for terrorists, but the center—and the U.S. Department of State—have vouched for the refugee vetting process. Nevertheless, the measures have triggered sizeable demonstrations for and against the center in Boise and, in November, Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter sided with the security crowd, joining a host of Republican governors calling for the President to halt refugee immigration to the U.S. until a thorough audit of the admissions process can be completed.

JUNE 13: THE BOISE CO-OP RECOVERS FROM ILLNESS

JULY 8: FEDERAL JUDGE RAPS IDOC OVER PUNISHMENT CELLS

Several months ahead of the muchanticipated opening of Boise Co-op’s second location at the Village at Meridian, people started getting sick. Ultimately, almost 300 people fell ill from deli items contaminated with salmonella—it was one of the largest foodborne illness outbreaks in Idaho history. Even amid the outbreak, many loyal customers rushed to the North End grocer’s defense. What’s more, the Co-op’s huge Meridian location opened on schedule, bringing farm-fresh food closer to customers in the center of the Treasure Valley and ending a 2015 on a positive note.

The long-simmering scandal at Idaho’s state prison complex came to a head in summer 2015, with a two-day federal court hearing in July followed in August by a slapdown from a federal judge. The real stunner came Sept. 1, when the Idaho Department of Correction announced it would ban any future use of so-called “dry cells,” labeled “barbaric” by a court-ordered investigator. The dry cells—so named because they had no running water or bed and only a hole in the floor for use as a toilet—had been routinely used by IDOC at the Behavioral Health Unit of the Idaho State Correctional

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Institution. Prisoners who had threatened suicide were often sent into the dry cells for lengthy periods. “I wouldn’t put an animal in there,” a former IDOC clinician told Boise Weekly. IDOC chief Kevin Kempf later said he and his administrators conceded that since they would never put their own sons or daughters in a dry cell, “It became pretty clear that we wouldn’t put anyone else’s son or daughter in a dry cell, either.” JULY 18: OLE! KAIXO AND ATHLETIC CLUB DE BILBAO FACE OFF IN FIRSTEVER BASQUE SOCCER FRIENDLY For a few days over the summer, Boise’s Basque Block became the most defined spot in the city as thousands of Basque and Basque enthusiasts flooded in for endless kalimotxos, sangrias and croquetas. Jaialdi—the massive Basque celebration—comes once every five years, after all, and the next one won’t be until 2020. This year’s Jaialdi brought it with the inaugural Basque Soccer Friendly, pitting the Basque Country’s Athletic Club de Bilbao against Club Tijuana Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente of Baja California, Mexico, for the first time on North American soil. And by soil, we mean the Albertsons Stadium, which required an elaborate process of covering the famous blue turf with 85,000 square feet of sod. We already can’t wait for the next one.

AUG. 7: BOULDER-WHITE CLOUDS WIN WILDERNESS STATUS It only took four decades to get permanent protection over parts of the BoulderWhite Cloud mountain ranges in Central Idaho. The fight for preservation ended on Aug. 7, when President Obama signed a bill designating 275,665 acres as wilderness— the highest protection that can be placed on an environment. The final word left hard-core environmentalists discouraged over the watered down acreage and mountain bikers bitter over the loss of their favorite trails, but it curbed a national monument designation— which many environmentalists and ranchers alike despised. Next, it’s up to the Salmon-Challis National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management, the Sawtooth National Forest and the Sawtooth National Recreation Area to mark the wilderness boundaries and come up with new land management plans. SEPT. 2: HOMELESSNESS IN BOISE FINDS A FLASHPOINT IN ‘COOPER COURT’ TENT CITY When Boise Weekly first reported in September on a growing tent city near downtown, most Boiseans had never heard of Cooper Court, let alone the encampment of homeless men and women. By year’s end, it had become Boise’s biggest controversy. Cooper Court became a political football during Mayor Dave Bieter’s re-election campaign and ultimately sparked a citywide debate about how, or even if, the city should BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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SEPT. 5: BOISE INTERNATIONAL MARKET DESTROYED IN TWO-ALARM FIRE Five months after it celebrated an official grand opening, the Boise International Market was gone. Just before midnight on Sept. 5, a fire broke out in the kitchen of one of the vendors, ultimately destroying much of the building on the 5800 block of Franklin Street. Found by investigators to be accidental, the blaze was a devastating blow to the more than dozen business owners—most of them refugees from around the world. A fundraising drive following the fire garnered $55,686 to help support the affected vendors. Meanwhile, the Global Community Market was set up at Trailhead, providing a temporary home for about 10 businesses through the holidays.

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OCT. 7: LED PREMIERES AT THE MORRISON CENTER WITH THIS SIDE OF PARADISE A few years ago dancer Lauren Edson set out to pursue what would become an award-winning choreography career. In October, as co-founder and artistic director of ambitious dance/music/projection troupe LED, Edson and her LED co-founder, creative director and husband Andrew Stensaas presented their company and their vision on the Morrison Center stage in This Side of Paradise, a multimedia retelling of the relationship between Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald. With Paradise, Edson and Stensaas showed they belong in the spotlight. (LED presents a multimedia showcase of the original music Stensaas composed for Paradise at the Egyptian Theatre on Friday, Jan. 22, 2016.) OCT. 21: ST. LUKE’S MASTER PLAN RECEIVES BOISE CITY COUNCIL APPROVAL A key vote is still scheduled for sometime in March 2016, but the much-debated St. Luke’s Master Plan, which calls for the closure of a stretch of Jefferson Street and a major expansion of the hospital’s downtown Boise footprint, was passed by the Boise City Council. The council’s October approval was a stark contrast to a rejection of the plan only eight months before by the city’s own planning and zoning commission. But through

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care for those men and women who either couldn’t or wouldn’t spend a night in a shelter. Cooper Court advocates said the tent city was a reflection of a growing homeless population, while city officials insisted there was adequate space in existing shelters. It wasn’t until December that the city declared the encampment to be a local disaster emergency and ousted its occupants. By year’s end, it was still unclear where the 140-plus Cooper Court occupiers had landed, but nearly everyone agreed the tent city’s underlying problem was far from gone.

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a series of negotiated workshops and an eight-hour public hearing in July, city officials said, “The St. Luke’s team has been working to amend the plan.” For instance, the amended plan would reopen a section of Bannock Street (closed by a previous St. Luke’s expansion in the 1990s), with a 28-foot-wide public easement in which no further construction would be allowed. Other changes included specific transit stops intended “to serve a future fixed line,” referring to the city’s desire to introduce a downtown circulator transit system, and new bike lanes on Idaho and Main streets, “depicted as a buffered—or protected—lane design.” “Much detail is yet to come,” said city planning director Hal Simmons, minutes before the council’s approval. NOV. 3: BOSS BIETER: HIZZONER BROADENS POWER BASE BEYOND CITY HALL Is Mayor Dave Bieter the most powerful man in Boise? Undoubtedly. Is he one of the most powerful men in Boise history? Most probably. After serving a couple of terms in the Idaho House, Boise became the youngest person on the Boise City Council when he was elected as mayor in 2000. In 2015, as he turned 56, Bieter sailed into a record-tying fourth term of office in a landslide re-election victory. This year marked Bieter’s sixth successful general election, although politicos bundle Bieter’s personal victories with the multiple

elections in which he has held considerable sway, including contests for the Ada County Highway District, the Greater Boise Auditorium District and multiple levies and/or bond initiatives. Citywide, Bieter garnered an impressive 69 percent of the vote; in northeast Boise’s sprawling precinct No. 1910, he secured 85 percent. Some key precincts reported turnouts of more than 40 percent of registered voters. Additionally, approximately 4,700 voters had cast their ballots early at Ada County early voting stations. Added with the nearly 2,000 mail-in ballots and it turns out nearly a third of all votes cast in Boise had been cast prior to Election Day. NOV. 3: FOOTHILLS LEVY: THE SEQUEL NETS AS MUCH AS THE ORIGINAL The $10 million levy that passed with an astounding 74 percent in the November election isn’t just for the foothills. While the original foothills levy—which passed in 2001 for the same amount of money—helped the city acquire thousands of acres of protected land, the new levy will focus on open space outside the foothills, as well as conservation of the Boise River. Before the city can start spending the money, it needs to put together a citizens’ advisory committee to oversee land purchases and conservation projects. There is still a little more than $1 million left in the original fund.

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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY DEC. 30 Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Enjoy more than 300,000 holiday lights hanging from every possible surface, transforming the garden into a brightly lit wonderland. Through Jan. 3. 6-9 p.m. $4-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

On Stage COF: A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD—7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter. org. SONGWRITERS NIGHT— Enjoy original music by up-and-coming singersongwriters, hosted by Keith and Julianna. 8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com. WEDNESDAY COMEDY OPEN MIC—Yuck it up with local comedians honing their craft, or take advantage of the opportunity to try out new material yourself. Sign-ups for comics start at 7 p.m., with the hilarity to follow at 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com.

Art ANIMALIA IV—Through Feb. 5. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com. CHINESE GARDENS—Through Feb. 14. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. FOLDING PAPER: THE INFINITE POSSIBILITIES OF ORIGAMI— Through Jan. 17. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. FULTON STREET SHOWROOM: FAVORITE THINGS—Through Dec. 31. FREE. Fulton Street Showroom, 850 W. Fulton St., Boise, 208-4214501. GARY KOMARIN: THE FIRST GREEN RUSHING—Through Feb. 5. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com. KNEELAND GALLERY: LAND OF THE FREE—Through Jan. 30. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5512, kneelandgallery. com. MELISSA ‘SASI’ CHAMBERS: TARPESTRIES—Through Jan. 17.

7 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242, finearts.boisestate.edu. NILES NORDQUIST: IN THE WILD—Through Jan. 10. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Friesen Galleries, Brandt Center, Northwest Nazarene University, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8398, brandtcenter.nnu. edu. ROLE PLAY: CHANGING IDEAS ABOUT GENDER—Through Feb. 20. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. THEODORE WADDELL: OUT TO PASTURE—Through Feb. 5. 9 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208726-5079, gailseverngallery.com. TVAA: CUISINE ART—Through Jan. 15. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, boisestatepublicradio.org. VIGNETTES—Through Feb. 5. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com.

Sports & Fitness ANTHONY LAKES OPEN—Open daily through Jan. 3. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $10-$35. Anthony Lakes Mountain Resort, 47500 Anthony Lake Hwy., North Powder, 541-856-3277, anthonylakes.com. BOGUS OPEN—Holiday hours will run 9 a.m.-9 p.m. through Jan. 3. $20-$54 alpine, $15-$25 nights, $3-$14 nordic, $12 tubing hill. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-332-5100, bogusbasin.org.

by Jonathan Warren and The Billy Goats at 10:30 p.m. Plus, a FREE champagne toast at midnight. 7:30 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. NAMPA CIVIC CENTER NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY—Ring in 2016 at the Nampa Civic Center with music by the Alley Cats, cocktails, dinner, FREE after-show hors d’oeuvres and a special champagne toast as the clock strikes midnight. 7 p.m. $40-$75. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE IDAHO POTATO DROP— Head down to the Capitol for live music beginning at 6 p.m. The party will be capped off with a world-class fireworks display. Visit idahopotatodrop.com for details. 6 p.m. FREE. Downtown Boise, 208954-5077, idahopotatodrop.com. NIGHT OF CHAMPAGNE, SPARKLES AND ICE—Ring in the new year at Boise’s premier dance club and gay bar, with complimentary champagne at midnight. The party rolls on until 4 a.m. 8 p.m. $15. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com. PINZ NYE COUNTDOWN PARTY— Let the good times roll this New Year’s Eve with your own lane for the entire evening, appetizer and dessert buffet, and a midnight countdown party with party favors and champagne (or sparkling cider) toast. All ages welcome. 9:15 p.m.-1 a.m. $27-$45 adv., $32-$50

door. Wahooz Fun Zone and Pinz Bowling Center, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, wahoozfunzone. com. 208-898-0900, ext. 0. PLAYHOUSE TASTE OF CHICAGO NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH—Join the Blues Brothers Rock ‘n Soul Revue and comedian Curt Sudden for a rockin’ fun time. There’ll be Chicago-style finger foods, full bar, party favors and a champagne toast. 8 p.m. $40, $75 couples. The Playhouse Boise (formerly AEN Playhouse), 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com. SVCA NEW YEAR’S EVE BUBBLY BASH—Cap off 2015 in style at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ winter fundraiser. You’ll enjoy FREE champagne from 9-10 p.m., plus the obligatory midnight toast. And you can dance the night away to tunes spun by L.A.’s DJ Shark, as well as DJ Jens Peterson. 9 p.m. $85 adv., $100 after Dec. 1. River Run Lodge, At the Base of Bald Mountain, Sun Valley, 208-6222133, sunvalleycenter.org. SWINGIN’ IN THE NEW YEAR—Enjoy a night of electronic-infused vintage music, with a dance lesson by Joel Hunter of the Heirloom Dance Studio from 9-10 p.m.Featuring DJs Chiron and Just Some Clown. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. $12 adv., $20 door. The Drink Bar & Waterfront Grill, 3000 N. Lakeharbor Lane, Boise, 208-853-5070. TAMARACK NEW YEAR’S EVE TORCHLIGHT PARADE AND FIREWORKS—Ring in 2016 on the slopes of Tamarack Resort

EYESPY

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BRUNDAGE OPEN—Open daily. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $16-$62. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800888-7544, brundage.com.

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—6-9 p.m. $4-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649.

On Stage COF: A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD—7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter. org. KINGS OF SWING—Dance away 2015 with the legendary Kings of Swing and special guest vocalist Pamela DeMarche. Bring in the new year with great big band music performed in the style of the era. 8:30 p.m. $15-$20. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-342-5553, kingsofswing.org.

Festivals & Events BPL HOLIDAY CLOSURES—All locations will be closing at 6 p.m. New Year’s Eve, and closed New Year’s Day. boisepubliclibrary.org. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

NEW YEAR’S EVE GALA—Go all out for New Year’s Eve with threeor five-course dinners, live music, dancing and appetizers, plus a champagne toast and party favors at midnight. Early dining starts at 5 p.m., and gala dining at 7:30 p.m. Call for reservations. 5 p.m.-1 a.m. $50-$75, or regular menu prices. Angell’s Bar and Grill Renato, 999 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-4900. angellsbarandgrill.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 1 Festivals & Events THE 13TH ANNUAL GREAT POLAR BEAR CHALLENGE—It’s that time of year again to brave the frigid waters at Lucky Peak’s Spring Shores Marina. So bundle up, then strip down for The Great Polar Bear Challenge, the annual event benefiting Make-A-Wish Idaho. Taking part in the icy dip will raise funds for children in Idaho with life-threatening medical conditions. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. FREE. Lucky Peak State Park, 74 Arrowrock Road, off Hwy. 21 below Lucky Peak Dam, Boise. 208-3459474, idaho.wish.org.

Sports & Fitness SKATE INTO THE NEW YEAR—Enjoy a familyfriendly evening. Party hats and favors will be provided while supplies last. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. $5. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-6087716, idahoiceworld.com.

FROZEN STONES HIGHLAND CHALLENGE—Join the Scottish American Athletic Association for traditional Highland competitions. Plus food, drink and fire pits. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE, $35 to compete. Gem Island Sports complex, Canal Street, Emmett, saaa-national.org.

WAHOOZ AND PINZ NOON YEAR’S EVE PARTY—Enjoy unlimited laser tag, bowling, mini golf, go-karts, Kiddie Cove and $5 Game Card, plus countdown at noon with balloon drop and bubble wrap stomp. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $14.99. Wahooz Fun Zone and Pinz Bowling Center, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-898-0900, wahoozfunzone.com.

THURSDAY DEC. 31

Food

BPL HOLIDAY CLOSURES—All locations of the Boise Public Library will be closed. boisepubliclibrary. org.

NEW YEAR’S EVE LOCK-IN—Kids can ring in the new year and stay locked in at the Nampa Rec Center all night. You’ll enjoy movies, swimming, games and a pizza party. For ages 6-12. 7 p.m. $20-$25. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

TAMARACK OPEN—Open daily. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $18-$62. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208-3251000. tamarackidaho.com/event/ projected-opening-day.

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WAHOOZ NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY—The whole family can celebrate the new year with unlimited laser tag, mini golf, go-karts, Kiddie Cove and $5 game card. Plus countdown at midnight with balloon drop and party favors. 5 p.m.-12 a.m. $15.99. Wahooz Fun Zone and Pinz Bowling Center, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-898-0900, wahoozfunzone.com.

Kids & Teens

SUN VALLEY OPEN—Open daily. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $45-$125. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800-7868259, sunvalley.com.

LIQUID NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH—Featuring live music by Muzzy Braun at 7:30 p.m., followed

with an evening bonfire followed by the annual torchlight parade at 7 p.m. and fireworks shortly after. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208-325-1000, tamarackidaho.com.

WINGS CENTER NEW YEAR’S OVERNIGHTER—Let your child ring in 2016 in style. 7 p.m. $35-$50. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641. wingscenter.com.

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—6-9 p.m. $4-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649. idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Sports & Fitness BOGUS OPEN—9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $20-$54 alpine, $15-$25 nights, $3-$14 nordic, $12 tubing hill. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-332-5100, bogusbasin.org. BRUNDAGE OPEN—9:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. $16-$62. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800-8887544, brundage.com. SUN VALLEY OPEN—9 a.m.-4 p.m. $45-$125. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208622-4111 or 1-800-786-8259, sunvalley.com. TAMARACK OPEN—9 a.m.-4 p.m. $18-$62. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208-3251000. tamarackidaho.com.

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16 | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR On Stage 12

COF: A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD—7 p.m. $15$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208578-9122. sunvalleycenter.org.

Food NEW YEAR’S DAY BRUNCH—Start the new year off right with what some consider to be Boise’s best brunch. 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Juniper Kitchen and Cocktails, 211 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-1142, juniperon8th.com.

SATURDAY JAN. 2 Festivals & Events OLD BOISE MODEL RAILROAD HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE—Don’t miss your last chance to see the Old Boise N-Scale Model Railroad Club’s holiday tour of their setup, which features more than 1,000 feet of track, multiple switch yards, miniature towns, villages and wilderness, and hundreds of rail cars. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. The Pioneer Building, 106 N. Sixth St., Boise. facebook.com/oldboiserailroad. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—6-9 p.m. $4-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649..

On Stage COF: A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD—7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122. sunvalleycenter. org.

Sports & Fitness BOGUS OPEN—9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $20-$54 alpine, $15-$25 nights, $3-$14 nordic, $12 tubing hill. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-332-5100, bogusbasin.org. BRUNDAGE OPEN—9:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. $16-$62. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800-8887544, brundage.com. HASTINGS WII U SUPER SMASH BROS. TOURNAMENT—Hastings on Boise Avenue and on Overland will host Wii U Super SMASH Bros. Tournament. There’ll be prizes: First place wins a $50 gift card, second wins a $25 gift card, and third a $15 gift card. Competitors can RSVP to the Facebook event pages for rules and updates. Registration in-store only; limited to 64 participants. 4 p.m. $5. Hastings, 680 E. Boise Ave., 208-345-9428; and 10539 W. Overland Road, 208-322-0314.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

SUN VALLEY OPEN—9 a.m.-4 p.m. $45-$125. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208622-4111 or 1-800-786-8259, sunvalley.com.

SUNDAY JAN. 3

TAMARACK OPEN—9 a.m.-4 p.m. $18-$62. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208-325-1000. tamarackidaho.com.

Festivals & Events

Kids & Teens SENSORY FRIENDLY MOVIE: ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS THE ROAD CHIP—e Chipmunks: The Road Chip. Lights will be on, the sound turned down, and kids can be loud and express themselves during the film. 10:30 a.m. $5. Majestic Cinemas-Meridian, 2140 E. Cinema Drive, Meridian, 208-8882228, meridian.hallettcinemas. com.

Food NEW YEAR’S DAY BRUNCH—Start the new year off right with what some consider to be Boise’s best brunch. 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Juniper Kitchen and Cocktails, 211 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-1142, juniperon8th.com.

BOISE DEPOT TOURS— See the iconic Boise building inside and out, and finish with an up-close look at the bells in the 96-foot tower. Tours are approximately one hour in length. Spots are limited; RSVP online. The Depot is open SundayMonday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 12 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, parks.cityofboise.org. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Don’t miss your last chance to see Idaho Botanical Garden’s 19th annual Winter Garden aGlow, with more than 300,000 holiday lights transforming the garden into a brightly lit wonderland. 6-9 p.m. $4-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

COF: A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD—3 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, sunvalleycenter. org.

MILD ABANDON

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE SEMINAR: SELF-AWARENESS— Learn why it’s important to come to an understanding of the self. 7 p.m. $10. Simpatico, 1414 S. Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-604-4705, simpaticokjl.com.

On Stage Sports & Fitness BOGUS OPEN—9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $20-$54 alpine, $15-$25 nights, $3-$14 nordic, $12 tubing hill. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-332-5100, bogusbasin.org. BRUNDAGE OPEN—9:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. $16-$62. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800-8887544, brundage.com. SUN VALLEY OPEN—9 a.m.-4 p.m. $45-$125. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208622-4111 or 1-800-786-8259, sunvalley.com. TAMARACK OPEN—9 a.m.-4 p.m. $18-$62. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208-325-1000. tamarackidaho.com.

Food

On Stage

TUESDAY JAN. 5

NEW YEAR’S DAY BRUNCH—Start the new year off right with what some consider to be Boise’s best brunch. 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Juniper Kitchen and Cocktails, 211 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-1142, juniperon8th.com.

BCT: LAUREN WEEDMAN’S WHAT WENT WRONG?—Boise favorite Lauren Weedman returns to the BCT stage with new stories, live music and big laughs, plus a few songs to sing. Through Jan. 17. 8 p.m. $16-$34. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Citizen TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. Tuesdays, 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

Workshops & Classes BPL TWICE-MONTHLY WRITING WORKSHOP—Adult writers of all levels are invited to check out the Boise Public Library’s twice-monthly workshops for feedback on your unpublished work. Writing may include fiction (short stories, flash fiction, novel excerpts) and creative nonfiction (personal essays and memoir excerpts). 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Odds & Ends FLYING M TRIVIA NIGHT—Enjoy a spirited competition filled with your favorite music between questions. Prizes include a $30 Flying M gift card for first place, $20 for second, and $10 for third. 7 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208467-5533.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

By E.J. Pettinger

MONDAY JAN. 4 Festivals & Events BOISE DEPOT TOURS—12 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, parks.cityofboise.org.

Workshops & Classes BOISE PARKS AND REC WINTER/SPRING ACTIVITIES—Boise Parks and Rec offers hundreds of classes and other activities for children, teens and adults who want to stay active this winter and spring. You can register online, by phone or in person at the Fort Boise center. Through March 31. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise. 208-608-7680, parks. cityofboise.org.

Kids & Teens LEGO THE LIBRARY—Tackle fun and challenging projects with the world’s most creative building toys. For ages 5-12. Mon., Jan. 4, 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org/lakehazel.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | 17


MUSIC GUIDE

LISTEN HERE FIVE OF OUR FAVORITE LOCAL ALBUMS OF 2015 We’re big fans of local-born music around here, and 2015 was a banner year for us. From debut albums to the last hurrah, we were proud of the range and quality of local tunes. With much difficulty, we narrowed down the list of this year’s great local releases to five of our faves: Clarke and The Himselfs, The WellRounded Clarke and The Himselfs Clarke Aleksandr Howell has released countless cassettes over the past five years, but this is the bedroom rocker’s official debut LP, which has made us even bigger fans of Boise’s version of Ty Segall, Mikal Cronin and Kurt Vile. Read what Clarke Himself had to say about Boise at deadhorsemarch.com/interview-clarkeand-the-himselfs. clarkeandthehimselfs. bandcamp.com Jonn E. Combat and The Jungle Fucks, Pain Milk Pain Milk sounds like an unearthed recording from the late ’70s-early ’80s Bay Area punk scene, and Jonn E. Combat and The Jungle Fucks are like the missing link between Fang and Flipper. This is punk rock at its best. jonnecombatandthejunglefucks.bandcamp.com

Marshall Poole, Totems The newest release in this list, Totems is as smart and engaging as its trio of creators. Though Idaho-born, MP delivers Southern psych rock like it’s in their DNA, yet offers enough twists and turns to keep it interesting and addictive. marshallpoole. bandcamp.com Mindrips, Mah Though Mindrips dropped the seven-song Mah in January, the trio’s grungey garagerock stood the test of time and is still making the rounds on our playlists. mindripsboise.bandcamp.com Toy Zoo, Toy Zoo Toy Zoo is of the most interesting and original Boise bands going. TZ’s debut album might not be everyone’s cup of eggnog, but we’re definitely listening to where they are taking Erase Errata meets sludge rock. toyzoo. bandcamp.com —BW Staff

18 | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WEDNESDAY DEC. 30

CHUCK SMITH QUARTET— Featuring Sandon Mayhew and Nicole Christensen. 10 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CLAY MOORE TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

COBERLY, TOWN AND DAY—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

COUNTRY CLUB—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DAN COSTELLO—6-9 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JAZ FAGAN—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten

FRANK MARRA—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

STEVE AND GRACE WALL—With George Johnson. 6 p.m. FREE. Gelato

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KINGS OF SWING—With Pamela DeMarche. 8:30 p.m. $15-$20. Mardi Gras

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

RUN FOREVER—With Looming and Telescopes As Time Machines. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

SWINGIN’ IN THE NEW YEAR—With DJs: Chiron and Just Some Clown. 8 p.m. $12 adv., $20 door. The Drink

SUNDAY JAN. 3

LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY—Electronic live music and DJs. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid SONGWRITERS NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s SOUL KITCHEN—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow SPENCER BATT—6 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM WITH THE BLIND MICE—8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THURSDAY DEC. 31 ALEXANDRA SJOBECK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE BEVERLY CAROTHERS TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Berryhill BROTHER BOB—6 p.m. FREE. Sofia’s

LIQUID NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH—Featuring Muzzy Braun, followed by Jonathan Warren and The Billy Goats. 7:30 p.m. $5. Liquid MICKY AND THE MOTORCARS—With Possum Livin, Timber VanLom and No Resolve. 9:30 p.m. $25-$75. Knitting Factory NAMPA CIVIC CENTER NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY— Featuring the Alley Cats. 7 p.m. $40-$75. Nampa Civic Center NYE ELECTRIC SNOW— Featuring Dirtyphonics, Candyland, Protohype, and DJ Tatiana, with IDA Untz. 8 p.m. $15-$55. Revolution $OUL PURPO$E—10 p.m. $10. Reef PLAYHOUSE TASTE OF CHICAGO NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH—Featuring the Blues Brothers Rock ‘n Soul Revue and comedian Curt Sudden. 8 p.m. $40, $75 couples. The Playhouse Boise (formerly AEN Playhouse)

SAPPHIRE ROOM NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY—Featuring Clay Moore and Frim Fram Four. Available with purchase of room package only. Call to RSVP. $199 and up. Sapphire SPENCER BATT—8 p.m. FREE. Piper

TOM TAYLOR—9:15 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

FRIDAY JAN. 1 CYMRY—6 p.m. FREE. Murph’s FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers POKE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s WHITAKER AND OLIVER—7:30 p.m. FREE. High Note

SATURDAY JAN. 2

CLYDE’S ON FIRE BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MICHAELA FRENCH—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

NO EVENTS

MONDAY JAN. 4 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid OPEN MIC WITH CRAIG SLOVER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TUESDAY JAN. 5 OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

BLAZE AND KELLY—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


Ditching the ski resort to explore the backcountry

SAW TOOTH MOUNTAIN GUIDE

OUT OF BOUNDS

RECREATION

This year’s count showed nearly 100 species of birds around Boise.

JESSICA MURRI Watching the snow marker for Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area can be an emotional roller coaster for skiers and snowboarders. One day, the marker will be buried under 11 inches of fresh, powdery snow. A few days later, it may be empty and slick with rain. Rather than constantly hit “refresh” on Bogus Basin’s conditions webpage, more people in the Treasure Valley are venturing into the backcountry. “It’s a growing sport for sure,” said Chris Lundy, co-owner of Sawtooth Mountain Guides in Stanley. “In the ski industry, backcountry is the only aspect that’s growing. Ski areas are stagnant or declining. Backcountry gear sales are increasing. You see more people when you’re out there. By all measures, it’s a growing sport.” Lundy’s business offers courses that teach backcountry skiers and snowboarders how to assess snowpack for avalanche risk, travel safely through avalanche territory and rescue techniques should an avalanche break loose. Sawtooth Mountain Guides also offers several guided ski trips throughout the Sawtooths and Sun Valley area. In the past five years, Lundy said his business has needed to double its avalanche courses to accommodate the uptick of interest in the backcountry. “I think there’s a number of reasons,” Lundy said. “I think that chasing snow plays a role, especially at Bogus. Sun Valley makes a lot of snow, but to get ski conditions people are looking for, they have to leave town.” Getting into the sport is more intimidating than buying a lift ticket at Bogus and putting your life in the hands of the local ski patrollers, though. Abe Vore, the owner and clinical audiologist at Eagle Hearing, decided to get serious about the sport after only two times out in the backcountry. “I got hooked,” he said. To get the ball rolling, he established the Boise Backcountry Ski Club group on Facebook and hosted its first meeting at a downtown coffeeshop during the city’s first snowstorm of the season. A dozen people showed up, clad in puffy jackets, beanies and trucker hats. The gathering attracted a range of people with varying skill in the backcountry. Each had a different reason for trading their downhill skis for an alpine touring set up or a splitboard—a BOISE WEEKLY.COM

REC NEWS

COUNTING BIRDS

Sawtooth Mountain Guides doubled its avalanche courses and increase guided trip offerings over the past five years to keep up with the demand to get into the backcountry.

snowboard that can separate into two skis to make trekking up a snow-covered hillside easier. For some, it’s the solitude that comes with the backcountry. Others are chasing big lines and untouched powder. “I like the problem-solving of it,” said Casey Strunk. “There’s more cerebral thinking in backcountry skiing—instead of getting on a lift and getting off and going down and getting on a lift and coming down. It’s also nice to have something aerobic to do in the winter.” Other people around the table said getting out in the backcountry helps alleviate seasonal affective disorder. There’s a payoff that comes from working for your turns. “The winter backcountry is one of the most quiet, peaceful places I have ever imagined in my entire life,” said Lana Weber, who works as the membership coordinator for the Idaho Conservation League. “I still have a ski pass to Brundage and part of that is having my family with me, my kids. We can all do that together. But they still have just as much desire to get out into the backcountry once they get old enough.” “And ski lodges are gross. They are smelly and sweaty,” added Stacey Donahue, who started exploring the backcountry on snowshoes with her snowboard strapped to her back a few years ago. Now she has a splitboard she can’t wait to give try out. Still, the backcountry brings a higher risk than the boundaries of a ski resort. One backcountry skier who moved to Boise within the past year came to the meeting to

expand his network, but he shared a story that left the group quiet and contemplative. “I once went with a guy I’d never met before. That was the first red flag,” said Gabe Finkelstein, who works as a ski patroller at Crystal Mountain and started backcountry skiing in 2000. “The second red flag: We got to the top of the mountain and did a beacon check before we started skiing. His wasn’t even on. I said, ‘You sure you know how to use this thing?’” That guy started down the mountain first, staying close to the trees and away from the open bowl, where an avalanche would be more likely. Then Finkelstein took his first turn and felt the snow drop below him, releasing 200-foot avalanche. “I immediately went into rescue mode. I got my beacon out and put it on ‘Search,’ and picked up a beep pretty quickly. His legs up a tree, snowboard caught in some branches. He was fine, except for being super scared,” Finkelstein said. “It was a great learning experience because nobody got hurt, but we all know a guy who died in an avalanche. The more experienced I get, the more scared I get. Your confidence level might go up, but your comfort level does not go with it.” Vore suggested everyone heading into the backcountry take an avalanche course and practice with their beacons at Bogus Basin’s beacon park. The excitement for the falling snow outside quickly returned as folks swapped emails and phone numbers, itching to break into those untouched powder fields.

Christmas for R.L. Rowland is synonymous with counting birds. Most holiday seasons since 1984, he has participated in the National Audubon Society’s Annual Christmas Bird Count. “Not quite every year,” Rowland said. “I had to go to a wedding once and I was sick twice.” For Boise’s 49th annual Christmas Bird Count on Dec. 17, around 25 volunteers met at 7 a.m. at the Boise main office of Idaho Fish and Game, then divvied up and took a section of the 7.5-mile count circle, with the center on the Idaho Statehouse. “We take a snapshot census of all the birds within the confines of a certain area,” Rowland said. “People go out and start counting birds, seeing how many species we’ve got. They come back, and we tally up all the numbers at the end of the day: how many miles they drove or walked, what the weather conditions were like, if the nearby lakes or streams were frozen.” Rowland is the Christmas Bird Count cocompiler for the Golden Eagle Audubon Society, which covers southwestern Idaho. He said the total number of birds from the count won’t be available for several months because they are vetted and compiled by the National Audubon Society, but he estimates around 100 species of birds were counted on Dec. 17. In the 2012-2013 count, there were around 425,000 birds across the state—mostly Canada geese, mallards, ring-necked ducks, quail, kestrels, pigeons, doves, crows, magpies, robins, sparrows and finches. In 2014, counters found 90 different species around Boise. Rowland’s biggest concern is continuing the tradition. The count draws as many as 40 volunteers and as few as 12. “We’re trying to attract a younger group of people, because they’re the ones that will take over for us,” Rowland said. “I’m an official geezer. If you said, ‘What’s the state of American birding right now?’ I’d tell you it looks like me: old, fat, white guys over 60. We need these younger people.” Rowland said there are more than 4,000 counts across the country during this time of year. Most of the Idaho counts have already been completed except for the Bruneau count, set for Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at 7 a.m. “If you don’t know a robin from a sparrow, that’s OK,” he said. “We’ll put you with someone who does.” —Jessica Murri

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | 19


WINESIPPER ANY PORT IN A STORM The two main styles of port are ruby and tawny. The first, after fermentation, spends most of its time in the bottle and retains a dark red color. The second is barrel aged, becoming lightly oxidized and acquiring a nut brown color. Both are a delicious antidote to frigid winter weather. Classic pairings are Stilton (ruby), aged cheddar (tawny) and dark chocolate (both) GRAHAM’S SIX GRAPES RESERVE PORTO, $23 Most port houses produce what is often called a “vintage character” port. It’s a house style that strives for consistency from year to year, and the Six Grapes is my current favorite. It’s fresh and fruity with mocha, licorice and cassis aromas, and dark berry and cherry fruit flavors. 2008 QUARLES HARRIS LATE BOTTLED VINTAGE PORTO, $13 True vintage port is bottled young, then needs 10 to 15 more years before it’s ready. Late bottled vintage is made with grapes from one year, but spends four or more years in barrel, mellowing and gaining complexity. It’s the poor—or impatient—man’s vintage. The Quarles Harris, which is an outstanding value, offers chocolate, plum, candied cherry, anise and almond aromas. Chocolate covered cherry flavors lead to a smooth and velvety finish. PORTO KOPKE 10 YEARS OLD TAWNY, $32 A blend of ports from different vintages, the 10 refers to the average age of those wines (some are younger, some older), but average age here is closer to 15. This sublime port experience offers tawny’s characteristic combo of nuts and caramel on the nose. The flavors are a rich mix of buttery caramel, vanilla and fruit cake backed by candied walnut and pecan. —David Kirkpatrick

FOOD BOISE CHEFS TALK TRENDS All the dish on 2015 TARA MORGAN We asked Bittercreek/Red Feather Lounge’s culinary team (BC/RFL), Kacey Montgomery at Juniper ( J ), Nate Whitley at The Modern ( M ), Brian Garrett at Saint Lawrence Gridiron ( SLG ) and Kris Komori at State & Lemp ( S&L ) what they thought were the biggest trends in Boise dining this year and where the food scene is heading. Boise Weekly: What were the trends in the Boise dining scene in 2015? BC/RFL: Southern-inspired cuisine seems to be taking root in menus around town, in addition to fermented foods. J: The service and food offered by locally founded restaurants is at its all-time high. M: I recently learned about hot chicken. I notice that it is now being served in at least two places. Does that constitute a trend? SLG: It seems to me every restaurant in Boise became low-country southern. That was weird. S&L: Canned alcohol. Growler stations. What do you predict will be the biggest trends of 2016? BC/RFL: Fresh casual places will continue to open around downtown. Automated beverage service is our long-shot pick for 2016’s big trend. J: Global flavors. More thinking outside the box. M: People will go crazy for wild berries. SLG: Pickling... It’s going to get huge in Boise. S&L: Vegetable-driven dishes, tortas, cider, open fire cooking, and the return of the gluten. What Boise restaurant/bar opening were you most psyched for in 2015? BC/RFL: We got two awesome neighbors this year. Prost provides a fun and distinct addition to the beer culture, while Wild Root does the same for Eighth Street’s food scene. Plus they’re super cool people. J: Barbarian Brewing. M: Grit American Cuisine. SLG: I finally went to State & Lemp. It was fantastic. Also, we got liquor at Saint Lawrence Gridiron, so for a few weeks, I was drinking way too much. I’m much better now. S&L: Restaurant: Gangnam. Bar: Saint Lawrence Gridiron getting a liquor license. What openings are you looking forward to? BC/RFL: We think Works Progress Administration has the potential to be a really cool brewery.

20 | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

It’s official: According to the experts, kale, non-wood-fired pizza, mac ’n’ cheese, and shrimp and grits are out.

J: One: More downtown living; moving up instead of out. Secondly: Telaya and Coiled’s new space on the Boise River next to the Riverside Hotel. M: I’ve heard that both Kibrom’s and The Goodness Land, from the Boise International Market, will have new locations and I’m glad for that. SLG: The Gardner Building is supposed to have some of the old food truck peeps coming in. Oh, they also have Buffalo Wild Wings... but what’s up with that? S&L: Restaurant: Kibrom’s. What ingredients are you most excited to work with? BC/RFL: Pork fat, schmaltz and duck butter. Kinda seriously. J: Gin. M: I’ve heard some people will be farming shrimp in Challis. I am super intrigued by that and want to see how they are. SLG: We have a new chef, Daniel. I’m excited to work with [him], but he’s not an ingredient. We’re exploring aged meats right now. It’s not new or trendy, but it’s new for us. We’re also smoking a lot of vegetables, butters and animal fats. S&L: We always seem to latch onto a couple ingredients that sneak onto dishes throughout menus. 2015 was the year of coconut milk, mochi, tapioca and clarified broths. We are trying to retire them after the New Year. What ingredients/dishes are you tired of seeing on Boise menus? BC/RFL: Kale. J: Pizza. Let’s leave it to the folks with woodfired pizza ovens. M: Mac ’n’ cheese. SLG: Shrimp and grits. It seems that every restaurant put it on their menu this year.

S&L: My wife and I have a standing bet on whether or not a menu will have mac ’n’ cheese. I say, “Yes,” and win the bet too often. That said, I do love mac ’n’ cheese. What’s your favorite hidden gem? BC/RFL: Tony’s Pizzeria. J: Well it certainly isn’t hidden, but I love everything they do at The Modern. M: I’d say the Goodness Land, in anticipation of their reopening. I really liked their ful. SLG: Bar Gernika is an absolute go-to for me. The Spacebar has a fantastic beer list and Mario Kart on N64. S&L: As a grab-and-go, the mushroom banh mi at the Boise Co-op Deli. For drinks, Gil’s K-9. What’s missing from Boise’s food scene? BC/RFL: Downtown Boise is missing a super cool fresh casual taco whiskey bar. J: I’d say diversity. But it’s a double-edged sword. To push the boundary a bit, you need a consistently willing consumer. M: Tapas. SLG: Ramen. It’s been missing for a decade and it’s still missing. Also, an authentic Mexican joint. S&L: Late-night dining. At least a place open until midnight so we can grab a bite after service. What’s the best thing you ate last year? BC/RFL: The local peaches this year were out-of-control good. J: Fresh oysters at 900 Wall in Bend, Ore. You could taste the ocean. M: Lamb brains. SLG: Raw oysters. We tried running them on the menu, but nobody bought them. It was fun to have to eat them all ourselves. S&L: Yukgaejang at Gangnam. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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OFFICE HOURS

ADOPT-A-PET

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com MONIQUE: I’d love to be the queen of your home, with petting and playtime as tribute.

KATRINA: I’m a velvety soft snuggler and head bonker. Let’s brighten each other’s lives.

WINNIE: Vivacious and voracious snuggler in need of petting, playtime and patience.

Some suggestions for Oscar.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

MEMO TO THE ACADEMY How about… ?

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Best Actor nominations will probably go to Leonardo DiCaprio (The Revenant) and Eddie Redmayne (The Danish Girl). But how about Ian McKellen for Mr. Holmes? His gem of a performance is a distant memory—the picture was released last summer—but not completely forgotten. Most are betting the Best Actress Oscar will go to Brie Larson (Room) or Cate Blanchett (Carol). But how about giving the irascible Maggie Smith a statue? She deserves it for her delicious performance in The Lady in the Van, which opens in Boise in early 2016. One final plea to Academy members: How about Harrison Ford as a Best Supporting Actor contender? Ford’s Spencer Tracy-like acting style is too easily dismissed, but his return as Han Solo in The Force Awakens is a major reason for the film’s record-breaking success. Show him a little love.

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RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

GEORGE PRENTICE

As many of us will be kicking the holiday season to the curb, Hollywood will hand out gifts in no fewer than 14 award shows starting Friday, Jan. 1, 2016 and ending Sunday, Feb. 28, the night when the Motion Picture Academy doles out the Oscars (the nominating process runs Wednesday, Dec. 30-Thursday, Jan. 14). While some like the Golden Globes and the BAFTA awards offer more glitter than, say, the People’s Choice awards, Oscar still rules. But, hey, Academy members: How about mixing things up a bit this year? Best Picture nods are almost guaranteed for Spotlight, The Martian, The Revenant and Carol. But how about Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens? Seriously, the Academy needs to get with the program. A Star Wars Best Picture nomination would dial up the television ratings for a broadcast that has been hemorrhaging viewer numbers for years.

DEADLINES*

COLONEL FITZ: 5-yearold, male, Chinese Shar-Pei mix. Easy-going and friendly. Good on a leash. Best in a home with older kids. (Kennel 304 – #30245742)

THUMPER: 2-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Shy at first, but sweet. Indoor dog. Needs older, respectful kids. No cats. (Ask at the front desk to meet him – #20889376)

STORM: 3-year-old, male, Labrador retriever mix. Energetic, needs some training. Best with adults or older kids. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #21075741)

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PAYMENT LUCY LOU: 8-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Sweet girl. Knows her name and loves everyone. Loves to be petted and held. (Kennel 11 – #30240044)

CLEO: 4½-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Laid-back, will be happy to hang out by your side. Very affectionate. (PetSmart Everyday Adoption Center – #13222386)

JANGO FETT: 7-monthold, domestic shorthair. Friendly, ready to say hello to anybody who comes by his kennel. Best as an only cat. (Kennel 25 – #30339906)

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NYT CROSSWORD | BINARY CODE ACROSS 1 Savor, as a drink 6 Takes down a peg 12 Je t’aime : French :: ____ : Spanish 17 Sell at a discount, say 19 Female toon with a “dollink” Boris 21 Grackles and grebes 23 PP 25 Attic 1

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22 | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

68 Historic German admiral Maximilian von ____ 69 Fizzy drink 71 Michael of “Saturday Night Live” 72 Cry to a husky 74 “When I was a ____ …” 75 Riot opportunist 76 Locale for cranberries 77 Very much 79 Uniform 81 See 114-Across 82 OO 85 Hodges who managed the Mets to a World Series title 86 Little Rascals boy 88 Tolkien tree creatures 89 Mars features, mistakenly 92 Befuddling 94 Peeps heard by Bo Peep 95 ZZ 97 When repeated, a Yale fight song 98 Playwright Clifford 100 “How ____!” 101 Modern TV feature, for short 102 Hazy memory 103 Grps. with the motto “Every child. One voice” 104 Conquest of 1953 107 Susan of “The Partridge Family” 108 Silas in “The Da Vinci Code,” notably 110 NN 113 Dances at the Tropicana Club 114 Santa Claus portrayer in 81-Across 115 Greet from behind the wheel 116 Witherspoon of “Legally Blonde” 117 Shot put and long jump 118 “Auld Lang Syne” and others

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53 The Jedi and the Sith, e.g. 54 “Thursday Night Football” airer 55 Alaska tourist attraction 57 Director of 2015’s “Chi-Raq” 58 Capital with the Norsk Folkemuseum 60 Travel info source, for short 61 London cathedral 62 Volunteer’s response 64 WW

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7

SERVICES

CAREERS

BY DON GAGLIARDO AND ZHOUQIN BURNIKEL / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

36 DD 39 First antibacterial soap brand 40 “Oh, please, that’s enough” 42 Derisive sounds 43 Abbr. in many airport names 44 Jubilant 45 Portrait on Chinese renminbi bills 46 AA 48 Extra bed, maybe 51 Bad thing on a record

26 Horror franchise beginning in 2004 27 Lasting for years and years 28 Dirt-road hazards 30 Melee 31 Street of film fame 32 You might take it out for a drive 33 Court, for short 35 Pile of stones used to mark a trail

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118

DOWN 1 Figured (out) 2 Has an inspiration 3 Agricultural figure in “The Canterbury Tales” 4 Alley ____ 5 Pep Boys competitor 6 Whites, informally

7 Strips shortly after getting up in the morning? 8 Rate ____ (be perfect) 9 Spicy fruit beverage often used as a tequila chaser 10 Cornerstone abbr. 11 Singer Crow 12 Identifies in a Facebook photo 13 A Perón 14 Soaring cost? 15 RR 16 Like macho push-ups 18 Explore deeply 20 Calla lily family 22 “Gypsy” composer 24 Techies, stereotypically 29 Gasless car 34 Java order that packs less of a punch 35 What Brits call “red sauce” 37 Major-____ 38 Muse for D. H. Lawrence 39 Some lab samples 41 Assets for food critics 43 Put away 44 Annapolis grad. 46 It comes before one 47 Building beam 49 Susan who wrote “The Orchid Thief” 50 Hit with a stun gun 51 “Chill out, will you” 52 FF 53 Wig out 56 Dorm V.I.P.s 57 Durable stocking fabric 59 Like courtroom witnesses 60 Floor 61 X-rated material 63 D.C. athlete 65 Pest-control brand 66 Sarcastic “Wonderful” 67 Tori of pop/rock 70 Symbol of Middle America

73 Big name in 35-Down 76 Gaudy wrap 77 Industrious workers 78 Some TVs and smartphones 80 The Impaler 83 Fort Knox valuable 84 To some degree 85 Beholds 87 It’s heard at a hearing 89 West Pointer 90 Opposite of an early adopter 91 Morning-run time, maybe 92 Arafat’s successor as Palestinian president 93 Budget alternative 94 Next to 95 Peers in a box 96 Meetings arranged through Ashley Madison L A S T T O T O

A S I S E A L E P E I E A T

B E B O P

L E G A L

O A H U

A V O W S D E L U X E

C E L L I O T E L L O

S I N T A X F J O R D S B U G G L E S

T S K D A R T E I T V R E O S N Y B M O W P E O D B T O O Y D D T

A M I S H

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

W A F T

A R N I E

O V I N E

A J F O Y S T A H L L E V D Y E E N M E S W

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99 Helen Mirren, e.g. 100 Like an alarm clock, night after night 103 It may be struck on a runway 105 ____ diagram 106 ’Vette choice 109 “N.Y. State of Mind” rapper 111 ____ system (luxury car option, briefly) 112 Romance

Y E O W S

R E O R E R E W E S W A G S T A Y L S A A T S L I K P L A I E N A E L L A I E G G D U H A E L M A

P I T C H

P O L K A

R J O I E G B E R R E E S S Y E N C D A B M C D E O C O H H V E A E C T R K S

S T Y V A N E S S A A W A S H I N

S E X E S

S A L U T E S T R A V E L

T H E N H L

A S A N A S

N O H I T

J E T L I

L A T E N

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O R I G I L N I A T F L O E A L Y M I A A N K N E

D O O U O R A L D A

S K E D

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BW B OISE W E E KLY

CAREERS BW CAREERS

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RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard. Call or text Richard at 208-6959492. SACRED BODY CARE For Relaxation Call Ami at 208-6976231. ULM Inc. Accepting new clients. 340-8377.

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COMMUNITY BW EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Grab your friends and join us for a pub quiz every Wednesday night from 8-10 p.m at Capitol Bar! 6100 W State St. or go to: thecapbar.com for more info.

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BW PROFESSIONAL Advocates for Inclusion (AFI) is a family owned and operated development disability agency since 1998. We partner with community organizations, health care providers, school districts and others to meet the needs of individuals we serve. Please visit IdahoAFI.com for more information. RIVERWORKS IMAGING Offering affordable photo restoration, printing services, photo capture & art reproduction. Located near downtown Boise, call or visit today! Ph 208 340-8788. riverworksimaging.com.

PETS

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goodbye to your pet in the privacy, comfort and familiarity of your own home. All euthanasia’s are performed at your home by a licensed veterinarian who is accompanied by a veterinary assistant. Our home euthanasia services are by appointment only. For more information: www.gentlegoodbyes.com or call 297-3990.

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BW PETS GENTLE GOODBYES Our goal at Gentle Goodbyes is to allow you to peacefully say

LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly. com or call 344-2055 for a quote. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 15 17067, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Ryan Meadows Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Matthew Biss and Emily Biss, Defendants. TO: MATTHEW BISS AND EMILY BISS You have been sued by Ryan Meadows Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): John Koenig is an artist who invents new words. Here’s one that’s applicable to your journey in 2016: “keyframe.” Koenig defines it as being a seemingly mundane phase of your life that is in fact a turning point. Major plot twists in your big story arrive half-hidden amid a stream of innocuous events. They don’t come about through “a series of jolting epiphanies,” Koenig says, but rather “by tiny imperceptible differences between one ordinary day and the next.” In revealing this secret, I hope I’ve alerted you to the importance of acting with maximum integrity and excellence in your everyday routine. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The coming months look like one of the best times ever for your love life. Old romantic wounds are finally ready to be healed. You’ll know what you have to do to shed tired traditions and bad habits that have limited your ability to get the spicy sweetness you deserve. Are you up for the fun challenge? Be horny for deep feelings. Be exuberantly aggressive in honoring your primal yearnings. Use your imagination to dream up new approaches to getting what you want. The innovations in intimacy that you initiate in the coming months will keep bringing you gifts and teachings for years to come.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In ancient times, observers of the sky knew the difference between stars and planets. The stars remained fixed in their places. The planets wandered around, always shifting positions in relation to the stars. However, now and then at irregular intervals, a very bright star would suddenly materialize out of nowhere, stay in the same place for a while, then disappear. Chinese astronomers called these “guest stars.” We refer to them as supernovae. They are previously dim or invisible stars that explode, releasing tremendous energy for a short time. I suspect that in 2016, you may experience the metaphorical equivalent of a guest star. Learn all you can from it. It’ll provide teachings and blessings that could feed you for years. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Be alert for an abundance of interesting lessons in 2016. You will be offered teachings about a variety of practical subjects, including how to take care of yourself really well, how to live the life you want to live and how to build the connections that serve your dreams. If you are even moderately responsive to the prompts and nudges that come your way, you will become smarter than you thought possible. So just imagine how savvy you’ll be if you ardently embrace your educational opportunities. (Please note that some of these opportunities may be partially in disguise.)

24 | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The silkworm grows fast. Once it hatches, it eats constantly for three weeks. By the time it spins its cocoon, it’s 10,000 times heavier than it was in the beginning. On the other hand, a mature, 60-foot-tall saguaro cactus may take 30 years to fully grow a new side arm. It’s in no hurry. From what I can tell, Leo, 2015 was more like a silkworm year for you, whereas 2016 will more closely resemble a saguaro. Keep in mind that while the saguaro phase is different from your silkworm time, it’s just as important. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “The sky calls me,” wrote Virgo teacher and poet Sri Chinmoy. “The wind calls me. The moon and stars call me. The dense groves call me. The dance of the fountain calls me. Smiles call me, tears call me. A faint melody calls me. The morn, noon and eve call me. Everyone is searching for a playmate. Everyone is calling me, ‘Come, come!’” In 2016, Virgo, I suspect you will have a lot of firsthand experience with feelings like these. Sometimes life’s seductiveness may overwhelm you, activating confused desires to go everywhere and do everything. On other occasions, you will be enchanted by the lush invitations, and will know exactly how to respond and reciprocate.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the 19th century, horses were a primary mode of personal transportation. Some people rode them, and others sat in carriages and wagons that horses pulled. As cities grew larger, a problem emerged: the mounting manure left behind on the roads. It became an ever-increasing challenge to clear away the equine “pollution.” In 1894, a British newspaper predicted the streets of London would be covered with nine feet of the stuff by 1950. Then something unexpected happened: cars. Gradually, the threat of an excremental apocalypse waned. I present this story as an example of what I expect for you in 2016: a pressing dilemma that will gradually dissolve because of the arrival of a factor you can’t imagine yet. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The longest river in the world flows through eastern Africa: the Nile. It originates below the equator and empties into the Mediterranean Sea. Although its current flows north, its prevailing winds blow south. That’s why sailors have found it easily navigable for thousands of years. They can either go with the flow of the water or use sails to harness the power of the breeze. I propose that we make the Nile your official metaphor in 2016, Scorpio. You need versatile resources that enable you to come and go as you please—that are

flexible in supporting your efforts to go where you want and when you want.

zone. Are there any undomesticated fantasies you’ve been suppressing? Unsuppress them!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In many cases, steel isn’t fully useful if it’s too hard. Manufacturers often have to soften it a bit. This process, which is called tempering, makes the steel springier and more malleable. Car parts, for example, can’t be too rigid. If they were, they’d break too easily. I invite you to use “tempering” as one of your main metaphors in 2016, Sagittarius. You’re going to be strong and vigorous, and those qualities will serve you best if you keep them flexible. Do you know the word “ductile”? If not, look it up. It’ll be a word of power for you.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Frederick the Great was king of Prussia between 1740 and 1786. He was also an Aquarius who sometimes experimented with eccentric ideas. When he brewed his coffee, for example, he used champagne instead of water. Once the hot elixir was ready to drink, he mixed in a dash of powdered mustard. In light of the astrological omens, I suspect Frederick’s exotic blend might be an apt symbol for your life in 2016: a vigorous, rich, complex synthesis of champagne, coffee and mustard. (P.S. Frederick testified that “champagne carries happiness to the brain.”)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In his essay “The Etiquette of Freedom,” poet Gary Snyder wrote that wildness “is perennially within us, dormant as a hard-shelled seed, awaiting the fire or flood that awakes it again.” The fact that it’s a “hard-shelled” seed is a crucial detail. The vital stuff inside the stiff outer coating may not be able to break out and start growing without the help of a ruckus. A fire or flood? They might do the job. I propose, Capricorn, that in 2016 you find an equally vigorous but less disruptive prod to liberate your dormant wildness. Like what? You could embark on a brave pilgrimage or quest. You could dare yourself to escape your comfort

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): My Piscean acquaintance Arturo plays the piano as well as anyone I’ve heard. He tells me that he can produce 150 different sounds from any single key. Using the foot pedals accounts for some of the variation. How he touches a key is an even more important factor. It can be percussive, fluid, staccato, relaxed, lively and many other moods. I invite you to cultivate a similar approach to your unique skills in 2016. Expand and deepen your ability to draw out the best in them. Learn how to be even more expressive with the powers you already possess.

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District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 15 17067. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr. Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 18 day of November, 2015. CHRISTOPHER D RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB December 16, 23, 30, 2015 and Jan 6, 2016. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV 15 9001 C, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CANYON, Windsor Creek Subdivision Neighborhood Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Francisco Ochoa-Ramirez, Defendant. TO: FRANCISCO OCHOARAMIREZ You have been sued by The Winsor Creek Subdivision Neighborhood Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Third Judicial District in and for Canyon

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County, Idaho, Case No. CV 15 9001 C. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Canyon County Courthouse, 1115 Albany St, Caldwell, Idaho 83605 Telephone: (208) 454-7300 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr. Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 18 day of November, 2015. T. Watkins, DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB December 16, 23, 30, 2015 and Jan 6, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Dallas Breck Young. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1517719 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Dallas Breck Young, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Dallas Uptown Brown. The reason for the change in name is: due to marriage and personal preference. A hearing on the petition

is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Feb 02, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: DEC 04, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk PUB December 16, 23, 30, 2015 and January 06, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: EVERETT ALLEN HARTY. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 2015-20671 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Everett Allen Harty, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Evelyn Anna Harty. The reason for the change in name is: that she has undergone a change in gender . A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on February 18, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: December 10, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Debbie Nagele Deputy Clerk PUB December 23, 30, 2015 and January 6, 13, 2016. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV 14 7903, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CANYON, Kingsveiw Estates Subdivision Neighborhood Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Jeff Mitchell and Shannon Mitchell, Defendant.

TO: JEFF MITCHELL AND SHANNON MITCHELL You have been sued by Kingsveiw Estates Subdivision Neighborhood Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Third Judicial District in and for Canyon County, Idaho, Case No. CV 14 7903. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Canyon County Courthouse, 1115 Albany, Caldwell, Idaho 83605 Telephone: (208) 454-7300 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr. Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 14th day of December, 2015. CHRIS YAMAMOTO, DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ T CRAWFORD, Deputy Clerk PUB. DATES: Dec. 23, 30, 2015 and Jan. 6, 13, 2016.

COMMUNITY BW KISSES ARE YOU TRYING TO REHOME YOUR CAT? Submit your information & a photo to info@simplycats.org We will post it on the Simply Cats website on our OUT of FACILITY page. Simply Cats Adoption Center 208343-7177. CHELSEA WHO PICKED UP MY TOOLS I was working on the A/C at your job. You showed up just in time to see me spill my toolbox. You helped me pick up my tools. I’d like to take you out to dinner to thank you for the helping hand. I am looking for Sarah, who I used to meet at Barnes & Noble. It has been about a year. I would like

to start up again, if you are interested. NOT YOUR UBER You thought I was your uber and tried to get in my car. When I told you I wasn’t, you dipped out but not before saying I was cute. Thanks! You’re cute too. With a vanilla pillow on a strawberry bed, have a butterscotch sleep full of chocolatey dreams of fruity funs with mango masti. Happy New Year. You: WarblerByTheWall, writer, new to Boise from NY via California. You studied art & architecture, lets get pie…everyone needs friends. Call the Boise Weekly!

ADULT

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FIND DINO PET Plants can be fickle. Without enough water or a sunny windowsill to sit on, they wither and die. If you’re not attentive, your living room will look like a graveyard of brown leaves buried in terra-cotta tombs. Those of us who can’t commit to furry companions or kids still

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

DEAR MINERVA, My husband has lost his sexual appetite. He always has an excuse to not do the sexy dance with me. I have started to masturbate more frequently, and he found out. He has started shaming me and bringing our religion into the mix. I want to have real sex with him, but he denies me. I’ve tried everything I can do to arouse him. What should I do? —Girls Need Love Too

DEAR GIRLS NEED LOVE, You have a right to a sex life. That is part of the deal when it comes to marriage. You are also absolutely allowed to masturbate. Sex should augment our lives, even if it is sex with ourselves. The next time he brings religion into it, I would say, “If God didn’t want me to touch it, he wouldn’t have made my arms long enough to reach it.” If the shoe were on the other foot you best believe he’d be kicking up a fuss. Perhaps there is an underlying medical condition causing his lack of desire. Have him see a doctor and your satisfaction could be just a pill away. If he refuses to try and fulfill his part of your marriage pact and his duties as a husband in the eyes of the Lord, then you have no choice but to take matters into your own hands.

sometimes have a parental $59.95 instinct and a plant can be biopop.com/products/dino-pet a pleasant alternative. Even sans a green thumb, it’s nearly impossible to kill the Dino Pet, an apatosaurus-shaped clear container of microscopic, bioluminescent sea life called dinoflagellates. The organisms photosynthesize during the day then glow bright blue at night when the container is shaken. It doesn’t require batteries, electricity or diaper changing and won’t run up any vet bills. It does come with a bit of dino food and an instruction manual but we promise, you can handle it. Your Dino Pet can’t roll over or play dead, but the sparkly little slivers of blue will no doubt be the best trick at the party. —Jessica Murri

How much profit the world’s largest drug and biotech company, Johnson & Johnson, made in 2015

Cost per year of the “most expensive drug in the world,” Glybera, a gene therapy used to treat familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

(forbes.com)

“What did you think of Star Wars: The Force Awakens?”

Liked it: 22.56%

“50-100 date solicitations a day for me, the world’s most eligible bachelor. Sorr y, but you

Meh: 5.49%

have to be a shareholder to meet me.”

Loathed it: 0.61%

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

$1.21 MILLION

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

Loved it: 59.15%

QUOTABLE

— MA RTI N S H KRE L I O N T WIT TE R J U ST DAY S B EFO RE H E WAS

$16.3 BILLION

Winter Garden aGlow, taken by instagram user chuck334455

A RRESTE D O N C HA RG ES O F S EC U RITI ES F R AUD.

Didn’t see it: 12.20% Disclaimer: This online poll is not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

4,002,661,750

5,556%

$5 MILLION

$2 MILLION

88 YEARS

1

The number of retail prescriptions filled at pharmacies in the United States

Amount Martin Shkreli’s company, Turing Pharmaceuticals AG, raised the price of Daraprim after it bought the drug: from U.S. $13.50 to U.S. $750 per tablet

Amount of Shkreli’s bond after he was arrested Dec. 17 for securities fraud

The amount “pharmabro” Shkreli paid for the only copy of double-album Once Upon a Time in Shaolin (EZCLZIV Scluzay, 2015) by WuTang Clan

The length of years before Once Upon a Time in Shaolin can be sold (although the owner can share it for free)

The number of Wu-Tang Clan members who have been vocal against the 88-year commercial moratorium—Method Man

(kaiserfamilyfoundation. org)

(alternet.org)

26 | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

(bloomberg.com)

(bloomberg.com)

(billboard.com)

(billboard.com)

(pitchfork.com)

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 30, 2015 – JANUARY 5, 2016 | 27


Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 28  

Old Acquaintance: Boise Weekly looks back at the top 15 stories of 2015

Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 28  

Old Acquaintance: Boise Weekly looks back at the top 15 stories of 2015