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BOISEWEEKLY N OV E M B E R 2 5 – D E C E M B E R 1 , 2 0 1 5

LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

“I have navigated a bok choy/corndog set-up.”

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Bike Makes Right

How Boise Bicycle Project and Idaho prisons are teaming up for a win-win-win

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Trumbo

Shining a (leading) light on the blacklist and the ’50s Red Scare in Hollywood

VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 2 3

CITIZEN 8

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Girls’ Night Out Alley Rep’s Golden Girls Christmas Extravaganza is Blanche-tastic FREE TAKE ONE!


2cNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015cBOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Nicole LeFavour Interns: Conner Jackson Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2015 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE HAPPY THANKSGIVING There has been a lot of bad, heavy news lately, and it feels like we’re in for more. Everyone’s Facebook etiquette has been abandoned—I’m as guilty as anyone—and you can almost feel the bitter Thanksgiving family fights brewing. Hopefully, there’s another way. Hopefully, we can take at least a few moments this week to reflect on civility and empathy, and consider how we can help each other out rather than shout each other down. In this week’s edition of Boise Weekly, we cover a few topics related to community, connection and compassion. First, on Page 6, BW News Editor George Prentice checks in with a handful of downtown Boise merchants who go the extra mile to build loyalty with customers and camaraderie with businesses that would otherwise be considered competitors. On Page 7, staff writer Jessica Murri profiles a new partnership that benefits kids, prison inmates, the Boise Bicycle Project and Idaho Department of Correction. It’s an example of the good that can be done when organizations look beyond their normal sources of support and focus on a common good. It’s also a welcome move by IDOC, which is working hard to correct years of systemic mistakes and abuses that landed the department on the losing side of a federal court ruling and earned it barrels of ink in embarrassing headlines. On Page 8, Prentice interviews National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Jane Chu and Idaho Commission on the Arts Executive Director Michael Faison, who describe how support for the arts not only brings people together but helps make communities more prosperous. Chu’s background includes refugees working for a better life, making her story all the more timely and important. No matter how angrily we disagree—and for a picture of those tensions, look no further than staff writer Harrison Berry’s exquisite reporting on Pages 6-7—it’s necessary for us to share stories of people helping each other, lest we forget we’re social animals, and it’s easier to be kind than not. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Suzanne Lee Chetwood TITLE: “Neo-Pangea” MEDIUM: Mixed Media ARTIST STATEMENT: My series of «Broken Earth» mixed media asks questions about our changing environment. This work is showing at The Fulton Street Showroom through January 2016, and visit my open ceramic studio Saturday, Dec. 5, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. , 4371 E. Amity Road, Boise. www.suzanneleechetwood.com

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015c3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM

OPINION

What you missed this week in the digital world.

ANIMAL AIRLIFT AHE AD OF SANTA’S BIG FLIGHT, 80 DOGS HE ADED FOR THE GEM STATE NOV. 20 AS PART OF THE WINGS OF RESCUE AIRLIF T, FLYING AS MANY AS 800 CANINES AND CATS FROM CALIFORNIA SHELTERS TO HUMANE SOCIE TIES AROUND THE COUNTRY. THE DOGS SENT TO IDAHO WILL BE AVAIL ABLE FOR ADOPTION FRIDAY, NOV. 27. MORE ON NE WS/CIT YDESK.

OPPORTUNITY As City Hall struggles to rein in the tent city that has grown up near Americana Boulevard, the idea of a pop-up community providing transitional housing has gained steam. Get more details on News/Citydesk.

PARK ART The controversy around Boise’s homeless has overshadowed developments at Rhodes Park skate park, but work has been progressing. Now the city is unveiling artwork for the site. See News/Citydesk.

OPINION

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TRAIL TALK Hot on the heels of a successful bond measure to fund future foothills purchases, the popular Ridge to Rivers trail system is due for another 10-year master plan. Get the details on News/Citydesk.

TIPPING POINTS Thanksgiving for liberals BILL COPE Let us call tomorrow the midpoint of the 2016 presidential campaign. That’s not as arbitrary as it might sound. Looking forward, we have just more than 11 months until Election Day. Eleven months ago was the day after Christmas 2014. Even though Ted Cruz, the first to enter the race officially, announced his candidacy in late March of this year, Rick Perry hinted we might see him in another presidential race as early as July 2013. Everyone has known for years that Cruz and Clinton, Paul, Jindal and Huckabee, would run. In the months preceding their announcements, they were all lining up donors, campaign teams, ground support, planning their strategy, calculating their chances... so, averaged out, tomorrow is as good a day as any to call the midpoint to this national hubbub. As it falls on Thanksgiving, would it not be propitious moment to relax, take stock and count our blessings? There is clearly a lot of tension in the American air, and for good reason. It’s not merely the presidency we’re all—Dem and Rep—nervous about. There is so much more: the future of the Supreme Court, of “Citizens United,” of abortion rights and voting rights and labor rights, education, health care, America’s standing in the community of nations... and more. Yet there is much to encourage us, too, and I come today to remind you of those bright spots on the approaching horizon. (But not if you are conservative. I’m warning conservatives right now that perhaps you’d best not read any further. I don’t want to get you all disgruntled and nasty on Thanksgiving Day, so why don’t you go see if there’s a football game you can watch on teevee, or maybe a turkey that needs beheading.) Especially during times like these, when the news is so preoccupied with bombast and bullshit, we tend to overlook the incremental changes happening around us. Unless we are directly involved in those changes, either as activists or beneficiaries of the activism, they slip by, often without notice, until a tipping point is reached. Take the LGBT rights movement. Had you told me 20 years ago... even 10... that gays and lesbians would be allowed marriage equality anytime soon, I would have laughed in your face and suggested you take a taxi home. Ah, but look what’s happened. Piece by piece, the framework was put in place and once the states started turning, the obstructions came tumbling down with remarkable speed. Same-sex marriage reality a decade ago?... Not in my lifetime! Same-sex marriage reality today?... Done deal! I can’t honestly say I know why this issue flipped over so quickly, but in my mind, the biggest and most palpable shift wasn’t in the

courts or state legislatures or social media, but in the hearts and minds of the American majority. Without it, the new reality wouldn’t exist. Here are some other matters that have tacked away from a long-held conservative course and picked up a progressive wind in their sails. Legalization of marijuana is such an obvious example, I don’t need to waste any more words on it. But can you feel the tide turn on animal welfare reform? Scoff at animal activists for their naivete if you will, but whatever they’re doing is taking hold in large parts of the country. Example: the end of turning orcas into 6-ton circus clowns, as recently decided by SeaWorld. That didn’t happen because SeaWorld execs were afraid of PETA. It happened because audiences showed with their lagging attendance they are no longer so interested in the show as they are the animal. Once people start understanding the intrinsic worth of one creature, it’s a short step to seeing the value in all creatures. Take note, corporate agriculture. Prison reform, another longtime smoking ember that has turned into a steady flame. And this flame is being fanned bipartisanly. Even the Kochs are for it. I hope you don’t own a lot of stock in private corrections corporations, because my guess is they are soon to be cinders. Minimum wage reform is on the march, city by city... state by state. I don’t suggest anyone hold their breath until Idaho follows Seattle down the path from laughable wage to livable wage, but let us thank the gods that Idaho really doesn’t count when it comes to anything important. What’s more, don’t be surprised to see unionized fast food workers all across America within another decade. Global warming awareness has taken a turn for the better. All the slung mud about it being an international environmentalist hoax is no longer sticking, mostly because the weather isn’t cooperating with the slingers. Finally, the reform of gun regulation is coming and any politician who stands in the way of such sane and sensible policies as universal background checks will soon find his NRA approval ratings won’t help him—not against the will of the American electorate. That’s the way it works, friends. In the longrun, what the American people don’t want to happen, won’t. When they change their minds on any particular policy, so does the policy. On issue after issue, Americans are settling into a liberal resolution, and once you’ve understood the intrinsic value of a liberal attitude on enough individual issues, you will understand the intrinsic folly of ever following a conservative path again. Happy Thanksgiving. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION FROM THE FAR MARGINS Bullets or bread? NICOLE LEFAVOUR Snow falls in Boise, and I write from the edge of somewhere. I write from a place of exile or distance, but I am not alone. We are the margins, the women, the homeless, the ample, the poor, the awkward young, the ones who are told we are godless, the genderless, the gay, the brown, black, the speakers of musical languages, staccato words, the otherwise able, the depressed, the hopeful, the wild, the different, the ones who want peace. We may sleep under bridges, in motorhomes, in houses with cold walls or mansions empty but for our heat, but we are awake and stirring. We may work at being warm, at feeding those we love, at managing human wants, human needs, at triage; at balancing, at death beds, at waiting tables, but we listen and often we find ourselves at the edge of our city looking in. The world rocks with ripples spread by terror, shudders at the violence. The nearest, most comfortable feel it most intensely, the shock. Many live in terror of other kinds already. This terror is another layer, a separate sadness, a separate burr beneath the skin, working its way to the heart. Like standing in the wake of a hate crime, some feel, “That was meant for me.” Others know it was not, know they are safe even if people they love are not. It’s like a woman who’s been hit once. Being struck then is forever-after a possibility, a shadow at the edge of every move, every harsh word. Some respond in anger. The world is divided between those who long for revenge, for whom anger is an emotion closer to the surface than sadness. So often the extremes of political party lines or even gender seem to sketch this out—the line between one human archetype and another. And we can’t fathom how the half other functions? Why hate? Why violence? Why lie down and cry? Why love one who hates you? This is age-old. From the margins, the world goes on. I open a New Yorker magazine set on a college library table and there is a world there I once knew, stage plays and restaurants, food as art, words of the educated, vocabulary beyond what I use any more. I feel like an urchin in a window, smiling at the vicarious moment. Looking in makes some feel hate. Perhaps if you have striven for something that you are intentionally denied, anger is a reasonable response. I am cool with a certain degree of disparity, but I do not tolerate those who disdain those of us looking in, those who close the shutters or chain-link the underpass to make our sleeping more invisible. We have choices. We can work to make the world more hateful. That part is easy: turn off the BOISE WEEKLY.COM

TV, filter your newsfeed, don’t turn down that street again, don’t listen to NPR. Or we can work to make those who hate us less hateful. Hate is born of fear. It is hard to hate someone who reaches out in kindness, who gives or acknowledges your pain. I would say this to the police, to mayors and presidential candidates, to our President Barack Obama and to French President François Hollande. But who am I to warn the mourning that the bombs will fall on children and that bombs teach people to hate. They create terrorists. They do. They did. I was never a fan of drones. They seem like an evil of their own. The extreme opposite of a suicide attack. In one, everything is risked and given. In the other, nothing is. If we see terror like a sickness or cancer, we believe in human evil and human brokenness. We might cut off a limb or not carefully choose what cells to take. Our haste and inability to discern is why we fill our prisons with people guilty of nothing but addiction, unmedicated mental unwellness. No one revels at being given the charge of protecting society. With that charge so many err to overprotection, thus creating more brokenness in families, more hate in those facing cruel and unusual punishment, more crime. When we have power, we are often not brave enough to walk the line of justice carefully, judiciously, with thought to the repercussions. Largely that is because the political divide created by partisanship makes us jump to blame our leaders. Or the leaders of the other political stripe who might be in charge. We have to be brave. Wise. Our human rush to anger and revenge is the death of us. The death of us all. Our rush to love is our grace, our survival. If we consider brokenness inevitable—that some small portion of it is spontaneous, infectious and unstoppable—then we know the world we have can either roil with hate or settle down to active and calculated peace. When we hold out our hand, will it hold a gun or a loaf of bread? Which will save more of us? Protect us from violence tomorrow? I would say the bread—the story of the bread will travel. It is a gesture that blurs the margins, folds the outside to the center, makes it no longer invisible. The bread will give us peace, keep us safer, warmer. Isn’t it harder to recruit soldiers to kill the ones who offered bread? Nicole LeFavour is a longtime educator and activist, former Boise Weekly reporter, and served in both the Idaho House of Representatives and Idaho State Senate. BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015c5


HARRISON BERRY

UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

NEWS SANTA, SECRET SALES AND SOCKS Downtown Boise merchants’ Christmas lists GEORGE PRENTICE

“The story of Jesus is a story of radical love.”

REFUGEE SUPPORT FILLS STATEHOUSE STEPS The tension between demonstrators who turned out to support—and oppose—admitting Syrian refugees to Idaho had mounted for more than an hour, but when Shay Primrose took the microphone at the top of the Idaho State Capitol steps and performed a ukelele rendition of “O Holy Night,” people on both sides of Jefferson Street sang along. “I was inspired by the second verse,” Primrose said afterward. “The story of Jesus is a story of radical love.” Estimates differ on how many people participated in the Nov. 21 rallies, but the dividing lines between them were distinct. On the Capitol side of Jefferson Street was the vast majority of demonstrators, waving signs welcoming refugees. They delivered speeches, sang songs and recited poetry in celebration of a version of America that welcomes the downtrodden. On the other side, a much smaller—though no less vocal—crowd gathered to press for more screening of incoming refugees and more resources for Idaho’s veterans and homeless populations. “Why should my taxes go to Syrians before Idahoans?” said David Pettinger. The demonstration and counter-demonstration were capstones to a long year for the issue of refugees in Idaho. It began with two ballot measures currently gathering signatures in Twin Falls County that, if successful, would close the College of Southern Idaho Refugee Center. Proponents say the referenda halt Twin Falls’ intake of potentially dangerous refugees coming from war-torn regions like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. Opponents say the ballot push is xenophobic at best and illegal at worst. Pressure on the refugee center became so intense, CSI held a community forum featuring Office of Refugee Admissions Director Larry Bartlett and Refugee Center Director Zeze Rwasama in September. In the wake of deadly terrosit attacks in Paris Nov. 13, fears were stoked worldwide. The self-declared “Islamic State” later claimed responsibility for the attack. In response to the attack and drawing on citizen input against refugee resettlement, Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter wrote to President Barack Obama urging him to halt the intake of refugees pending an audit of the program, which Otter reiter7 ated during a conference call including more than 30 governors.

Sorry, Hillary Clinton, but a number of downtown merchants don’t think it takes a village—and by village, they mean The Village, the 500,000-plus square feet of super-shopping in Meridian about to enter its second holiday season. Besides, Boise shopkeepers say, they wouldn’t even want their stores near The Village or Boise Towne Square Mall, now in its 27th year. “Our store is a reflection of downtown Boise and vice versa,” said Kent Collins, owner of Flying M Coffeehouse on the corner of Idaho and Fifth streets. “Besides, I don’t think we would get away with a lot of the… hmm, let’s say ‘unique’ gifts that we offer if we were at The Village or the mall.” Cindy Beauclair, owner of Dragonfly, whis is around the corner from Flying M at 462 Main St., couldn’t agree more. “The Village? Puh-leez. And the mall? I can tell you that when we were looking to buy our Main Street building in downtown Boise—and that was 25 ADAM RO SENLUND years ago—some young consultant told us that we had to go out to the mall and the No. 1 reason some downtown retail won’t be to absolutely not invest in downtown. We said, ‘See you later.’ I would absolutely be un- successful.” Again, Beauclair agreed with her fellow downhappy out there,” Beauclair said. “I can’t imagine town business owners. for a minute working at the mall or The Village.” “We’re lucky because we have a parking lot, Rich Harris owns Bandana Running and Walking, which is down the block from Dragon- but as far as the meters go, 20 free minutes simply fly. He was spending time with a customer trying isn’t enough,” she said. “Maybe an hour would be to find the right running shoe, while his wife and better.” Beauclair was quick to add, though, that business partner, Shannon, beamed with pride. “Just look at him over there. He’s as genuine as even an expired parking meter can’t dampen the holiday spirit at Dragonfly. the day is long,” she said. “We are the other end “What can I say? Everybody’s happy. Our of the spectrum from the mall or The Village. For customers even bring us goodies on Christmas us, it’s less about the sale and more about doing what we want really well. Yes, we’ve heard of a lot Eve. We absolutely love being downtown,” said Beauclair, who then shared a few stories of holiday of downtown stores that have moved and we’ve camaraderie among downtown merchants. “I talked about it over the years, but that’s just not honestly don’t see other stores as our competitors. who we are.” I send people to other stores—Eyes of the World, As Shannon spoke, Rich grabbed a fistful of Crone’s Cupboard and Flying M—all the time.” quarters and ran outside the store to fill customFlying M’s Collins said he couldn’t be more ers’ parking meters. “That’s the one thing that we struggle with—a thankful. “The Flying M always sold some gifts, even lot of merchants struggle with it. Of course, I’m before we had an official gift shop. Now, we’ve talking about street parking,” Shannon said. “As got thousands of items, but we try really hard great an experience as we can make it inside, a to get the stuff that you can’t get at the mall,” he ticket on the car outside is terrible. And it’s less said. Collins pointed to custom-made Idaho- and about the meters, it’s more about how aggressive Boise-themed glasses, a lederhosen-wearing unithe city is in handing out those parking tickets. corn Christmas ornament, wildly-popular adult I’m not sure what the solution is, but street parkcoloring books and faux taxidermied heads of ing and the meters are quickly going to become

6cNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015cBOISEweekly

rhinos, hippos and, again, unicorns. “What’s popular? Definitely the jewelry and socks are huge,” he said. At Dragonfly, the sock corner is Beauclair’s favorite area of the store. “This is our sock wall,” she said, pointing to the hundreds of men’s and women’s socks, including a pair sporting the phrase “Carpe the F***k Out Of This Diem.” “Now I ask you, how many places are you going to find these?” Beauclair said. “There isn’t a day here where we’re not laughing. It’s more fun than work.” That couldn’t make the Downtown Boise Association happier. The postrecession downtown Boise landscape is rapidly evolving, and Karlee May, DBA membership manager, said “it’s all good.” When Macy’s shuttered its downtown Boise location in 2010, the immediate reaction was to find another big box store to replace the retailer’s significant footprint. As time passed, downtown Boise has learned to live—some would say thrive—in spite of the loss. “It doesn’t hurt to get a big, anchor store for downtown, but it’s not the end of the world if we don’t,” said May. “This year, we’re pretty sure that we’ve got just about everything for anyone’s Christmas list: furniture, clothes, the home, kitchen, you name it.” The DBA also tries to fill downtown merchants’ stockings with plenty of events to help lure customers, beginning with Small Business Saturday on Nov. 28; First Thursday on Dec. 3, which May says is, by far, the most successful First Thursday of the year; a downtown home for Santa Claus at D.L. Evans Bank at Ninth and Main streets every Saturday through Christmas; and some gorgeous designs adorning store windows. “This year, we’ll have 20 different artists decorating more than a couple dozen different storefronts,” said May. “They’re really something. We’ll unveil them on the First Thursday of December.” At Bandana, the Harrises have decided their once-a-year sale will fall on First Thursday, Dec. 3. “It’s a bit of a secret, but we can tell your readers,” said Shannon. “You name it, we’ll be discounting our items that day. I bake homemade goodies for a week preparing for that. We do some special gift-wrapping, and it’s a pretty special feeling that you can only get downtown. I’m getting in the mood just thinking about it.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


Boise Bicycle Project looks to Idaho prisons for help fixing bikes

“The reason there’s racism is because there’s an us-versus-them mentality.”

JESSICA MURRI Every morning, Boise Bicycle Project Executive Director Jimmy Hallyburton’s alarm goes off at 6:30. Before he does anything else, he grabs a legal notepad and fills three pages with reflections, ideas and goals. He circles his daily goal and keeps it at the forefront of his mind all day. As bike donations at the Boise Bicycle Project continue to pile up faster than Hallyburton and his crew can fix and hand them out to children in need, one particular idea kept emerging in his daily free writes. “We really want to maximize our space here and get as many bikes out to people as possible, so while trying to figure out a storage solution we thought about having them fixed somewhere else,” Hallyburton said. “Who could be fixing the bikes?” At the same time, Hallyburton kept running into another challenge: recently released inmates from the Idaho Department of Correction coming in to get a bicycle, but they either couldn’t afford one or didn’t qualify for BBP’s programs. “We started to wonder if we could solve our storage problem, solve a problem of getting bicycles for prisoners and then also try to figure out a way where they can contribute to our program and get more bikes to kids,” he said. “We came up with a win-win-win scenario.” Hallyburton’s idea is to take 10-20 kids’ bikes to the prison southeast of Boise once a week and spend two hours helping inmates patch flat tires, replace rusted chains and adjust brakes. Eventually, he hopes the prisoners can fix the bikes without him. IDOC Director Kevin Kempf couldn’t be more thrilled with the idea. “This just fits perfectly with what we want to do,” he said. “As a corrections system, we want to partner with the community. We know our inmates and our staff will be super excited about this. I just see it as a win-win.” On a recent Tuesday morning tour of the Boise Bicycle Project, Kempf was impressed by the hundreds of bikes stacked head-high in the nonprofit’s small backyard. The organization received 89 bikes on Sunday, Nov. 15 alone. Hallyburton explained the problem: with so many donations, the bikes stay stacked on top BOISE WEEKLY.COM

At the demonstration, safety was a rallying point for Mike Dennis, of Caldwell, who said the refugees from Syria currently being admitted into the United States were young men “of fighting age” and the attacks in Paris should be a lesson to the United States. “We’re welcoming in an army to attack us,” he said. “Look in the media.” Talk like that, said Boise State University student Megan Freeman, could make America more vulnerable. “The rhetoric of terrorism is to propel a movement like we have on the other side [of the street],” she said. Richard Heinzcarried a sign bearing crossedout swastikas that read: “Refugees welcome to stay/ Racists welcome to leave.” He added he didn’t think the people on the other side of the street were racists, but that didn’t mean racism wasn’t playing a role in their demonstration. “Most likely, the majority of them aren’t racists,” he said. “The reason there’s racism is because there’s an us-versus-them mentality.” Counter-protest members denied there was a racial component to their demonstration. “This isn’t about hate,” said III Percent of Idaho Public Information Officer Chris McIntire to the demonstration on the Capitol steps while calling for a moment of silence for veterans. The group he represents played a key role in organizing the the counter-protest. III Percent of Idaho, however, was what attracted Southern Poverty Law Center correspondent David Neiwert to the demonstration. Neiwert said he has tracked militia and extremist groups since the 1990s, and Patriot Movement groups like III Percent and Oath Keepers have strong ties to militia groups he has studied in the past. “The whole idea of III Percent is a second American Revolution,” he said. People on both sides of Jefferson Street had strong words, but Boise State student and Muslim Student Association Vice President Noora Muhamad, an Iraqi refugee from Kurdistan who came to America as an infant, was able to cut through the noise. As chants of “America first” threatened to drown out her speech, she drew cheers when she said, “I know you guys say ‘Idaho First,’ but I believe ‘People First.’” “I grew up learning to be open-minded and strong and independent,” she said. —Harrison Berry 6

Boise Bicycle Project Executive Director Jimmy Hallyburton (left) and Idaho Department of Correction Director Kevin Kempft (right) are working out a deal to get wheels in the hands of both kids and cons.

of each other and it takes months to get to the bottom of the piles. By then, the bikes at the bottom are so rusted from the elements, they often have to be parted out. “We need to get that circulation going,” Hallyburton said. Kempf is also anxious to get a program like this started to reverse course on the negative reputation that has dogged IDOC for years. “We actively want to change the image of corrections and this a great way to do it,” he said. On the same token, Hallyburton is excited to help inmates move beyond their own pasts and onto a better life. “Think about how hard it is to get a job, even if you haven’t just gotten out of prison,” Hallyburton said. “Imagine getting the door slammed in your face everywhere you went. That can be a hard environment. As soon as you can make it a more welcoming environment, where you are trying to work with them and give them skills, you see people turn around really quickly—when all of the sudden a door opens for them.” For each kid’s bike an inmate repairs, Hallyburton said the inmate will receive a credit toward an adult bike at Boise Bicycle Project. When the inmate is released, he or she can come straight to BBP’s shop and cash in the

voucher for a reliable bike, helmet, lock and a set of bike lights. The details aren’t ironed out yet, but Hallyburton said a an adult bike would be worth around 15 fixed kids’ bikes. Half the fixed bikes will be donated to families in need and the other half would be for sale at a discounted price—around $20 or $40. “The sales for those pay for the adult bikes for the folks released from prison,” he said. “Then you’re looking at a program that’s selffunding.” To help get the program up and running, Hallyburton put out a call on Facebook to create a task force that could bring the idea to fruition. Within hours of the post going live on Nov. 11, it reached more than 15,000 people and had more than 150 shares. He has a dozen people on board with a diverse set of backgrounds, including some who were formerly incarcerated. He suspects the program will be operational by spring 2016. With Kempf onboard, the program might move faster than Hallyburton thought. “The good news for us is we can move pretty fast once we have willing participants on both ends,” Kempf said. “This is an exciting project, so it won’t take us very long to get up and running. I would say a matter of weeks, not months.”

BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015c7

HARRISON BERRY

JES SICA MURRI

A GOOD CYCLE

NEWS

UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA


CITIZEN in tandem with the states. That said, there’s a paradigm I want to change. I want people to understand that the arts are not just for some and not others. I want to get to the point where more people say, “I don’t think I can live without the arts.”

JER

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Does the nation’s economy have to grow to find adequate federal dollars to restore NEA funding? Chu: We need to show through hard evidence that the arts are important in our everyday lives.

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Again, doesn’t the NEA need more federal funding? Chu: I’m not a fan of saying, “We can only do more if the economy grows.”

JANE CHU AND MICHAEL FAISON

The art of honoring America’s diversity

Conversely, don’t the arts continue to be a tangible economic engine for many American communities? Chu: Absolutely. The most recent Bureau of Economic Analysis report shows that the arts and culture sector provides 4.3 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. That’s more than transportation, more than construction and many other sectors.

GEORGE PRENTICE The shorthand for Jane Chu’s personal story is “bok choy and corndogs.” The daughter of Chinese immigrants who fled their nation’s political unrest, Chu was born in Oklahoma and raised in Arkansas. “So I have navigated a bok choy/corndog set-up,” she likes to say. Chu went on to become a pianist, earn a Ph.D. from Indiana University and ultimately be named the 11th chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts in 2014. “And heeeeeere’s Michael,” said Chu, playing an introductory flourish on a nearby piano when Boise Weekly asked her to play a few bars on her favorite instrument. “Michael” is Michael Faison, executive director of the Idaho Commission on the Arts. Chu insisted Faison be at her side during her recent visit to Idaho, and Faison was quick to remind us the ICA and NEA are in perfect harmony. What might you tell a stranger what you do for a living? Chu: I run a federal agency that is all about sparking the vitality of the arts in the United States. We certainly know of the transformational power of the arts on individuals and communities. Faison: When the NEA was born 50 years ago, it was a spark for local arts across the country. It began leveraging enormous local support that breathed life into state and city agencies and particularly local arts council that hadn’t existed before. That all resulted because of that spark that Jane spoke of. Chu: The NEA gives 40 percent of its budgets to the states. I’m assuming Idaho’s arts commissions and state agencies across the country can’t exist without the NEA and vice versa. Chu: Other nations have cultural ministers. 8cNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015cBOISEweekly

We don’t. What I like about that is that together, we shape the arts in America. No one is telling the other what you can or can’t do when it comes to the arts. That’s one of the reasons I love to travel so much. How much time do you spend out of your D.C.office? Chu: Probably 80 to 90 percent. I’ve been at the job for a year and, so far, I’ve been to 60 communities. Faison: But in her first year, she chose to come to Idaho. That’s huge for us. In the half-century history of the NEA, many of us recall times when its very existence was threatened, particularly by budget cuts. In fact, the NEA still hasn’t seen it previous funding restored. Chu: But we’re moving in the right direction, especially when people understand that the arts are thriving because the NEA works

Michael, we should take note that Chairman Chu’s visit to Idaho included some time to visit Artisans for Hope here in Boise. Faison: They do extraordinary work, supporting our community’s newcomers to creatively express their stories and share their personal journeys to Idaho. Many of them have come from war-torn nations and have lost everything. But we greet them in Idaho with open arms and we’re so anxious for them to share their extraordinary stories. Artisans for Hope helps them share those moments through things like story quilts and the Idaho Commission on the Arts and the NEA proudly support that effort. And the Artisans for Hope particularly resonated with Chairman Chu because of her own personal story and how her parents immigrated to America to make a new life for her to thrive in such a glorious way. Chairman Chu, if you were queen for a day, what kind of sweeping change would you effect? Chu: The Brookings Institution tells us that by 2020, the population of Americans 18 and younger will be a minority-majority [minorities will be the majority of that demographic]; by 2040, the population of 30 and under will be a minority-majority. That in itself reveals the multiple perspectives of our nation, and the arts spark us to honor all of those perspectives. If I were royalty, I would say let’s honor that even more right now. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY NOV. 25 Festivals & Events SAINT AL’S FESTIVAL OF TREES—Share in the magic as the Boise Centre becomes home to a wonderland of holiday splendor, featuring hundreds of lavishly decorated Christmas trees, wreaths and inspirational decor. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$7, $30 family. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, saintalphonsus.org/festival.

On Stage BCT: NO MORE SAD THINGS—Catch the co-world premiere of this quirky, sexy musical in which a 30-something woman from Akron, Ohio, absconds to Hawaii where she shares a rocky romance with a young cliff diver. Through Dec. 20. 8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contempo-

rary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Art

COLOR IV—Through Dec. 18, with special Gallery Walk 4-6 p.m. Nov. 27, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com.

2015 BOISE STATE FALL BFA EXHIBITION—Through Dec. 4. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 1, Liberal Arts Building, Room 170; and Boise State Visual Arts Center Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, art.boisestate.edu/ visualartscenter.

FOLDING PAPER: THE INFINITE POSSIBILITIES OF ORIGAMI— Through Jan. 17. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

ANIMALIA IV—Through Dec. 18, with special Gallery Walk 4-6 p.m. Nov. 27, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com.

HONORING OUR LANDSCAPE IV—Through Dec. 18, with special Gallery Walk 4-6 p.m. Nov. 27. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208726-5079, gailseverngallery.com.

BRONCOS ABROAD PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION—Through Dec. 4. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242, finearts.boisestate.edu.

JAMES (JIM) TALBOT: IDAHO WILDLIFE—Through Nov. 30. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Cinder Winery, 107 E.44th St., Garden City, 208376-4023. surelsplace.org/ surelsotherplace.

CHINESE GARDENS—Through Feb. 14. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6.

KAYLA HURD: SOCIAL FRUIT—In the SUB Trueblood Room through Nov. 29. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-INFO, sub.boisestate.edu.

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY, NOV. 25-29 L AURIE PE ARMAN

NILES NORDQUIST: IN THE WILD—Through Jan. 10. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Friesen Galleries, Brandt Center, Northwest Nazarene University, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-4678398, brandtcenter.nnu.edu. SUN VALLEY PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB: WOOD RIVER VALLEY, WHERE WE LIVE—Through Dec. 31. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, thecommunitylibrary.org. SVCA: SLEIGHT OF HAND— Through Nov. 27. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-7269491, sunvalleycenter.org. TVAA: CUISINE ART—Through Jan. 15. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, boisestatepublicradio.org.

“Oh Christmas tree, Oh Christmas tree/ You’ll ever be unchanging/ A symbol of goodwill and love/ You’ll ever be unchanging.”

SAINT AL’S FESTIVAL OF TREES Though the annual Saint Alphonsus Foundation’s Festival of Trees is all about the Weihnachtsbaum, it starts even before Thanksgiving dinner has turned into leftovers. During the weeklong celebration, the Boise Centre is filled with hundreds of decorated Christmas trees and wreaths. It would be easy to spend the week just looking through the splendid displays, but there’s a whole sleighful of holiday happenings, like visits with Santa Claus and Prancer the reindeer at North Pole Village, a kids’ art contest and scavenger hunt, balloon artists making Christmas-y creations, live performances, a gift shop and a fashion show. This is the Festival of Trees’ 33rd year, and proceeds benefit the Saint Alphonsus Rehabilitation Center. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $7-$30, Boise Centre, 850 Front St., 208-3672121, saintalphonsus.org/festival. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

THURSDAY NOV. 26 Festivals & Events SAINT AL’S FESTIVAL OF TREES— Share in the magic as the Boise 2-9 p.m. FREE-$7, $30 family. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900. saintalphonsus. org/festival. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Join the Idaho Botanical Garden for a dazzling display of over 300,000 sparkling lights artfully arranged throughout the holiday season. 6-9:30 p.m. $4-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649. idahobotanicalgarden.org/wintergarden-aglow.

BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015c9


CALENDAR On Stage

Food

THANKSGIVING COMEDY SHOW WITH HEATH HARMISON AND AARON WOODALL—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com.

RESTAURANTS IN BOISE OPEN ON THANKSGIVING—Visit boiseweekly.com for a roundup of Boise restaurants open for Thanksgiving.

Sports & Fitness LIFETIME FITNESS TURKEY DAY 5K BOISE—This 5K course through downtown Boise starts on Capitol Boulevard at Main Street. Take nonperishable food items to help fill up the pantries of Boise Rescue Mission and City Light Home for Women and Children. 9 a.m. $12-$35. Downtown Boise, Downtown Corridor, Boise. turkeyday-5k.com/races/boise/#sthash. wgmPvahI.dpuf.

potluck Thanksgiving dinner, along with games, puzzles, football on TVs and more. The fun starts at 3 p.m. and dinner will be served at 5 p.m. Feel free to invite guests, but RSVP to ensure they have enough food for everyone. 3 p.m. FREE. The Journey Boise, 9105 W. Overland Road, Boise. 208-779-0483, perfectpotluck.com.

SUN VALLEY RESORT THANKSGIVING BUFFET—Skip kitchen duty and dine in style this Thanksgiving. Buffet service will be accompanied by the Sun Valley Jazz Trio in the Limelite Room. 4 p.m. $33-$65 adv., $45-$85 door. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800-7868259, sunvalley.com.

FRIDAY NOV. 27 Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FESTIVAL OF TREES—Enjoy a forest of customdesigned trees, a selection of silent auction items, unique centerpieces, wreaths, decorations and a craft fair. The event wraps up on Monday. Nov. 30, with the gala dinner and auction. Proceeds benefit Canyon County Meals on Wheels. 1-7 p.m. $2-$4, $12 family. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000. canyoncountyfestivaloftrees.com.

THANKSGIVING AT THE NARROWS—Enjoy a selection of Thanksgiving-themed items like freshly carved roasted turkey and Double R Ranch prime rib. Regular menu pricing applies. Call or visit the website to book a reservation. Noon-7 p.m. Shore Lodge-McCall, 501 W. Lake St., McCall, 1-800657-6464, shorelodge.com. THANKSGIVING DINNER—Join The Journey Boise for a delicious

THURSDAY-SUNDAY, NOV. 26-JAN. 3

DCI TOY EXPO—Get a look at a wide array of unusual toys from the likes of The Smithsonian, Fat Brain Toys, Tegu, Green Toys, Goldie Blox and more. Plus demos and giveaways. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org/shop. HELLS CANYON WINERY HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE—Sample new release wines and older vintages from both Hells Canyon Winery and sister brand, Zhoo Zhoo, and take advantage of the best wine prices all year. Entry fee includes tasting and souvenir stemless glass. Noon5 p.m. $9. Hell’s Canyon Winery, 18835 Symms Road, Caldwell, 208-454-3300, hellscanyonwinery. org. PAYETTE BREWING BLACK FRIDAY—Join Payette Brewing Co. for a celebration of dark beers, featuring more than 40 imperial stouts and porters from local and regional breweries. Noon-8 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing Co. New Facility, 733 S. Pioneer St., Boise, payetteblackfriday.com.

FRIDAY, NOV. 27

PRAY FOR SNOW—Join your fellow winter worshipers and do a snow dance around a giant bonfire. You’ll enjoy live music by Bread and Circus, rail jam (conditions permitting), raffle and beer from Salmon River Brewery as you pray to the snow gods to bless us with a plentiful winter wonderland. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$10, $2 dogs. McCall Activity Barn, Moonridge Road, McCall, 208-634-2222, brundage.com. RX RECORD STORE DAY BLACK FRIDAY—Brighten your Black Friday with deals on more than 125 titles on vinyl, CD and other formats. The sale starts at 8 a.m., but you can snag a spot in line at the gift shop beginning a half-hour earlier. 7:30 a.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-3448010, recordstoreday.com. SAINT AL’S FESTIVAL OF TREES—10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$7, $30 family. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900. saintalphonsus.org/festival.

STE. CHAPELLE OPEN HOUSE AND BARREL TASTING—Taste and tour your way through the winery with hourly tours and tastes of award-winning wines straight from the barrel. There’ll be Black Friday specials, light fare and live music. Noon-5 p.m. $15. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-453-7843, stechapelle.com. SUN VALLEY GALLERY ASSOCIATION GIVING WALK—See a fabulous array of world-class art at the 10 member galleries while helping out three deserving local nonprofits. Each gallery will have collection bins, where you can drop off donations for the Advocates (used or new clothing and toys), the Animal Shelter of the Wood River Valley (pet food and supplies), and the Hunger Coalition (canned or boxed nonperishable food). 4-6 p.m. FREE. svgalleries.org. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—6-9:30 p.m. $4-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649. idahobotanicalgarden.org/ winter-garden-aglow.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, NOV. 27-28

FAR Z AN FAR AMAR ZI

L AURIE PE ARMAN

Lights, lights, lights and more lights.

What a soup-er way to spend the day.

Fun for everyone.

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW

IDAHO FOODBANK’S EMPTY BOWLS

DISCOVERY CENTER OF IDAHO TOY EXPO

It’s one thing to visit Santa at a mall; it’s another to tell him what you want against a backdrop of enough lights to make Emmett look like Las Vegas—-which you can do at the Idaho Botanical Garden’s 19th annual Winter Garden aGlow. Parents can have their children professionally photographed with Santa and do some shopping at the Holiday Garden Gift Store. The main attraction, though, is the garden itself, which has been decorated with more than 300,000 holiday lights hanging from every possible surface, transforming the garden into a brightly lit wonderland sure to bring a smile to the faces of parents and children alike. 6-9 p.m., $4-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Nothing goes better with turkey leftovers (or is a delicious alternative to Thanksgiving ) than a yummy bowl of soup crafted from some of the Treasure Valley’s best chefs. That’s only one of the reasons why we adore The Idaho Foodbank’s annual day-after-Thanksgiving Empty Bowls celebration where gallons of hot soup generously fill some beautifully handcrafted bowls, designed by professional and amateur artists and students. This is the 18th year the Foodbank (and several dozen of its loyal friends) will turn the Grove Plaza into Boise’s biggest kitchen, featuring more than 30 varieties of soup. Most of the bowls go for about $10—soup is free—though some extraordinary bowls go for a few dollars more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., $10 and up. The Grove Plaza, Eighth Street between Grove and Front streets, 208-336-9643, idahofoodbank. org/event/empty-bowls.

The Discovery Center of Idaho has come up with a less pushyshovy alternative to Black Friday: its first-ever Toy Expo. DCI will showcase the most fun and exciting educational toys out there, such as the Wonder Workshop’s Dash and Dot Pack—a robot companion that helps kids learn how to code. Kids can program Dash to move, light up, make sound and respond to their voices. There’s the 3Doodler Pen 2.0, which is basically a tiny 3-D printer. The Rolling Spider is basically a drone for kids. Seriously, these toys sound fun no matter how old you are. No admission is needed to check out the toys, and every purchase is an entry into eight big giveaways from STEMfinity. 9:30-5 p.m., FREE. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 W. Myrtle St., 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org.

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CALENDAR On Stage ALLEY REP: GOLDEN GIRLS CHRISTMAS EXTRAVAGANZA—Enjoy singing, dancing and moments that made us love the Girls in the first place. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., 208-424-8297. alleyrep.org. BCT: NO MORE SAD THINGS—8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208331-9224, bctheater.org. BLT: EVERY CHRISTMAS STORY EVER TOLD, AND THEN SOME— Enjoy this madcap romp through the holiday season, as three actors decide to perform every Christmas story ever told. 8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIANS HEATH HARMISON AND AARON WOODALL—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $10. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-9914746, boisecomedy.com.

THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES—If you want something different for your holiday entertainment, this is the play for you: eight reindeer dishing about the real Santa. And they do not hold back. For adults; sexual content, strong language. 11 p.m. $10-$12. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. THE GAME’S AFOOT, OR HOLMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS—The danger and hilarity are nonstop in this glittering whodunit set during the Christmas holidays. 8 p.m. $12$17. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Citizen MAJESTIC CINEMAS HOLIDAY MATINEE CANNED FOOD DRIVE— Enjoy an encore presentation of Minions with your donation of a can of food (no home-canned items) for the Meridian Food Bank. 10 a.m. FREE. Majestic Cinemas-Meridian, 2140 E. Cinema Drive, Meridian, 208-888-2228, meridian.hallettcinemas.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Odds & Ends BOISE RESCUE MISSION TREE LOTS—BRM Tree Lots will be open in Boise and Nampa through Christmas Eve. 4-7 p.m. $25-$60. BRM Warehouse, 308 S. 24th St., Boise, 208-343-2389; and Boise Boise Rescue Mission Thrift Store, 1215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208466-4006, boiserm.org.

Food BASQUE MARKET BLACK PORT FRIDAY—Stop in for free tastes, order some special port-inspired tapas and do some holiday shopping. All ports are 10 percent off all day. At 4 p.m., an exclusive tasting event kicks off with a glass of bubbly Cava, followed by three unique ports paired with a light tapas plate. The private tasting is $15 in advance or $20 the day of the event. Space is limited. Call for reservations. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE-$20. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-4331208, thebasquemarket.com. EMPTY BOWLS IDAHO FOODBANK FUNDRAISER—Buy a handmade, hand-painted bowl and enjoy complimentary hot soup. Proceeds go toward providing food assistance through the food bank. 11 a.m. By donation. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise. idahofoodbank.org.

SATURDAY NOV. 28 Festivals & Events BASQUE MARKET SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY—Enjoy Vino Especial (hot mulled wine) samples, Basque and Spanish wine tasting and delicious seasonal tapas. Also, save 10 percent on Spanish candies. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

CALDWELL MODEL RAILROAD CLUB HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE— Check out the CMRC clubhouse and model train layouts, with hundreds of feet to track to enjoy. Special Thomas train and holiday trains for the kids will be on display and running. Plus, a scavenger hunt, and drinks and snacks available. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Caldwell Model Railroad Clubhouse, 809 Dearborn St., Caldwell, cmrchs.org. CANYON COUNTY FESTIVAL OF TREES—Enjoy a forest of custom-designed 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $2-$4, $12 family. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, canyoncountyfestivaloftrees.com.

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015c11


CALENDAR CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-3499. seeyouatthemarket.com.

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—6-9:30 p.m. $4-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden. org/winter-garden-aglow.

DCI TOY EXPO—9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-3439895, dcidaho.org/shop.

On Stage

DOWNTOWN BOISE HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY—Join Zions Bank for the official start to the capital city’s Christmas season, with caroling, candle lighting, live music, food and drink. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise.

THE GAME’S AFOOT, OR HOLMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS—8 p.m. $12-$17. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

BCT: NO MORE SAD THINGS—8 p.m. $16-$18. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater. org.

Art

BLT: EVERY CHRISTMAS STORY EVER TOLD, AND THEN SOME—8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

RECORD EXCHANGE SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY—Celebrate Small Business Saturday with live music buskers outside the store from noon to 2 p.m. Anyone who makes an SBS purchase will be entered to win a prize pack filled with music or items from The Record Exchange Gift Shop. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-3448010, facebook.com.

BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: ELF—Enjoy the hilarious story of how Buddy the elf reunites with his naughty-listed father while saving Christmas for a world that has lost its Christmas spirit. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. $6-$9. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3450454, 208-387-1273, boiseclassicmovies.com/deals.

SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY—Show your love for all the unique small businesses that help make our communities special while cashing in on some special deals. Visit the AmEx Small Business Saturday website if you need help finding participating shops in your area. americanexpress.com.

THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES—11 p.m. $10-$12. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

ALLEY REP: GOLDEN GIRLS CHRISTMAS EXTRAVAGANZA—8 p.m. $15-$20. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297. alleyrep.org.

HELLS CANYON WINERY ANNUAL SALE AND HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE—12-5 p.m. $9. Hell’s Canyon Winery, 18835 Symms Road, Caldwell, 208-454-3300, hellscanyonwinery.org.

REDISCOVERED BOOKS SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY—Local authors will be in the store throughout the day to suggest some of their favorite reads: Alan Heathcock and A.K. Turner 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and Cynthia Hand 12:30-2:30 p.m. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, facebook.com.

COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—7:30 p.m. $9.99. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208991-4746, boisecomedy.com.

COMEDIANS HEATH HARMISON AND AARON WOODALL— 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

VAC: ROLLIN’ HOLY DOWN A DIRTY RIVER—Enjoy new work by Mike Flinn, Noble Hardesty and Steve Willhite. Saturdays through November. Noon-6 p.m. FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

SUNDAY NOV. 29 Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FESTIVAL OF TREES—11 a.m.-5 p.m. $2-$4, $12 family. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, canyoncountyfestivaloftrees.com. SAINT AL’S FESTIVAL OF TREES—10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$7, $30 family. Boise Centre, 850 W.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY PASSPORT TO STATE STREET— Don’t forget to check out all the unique shops on West State Street, from 13th to 36th, while you’re out and about shopping local on Small Business Saturday. You can pick up a passport to special offers from State Street small businesses, fill the passport with stamps from different shops, and be entered into a drawing for prizes. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. eventbrite.com. SAINT AL’S FESTIVAL OF TREES—10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$7, $30 family. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900. saintalphonsus.org/festival. STE. CHAPELLE OPEN HOUSE AND BARREL TASTING—12 p.m. $15. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-4537843, stechapelle.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

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CALENDAR Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900. saintalphonsus.org/festival. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—6-9:30 p.m. $4-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden. org/winter-garden-aglow.

On Stage BLT: EVERY CHRISTMAS STORY EVER TOLD, AND THEN SOME—2 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDIANS HEATH HARMISON AND AARON WOODALL—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

MONDAY NOV. 30 Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FESTIVAL OF TREES GALA DINNER AND AUCTION—Proceeds benefit the Canyon County Meals on Wheels.

5:30 p.m. $25, $640 table of 8. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000. canyoncountyfestivaloftrees.com.

only; leashes and crates required. 6 p.m. Boise Towne Square, 350 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, 208-3784400, boisetownesquare.com.

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—6-9:30 p.m. $4-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden. org/winter-garden-aglow.

TUESDAY DEC. 1

On Stage

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—6-9:30 p.m. $4-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden. org/winter-garden-aglow.

STORY STORY NIGHT 2015-16: BLAST FROM THE PAST—Kick it old-school with true stories from the not-too-distant past at the ’90s-movie-themed season of Story Story Night: “My Own Private Idaho, Stories of Wild States.” 7 p.m. $12. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208343-0571. storystorynight.org.

Animals & Pets PET NIGHT—Get your furry friends in the holiday spirit with a visit to Santa. His elves will be nearby, prepared to lend a helping hand and snap a commemorative photo. Price is determined by photo package selected. Dogs and cats

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

Festivals & Events

On Stage BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: SCROOGED—Bill Murray plays Frank, an Ebenezer Scrooge of sorts, in the ’80s version of A Christmas Carol. He gets his bell rung by Carol Kane (as the Ghost of Christmas Present) and shot at by Bobcat Goldthwaite. 7 p.m. $6-$9. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208387-1273. boiseclassicmovies. com/deals. CALDWELL FINE ARTS: EUGENE BALLET’S NUTCRACKER—Toni Pimble’s exquisite choreography and Don Carson’s colorful and magical sets complement Tchaikovsky’s glorious music to create the perfect holiday tradition. 7 p.m. $10-$30. Jewett Auditorium, The College of Idaho, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell. 208-4595275, caldwellfinearts.org.

Literature 7% CHANCE OF SUNSHINE BOOK RELEASE PARTY—Join local illustrator Meredith Fern Messinger to celebrate the release of her first picture book. Ninety percent of proceeds from book sales go to Make-A-Wish Idaho. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Two Rivers Clubhouse 261 W. Island Woods Drive, Eagle, facebook.com.

Food SPECIAL OLYMPICS REVEAL THE CHAMPIONS BREAKFAST—Enjoy breakfast with Special Olympics Idaho, with your donation helping continue programs for specialneeds athletes. If you’d like to be a table captain (you take nine others with you to the breakfast), email Laurie LaFollette at llafollette@idso.org or visit the website, click on “events,” click on “Reveal the Champions Breakfast,” and sign up online. 9 a.m. By donation. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208343-1871. idso.org.

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E n d o f Y e a r I s su e

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OU R F IC T I O N 1 0 1 I S SU E

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Calendar De adline: FRIDAY DECEMBER 18th

WE WILL BE CLOSED DECEMBER 24 - January 1

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MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY NOV. 25 BEN BURDICK TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY—Electronic live music and DJs. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid OPHELIA—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel THE SHIVAS—With Marshall Poole and Urban Outfielders. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux SONGWRITERS NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 TYLOR BUSHMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM WITH THE BLIND MICE—8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s WOH TWERKYDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

LISTEN HERE

OPEN MIC WITH CRAIG SLOVER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CREDENDA—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DJ DUSTY C—10 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

CURTIS/SUTTON AND THE SCAVENGERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WILSON ROBERTS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CYMRY—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten

JEREMY STEWART—2:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DJ WENDY FOX—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

TUESDAY DEC. 1

THURSDAY NOV. 26 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

FRIDAY NOV. 27 BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KAYLEIGH JACK—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

BROCK BARTEL—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

LOUDPVCK AND AAZAR—8 p.m. $10-$35. Revolution

CYMRY—6 p.m. FREE. Murph’s Corner Brew, Boise Spectrum

ROUGHED UP SUSPECTS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

DAVEY JONES AND THE SPIDERS FROM BARS: A DAVID BOWIE ODESSEY—With Hand of Doom: A Black Sabbath Tribute. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

SANDRA CAVANAUGH AND REX MILLER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers RYAN WISSINGER—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

—Jeffrey C. Lowe With Marshall Poole and Urban Outfielders. 7 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com.

16cNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015cBOISEweekly

FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JERRY JOSEPH AND THE JACKMORMONS—7 p.m. $10. Neurolux

JERRY GRUSELL—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

Just in time for Thanksgiving, another listen to The Shivas’ You Know What to Do (K Records, 2014) offers reminders of a few things to be thankful for: We’re thankful kids are still discovering 1960s Nuggets-style rock ’n’ roll and making it their own. We’re thankful K Records is still releasing kick-ass, lo-fi punk albums. Last but not least, we’re thankful living legend Calvin Johnson is still producing fuzzed-out rock with a strong sense of soul and melody at his Dub Narcotic Studio. Don’t take these things for granted, and give thanks on Wednesday, Nov. 25, when The Shivas barnstorm the Neurolux. Rock out and get stupid at the kids’ table before you to have go act like an adult and have a sit-down meal with your parents.

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE SHIVAS, NOV. 25, NEUROLUX

CLASSICAL REVOLUTION: BOISE—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District

SOUL KITCHEN—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole STYLUST BEATS—10 p.m. $10. Reef SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

SATURDAY NOV. 28 ALL THAT REMAINS—With Devour The Day, Audiotopsy and Sons of Texas. 7:30 p.m. $20-$40. Knitting Factory

OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: SALLIE FORD—With TacocaT. 7 p.m. $10. Neurolux

BLAZE AND KELLY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

LISTEN HERE

SOUL SERENE—10 p.m. FREE. Reef A TASTY JAMM—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SUNDAY NOV. 29 JERRY JOSEPH AND THE JACKMORMONS—7 p.m. $10. Neurolux NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY NOV. 30 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY— 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid CHUCK SMITH DUO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHAZ BROWNE GROUP—6:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Sapphire Room

CHUCK SMITH DUO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GUY BLAKESLEE—With The Lower 48. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

ALL THAT REMAINS, NOV. 28, KNITTING FACTORY Sometimes a band makes music that is fully entrenched in the band’s chosen genre but is also, in some ways, boundary bending. Springfield, Mass.-born All That Remains is metal. Although in its last few albums the band has integrated a poppier sound, ATR is still metal… musically. Lyrically, however, ATR songs would be right at home on the shelf next to Swift’s or those of any other current country musician, because inside all the screaming and pounding guitar chords, there’s a story. For example, check out the opening lyrics to “This Probably Won’t End Well” off ATR’s recently released The Order of Things (Razor and Tie, 2015): “Packing your things and you storm through the house/ Said, no, I can’t take it, I just wanna end it/ And all I can think, you look good when you’re angry/ So, let’s take a step back and get us back on track.” Even if you can’t understand ATR frontman Philip Labonte, you can be sure he has something to say. —Amy Atkins With Devour the Day, Audiotopsy, Sons of Texas. 7:30 p.m., $20$40. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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SCREEN

Bryan Cranston is breaking good in Trumbo.

TRUMBO: THE REBEL WITH A CAUSE Bryan Cranston is stirring (never shaken) GEORGE PRENTICE Trumbo—yet another stellar film in a bountiful November at the cinema—goes down like a near-perfect martini. With Bryan Cranston in the lead role, Trumbo is smooth but peppered with powerful bitters, reminding us it wasn’t so long ago our nation put people behind bars for what they thought as much as for what they did. The question still haunts our history: “Are you now, or have you ever been, a member of the Communist Party?” In 1947, when that question was put to Dalton Trumbo, Hollywood’s most provocative playwright, he responded, “Many questions can be answered ‘yes’ or ‘no’ only by a moron or a slave.” His response got a good laugh during a meeting of the U.S. House UnAmerican Activities Committee. What many people have forgotten over time, however, is it also earned Trumbo a Contempt of Congress conviction and a prison sentence. In one particularly pungent sequence of Trumbo, we see the Oscar-winning playwright strip-searched before surrendering his identity, henceforth to be known as Prisoner No. 7551. Trumbo was once Hollywood’s highest-paid screenwriter, responsible for films like Roman Holiday and Kitty Foyle. Like many other Americans, he was also a communist sympathizer. For the record, so were Helen Keller, 18cNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015cBOISEweekly

attached to the script. What followed was a Charlie Chaplin, Aaron Copland and Lillian game-changing moment in U.S. history and Hellman. the stuff that makes Trumbo, the movie, so The film reveals that while Hollywood was grand. a dream factory, it was also a nasty place in Cranston, who has conquered television (he post-war America. Because of his affiliation, earned several Emmys for Breaking Bad) and Trumbo was ostracized, blacklisted and, worst Broadway (he won the 2014 Best Actor Tony of all, unemployed. for his portrayal of U.S. President Lyndon After serving his term in federal prison, Johnson in All the Way) is now almost certainly Trumbo returned to Hollywood but couldn’t secure any work despite his credentials. He be- a lock for a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his work in Trumbo, helped gan writing scripts under by a wonderful supporting false names, and it wasn’t TRUMBO (R) cast, which includes Louis long before Trumbo was Directed by Jay Roach C.K., Helen Mirren, Diane cranking out some of the Lane and John Goodman, best scripts in HollyStarring Bryan Cranston, Louis C.K., John Goodman, Diane Lane, Helen Mirren who would steal the show wood—not that audiencif it wasn’t already in Cranes would have known. In Opens Wednesday, Nov. 25 at The Flicks, ston’s pocket. a particularly fascinating 646 W. Fulton St., 208-342-4288, theflicksboise.com. Praise also belongs to scene, we watch as one of John McNamara whose his screenplays, written whip-smart screenplay under a nom de plume, based on Bruce Cook’s 1977 bestseller Dalton wins the Academy Award. Of course, no one Trumbo is also his first for a feature-length was there to claim the Oscar, sending all of film. Extra credit goes to composer Theodore Hollywood into a buzz of gossip. Shapiro, set designs by Cindy Carr, meticulous Then there was Spartacus. period costumes by Daniel Orlandi and Mark One evening, a young Kirk Douglas arRicker’s overall production design. rived at Trumbo’s door to ask the screenwriter Ultimately, though, this is Cranston’s to work on a new film starring Douglas and movie. His martini-like Trumbo is stirring directed by a young filmmaker named Stanley (and never shaken). Kubrick. Douglas insisted Trumbo’s name be BOISE WEEKLY.COM


WINESIPPER TIME FOR TEMPRANILLO Tempranillo’s best known incarnation is as the base for the wines of Rioja and the Ribera del Duero. Its popularity is definitely on the rise, having found a home in vineyards across the globe. Tempranillo seems particularly well suited to the Northwest, and the results of this tasting appear to bear that out. Here are the panel’s top three: 2013 HOLLORAN TEMPRANILLO, $19 When it comes to red wine, Oregon’s Willamette Valley is synonymous with pinot noir, so this Tempranillo from the Eola-Amity Hills district is a surprise. Bright cherry aromas are colored by nuanced leather, black pepper and sage. The chocolate-covered cherry and raspberry flavors are supple, with a nice tannic grip on the finish. Touches of tobacco and leather add interest. 2011 POMUM TEMPRANILLO, $24 Co-owner and winemaker Javier Alfonso hails from Spain’s Ribera del Duero and brings an Old World sensibility to this Washington blend of 90 percent Tempranillo, 10 percent garnacha. Dark cherry dominates the nose with kisses of oak, licorice, cedar and cigar. On the palate, it’s creamy red fruit and plum, backed by silky tannins, smoky oak and leather. A touch of olive comes through on the finish. 2012 VOLVER SINGLE VINEYARD TEMPRANILLO, $27 One hundred percent Tempranillo, the grapes come from 50-plus-yearold vines situated in Spain’s south-central wine region of La Mancha. The sumptuous aromas include candied cherry, mocha, vanilla and graham cracker. It’s ripe and round in the mouth offering cherry, blueberry and plum flavors. The finish is soft, lingering nicely with subtle oak and coffee. —David Kirkpatrick BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015c19


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ARTS & CULTURE ANYTHING BUT A DRAG

Golden Girls Christmas Extravaganza hits the sweet (and saucy) spot AMY ATKINS

208.342.100ōņ¬ 1025 Main Street On the corner of main & 11th Tues–sat 9–6

One difficulty in re-staging a play is staying true to the original while adding something fresh and interesting. Alley Repertory Theater’s The Golden Girls Christmas Extravaganza, hilariously hits that sweet spot with its take on San Francisco’s beloved holiday drag show. The performance is comprised of excerpts (L-R) Sophia, Rose, Blanche and Dorothy win The Gold(en Girls) in Alley Repertory’s Christmas Extravaganza. from holiday episodes of The Golden Girls TV show, interspersed with musical numbers and funny ’80s-inspired commercial sketches. Jayne channeled the Southern belle, bringing the of the night’s biggest laughs. The girls are portrayed by Jodi Eichelberger For being so dim-witted, Rose is a surprisingly vivacious vixen to life and somehow managing at as Dorothy, Boise Weekly’s own Minerva Jayne times to be more Blanche than Blanche herself. complex character and, though Santos may still as Blanche, Steven Lanzet as Sophia and Steven Kudos to Nick Garcia for the between-scene be navigating those deep waters, he brought an Santos as Rose. sketch scripts and his turn as Stan (Dorothy’s authentic sweetness to the big-hearted ditz. In the Nov. 19 preview performance, Eichelex-husband), Taylor Hawker for seamlessly Part of what made berger was spot-on— GOLDEN GIRLS CHRISTMAS EXTRAVAGANZA integrating his role as emcee, Tess Worstell for her Sophia so engaging was his voice, demeanor accomplished piano accompaniment and Liberty the huge personality and long pauses were Fridays and Saturdays: Nov. 19-21, Nov. 27-28, Thursday-Saturday, Dec. 10-12. 8 p.m., $15contained in such a tiny Leeds, Kelly Lynae and Kenna Marks for their quintessential Dorothy, $20. Brunch performance and meet-and-greet spirited singing. package—Estelle Getty and he brought as Sunday, Dec. 13, 12:30 p.m., $25. Alley Repertory’s Golden Girls Christmas wasn’t even 5 feet tall. much humor to her Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St. Garden Extravaganza could easily have dragged the Lanzet isn’t nearly as deadpan delivery in this City, 208-424-8297, alleyrep.org characters into caricatures but instead of parody, small as Sophia but was version of Golden Girls the show lovingly and humorously pays homage just as feisty and funny; as Bea Arthur did in hers. Some of the funniest lines in the production and Minerva Jayne, as Blanche Devereaux, was in- to Blanche, Dorothy, Rose and Sophia in a laughout-loud blast from the pastiche. spired casting on the part of director Justin Ness. don’t belong to Eichelberger, yet he earned some

ARTS/NEWS THE MUSEUM OF BROKEN RELATIONSHIPS NEEDS LOCAL SOUVENIRS OF SADNESS It was in a moment of bittersweet serendipity that local screenwriter and author Samantha Silva saw Broken Relationships, an exhibition from The Museum of Broken Relationships exhibit in London in 2011. She was “in the throes” of ending a 23-year relationship. “It was difficult and painful and lots of people got hurt,” Silva said. “But it’s a universal experience, and that’s what [Broken Relationships] is all about. We’re all constructing narratives ... about our relationships but when relationships end, we construct a different narrative ... we can look back on it and see seeds of how it grew and its demise.” The “seeds,” though metaphorical, are often manifested in souvenirs of lost love, like those that fill The Museum of Broken Relationships, based in Zagreb, Croatia. Silva was so moved by the Broken Relationships exhibition, she helped organize its February 2016 visit to Boise, including securing a $5,000 grant from the Boise City Department of Arts and History. After their own relationship failed, founders Olinka Vistica and Drazen Grubisic created the museum, hoping to “offer a chance to overcome an emotional collapse through creation by contributing” a memento. Like the people who contribute them, each piece in the museum has a story: One item is an 20cNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015cBOISEweekly

old Nokia. “He gave me his cellphone so I couldn’t call him any more,” reads the description. When Broken Relationships opens at Ming Studios on First Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, it will include selections from the permanent collection—but those will make up only half of the display. The other 50 percent of the exhibition will be comprised of mementos donated locally, and those will become part of the museum’s permanent collection. Contributing to the Boise exhibit and collection is easy and anonymous: Fill out the submission form at brokenships.com, including the story of the item you want to donate. If your story is chosen, you’ll receive an email with instructions on when and where to take your memento. Submissions open Tuesday, Dec. 1 and will be open for about a month. Silva said it’s important to have submissions from a wide range of people, so is working to get the word out to refugee, senior, veteran, LGBT populations and more. From brokenships.com: “Although often colored by personal experience, local culture and history, the exhibits presented here form universal patterns offering us to discover them and feel the comfort they can bring.” —Amy Atkins BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015c21


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23 Charged (with) 24 Part of a mob 25 Threshold of major change 27 Heroic deeds 28 Eritrea’s capital 29 Small body of medical research 31 Jack in the box, once? 33 Attempt to debug? 34 Soundly defeat, informally 38 Arthur Conan Doyle title

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GEEKS WHO DRINK Grab your friends and join us for a pub quiz every Wednesday night from 8-10 p.m at Capitol Bar! 6100 W State St. or go to: thecapbar.com for more info. IDAHO FOODBANK’S EMPTY BOWLS Join us Thursday, November 27th, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Grove Plaza. Purchase a handpainted or artisan bowl for $10

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74 “That’s lovely!” 75 Rush to beat a deadline 80 Not aweather 81 Penultimate countdown word 82 Messenger ____ 83 One of the Golden Girls of 1980s-’90s TV 85 Nonexpert 86 Cubs’ home 87 Surrounded by 90 Danced to Xavier Cugat, say 92 “Supposing that’s true …” 93 Modern spelling? 94 Madame’s “mine” 97 Sites for R.N.s and M.D.s 98 Skedaddles 100 Prince’s inits. 10 1 Mark that’s hard to hit 104 Red Cross work 106 Where to find some ham 107 “____ in Calico” (jazz classic) 109 It makes flakes 110 Biceps exercise 113 Steamed dish that may be prepared in an olla 115 Rapper né Andre Young 117 British pool stick 122 Fort ____ National Monument 123 They’ll make you blush 125 Reindeer relative 126 “That makes sense now” 127 Early Mexicans 128 Up 129 Businesswoman/ philanthropist ____ Heinz Kerry 130 Auto identifiers 131 Launch dates

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39 Catchphrase from “Jerry Maguire” 42 Actress Larter of “Heroes” 43 A little light 45 Homer’s neighbor on “The Simpsons” 47 ____ facto 48 Winnie-the-Pooh greeting 50 Jet black 51 Like Nahuatl speakers 54 Puffs

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Ellen

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1 Sons of, in Hebrew 2 Drooping 3 Exasperated cry in the morning 4 “A Few Good Men” men 5 First option 6 Rented 7 Last stage of metamorphosis 8 Dogs 9 Rankles 10 Coke Zero, for one 11 “Every dog has his day” and others

12 Zimbabwe’s capital 13 It’s in the eye of the beholder 14 Formal occasions 15 Be unable to make further progress 16 Part of a Mario Brothers costume 17 Equity valuation stat 18 Prince Edward Isl. setting 19 Talks with one’s hands 26 Exact 30 Newfoundland or Labrador 32 Singer Tori 34 Weight-room figure 35 Board game popular throughout Africa 36 ____ Games 37 Puffed-grain cereal 40 Language that gave us “bungalow” and “guru” 41 Exact 44 Really enjoy oneself 46 Intimate apparel size bigger than C 49 Jesus on a diamond 52 Site of King Rudolf’s imprisonment, in fiction 53 Santa ____ 55 Sour-candy brand 57 Nile River spanner 59 Typical end of a professor’s address? 60 ____ Place (Butch and Sundance companion) 64 Six, in Seville 66 Berry of “Monster’s Ball” 67 Beneficial to 68 The best policy, supposedly 69 Exact 72 Winter-related commercial prefix 76 Hoffer or Holder 77 Green garnish 78 Two past Tue. 79 Exact

84 President Garfield’s middle name 87 Tire-pressure indicator 88 “Let’s Get It Started” rapper 89 “Rikki-Tikki-____” 91 Reebok competitor 92 “Positively Entertaining” network 93 Thingamajig 95 It might follow a showstopping performance, in modern lingo 96 Hot 99 Not black-and-white 102 Code of silence 103 Exact 105 Conehead 108 Caffè ____ 111 Sports-star-turned-model Gabrielle L A S T M A T T E L

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112 Author Dahl 114 They go around heads around Diamond Head 116 Russian legislature 118 Big name in microloans 119 Subject of the 2002 book “The Perfect Store” 120 Turns bad 121 Exact 124 Draft org. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

C O T S A C H E W H I R L S S T A R W A N S E E D T H E R O R I K A O R N E L E C L L W H I S I N E M E R Y C A T A A R W H R I S E E H I D L O G E E W H I S M I S S E N M

T U E S D A Y

I N D I A N A

C E C I L I A

K A H N

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L C D S I P S

A N S W E R S

M I D I C L O T S E R I S A S N I E S L W H E L E O N L O R L Y D O C T A W O R S W A S K S M U I N A R S U N B G U A N G A N E L L H E S

T H E E D G E S T O D G E S E R D O S

Y E S S I R A C W O E R I N R I N S S E U A L L T E D I U T P O

O P E N S F O R

G E T O U T O F M Y W H E Y

T A M I A M I S E I R N I R A I L

R O O T L E T

E N N E A D S

S P L I C E

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T R A N C E

S A N G E R

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B OISE W E E KLY OFFICE HOURS

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AUTOMOTIVE

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BW AUTOMOTIVE

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS VW’s 1969 & 1973 Come in & take a look! Harris Auto Sales 573-2534

Chevy 2009 Alero LT Low miles, buy here pay here. Harris Auto Sales. 573-2534

CAREERS These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055 Toyota 2004 Tundra Matching canopy, V6, AT, nice truck! $5,950. Harris Auto Sales 573-2534.

Honda 2005 Accord Every option – absolutely loaded! Sunroof, leather. Sale! $5,650. Harris Auto Sales. 573-2534.

FAX (208) 342-4733

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Volvo 1998 V70 AWD $3,950. Harris Auto Sales 573-2534.

Chevy 2005 Avalanche Low miles. Very, Very nice! Sale! $10,860. Harris Auto Sales. 573-2534.

BELLE: I’m a soft sweetheart who loves being brushed and petted—let me show you.

GLORIA: I’m demure, petite, quiet, polite, and loyal. In short: a wonderful friend for you.

MINERVA: I’m a purr-ific, fun and verbose little sweetie. Let’s chit-chat and play.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508 Chevy 2008 Cargo Van Duramax diesel, w/bins, Allison Trans, very rare. Sale! $13,740. Harris Auto Sales 573-2534.

We Buy Cars! Call us today! We pay cash! Harris Auto Sales 573-2534

Ford 2002 Explorer Loaded, leather, 3rd seat. Sale! $5,250. Harris Auto Sales. 5732534.

Volvo 2001 S80 Leather, Navigation, runs & drives great! Sale! $2,950. In house fin. avail. Harris Auto Sales. 573-2534.

We Find Cars! Looking for a specific make & model? We can help! Harris Auto Sales 573-253

Pontiac 2000 Montana Van Low, low miles. New tires, very nice! $3,450. Harris Auto Sales 573-2534.

Mazda 1995 Protégé Clean little car! Runs & drives great! $1,950. Harris Auto Sales 573-2534.

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Dodge 2001 Dakota Crew Cab SLT Matching canopy, 4WD, low miles $5,950. Harris Auto Sales 573-2534.

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. CRICKET: 8-month-old spayed female shepherd mix. Silly, goofy, has a lot of energy. Knows basic commands, enthusiastic for treats. (Kennel 310– #30129049)

AGNES: 4-year-old spayed female bloodhound. Needs someone who understands hounds’ independence. Appears crate-trained. (Kennel 314 – #30075882)

MOOSE: 7-year-old German short-hair pointer mix. Easy to love. Quiet but described as playful. Not OK with cats or small dogs. Needs a diet. (Kennel 323 – #30192513)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT PEACHES: 2 ½-year-old spayed female domestic Needs to be only pet in home. Sweet, enjoys attention but also ready to explore her surroundings. (Kennel 5 – #29755459)

DOVE: 5-year-old female domestic shorthair. Needs to warm up to people. Best with older children. Will need to spend the night to be spayed. (Kennel 106 – #30080880)

RONNIE: 5-year-old Maine Coon mix. Nervous but sweet. Stray, has been given up by two families. Okay with other cats. (PetSmart Adoption Center – #30096656)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015 c23


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Simply Cats Adoption Center sells low cost spay/neuter vouchers? For more information, call 208343-7177. LIBRA NEEDS A NEW HOME! I have a 3 year old neutered cat who needs a new home. He is up to date on all his shots, litterboxed trained and very affectionate. Libra would do best as

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CRISIS

LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV 15-506, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CANYON, Crestwood Neighborhood Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Joleena Jennifer (Wallace) Spalding, Defendant. TO: JOLEENA JENNIFER (WALLACE) SPALDING You have been sued by Crestwood Neighborhood Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Third Judicial District in and for Canyon County, Idaho, Case No. CV 15-506. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons,

the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Canyon County Courthouse, 1115 Albany, Caldwell, Idaho 83605 Telephone: (208) 4547300 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Brindee L. Probst-Collins of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 24 day of June, 2015. CLERK, DEPUTY CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB November 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2015. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 1422341, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA,

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “We are torn between nostalgia for the familiar and an urge for the foreign and strange,” wrote novelist Carson McCullers. “As often as not, we are homesick most for the places we have never known.” I’m guessing these days you’re feeling that kind of homesickness, Aries. The people and places that usually comfort you don’t have their customary power. The experiences you typically seek out to strengthen your stability just aren’t having that effect. The proper response, in my opinion, is to go in quest of exotic and experimental stimuli. In ways you may not yet be able to imagine, they can provide the grounding you need. They will steady your nerves and bolster your courage. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Pekingese is a breed of dog that has been around for more than 2,000 years. In ancient China, it was beloved by Buddhist monks and the families of emperors. Here’s the legend of its origin: A tiny marmoset and huge lion fell in love with each other, but the contrast in their sizes made union impossible. Then the gods intervened, using magic to make them the same size. Out of the creatures’ consummated passion, the first Pekingese was born. I think this myth can serve as inspiration for you, Taurus. Amazingly, you may soon find a way to blend and even synergize two elements that

are ostensibly quite different. Who knows? You may even get some divine help.

wonder if you should free yourself from a pretty or sentimental constriction that you have outgrown? If so, get help.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Author Virginia Woolf wrote this message to a dear ally: “I sincerely hope I’ll never fathom you. You’re mystical, serene, intriguing; you enclose such charm within you. The luster of your presence bewitches me ... the whole thing is splendid and voluptuous and absurd.” I hope you will have good reason to whisper sweet things like that in the coming weeks, Gemini. You’re in the Season of Togetherness, which is a favorable time to seek and cultivate interesting kinds of intimacy. If there is no one to whom you can sincerely deliver a memo like Woolf’s, search for such a person.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Most human beings have an almost infinite capacity for taking things for granted,” wrote Leo author Aldous Huxley. That’s the bad news. The good news is in the coming weeks you are less likely to take things for granted than you have been in a long time. Happily, it’s not because your familiar pleasures and sources of stability are in jeopardy. Rather, it’s because you have become more deeply connected to the core of your life energy. You have a vivid appreciation for what sustains you. Your assignment: Be alert for the eternal as it wells up out of the mundane.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Some people are so attached to wearing a favorite ring on one of their fingers that they never take it off. They love the beauty and endearment it evokes. In rare cases, years go by and their ring finger grows thicker. Blood flow is constricted. Discomfort sets in and they can’t remove their precious jewelry with the lubrication provided by a little olive oil or soap and water. They need the assistance of a jeweler who uses a small saw and a protective sheath to cut away the ring. I suspect this may be an apt metaphor for a certain situation in your life, Cancerian. Is it? Do you

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In their quest to collect nectar, honeybees are attuned to the importance of proper timing. Even if flowering plants are abundant, the quality and quantity of the nectar that’s available vary with the weather, season and hour of the day. For example, dandelions may offer their peak blessings at 9 a.m., cornflowers in late morning and clover in mid-afternoon. I urge you to be equally sensitive to the sources where you can obtain nourishment, Virgo. Arrange your schedule so you consistently seek to gather what you need at the right time and place.

24cNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015 cBOISEweekly

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Are you willing to dedicate yourself fully to a game whose rules are constantly mutating? Are you resourceful enough to keep playing at a high level even if some of the other players don’t have as much integrity and commitment as you? Do you have confidence in your ability to detect and adjust to ever-shifting alliances? Will the game still engage your interest if you discover that the rewards are different from what you thought they were? If you can answer yes to these questions, by all means jump all the way into the complicated fun! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I suspect your body has been unusually healthy and vigorous lately. Is that true? If so, figure out why. Have you been taking better care of yourself? Have there been lucky accidents or serendipitous innovations on which you’ve been capitalizing? Make these new trends a permanent part of your routine. Now I’ll make a similar observation about your psychological well-being. It also seems to have been extra strong recently. Why? Has your attitude improved in such a way as to generate more positive emotions? Have there been fluky breakthroughs that unleashed unexpected surges of hope and good cheer? Make these new trends a permanent part of your routine.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): From the dawn of civilization until 1995, humans cataloged about 900 comets in our solar system. Since then, we have expanded that tally by more than 3,000. Most of the recent discoveries have been made not by professional astronomers, but by laypersons, including two 13-year-olds. They have used the Internet to access images from the SOHO satellite placed in orbit by NASA and the European Space Agency. After analyzing the astrological omens, I expect you Sagittarians to enjoy a similar run of amateur success. So trust your rookie instincts. Feed your innocent curiosity. Ride your raw enthusiasm. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Whether or not you are literally a student enrolled in school, I suspect you will soon be given a final exam. It may not happen in a classroom or require you to write responses to questions. The exam will more likely be administered by life in the course of your daily challenges. The material you’ll be tested on will mostly include the lessons you have been studying since your last birthday. There will also be at least one section that deals with a subject you’ve been wrestling with since early in your life—maybe even a riddle from before you were born. Since you have free will, Capricorn, you can refuse to take the exam. I hope you won’t. The more enthusiastic

you are about accepting its challenge, the more likely it is that you’ll do well. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): For $70,000 per night, you can rent the entire country of Liechtenstein for your big party. The price includes the right to rename the streets while you’re there. You can also create a temporary currency with a likeness of you on the bills, have a giant rendition of your favorite image carved into the snow on a mountainside, and preside over a festive medieval-style parade. Given your current astrological omens, I suggest you consider the possibility. If that’s too extravagant, I hope you will at least gather your legion of best friends for the Blowout Bash of the Decade. It’s time, in my opinion, to explore the mysteries of vivid and vigorous conviviality. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you available to benefit from a thunderbolt healing? Would you consider wading into a maelstrom if you knew it was a breakthrough in disguise? Do you have enough faith to harvest an epiphany that begins as an uproar? Weirdly lucky phenomena like these are on tap if you have the courage to ask for overdue transformations. Your blind spots and sore places are being targeted by life’s fierce tenderness. All you have to do is say, “Yes, I’m ready.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


Saddlebrook Subdivision Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Daniel E. MacLellan, Defendant. TO: DANIEL E. MACLELLAN You have been sued by Saddlebrook Subdivision Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 1422341. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Brindee L. Probst-Collins of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 24 day of July, 2015. CHRISTOPHER D RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB November 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2015. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 1406647, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Eagle Pointe Homeowners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Dale Woodson and Claudine L Woodson, Defendant. TO: Dale Woodson and Claudine

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Woodson You have been sued by Eagle Pointe Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 1406647. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Sarah M. Anderson of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 16 day of October, 2015. CHRISTOPHER D RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB November 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA Case No. CV NC 1510112 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Stephanie Leslie Schmid, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Stephanie Amore McCall. The reason for the change in name is: divorcepersonal. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on DEC 22, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the

name change. Date: OCT 29, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB November 11, 18, 25 and December 2, 2015. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 15 07134, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Woodbridge Community Homeowners’ Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. The Larry D. & V. Darlene Borchers Trust, any current Trustee(s) and Larry D. Borchers, Defendants. TO: THE LARRY D. & V. DARLENE BORCHERS TRUST, ANY CURRENT TRUSTEE(S) AND LARRY D. BORCHERS, TRUSTEE You have been sued by The Woodbridge Community Homeowners Association, Inc., the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 15 07134. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the case number, and paid any required filing fee to: Clerk of the Court, Ada County Courthouse, 200 W Front St, Boise, Idaho 83702 Telephone: (208) 2876900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste. 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-3921400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you

wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED this 28 day of October, 2015. CHRISTOPHER D RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT PUB November 25 and December 02, 09 16, 2015.

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BRYCE REDDINGER! Happy Birthday Bryce (Wednesday the 24th). Congrats on the house. You’re a great guy- lets hang out soon!

COMMUNITY BW KISSES HAPPY BIRTHDAY LISA CLARK! You can always tell when two people are best friends because they are having way more fun than it makes sense for them to be having. I adore you. Happy Birthday!

Happy Birthday to MY great Dane! I love you. Xoxo M.

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BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015 c25


PAGE BREAK MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

#boiseweeklypic

FIND NYT VR

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

DEAR MINERVA, I have a problem. I’ve been dating this guy who treats me like gold. He has a great job, a great personality and he is so attentive to me. I love being around him. We recently started having sex and while I enjoy being with him, he doesn’t measure up. His penis is small, and I need something more. I can’t seem to get over his manhood. Am I bad person? —Size Queen

DEAR SIZE QUEEN, This question does pop up, so to speak, from time to time. Are you a bad person for desiring more from him than he can provide physically? Not necessarily. Does it smell of shallowness? Yes. He obviously cannot control the size of his penis. What can he control? His personality, his ability to provide and the way he treats you. From what you’ve said about him, he sounds like a solid guy. Trust me, he is aware and probably worried every moment that he doesn’t satisfy you. The heart—and whatever other organs—want what they want. That alone does not make you a bad person. However, we live in a world where sexual satisfaction is only a trip to the sex shop away. Get creative. If you still can’t deal with the reality of his endowment, then put him back on the market. He deserves someone who sees his manhood is not based on his penis but on the other qualities he has nurtured.

Approximately 1.2 million Americans woke up Nov. 7 to discover a small cardboard box had been delivered atop their Sunday New York Times. It was the size and shape of a promotional box of breakfast cereal or laundry detergent. It was, however, a revelation of how Americans will probably be accessing journalism in the near future. The box, designed with the help of Google and General Electric, is The Times’ new virtual reality nytimes.com/newsgraphviewer that immerses the newsics/2015/nytvr papers’ readers into 21st century storytelling. The Times VR viewer requires the NYT VR app, available for iPhones and Android devices. To date, The Times has included stories about children driven from their homes by war and persecution, and a short film about the paper’s “Walking New York” magazine cover story. Virtual reality is not new, but The Times’ cheap, mass produced and distributed version is a game-changer for discerning consumers of news and superb storytelling. —George Prentice

QUOTABLE “I c annot think of a more potent recruitment tool for ISIL than some of the rhetoric that’s been coming out of here during the cour se of this debate.”

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

250,000

12 MILLION

Estimated number of Syrians who have died as a result of violence in their home country since 2011.

Estimated number of Syrians who have fled their homes as a result of violence, half of them children.

(CNN)

(World Vision)

—PRESIDENT BAR ACK OBAMA , RESP ONDING TO CALLS BY REPUBLICAN CONGRES SIONAL LE ADERS TO CLOSE THE UNITED STATES’ BORDERS TO SYRIAN REFUGEES .

2 MILLION3 MILLION Number of Syrian children who are not attending school, reversing 10 years of progress in education. (World Vision/United Nations)

26cNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015 cBOISEweekly

Taken by instagram user chuck334455.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT “Do you agree with Gov. Otter that the U.S. should halt its refugee resettlement program pending review?”

Yes: 4.17% No: 91.67% I don’t know: 4.17% Disclaimer: This online poll is not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

3,200

2,000

35

20

31

Estimated number of Syrians who have died attempting sea crossings into Europe this year.

Approximate number of Syrians who have been granted asylum in the United States, set to increase to 10,000 during 2016.

Number of Syrian refugees who have been admitted to Idaho since May 2015.

Number of children among the Syrian refugees resettled in Idaho since May 2015.

(Idaho Reports)

(Idaho Reports)

Number of U.S. governors who have declared opposition to admitting Syrian refugees into their states, including Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter.

(World Vision)

(Idaho State Journal)

(CNN)

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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MUSIC

B OISE W E E KLY EAT HERE

SERVICES

SERVICES

Life’s Kitchen is dedicated to transforming the lives of young adults by building self-sufficiency and independence through comprehensive food service and life skills training, placement in the food service industry, and continuing education.

November Menu

Free Youth Job Training!

EVENTS

Ham Burger • $9 Carnitas Street Tacos • $8 Smokin’ Gouda Grilled Cheese • $7.50 Pork Gyro • $9 Harvest Salad • $9 BLTA • $8 Side Salad • $2.50 Add Carnitas • $2.50

Do you know a 16-20 year old who wants job training in the culinary arts? Check out our website for more info.

The Café is open T-F, from 11am-1pm. Menu can be found at www.lifeskitchen.org or 208.331.0199.

PETS SHOP HERE Comfort of Home Christmas Bazaar

DECEMBER 5TH • BOISE ELK’S LODGE• 10AM-6PM • 6608 W. FAIRVIEW AVE., BOISE

SANTA ON SITE FROM 10AM-NOON GREAT VARIETY OF SHOPPING AVAILABLE TO COMPLETE YOUR HOLIDAY LISTS.

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Eugene Ballet’s E B N Nutcracker - December 1st

TICKETS:

The world’s most beloved ballet set to Tchaikovsky’s memorable score.

caldwellfinearts.org or (208) 459-5275

Nutcracker Jr. - December 2nd

Performances at Jewett Auditorium/ College of Idaho Parking at 20th & Filmore.)

All the wonder of the Nutcracker... in a smaller shell. Perfect for preschoolers.

Clara’s Tea Party - December 1st & 2nd A red-carpet entrance, visits by the Nutcracker dancers, crafts, and treats, make this the party of the year. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweeklycNOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 1, 2015 c27


Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 23  

Trumbo: Shinning a (leading) light on the blacklist and the '50s Red Scare in Hollywood

Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 23  

Trumbo: Shinning a (leading) light on the blacklist and the '50s Red Scare in Hollywood