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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

J U LY 2 9 – AU G U S T 4 , 2 0 1 5

VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 0 6

“The warrant said one thing, but these people were totally innocent in the whole thing.”

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Trial and Error

Attorneys make closing arguments in prison records tampering case

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Ongi Ettori

Be a Jaialdi hero with our A-to-Z guide of all things Basque

INSIDE

CIT YDESK 7

Annual Manual A year’s worth of happenings from Canyon County to Sun Valley FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com Associate Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Tara Morgan, John Rember Interns: Patty Bowen, Micah Drew, Shannon Heller, Justin Kirkham, Hannah Loveless, Emily Peters, Keleah Pinto, Sarah Rosin Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com Buzz Valutis, buzz@boiseweekly.com Public Relations Intern: Stacy Marston Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2015 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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EDITOR’S NOTE KAIXO AND ONGI ETORRI (HELLO AND WELCOME) That big “B” on Table Rock stands for “Boise,” but at least once every five years it could (and maybe should) just as easily mean “Basque.” The Basque community has given much to the City of Trees— Basque history and culture are intimately linked with Boise’s own past, present and future, and are valued, even defining, elements of life in the Treasure Valley. As if that wasn’t enough, every five years, we get to experience Basque culture on a grand scale: Welcome to Jaialdi. Jaialdi is a weeklong celebration of all things Euskadi, drawing visitors from across the United States and as far as the home cities of Spanish and French Basque Country. In keeping with the importance of Boise’s Basque heritage, this week’s Boise Weekly gives over a big chunk of space to Jaialdi-related coverage. On Page 10, resident BW Basque expert Tara Morgan presents an A-to-Z guide to Jaialdi, running through 26 words, phrases, foods and cultural items intrinsic to Europe’s “mystery people.” We’ve also included a special pull out calendar on Pages 16 and 17 that profiles only Jaialdi happenings. On Page 21, BW Staff Writer Harrison Berry checks in with Basque artist Judas Arrieta, whose work is currently showing at Ming Studios. Arrieta’s unique style explores Western cultural themes through the eyes of an international traveler, asking what it means to identify with a particular nationality. Beyond the Basque-ness of our Jaialdi offerings, be sure to check out BW News Editor George Prentice’s update on the federal court case surrounding alleged records tampering and prisoner mistreatment within the Idaho Department of Correction. Finally—and how’s this for burying the lead—inside this week’s edition, you’ll find our Annual Manual, which has more than 50 glossy pages filled with an entire year’s worth of events from Canyon County to McCall, and Boise to Sun Valley. It’s going to be a crazy week filled with fine food, great music and more kalimotxos than we’ll admit to drinking, so here’s to Jaialdi. On egin! —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Mary Meyer TITLE: “Leaf Form 9” MEDIUM: hand-cut paper, pigment, stitching on panel ARTIST STATEMENT: Inspired by the study of natural form and botanical illustration, artist Mary Meyer explores the shapes, patterns and symmetries that celebrate the beauty and connectedness of all living things. Her work is available at Gallery Five18 and marymeyerstudio.com.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

UNHAPPY CAMPERS T WO MOTORCYCLE CLUB S GOT TO G E TH E R AT A C A M P G RO U N D NE AR POCATELLO ON JULY 25, BUT NOT E VERYONE WAS A HAPPY CAMPER. TENSIONS RO SE BE T WEEN THE GROUP S TO THE POINT THAT THE BANNOCK COUNT Y SHERIFF’S OFFICE ROLLED OUT AN ARMORED VEHICLE. GE T THE DE TAILS ON NE WS/CIT YDESK.

FISH FEARS Warm water conditions in the Columbia and Snake rivers are fueling a crisis among sockeye salmon populations, and state wildlife officials are scrambling to save the fish. More on News/Citydesk.

20 TO LIFE Alfredo Mendoza will serve 20 years to life in prison for the murder of his girlfriend, Selena Thomas, who was beaten to death and buried in a Canyon County cornfield. More on News/Citydesk.

OVERSEER IN Natalie Camacho Mendoza has taken the reins as Boise’s part-time civilian police overseer—two years after former full-time Ombudsman Pierce Murphy left. Details on News/Citydesk.

OPINION

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OPINION INFORNOGRAPHY

Where all the information’s dirty, all the time BILL COPE Here’s something to think about: Two Internets. One for you and me and all the non-scummy, non-infantile, non-obsessive, non-poisonous, non-lunatic, non-creepy-borderline-psycho-thugconspiratorial-dunce-douche-dirtbag-dogturddemented somewhat-normal citizens of the world. And the other one for... them. But let’s back up and see how I got here, OK? Contrary to what you may think, I do do research. Not all the time. As often as not, I write on faith that I know what I’m talking about; that I don’t need no steenking confirmation of what I just said. That’s the difference between me and a real reporter. Real reporters try to make sure they tell you accurately what is happening; I’m just telling you accurately what I think is happening. Still, I don’t want to sound like an idiot, so if there is any question in my mind that something I’m writing is right, I pick up a dictionary, perhaps the one-volume encyclopedia I keep next to the computer, or, if either of those prove inadequate, I go to the Internet. Trouble is, I don’t trust it. Anytime I’m checking something on the Internet, it feels like I’m calling up my crazy cousin Carl—who lives in a camper way out in the desert because he suspects street sweeper operators and mailmen are spying on him—and asking him what he knows about pruning tomatoes. However, if I have to find something about... say... Beyoncé... or al Qaeda... or Spongebob Squarepants... I know it isn’t going to be found in my encyclopedia—which was printed in 1983— or my dictionary—which I bought as a freshman in college. Then it’s to the Internet I go. (I could get myself a more current encyclopedia, but any reference book that would include Beyoncé, Squarepants and al Qaeda, as well as anything I might want to know about... say... the chronology of Egyptian pharaohs, a summary of the 30 Years War and the history of space exploration, it would likely no longer be something I could “pick up.”) Normally, when I’m doing research on the Internet, I try to keep it to small, precise things like confirming the spelling of a name. I also use the Internet to verify dates, quotes, geography, conversion tables, time lines... stuff I can’t imagine even Wikipedia screwing up. But on occasion, I am forced to dig a little deeper. For instance, a couple of weeks ago, I had to find some information concerning most of the infamous mass shootings that have occurred in recent years, going back to Columbine. My server... search engine... home page... whatever the hell it is... offers a feature that tries to anticipate what I’m looking for by completing a word BOISE WEEKLY.COM

or phrase extrapolated from a few letters. Like, if I type in “Bill” a list will appear that will include “Bill Cosby,” “Bill O’Reilly,” “Bill Clinton,” “Bill Gates,” “Bill of Rights,” etc. (This feature probably has a name, but I don’t care enough what it is to get on the Internet and find out.) Anyway, with every mass shooting I typed in, there popped up the qualifier “hoax.” “Sandy Hook shooting hoax,” “Aurora shooting hoax,” “Fort Hood shooting hoax,” on and on, and always near the top of the list. Of course, my mistake was foolishly venturing down these twisted paths, but I was curious: How could every one of them, from—Columbine to Charleston—be a hoax? Or, better question: How could there be human beings out there claiming every one of them— from Columbine to Charleston—is a hoax? I followed the links, and the farther I went, the ickier it got. It’s like crawling into some gooey hole from a horror flick, a hive colony of mutant earwig thought-pukers, sharing a common—if small—brain. Feeding off one another. Transmitting anti-truth globules from one rectum to the next. Swarming around the most paranoid hysteria and imagined discrepancies, leaving their corrosive slime on every subject they touch. Ugh! Of course, it goes far beyond laughable conspiracy theories about mass shootings. Type in “Obama 666”—or “Obama” and anything else even vaguely related to the Bible—and see what you get. The point is, I don’t want to be on the same Internet as those people. The “Stormfront” people. The gun-humping people and the “martial law is around the corner” people. The “Obama is the Antichrist” and “Hillary is a lesbian” people. I wouldn’t invite people like that to my home, would I? I wouldn’t go to bars they hang out in or conferences they attend. I wouldn’t be seen dead in any church they belong to or clubs they are members of. These are unacceptable people in every reality but the virtual, so why do I—and you and the somewhat normal citizens of the world— have to share the Internet with them? Would it be so unreasonable to make them go start their own Internet, their own YouTube where they can expose their lunacy to each other, their own links that lead nowhere but to others of their sort?... an entirely different network unconnected in any way from the one we use? You know, so that there could never be any leakage or backflow or contamination from the toxic sewage their minds produce? It is something to think about, isn’t it? BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 5


OPINION A SHORT MEDITATION On long beach books JOHN REMBER Years ago, at a beach hotel in Thailand, I found a tattered but complete copy of Stephen King’s The Stand, all 1,500 or so pages of it. I hadn’t read much Stephen King because my career has taken me toward literary rather than genre fiction, but I had admired his short stories and been impressed by an article he published in The New Yorker about jogging along a country road and getting hit by a careless driver. From reviews, I knew that The Stand was about a viral bio-weapon that kills most of the people on the planet. I also knew— from having read Dostoevsky on other beaches— that you could get through 1,500 pages in two or three days if you had someone bringing you the occasional sandwich and beer and you weren’t afraid of sunburn or bedsores. I’ve also been interested in apocalyptic literature since Sunday school. My more recent researches into our current end-of-days have convinced me that the world is likely to end not with a nuclear bang or Gideon’s Trumpet but with the release of existing stocks of weaponized smallpox. I opened The Stand. At first I was amazed at King’s ability to set scenes and bring characters into this world. He’s one of the best technicians I’ve ever read. And if wealth could be measured in words, he’d be the richest human on the planet. Then two things happened: 1) The Stand’s deepening process, which occurs naturally when you let characters move from one scene into the one they choose next, stopped cold. 2) A Satan figure was introduced as the bad guy, and the novel became a cosmic struggle between supernatural good and evil. I wasn’t happy when Satan showed up. I figured bio-weapons loose in the world were enough evil for 1,500 pages without bringing the supernatural into it. I also sensed that King’s characters were being treated as marionettes in an already plotted puppet show. I quit reading at 500 pages. Technical skill will take you only so far with a reader who sees a Danish porn magazine on the next beach chair, even if he doesn’t understand Danish. Evil is one of those topics that interests me a bunch, but I lost interest in King’s depiction of evil as rotting flesh and bones and gibbering insanity and dark tunnels full of dead people who clutch at your ankles as you run toward daylight. Conventional depictions of horror can be a distraction from evil rather than evil itself. A splatter movie doesn’t depict anything near as bad as the emptiness of being stuck in a cubicle for your working life, with a mortgage, unappreciative kids, a car that needs repair and a boss who is monitoring the keystrokes on your computer. In the end, evil lies more in carelessness or 6 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

indifference toward others’ lives than in people or things crossing over from the Dark Side. True horror lies in the mundane, as Hanna Arendt pointed out in Eichmann in Jerusalem. I know that it’s unfair to judge a writer by his early work. I know that all of my books together will never sell as many copies as The Stand. I know I will never have the stamina to write a 1,500-page book. For better or worse, I like following my characters down the shadowed stairways that lead to messy psychological truths. If you tiptoe along even a gentle psychological downslope when you write, you’ll find an ending—however untidy— long before the 500-page mark. I’ve seen reviews of Stephen King’s later work that predict in 500 years he’ll be the equivalent of our Shakespeare, and that scholars will mine his books for insight into the human psyche in the 20th and 21st centuries. Nobody’s said that about my work. I doubt anybody ever will. But I disagree with the critics, and not just for craven personal reasons. People 500 years hence, if they still exist and if they can still read and write, will look at the humans of our era and know that true horror doesn’t require the supernatural. All it takes are human beings shut away from their own best impulses, full of fear and willing to magnify their own sufferings to the point where they cannot see or understand the suffering of others. Writers need to magnify their own best impulses and downplay their own suffering to better grasp what’s real. Ironically, many of my writing students—and even some of my writing teachers—have been drawn to writing because of a core of narcissistic self-pity. I once offended a room of Hemingway scholars by pointing out that the Hemingway Hero, by refusing to whine about his misfortunes, is still producing a loud, cicada-like whine about his misfortunes. He has a wound he will not allow to heal, because if it healed he would have to get on with life. I concluded that with his final act, Hemingway rendered himself into a Hemingway Hero. It was a statement that did not go over well. It’s the season for beach books, which famously ignore psychological depth. But it’s also a season where evil remains very much alive in the world, and where better to understand it than on warm, tree-shadowed sand, under a blue sky, with margaritas in the thermos and the peaks of the Sawtooths rearing up at the far end of Redfish Lake. I’ll start by re-reading The Possessed. Adapted from John Rember’s blog MFA in a Box, mfainabox.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


HARRISON BERRY

ADAM RO S E NLUND

SOMEBODY’S LYING

NEWS

CITYDESK

And it’s up to ‘King David’ to sort out the truth GEORGE PRENTICE

In a much-anticipated federal court ruling concerning allegations of a systemic cover-up by the Idaho Department of Correction, nothing short of the department’s integrity is at stake. Ultimately, the judge needs to determine whether the words of Fyodor Dostoevsky are true—that a society is to be judged by how it treats its prisoners or, at least, its weakest members. The charges against IDOC include the alteration and/or destruction of medical records; the movement of inmates out of the prison’s mental health unit and into the general population, part of a game called “musical jail cells” meant to sidestep a yearslong investigation into health care at the Idaho State Correctional Institution; and the inappropriate use of so-called “dry cells” labeled “barbaric” by a court-appointed investigator. The allegations were chronicled by Boise Weekly in a series of reports earlier this month, but representatives from the Idaho attorney general’s office told the federal judge that they would have preferred if the matter had not been made public. “We don’t know how this case has ended up in the newspaper,” said Deputy Attorney General Colleen Zahn in her closing argument following two marathon court sessions July 22-23. “But it has made defending this case very difficult for us.” According to a number of witnesses, the true difficulty was fear of retaliation for going public with frustration—and even anger—at a system that they said included prisoner treatment plans being altered by a supervisor who hadn’t even seen the inmates and, in some cases, entire portions of medical records and logs altered or destroyed. Following initial reports on the prison scandal, a steady stream of clinicians, inmates and former IDOC officials continued to come forward to corroborate the claims, including one former IDOC business analyst who told BW that the “squelching of information remains alive and well,” and that “people with firsthand knowledge are moving beyond fear to the truth.” In spite of veteran clinicians recounting the same story as witnesses in the court hearing, IDOC officials insisted that the claims weren’t true. The Idaho attorney general’s office, acting as defense counsel for IDOC, said the allegations were coming from “unhappy former employees” who saw things “through a different lens.” Following two days of testimony, even a casual observer could conclude that somebody was lying. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

This door replaced another that was kicked in during what police admit was a raid gone bad.

RAID GONE WRONG

THE JUDGE U.S. District Court Judge David Carter is the definition of a no-nonsense jurist. Minutes before gaveling into session July 22, Carter stood in front of courtroom No. 1 at the U.S. Courthouse in Boise, hands on his hips, and set the pace for the next 48 hours. “When I call for a piece of evidence, I want it up here in a nanosecond,” said Carter, a decorated U.S. Marine Corps veteran of the Vietnam War. While serving as a supervising judge in California’s Orange County Superior Court, Carter was dubbed “King David” for his direct style. Though California is his home base, Carter also tries cases in the U.S. District Court of Idaho, where he is teamed with U.S. District Court Chief Justice B. Lynn Winmill in the decadeslong Balla vs. Idaho case, alleging poor medical service and overcrowding in Idaho prisons. That still-open case triggered a 2011 court order of a so-called “special master” to conduct forensic audits of Idaho prisons, with particular focus on mental health care. The plaintiffs in the ongoing class-action suit returned to the U.S. Courthouse in Boise after new allegations began to surface accusing IDOC of “tainting” the special master probe. Whether or not attorney Elijah Watkins, representing the plaintiffs, was aware of Carter’s nickname, he argued that IDOC’s alleged attempt to manipulate

the special master investigation was, “An attack on the king’s man; and that is an attack on the king.”

SHELL WAMBLE-FISHER Perhaps no name was repeated more often through the course of the two-day federal court hearing than Shell Wamble-Fisher, a former IDOC clinical supervisor and deputy warden who is slated to retire from IDOC, effective Aug. 1. Wamble-Fisher conceded on the witness stand that the pending court proceedings had contributed to stress that led to her early retirement. When Wamble-Fisher walked into the courtroom her small stature seemed at odds with the monumental accusations lodged against her, including a propensity to override clinicians’ treatment plans, alteration of medical records and logs, harassment and intimidation, and dishonesty in the face of the special master investigation. Five of the eight clinicians working under her lodged a detailed complaint with the warden of the Idaho State Correctional Institution, providing what the warden later described as documented incidences of inappropriate behavior that clinicians said mounted to a “crisis point” at the prison. “But please take note of which particular witness is missing from the defense’s argument: The one clinician who can refute 8 what the other clinicians said about Ms. Wamble-Fisher. But the fact is, that witness

Apartment No. 104 is the only unit at the Parkhill apartment complex that has a white front door. It is brand new, installed after the old one—which was brown—was kicked down by Boise police in a predawn raid July 16. Unfortunately, it was the wrong apartment. Since May, the Boise Police Department had investigated a series of allegations about suspected drug dealing and thefts near the complex, with an uptick in complaints in early July. Investigators said they identified a suspect and alleged associates with criminal histories including drugs, firearms and violence toward law enforcement operating out of one of the apartments. In the early morning hours of July 16, officers went to No. 104, tore the front door from its hinges, detonated a flashbang grenade in the entryway and placed two dazed residents in handcuffs. “I just heard the bomb and fell out of bed,” said retiree and next-door neighbor, Mary Beasock, adding that she witnessed SWAT officers armed with semi-automatic weapons escort the cuffed residents past her window. Witnesses said it took police about 20 minutes to realize they’d stormed the wrong apartment. “The warrant said one thing, but these people were totally innocent in the whole thing,” Beasock said. Police released the tenants and made arrangements to pay for any property damage— hence the apartment’s new, white door—and offered to put up the rattled occupants in a hotel for the night. Meanwhile, an internal BPD investigation has begun to determine why officers entered the wrong apartment in the first place. Parkhill resi8 dents, meanwhile, still have questions about what might happen next. BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 7


CITYDESK

HARRISON BERRY

NEWS

Mary Beasock: “I just heard the bomb and fell out of bed.”

Beasock said the source of the initial allegations of drug dealing were 7 linked to a unit where occupants had hoarded scrap material, but it had spread to a parking lot. She also said she believed the people who lived in the unit were responsible for thefts from apartment complex mailboxes. Boise Weekly contacted the tenants in that unit, as well as those in the unit raided by police, but they declined to comment for the record. Beasock said police visits to the complex were frequent, and the July 16 raid is only the latest incident that makes her want to move away from the neighborhood. “I’ve only been here since January and it’s been an experience,” Beasock said. According to BPD Public Information Officer Lynn Hightower, the investigation into the botched raid is being reviewed by a supervisor. It will then be shifted to the BPD Office of Internal Affairs and will ultimately reach the desk of Boise Police Chief Bill Bones. “Certainly there is great interest in preventing something like this from happening again,” Hightower wrote in an email. The results of the investigation will also end up on the desk of Natalia Camacho Mendoza, who was recently appointed by Mayor Dave Bieter to serve as director of the Office of Police Oversight. According to OPO staffer Jesus Jara, the oversight investigation could “piggyback” on the Office of Internal Affairs report, or, in the event that a citizen complains to the office, a separate investigation could be launched. To date, Jara told BW that no citizen complaints regarding the July 16 incident have been filed. Camacho Mendoza took control of the oversight office—renamed from the Office of the Community Ombudsman—at a crucial moment. For the past two years, the office has been run on an interim, part-time basis, but city officials say the number of complaints against BPD has decreased dramatically, leading Bieter and the Boise City Council to make the OPO director a part-time position. Meanwhile, BPD’s internal investigation into the Parkhill incident is ongoing and there have been no arrests in the case. —Harrison Berry 8 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

doesn’t exist” said attorney Watkins, who also pointed to Wamble-Fisher’s previous 7 employment history where workers at Ada County Family Court Services similarly accused her of altering employees’ records, triggering an Idaho Supreme Court investigation. When asked about those allegations on the witness stand, Wamble-Fisher insisted that she wasn’t even aware of the separate investigation. Watkins also pressed Wamble-Fisher about conflicting statements in a deposition and affidavit, given less than 24 hours apart, regarding the use of dry cells—so named because they lack furniture and running water, with only a hole in the floor for use as a toilet. When confronted about why the special master was told an inmate had been left in a dry cell for 10 days while records revealed that the inmate was in the cell for 19 days, Wamble-Fisher said she couldn’t recall why there was a discrepancy. She also testified that she couldn’t remember if she had ordered certain inmates moved out of the behavioral health unit prior to the special master’s visits. When she was asked if she had altered a so-called “primary log” of inmate names, medical status and medications, Wamble-Fisher insisted that she had only “condensed” some of the information. Deputy Attorney General Zahn said WambleFisher and the clinicians simply “couldn’t get along and they just don’t like each other.” Zahn argued that the clinicians were “people who view their circumstances differently” and were only “a group who had personal differences.” When it came time to answer the plaintiff’s question of why Zahn and her defense team couldn’t produce a single clinician to come to Wamble-Fisher’s defense, Zahn said “It was a matter of time. We didn’t have time.” Judge Carter pushed back against that, reminding Zahn that both sides had ample opportunity to call an equal number of witnesses and that he had even extended the hours on the first day of testimony, stretching the session well into the night.

THE CLINICIANS The key witnesses for the plaintiffs’ case against IDOC were Diana Canfield and Jessie Bogley, both former mental health clinicians at the prison’s behavioral health unit. Canfield had worked at the BHU from September 2010 until July 2012 and Bogley worked there from August 2010 until January 2013. Canfield returned to Boise for the court hearing from her new home in Gilbert, Ariz., and Bogley testified via video from her new home in Grand Junction, Colo. “Am I nervous? Yes. Because of past retaliation against me,” said Canfield. For the better part of two hours on the witness stand, Canfield told the court that her thensupervisor, Wamble-Fisher, had openly hatched a plan to move any troubled inmates out of the dry cells during the special master investigation; to shift other inmates who “complained a lot” out of

the BHU and into the prison’s general population just prior to the investigative visit; and continued to alter or scrub some of Canfield’s own notes in prisoners’ medical files or logs. In one instance, Canfield testified that Wamble-Fisher had gone as far as to change some medical notes on a suicide risk assessment, putting Canfield’s name on the notes instead of her own. In early July 2012, Canfield said she noticed a significant amount of her own medical notes had mysteriously disappeared from inmate files. “That’s when I resigned. I knew I was being set up,” Canfield told the court. “When medical documents are destroyed there’s no way to legitimately know that care is being given.” Three years later, this past March, Canfield emerged victorious in a separate courtroom at the Ada County Courthouse, where a jury ruled that IDOC had wronged Canfield and ordered the department to pay her a judgment of $78,000. “It blew me away. I was in tears. It restored my faith in humankind,” Canfield later told BW. “I was fighting for the inmates and my fellow clinicians. Actually, I was fighting for the integrity of the entire system.” Bogley’s testimony at the U.S. Courthouse was just as sobering, confirming that dry cells had been used “almost every day” prior to the special master’s investigative visits but were emptied at the times when he toured the facility. Bogley also told the court that Wamble-Fisher had only wanted the special master to see “offenders that were pleased with their mental health care” and that she was personally aware of at least four inmates transferred out of the BHU prior to the visits. “The special master was not getting an accurate presentation,” said Bogley. Bogley also testified that Wamble-Fisher once asked her to write a suicide risk assessment for a particular inmate without even seeing the individual, something Bogley said she refused to do. “Things weren’t making sense. I found notes had gone missing from inmate files. And the primary log was being altered,” said Bogley. “I can’t imagine why the [files] would be changed or missing, other than someone actively wanting to take them out.”

THE INVESTIGATOR

Canfield on charges of altering medical records. Following a five-month probe, Stephenson found the exact opposite to be true: Records “had been altered or destroyed,” Stephenson said, but it wasn’t Canfield’s doing. Stephenson said she had her suspicions, but it wasn’t her job to lodge an allegation. “I didn’t have the authority to open a case on Ms. Wamble-Fisher. My job was to investigate Ms. Canfield,” said Stephenson, who added that her probe included full access to all IDOC files and interviews with 17 department officials and employees.

WAITING FOR A RULING Following testimony from nearly 20 witnesses and boxes of documents were entered into evidence, Carter, armed with his own voluminous notes, finally allowed the defense and plaintiffs’ counsels to offer closing arguments, which, more often than not, were intense. “Your honor, we know documents were fabricated,” said Watkins. “We know that dry cells were routinely used, sometimes up to 30 days at a time; yet they were emptied prior to the special master’s arrival. We know select inmates were moved in and moved out of the unit. We know that investigator Stephenson had even gone to the prison warden to say, ‘Something’s going on here.’ Yet they continued to double-down and triple-down on Ms. Wamble-Fisher. A wrong has been done.” Zahn was just as impassioned in her closing arguments, saying that the plaintiffs’ case had been a “game of whack-a-mole” and “a moving target from the beginning.” “It wasn’t possible for [the special master] to talk to every inmate there during his visit,” said Zahn. “There is no proof of any fraud or cause for any sanctions here. Their case is broad and overreaching. The state of Idaho is complying with [Balla vs. Idaho] and we continue to comply. We may not be perfect’ and we’ll probably always have our differences; that’s a certainty.” It will be Judge “King David” Carter who will be the ultimate arbiter of just how big, and more importantly how critical, those differences truly have been—and whether Idaho can continue to do business as usual at its prison complex or face contempt or sanctions.

Cindy Stephenson, a 25-year veteran investigator with 15 years at the Idaho Bureau of Occupational Licensing and 10 more at the Idaho Industrial Commission, first heard Diana Canfield’s name in late 2012, shortly after her resignation from IDOC. Ironically, the department wanted DONE Six ISCI prisoners, representing the class-action suit against Stephenson H AG A Z AC H Idaho, sat in the jury box throughout the two-day hearing. to investigate BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN plates of ice. We fracture it and size it into smaller pieces. At the height of this summer’s heat we were running hard and supplying ice to some other producers in the Columbia Basin area, eastern Idaho and Utah.

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You must be one of the biggest ice producers in the region. Plus, we’re one of the last independent ice companies, which means we’ll get calls from other companies.

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TIM JOHNSON The coolest guy in town GEORGE PRENTICE Chances are you’ve passed it a hundred times. Boise Cold Storage, founded in the early 1900s, covers more than 60,000 square feet between 15th Street and Americana Boulevard. Between housing tons of grocery and dairy products in perfectly chilled warehouses, and pumping out tons of ice every day, working for the company may be the most enviable task in town when Boise temperatures approach triple digits—something the Treasure Valley has been doing with record-setting regularity this summer. The Johnson family, which founded the iconic Fearless Fairless Stinker stations across southwestern Idaho, purchased Boise Cold Storage in 2003. Today, Tim Johnson manages the unique business. He’s a Boise State University graduate, his wife is a University of Idaho alumna and their two daughters—you guessed it—go to Boise State and the U of I. On a particularly hot summer afternoon, Johnson sat down with Boise Weekly to share some cold, hard facts about his life and work. History tells us that Boise Cold Storage was founded in 1903. Railroad tracks ran right through here and they would load huge, 300- to 600-pound blocks of ice aboard the cars—that was way before refrigeration cars—to keep produce fresh until it got to California. In 1922, they drilled an artesian well, 630 feet deep. Several years after that they put up a building around it. It’s geothermal, so the water comes out at about 71 degrees, instead of the normal 55. It’s stunning to know that there’s an artesian well here in the middle of the city. When we took over the business they had all of this equipment introducing chemicals to keep the cooling towers clean on the roof. We thought that was crazy. We shut them down; ripped out all of the chemical treatments. The only thing we use city water for is to hose off our loading docks or clean things up. But when we’re producing ice, it’s crystal-clean artesian water. Who are your biggest clients? There are two sides to the business. For cold storage, we have a number of school districts, AgriBeef, Franz Bakery, Deli Express, Krispy Kreme, a number of food companies. Almost all of our clients are commercial. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

How about the other half of your business? If you walk into any grocery or convenience store, most of the bags of ice say Boise Cold Storage. And most of the rest is probably ice that was packaged here. Albertsons, Costco, Cash and Carry, Rosauers, Whole Foods. That’s our ice in their bags. How much ice is coming out of your facility? We’re capable of sending out about 100 tons a day. If all of our machines were turned on, we could send out about 240 tons. I’m presuming that your business is very seasonal. Eighty-five percent of our business is done in 100 days. And the Fourth of July weekend? That’s our Super Bowl. Memorial Day to Labor Day is our 100-day year. We start dismantling our pumps and machinery come the fall. Years ago American families would require large blocks of ice for their ice boxes, but I’m assuming that you don’t make too many of those anymore. We have a compressed 10-pound block, but most of our ice—99 percent of it—is crushed. The machines send out 8-foot-wide, 5-foot-high

Are there significant events on your calendar? Boise State football needs a lot of ice, especially the merchandisers inside the stadium. Plus, the Idaho Center, the fair and the Snake River Stampede are all great for us. I would be remiss if I didn’t ask you why you’re in a wheelchair. A month before I graduated high school, I was riding a motorcycle and collided with a bus. The bus was bigger. What kind of injury did you suffer? A T-12 [spinal cord] injury. Tell me how that incident turned your life inside out. I went through some interesting times. It’s life-changing and it’s hard. It took a few years to figure out. There were a couple of people who were extremely instrumental in getting me back. I was a high-school athlete—I ran track and played fullback for Meridian High—so I like coaches. They don’t soft-coat things. They kick your butt and tell you to get going. I’m sure I’m not the first person to tell you that you would be a great coach. I coached football—eight years in Optimist football and four years at Eagle High School. I also coached my daughters in softball. I loved coaching. Speaking of coaches and your alma mater, we have a major duel coming up on Sept, 5 when [Boise State football coach] Bryan Harsin and [ex-Boise State and current University of Washington coach] Chris Petersen go head-to-head for the season opener. But we all know who’s going to win, don’t we? Coach Petersen is a life-changing coach. I love him, but too bad he’s about to be beat by Boise State. I must say that you keep your office at a very comfortable temperature. At what temperature is your thermostat set at? Too damn cold. I don’t think “too damn cold” is a setting. Well, at least everyone else in the office thinks it’s nice. BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 9


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An illustrated exploration of Basque culture A BY TARA MORGAN | ILLUSTRATIONS BY JEFFREY C . LOWE

Jaialdi, the big Basque blowout that takes place in Boise every five years, is upon us. Walking around downtown downto Boise, you might have noticed a proliferation of Basque berets, or txapelas, smelled the deep-fried de sizzle of croquetas and heard consonant-rich phrases like kaixo and eskerrik asko echoing e through the streets. Even if the only Basque word you know is kalimotxo, you can easily become a Basque savant with our handy illustrated guide: Jaialdi: A to Z.

A : AMUMA SAYS NO

Based on the traditional trikitixa— a Basque musical ensemble featuring accordion and tambourine—Amuma Says No combines Jill Aldape’s energetic Basque vocals, Dan Ansotegui’s festive accordion playing and Sean Aucutt’s tambourine skills. Straying from tradition, the band also adds other instruments like bass and guitar, which gives the group a modern rock vibe. Amuma Says No just released its third album, Gatz and Berakatz, which was inspired by Jaialdi 2015. You’ll have plenty of opportunities to catch the band during the festival: Amuma Says No is performing at Alive After Five on The Grove Wednesday, July 29; at the Dance at Expo Idaho on Saturday, Aug. 1; and at the Street Dance on the Basque Block Sunday, Aug. 2.

B : BASQUE BLOCK

Located on Grove Street between Sixth Street and Capitol Boulevard, the Basque Block is home to a variety of Basque cultural hubs, including the Basque Center, the Basque Museum, the Cyrus Jacobs-Uberuaga house, the Anduiza Fronton, Leku Ona, The Basque Market and Bar Gernika. During Jaialdi, this strip of downtown will be closed to traffic through Monday, Aug. 3, so revelers can wander the block, sip kalimotxos and snack on street food with friends and family.

C : CHORIZO

Ruby-hued Basque chorizo, studded with garlic and peppers, is a juicy summer treat. Gem Pack Meats in Garden City supplies Jaialdi with chorizos, which you can pick up hot off the grill on the Basque Block and at Expo Idaho. Gem Pack owner Brent Compton said the company anticipates selling around 20,000 chorizos

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during Jaialdi, the perfect pairing with another Basque specialty: croquetas. You’ll find these heavenly balls of fried béchamel pretty much everywhere you’ll find chorizos.

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Hidden inside the Basque Block’s Anduiza Building, a former boarding house built in the 1910s, the Anduiza Fronton is a 3,400-square-foot pala court with white walls and a 50-foot-high ceiling. Pala—aka Basque racquetball—is played with flat, spoon-shaped paddles and a small rubbery ball. Four pala players compete in pairs on the century-old Fronton, which is the oldest pala court still in use in the U.S. There will be a pala tournament held at the Anduiza Fronton Thursday, July 30 and Friday, July 31.

DIASPORA

The Basque Country, or Euskal Herria, is a small swath of land on the border between southern France and northern Spain where the Pyrenees Mountains meet the Bay of Biscay. According to Boise’s Basque Museum and Cultural Center, “Basque people have a homeland, but no nation of their own. The region occupies three areas—part of the Atlantic Pyrenees Department in France and two areas in Spain—the Basque Autonomous Community and the Autonomous Community of Navarre.” Over the years, limited space combined with economic and political factors have encouraged Basque emigration. There are now substantial Basque populations in countries around the world, including Argentina, Colombia and the United States. Boise is home to one of the largest concentrations of Basques in the U.S.

The building at 202 S. Capitol Blvd. that is now home to Bar Gernika once housed a Chinese laundry, the Chin Joe Restaurant and the Trade Dollar Bar before it turned into the Cub Tavern in 1948. This landmark bar survived downtown redevelopment in the 1970s, but by the late ’80s, the tiny tavern’s owner wanted to bulldoze it to make room for more parking spaces. Luckily, Adelia Garro Simplot fought to preserve the building. With Simplot’s help, the Basque Museum and Cultural Center was able to purchase the space and rent it to Dan Ansotegui, who turned it into the iconic Bar Gernika, named after the Basque town of Guernica, which is a sister city with Boise. More than 20 years later, the popular pub still slings Basque specialties like lomo, beef tongue and croquetas, along with a top-notch selection of rotating micros on draft and Spanish wines.

E :  EUSKARA

H : HERRI KIROLAK

Euskara, or the Basque language, is the only surviving pre-Indo-European language in Western Europe. Its words, described as an “imposing stew of consonants” by The New York Times, are often written in a folksy font with swooping serifs. Euskal Herria literally means “the land where the Basque language is spoken.” Though the Basque language was repressed during the dictatorship of Francisco Franco, who declared Castilian Spain’s official language, Euskara is once again gaining popularity as Basques seek to preserve their culture. Boise is home to the Boiseko Ikastola, the only Basque language preschool outside of the Basque Country.

G : BAR GERNIKA

Basque rural sports, or herri kirolak, originate from the region’s two primary historical occupations—farming and fishing. The sports include everything from aizkolaritza, an event in which woodcutters chop through tree trunks as quickly as possible, to lasto botatzea, hay bale tossing, to orga jokoa, or oxcart carrying. On Thursday, July 30, you can catch all the herri kirolak action during the Jaialdi Sports Night, which takes place at the CenturyLink Arena at 7 p.m. and costs $15 per person. There will also be herri kirolak demonstrations at Expo Idaho at 3:45 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 2.

I : IKURRINA

The Basque flag, also known as the Ikurrina, features a design similar to Britain’s Union Jack with bold stripes of red, white and green.

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J : JOTA

The Jota is a popular Basque party dance that involves above-the-head finger snaps and fancy footwork. According to John M. Ysursa’s book Basque Dance, “Many Basque American celebrations now also include jota contests that consist of two parts—the fandango and arin-arin. … In these popular dance gatherings, dancers do not usually wait for a partner and it matters little if the fandango repeats three or four times. As the musicians begin with the first few notes, the dance floor quickly fills with circles of dancers who step out the lively beat.”

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KAIXO’ OR ‘HELLO’

Pronounced “khai-cho,” this word means “hello” in Euskara.

L : LAUBURU

The lauburu, which translates to “four heads,” is a traditional Basque swastika with comma-shaped arms that adorns everything from key chains to business signs. Though the swastika now has negative connotations, the symbol was historically used across Europe by the ancient Greeks, Celts and Anglo-Saxons. The lauburu is frequently displayed as a talisman, hung over the doorways of Basque homes and stores.

M : MUS

Mus is a popular Basque card game played between two teams sitting opposite each other. Mus and its sister game, briska, were a staple at Basque boarding houses and provided an opportunity for socializing. Mus requires a Spanish deck with 40 cards and has four rounds—haundia (high), txikia (low), pareak (pairs) and jokua (game). Players decide with their partners whether to bid or pass during each

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round. They also use a range of elaborate facial cues—like lip-biting and winking—to clandestinely signal what’s in their hand. Points are awarded for various card combinations and the team that reaches 40 points first wins. Though there aren’t any mus tournaments scheduled during Jaialdi, festival PR Chair Julie Hahn said there will be plenty of people playing the game. “If you wander through the Basque Center, I can pretty much guarantee that there will be some people playing mus,” she said.

NIGHT WITH BASQUE N : ACHEFS

Basque chefs Aitor Elizegi, Josu Ibarra and Beñat Ormaetxea (former head chef at the Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao) are travelling to Boise to prepare a unique six-course meal at the Arid Club Saturday, Aug. 1 at 6:30 p.m. The menu includes Basque style house-cured tuna, bacalao confit with caramelized sweet onion sauce, and slow-braised beef cheeks with vegetables and mushrooms. Sommelier Mikel Garaizabal Pildain will provide wine pairings for each course, including the lightly fizzy Txakoli and Rioja. Tickets for the meal are $150 and proceeds benefit the Cenarrusa Foundation for Basque Culture.

BASQUE DANCERS O:  OINKARI

Boise’s Oinkari Basque Dancers perform Basque folk dances that incorporate flying feet, high-kicks, snapping, twirling and shouting. The dancers use a variety of props—like swords and bells—and are decked out in costumes that resemble traditional Basque outfits. Males wear white shirts and trousers with red sashes, or gerrikos, slung around their waists and red berets, or txapelas, on their heads. Females wear long red wool skirts embroidered with black ribbons, nubby 12 white socks and leather shoes with JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly 11


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black cords, or abarkak. The Oinkari Basque Dancers will perform during Jaialdi at the sold out Festa’ra at the Morrison Center Friday, July 31; at Expo Idaho on Saturday, Aug. 1; and later that day at the San Inazio Mass at St. Mark’s at 7 p.m.

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P  : PINTXOS

Pintxos, aka Basque tapas, are a variety of toothpick-skewered snacks served in Basque bars. Ranging from the classic tortilla, a cold frittata filled with thin-sliced potatoes, to bread rounds topped with peppers, fried salt cod or fat-striped shavings of jamon Iberico (cured ham), pintxos are small bites that pair perfectly with tiny pours of wine or beer. During Jaialdi, the Basque Market will offer a limited selection of pintxos, including calamari, meatballs and tortilla.

Q : QUINCE PASTE

Quince paste, aka dulce de membrillo, is a rosy jelly made from ripe quince that’s been cooked down with sugar until it’s mealy and gelatinous. The tart paste is sliced into squares and served with Idiazabal, a nutty Basque cheese made from unpasteurized sheep’s milk.

WINE AND COKE (AKA THE NOTORIOUS R : RED KALIMOTXO) The kalimotxo is a Basque bar staple. Consisting of equal parts red wine (the cheaper the better) and cola on ice, the kalimotxo sounds like a questionable combo but is oddly refreshing. Not to mention, the caffeine gives you a jolt of energy to keep you going from the afternoon late into the evening. During Jaialdi, you can find ice-cold kalimotxos at stands on the Basque Block and at Expo Idaho.

S : SHEEPHERDING

Sheepherding was a widespread profession among Basque immigrants in the late 1800s and early 1900s, including in Idaho. According to Dr. Gloria Totoricagüena Egurrola, at the Center for Basque Studies at the University of Nevada, Reno, the life of a 12 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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Basque sheepherder was difficult and lonely: “Many Basque sheepherders interviewed decades later still remember their fright at arriving to the United States and reaching their destinations, only to be taken to the mountains and left with supplies and a band of 2,000 sheep, and then told, ‘See you in a month.’ Most were completely untrained and unprepared for the physical endurance needed to care for so many animals, and were certainly ill equipped to deal with the psychological and emotional loneliness of the range.” That changed during the winter months, when sheepherders filtered into towns to stay in Basque boarding houses, where they would speak Euskara, eat Basque food, drink, dance and socialize. During Jaialdi, the tiny wagons that Basque sheepherders lived in on the range will be on display at Expo Idaho. You can tour these compact “sheep wagons,” or karro kampos, and catch a glimpse of the austere life of Basque sheepherders in the West.

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TXAKOLI

If you’re looking for a crisp, lightly fizzy white wine to beat the heat during Jaialdi, look no further than Txakoli (pronounced chock-oh-lee). This high acid, low alcohol wine has plenty of minerality that makes it great to pair with pintxos containing cured meats and seafood. This light wine with a faint green tinge is produced using the Hondarrabi Zuri grape in three regions: Getariako, Bizkaiko and Alava. Txakoli is typically poured from a T-shaped spout from high

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men hoist heavy weights at Expo Idaho at 3:45 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1 and 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 2.

JACOBSUBERUAGA HOUSE U : CYRUS

X : XOLOS DE TIJUANA

Situated on the Basque Block, the Cyrus Jacobs-Uberuaga House is the oldest surviving brick structure in Boise and one of the few remaining Basque boarding houses in the West. Built in 1864, the house was originally owned by Cyrus and Mary Jacobs before it was converted into a Basque boarding house in 1910. The Uberuaga family purchased the house for $2,000 and rented it primarily to Basque sheepherders for $50 a month, including room and board. At the time, meals cost 75 cents each for non-boarders and consisted of meat or fish, vegetables, beans, flan or rice pudding. Whiskey was 25 cents a shot. The Basque Museum and Cultural Center undertook a massive project to restore the building, which was completed in time for Jaialdi 2005. You can tour the home, which has been painstakingly restored to the time periods of 1879 and 1928. Preservation Idaho is also offering 1 1/2-hour WalkaBasque Boise tours during Jaialdi from Wednesday, July 29 through Sunday, Aug. 2.

V : VISITORS

Jaialdi organizers estimate that about 30,000 people attended Jaialdi in 2010, and they expect that number to jump even higher this year. “Because of the buzz we have been hearing both locally, regionally and internationally we are expecting Jaialdi 2015 to be just as well attended, if not even larger,” said Amy Hormaechea Wray, Jaialdi 2015 co-director. “We’re hoping that it’s around, say, 40,000,” added Jaialdi PR Chair Julie Hahn. “I think that after this year—because this year we’re doing online ticket sales, which we’ve never done before—I think that for Jaialdi 2020, we’ll have way better estimates of how many people actually come.”

On July 18, nearly 22,000 fans turned up to watch La Liga’s Athletic Club de Bilbao play Liga MX’s Club Tijuana Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente at the Basque Soccer Friendly. For the match, Albertsons Stadium covered its famous blue turf with a temporary layer of green sod. The game was originally slated to take place during Jaialdi, but had to be moved up a week and a half because Athletic Bilbao qualified for the prestigious UEFA Europa League tournament. Athletic Bilbao defeated Club Tijuana, aka Xolos de Tijuana, 2-0.

WELCOME’ OR ‘EZ HORREGATIK’ Y : ‘YOU’RE

Ez horregatik, or “you’re welcome,” is a common response to eskerrik asko, or “thank you,” in Basque.

Z : ZAZPIAK BAT

Zazpiak Bat, a motto and nickname for the Basque coat of arms, comes from the Basque words zazpiak, or “the seven” and bat meaning “one.” The coat of arms represents unity between the seven traditional Basque provinces.

(AKA HARRI-JASOTZE) W : WEIGHTLIFTING

As part of the Basque Sports Night competition, which takes place Thursday, July 30 at CenturyLink Arena, weightlifters from around the Basque Country will show their strength by lifting cylinders that weigh a whopping 250 to 400 pounds and stone balls that weigh 350 pounds. You can also watch these macho BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JULY 29

THURSDAY JULY 30

Festivals & Events

On Stage

CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET— 3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com.

ANA POPOVIC—Don’t miss the Boise debut of blues artist Ana Popovic, who was nominated for Best Contemporary Female Blues Artist in 2014. 7:30 p.m. $22-$27 adv., $27-$32 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, anapopovic.com.

On Stage ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER— Through Aug. 2. 8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE— Through Aug. 22. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-4625523, starlightmt.com.

Art 13TH ANNUAL JURIED ART SHOW—Through July 31. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. CRAIG CULLY: SINGULAR MARVELS—Through July 31. 12-4 p.m. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com. DEFYING GRAVITY: INTERVENTIONS IN CLAY—Through Sept. 18. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

COMEDIAN TIM NORTHERN—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. ISF: THE SECRET GARDEN— Through Aug. 30. 8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: CALAMITY JANE—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

JA IALDI

Art JUDAS ARRIETA: BOISELAND— MING Studios artist-in-residence Judas Arrieta’s first U.S. exhibit, Boiseland, expresses an alternative representation of reality in which dreams and legends live together mixed with real experiences he had during his stay. Through Aug. 22. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-9494365, judasarrieta.com.

Literature KINDLING: TEACHINGWRITER READING AND SCHOLARSHIP FUNDRAISER—The Cabin’s teaching-writers share their work and speak on how teaching-writing informs their own writing practice. Proceeds will be used to fund writing-camp scholarships. 5:30 p.m. $3 minimum donation. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org.

E VENT S

See pages 16-17

for a complete list of Jaialdi events.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

GROUP F/64: REVOLUTIONARY VISION—Through Oct. 25. 10 a.m.5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. MARCIA MYERS: RICHES OF REMEMBRANCE—Through Aug. 30. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-7265079, gailseverngallery.com. ONE SQUARE MILE FINE ART SHOW—Through Aug. 31. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-888-9898, finerframes. com. RICHARD C. ELLIOTT: LANGUAGE OF LIGHT—Through Oct. 4. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Food GRIMALDI’S ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY—All guests who dine at the Village at Meridian location from 1-4 p.m. or 8 p.m.-close will receive a gift card to spend on a future visit. Grimaldi’s Pizzeria, 3573 Longwing Lane, Ste. 130, Meridian, 208-884-2031, grimaldispizzeria. com.

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CALENDAR FRIDAY

JULY 31 Festivals & Events BOISE CITY SWING VINTAGE JAZZ FESTIVAL—The second annual Boise City Swing is a full weekend of dance workshops and social dancing to live local jazz music by local musicians, featuring Kings of Swing on Friday, Frim Fram Four on Saturday and Pamela DeMarche Scott on Sunday. Swing dance workshops 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 8 p.m. $15-$150. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-871-6352, boisecityswing. eventbrite.com. NORTHERN ROCKIES MUSIC FESTIVAL—Along with two days of musical acts, the festival will offer food and art vendors, overnight camping, beer and wine sales, children’s activities, and much more. 5 p.m. $17-$45. Hop Porter

Park, 209 E. Bullion St., Hailey, northernrockiesmusicfestival.org.

On Stage COMEDIAN TIM NORTHERN—10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMIC CINEMA REMIX: CON AIR—Join Brett Badostain, Chadwick Heft, Dylan Haas and Olek Szewczyk as they remix the 1997 classic Con Air. 8 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297. IMPROV COMEDY CAGE MATCH—8 p.m. $7. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. ISF: THE SECRET GARDEN—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 31-AUG. 2

Mountain music comes home.

MOUNTAIN HOME COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL—Enjoy three days of country music from 20 of the hottest acts around, with DJ KO opening for headliners Brad Paisley (July 31), Blake Shelton (Aug. 1) and Florida Georgia Line (Aug. 2). $75-$250, 20 miles east of Mountain Home on Hwy. 20. mountainhomefestival.com. SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—Through Sept. 12. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com. WIZ KHALIFA—The rapper brings his Blacc Hollywood tunes to town. With Tory Lanez and DJ Drama. 7:30 p.m. $39.50-$85. Ford Idaho Center Amphitheater, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208468-1000, idahocenter.com.

Religious/Spiritual DHARMA TALK WITH ZEN MASTER BON SOENG—Everyone is invited to this dharma talk with visiting Zen Master Bon Soeng. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Institute for Buddhist Studies, 660 N. Ninth St., 208-661-6277, bibscenter.org.

SATURDAY AUG. 1 Festivals & Events BOISE CITY SWING VINTAGE JAZZ FESTIVAL—8 p.m. $15$150. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise. 208-8716352, boisecityswing.eventbrite. com. BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com.

SATURDAY, AUG. 1

Who will have the last laugh?

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, seeyouatthemarket.com. INTERNATIONAL FOOD AND CULTURE FESTIVAL—Try out authentic cuisines from around the world created by the best regional restaurants and eateries. Plus merchandise vendors, children’s activities, cultural arts and crafts, workshops, beer garden, music and cultural entertainment. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, facebook.com/ intlfoodandculturefest. KIDSFEST IDAHO—This familyfriendly event features arts and crafts, water activities, bubble soccer, face painters, live music and more. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, 1900 N. Records Ave., near Fairview Avenue and Eagle Road, Meridian, kidsfestidaho.com.

MCCALL FAMILY FLY-IN AND OPEN HOUSE— Whether you fly in or just drive, there will be loads of family fun at the McCall Airport. Enjoy food, live entertainment, free airplane rides for kids, seminars, happy hour and more. Plus a pancake breakfast Sunday morning ($10). 8 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. McCall Municipal Airport, 336 Deinhard Lane, McCall, 208-634-1488, McCallAirportEvents.weebly.com. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square, Intersection of 14th and Front streets, Nampa. NORTHERN ROCKIES MUSIC FESTIVAL—3 p.m. $17-$45. Hop Porter Park, 209 E. Bullion St., Hailey, northernrockiesmusicfestival.org. ROOTS RATED/IDAHO MOUNTAIN TOURING PINT NIGHT— RootsRated.com and IMT are having a shindig to get people together to talk about all the great outdoorsy stuff 19 to do when visiting Idaho. Proceeds go to Conservation

SATURDAY, AUG. 1

Another ethnic food festival? Yes, please.

MOUNTAIN HOME COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL

BOISE’S FUNNIEST PERSON 2015: FINALS

INTERNATIONAL FOOD AND CULTURE FESTIVAL

Elmore County will play host to some of country music’s biggest stars—and one guy on his way to joining their ranks. Before Brad Paisley, Blake Shelton and Florida Georgia Line storm the stage at the Mountain Home Country Music Festival, Nashville-based DJ KO (aka Justin Spillner) will warm up the crowds, and he’ll also host after-parties each night. The DJ/producer grew up in Atlanta, Ga., and got his start making hip-hop mix CDs for friends before finding his niche: re-mixing classic country tunes, giving them a fresh sound while still honoring the originals. Thursday: 5 p.m. gates, 7 p.m. show (for campers only); Friday: 1 p.m. gates, 3 p.m. show; Saturday: 11 a.m. gates, 1 p.m. show; Sunday: noon gates; 2 p.m. show. Passes $50-$200, camping available. Highway 20, 20 miles outside of Mountain Home, 208345-9263, mountainhomefestival.com.

It’s down to the wire for the final five amateur comedians who will battle it out for the title of Boise’s Funniest Person 2015. The hopefuls were culled from a group of 20 contestants, pared down to 10, then teamed with a professional comic before duking it out in the semi-finals. Aside from the coveted title, the winner will also go home with a cash prize of $1,000 Boise’s Funniest Person came out of the gate at a gallop three years ago, and it continues to be a popular event with professional comedians, up-and-coming comics and comedy crowds: Shows are usually sold out. While the saying might be “everyone’s a comedian,” there can only be one “Boise’s Funniest Person.” 8 p.m., $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Summer is the season of food and culture. So far, we’ve eaten our way from the Russian Food Festival to the Greek Food Festival, and from the Idaho Jewish Cultural Festival’s Deli Days to the World Village Festival in Capitol Park. On Saturday, Aug. 1, the International Food and Culture Festival will debut in Julia Davis Park, featuring a day of food vendors from Afghanistan, Greece, Japan, the United States, Vietnam and more, as well as beer and wine sponsored by Sockeye Brewing. “Everybody loves food,” said festival coordinator Wendy Flores. “It’s a great way to share culture.” Enjoy Aztec, Chinese and Vietnamese dancers, live music and cultural entertainment. Kids crafts include a piñata workshop. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-573-4282, facebook.com/intlfoodandculturefest.

14 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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NAT’L HONEY BEE DAY

University of Idaho Food Demonstration DISCOVER MARKET FRESH Food Preservation

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WELCOME TO BOISE BOISE WEEKLY.COM

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JAIALDI CALENDAR WEDNESDAY JULY 29 JOAN-ETORRI BASQUE STUDIES SYMPOSIUM— Sit in on two days of presentations and discussions exploring the Basque people’s past, present and future. Day one includes an overview of Basque studies; a look at Basque mariners, including whalers; a history of the Basque Diaspora; and Basques and U.S. public grazing lands. The symposium is hosted by the Boise State Basque Studies program. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., FREE. Boise State University Micron Business and Economics Building, Room 4001, 2360 University Drive, go.boisestate.edu/basque-studies. MEET THE BASQUES COMMUNITY EVENT—Enjoy a screening of the film Song of the Basques by director Emily Lobsenz, followed by an overview of Europe’s “mystery people” from keynote speaker Aizpea Goenaga, director of the Etxepare Basque Institute. Sponsored by Boise State Basque Studies and the Idaho Humanities Council. 5:30 p.m., FREE. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454 or 208387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

16 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

WELCOME TO BOISE—Join the Jaialdi 2015 kickoff party on the Basque Block. There’ll be food, drink and tunes by strolling musicians. Visit the website for a complete schedule of events. 5-11 p.m. FREE. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise, jaialdi.com.

THURSDAY JULY 30 JOAN-TORRI BASQUE STUDIES SYMPOSIUM—Day two of Boise State’s Basque Studies Program symposium includes a panel discussion with John Bieter on the Basque Studies Abroad program and lectures on the Basque language at the Micron Business and Economics Building, followed by presentations on Basques in America, including settlement of the Southwestern U.S. and a round of talks on Basque-American literature at the Boise State Downtown campus. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., FREE. Micron Business and Economics Building, Room 4001, 2360 University Drive; Boise State Downtown, 301 S. Capitol Blvd.; go.boisestate. edu/basque-studies.

IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF BASQUE WHALERS—Learn about the history of the first Basques in the New World as well as the opening of a cultural route that circumnavigates Newfoundland, visiting the historic vestiges and representative sites of 16th century Basque whaling. See Culture News, Page 21, for more info. 10 a.m.-noon, FREE. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3338000, basquewhalers.info. JUDAS ARRIETA: BOISELAND— Ming Studios’ artist-in-residence Judas Arrieta’s first U.S. exhibition, Boiseland, expresses an alternative representation of reality in which dreams and legends live together mixed with real experiences he had during his stay. The artist will be available to schedule guided tours of the exhibit during Jaialdi. The exhibition runs through Aug. 22. See Culture, Page 21, for more info. ThursdaysSaturdays, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., FREE. Ming Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org. SPORTS NIGHT—Weightlifters from the Basque Country will test their strength by lifting cylinders weighing 250-400 pounds and stone balls weighing 350 pounds. Woodchoppers will test their skills against each other, and traditional farm sports competitors will throw

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hay bales, lift wagons and see who can carry milk cans the farthest. 7 p.m., $15. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, jaialdi. com.

FRIDAY JULY 31 BASQUE-ING ON THE BLOCK— It’s party time at the Basque Block. Grab some food, get a drink and enjoy Basque music. Dancing encouraged. Noon-midnight, FREE. Basque Block, Grove Street between Sixth Street and Capitol Boulevard, jaialdi.com. FESTA’RA—Festa’ra is a celebration of the traditional music and dance of the Basque Country, including performers from Euskadi and Boise’s famous Oinkari Dancers. 7 p.m., $35. SOLD OUT. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1110, mc.boisestate. edu. STREET DANCE—Put on your dancing shoes and get down to music by Luhartz and The Crazy Wheels. 8:45 p.m., FREE. Basque

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Block, Grove Street between Sixth Street and Capitol Boulevard, jaialdi.com.

SATURDAY AUGUST 1 BASQUE-ING AT EXPO IDAHO— For two days, dozens of dance groups from around the West will perform on two indoor stages while Basque vendors offer novelties, souvenirs and clothing for sale. Plus food, drink and displays of distinctive Basque sheep wagons. Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; kids under 10 FREE, $6.50 online, $7 door. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, jaialdi.com. A NIGHT WITH BASQUE CHEFS—Celebrated Basque chefs and a sommelier will travel to Boise from the Basque Country to prepare a six-course dinner with wine pairings. All proceeds benefit the Cenarrusa Foundation for Basque Culture. Event sponsored by the Foral Territory of Bizkaia (Basque Country). 6:30-11 p.m. $150. Arid Club, 1137 W. River St.,

Boise, 208-343-4631. facebook. com/basqueculinaryarts. SAN INAZIO MASS—The annual San Inazio Mass will be celebrated in Basque and English as part of Jaialdi 2015. The Onati Dancers will perform a sacred liturgical dance on the altar at St. Mark’s, with assistance from the Oinkari Basque Dancers. 7 p.m., FREE. St. Mark’s Catholic Church, 7960 Northview St., 208-375-6651, jaialdi.com. DANCE—Amuma Says No and The Crazy Wheels provide the tunes at this celebration of music and dancing. For all ages. 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; $11.50 online, $12 door. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, jaialdi.com

SUNDAY AUGUST 2 STREET DANCE—Another evening of dancing at the Basque Block, with music by Luhartz and Amuma Says No. 8 p.m., FREE, Basque Block, Grove Street between Sixth Street and Capitol Boulevard, jaialdi.com.

www.trailingofthesheep.org 208-720-0585

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18 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR 14

Voters of Idaho and Land Trust of the Treasure Valley. 5:30-8 p.m. FREE. Idaho Mountain Touring, 1310 Main St., Boise, 208-336-3854.

SPORTS AND NONSPORTS CARD SHOW—Join other hobby enthusiasts in exploring 30 tables overflowing with sports and entertainment cards and memorabilia. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Hotel and Conference Center, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise. 208-338-3828. STAGE STOP MARKET—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE, $20 vendors. Boise Stage Stop, 23801 S. Orchard Access Road, I-84 off Exit 71, Boise, 208-343-1367, boisestagestop.org.

On Stage BOISE’S FUNNIEST PERSON 2015: FINALS—BFP takes 20 regular folks and turns them into stand-up comedians in just four weeks. Tonight, the final five compete for $1,000 and the title of Boise’s Funniest Person. 8-10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, boisesfunniestperson.com.

COMEDIAN TIM NORTHERN—10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMEDYSPORTZ IMPROV—Two teams of comics battle it out for your laughs. Suitable for all ages. 7:30 p.m. $9.99. ComedySportz Boise, 4619 Emerald St., Boise, 208-991-4746, boisecomedy.com. IMAGINE DRAGONS—The Las Vegas rockers bring their Smoke and Mirrors Tour to the Taco Bell Arena stage, with special guests Metric and Halsey. 7 p.m. $29.50-$79.50. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1900, tacobellarena.com. ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. MOUNTAIN HOME COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL—Through Aug. 2. $75-$250. mountainhomefestival. com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

MOVE LIVE ON TOUR WITH JULIANNE AND DEREK HOUGH—Check

| SUDOKU

out this brand new stage production showcasing fresh, exciting and high-impact choreography spanning a multitude of different dance styles. 8 p.m. $59.50$89.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261110, mc.boisestate.edu. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Sports & Fitness TREASURE VALLEY ROLLER DERBY—7 p.m. $4-$15. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8497. tvrderby. com.

Citizen COFFEE WITH THE MAYOR OF EAGLE—Share your successes and concerns over a beverage of your choice, courtesy of Eagle Mayor Jim Reynolds. Open to the public; no reservations necessary. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. FREE. Starbucks Eagle Plaza, 228 E. Plaza St.,, Ste. A, Eagle, 208-938-0630.

Religious/Spiritual HALF-DAY ZEN MEDITATION RETREAT—Everyone (including beginners) is welcome at this halfday meditation retreat featuring chanting, sitting and walking meditation. RSVP via email or phone. 8 a.m.-12 p.m. By donation. Boise Institute for Buddhist Studies, 660 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-6616277, bibscenter.org.

SUNDAY AUG. 2 Festivals & Events BOISE CITY SWING VINTAGE JAZZ FESTIVAL—8 p.m. $15$150. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-8716352, boisecityswing.eventbrite. com.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

MCCALL FAMILY FLY-IN AND OPEN HOUSE—7-10 a.m. FREE. McCall Municipal Airport, 336 Deinhard Lane, McCall, 208634-1488, McCallAirportEvents. weebly.com. STAGE STOP MARKET—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE, $20 vendors. Boise Stage Stop, 23801 S. Orchard Access Road, I-84 off Exit 71, Boise, 208-343-1367, boisestagestop.org.

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 19


Get Your

CALENDAR

Tickets

Student Packages Now!

TREASURE VALLEY SINGLES CLUB WEEKLY DANCE—J7:30 p.m. $6-$7. Boise Eagles Lodge, 7025 Overland Road, Boise, 208376-0115, treasurevalleysingles. weebly.com.

On Stage

Citizen

BOISE ROCK SCHOOL CONCERT—Rock out at the library to a concert by kids, for kids of all ages. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-2976700, adalib.org.

MOUNTAIN HOME COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL—Through Aug. 2. $75-$250, mountainhomefestival. com.

STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: CALAMITY JANE—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

COMPASS: TREASURE VALLEY TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS OPEN HOUSE—Join COMPASS for an open house to discuss the future of the Treasure Valley’s transportation system, and review the FY2016-2020 Transportation Improvement Program, a five-year transportation budget for Ada and Canyon counties. Maps, photos and videos will be displayed, with brief presentations by COMPASS and local transportation agency staff at 6 p.m. You’ll be able to review the TIP materials, ask questions and submit your written comments all at once. 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m. FREE. COMPASS: Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho, 700 N.E. Second St., Ste. 200, Meridian. 208-475-2238, compassidaho.org/ prodserv/transimprovement.htm.

Sports & Fitness

Sponsored by Holland and Hart LLP and 107.1 K-HITS

MONDAY AUG. 3

Food

Book and lyrics by Tom Jones, music by Harvey Schmidt

Check ouut ou o r website at

On Stage

HALF-BOGUS TRAINING RIDES— The Half-Bogus Training Rides will be held every Tuesday through Aug. 11. Meet at the Highlands Elementary School parking lot. Tuesdays, 6:20 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11. FREE. Highlands Elementary School, 3434 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-854-5050, boiseschools.org.

PAYETTE BREWING BEER DINNER—Enjoy a three-course meal prepared by Old Chicago, paired with three Payette Brewing beers: Hell Pony Maibock, Blood Orange Outlaw IPA and Hoop & Stave No. 2 Brandy Barrel Aged Belgian Ale. Only 35 spots available; call Old Chicago to reserve your seats. 6 p.m. $40. Old Chicago Pizza Downtown, 730 W. Idaho St., 208-3630037. payettebrewing.com.

Dial “M” for Murder

May 29–Aug 2

By Frederick Knott

On Stage

Sponsored by Hawley Troxell and Idaho Public Television

The Tempest

June 4–July 24

By William Shakespeare Sponsored by Parsons Behle & Latimer and Scene/Treasure Magazines

The Secret Garden

July 3–Aug 30

Book and lyrics by Marsha Norman, music by Lucy Simon, based on the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett Sponsored by Truckstop.com and Boise Weekly

King Lear

Aug 7–27

COMEDIAN TIM NORTHERN—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER—7 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

By William Shakespeare

JASON ISBELL—Jason Isbell’s latest release hit the street July 17, and you can bet the award-winning singer-songwriter will play a slew of new tunes when he hits the Morrison Center stage. 7:30 p.m. $35-$45. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, mc.boisestate.edu.

Sponsored by ArmgaSys, Inc. and Boise State Public Radio

The Fantasticks Photo Credit: Jillian Kates*, Warren Bodily, The Secret Garden (2015). Photo by DKM Photography. *Member Actors’ Equity.

Sea Se e so son Sp S ons on orr

Se son Sea soon Partn Partners tnerss

Season Sea son Me Media dia Pa Partn rtners rtn e ers

Sept 4–27

idahhoshakespearee.org or cal calll 33 3366-92 9 211 M–F M–F,, 10 1 am t o 5 pm

STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com. SVCA SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: TROMBONE SHORTY AND ORLEANS AVENUE—Enjoy a “New Orleans funky night” with Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue, who play hard-edged funk that employs hip-hop beats, rock dynamics and improvisation in a jazz tradition. 7 p.m. $54-$97. River Run Lodge, At the Base of Bald Mountain, Sun Valley, 208622-2133, sunvalleycenter.org.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

TUESDAY AUG. 4 Festivals & Events IMP AUGUST MIXER—Join the Idaho Media Professionals at their monthly mixer for networking and conversation. Food and both alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages will be available. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Ling and Louie’s Asian Bar and Grill, 3210 E. Louise Drive, Meridian, 208-888-5000, idahomediapro. com. MERIDIAN NATIONAL NIGHT OUT—On this evening, residents are encouraged to hold neighborhood gatherings to show solidarity against neighborhood crime and vandalism. Consider hosting a potluck dinner, a pizza party or a pie or ice cream social. To learn more, contact Stefany Galbreaith at the Meridian Police Department. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 208-888-6678, meridiancity.org.

20 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


HARRISON BERRY

ARTS & CULTURE

CULTURE NEWS

IN SEARCH OF HISTORIC BASQUE WHALERS

Basque artist Judas Arrieta views Western culture through an international lens, providing an alternate vision of seemingly familiar themes.

CRITIQUE OR CONTROVERSY?

An international artist is challenging national identity in time for Jaialdi. HARRISON BERRY “One of the things that caught me off guard Once every five years, Boise rolls out the welcome mat for tens of thousands of visitors to have been the Native American caricatures,” he said. the massive Basque festival, Jaialdi, which this Specifically, it was a painting containing the year kicked off on Tuesday, July 28 and will run mascot of the Cleveland Indians baseball team, through Sunday, Aug. 2. It’s almost a full week of Basque music, food, dancing, sports and oth- Chief Wahoo, that caught Morales’ attention. Native American mascots have received er activities. Along with the Twilight Criterium, considerable scrutiny in recent years as civil rights Treefort Music Fest and the Idaho Shakespeare and Native American groups press sports teams to Festival, it’s one of the biggest feathers in the drop the depictions, which many say are offensive City of Trees’ cultural cap. As Boise connects with its Basque roots, Judas and stereotypical. Among the teams that have faced pushback over their mascots are the CleveArrieta is bringing cultural cosmopolitanism to land Indians and Washington Redskins, but there Ming Studios. The artist, who hails from Spain’s are scores of Native AmericanBasque Country, has lovingly themed university, college and filled his paintings with images BOISELAND high-school mascots—among lifted from Americans’ visual Through Saturday, Aug. 22; 11 them, in Idaho, the Boise High vocabulary and filtered them a.m.-6 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays; FREE. Braves. through the mind of a world Ming Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Arrieta’s caricatures could be traveler. Boise, 208-972-9028, mingstuseen as offensive, provocative “I feel like a DJ when I dios.org. or, as Morales put it, “a mirror paint,” Arrieta said. “I take eleto American pop culture”; but ments that don’t belong to me.” Arrieta has shown his work across Europe and Morales felt that the images could be construed in Asia, but this is his first visit to the United States, a negative light. After conferring with Arrieta, he which he called “the Far West.” His impressions of wrote an email to tribal leaders to tell them about Arrieta’s work containing depictions of Native America come primarily from cinema and comic Americans. books. His paintings, part of the Ming Studios “I did not want the work to be isolated or misexhibition Boiseland, are chaotic compositions of understood. It’s a personal responsibility,” Morales caricatures of beret-wearing Basques, cowboys, Native Americans and taglines written in carefully said. “We don’t censor artists. The idea was to be proactive rather than reactive.” imitated fonts. Some of those images startled Arrieta said he views his work in a different Ming Studios founder and Executive Director light entirely, saying that the images of Native Jason Morales, who worried that some viewers Americans are not the only caricatures in his work could find them offensive. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

and that he draws his imagery from the wells of popular culture and his own curiosity, not prejudice or bigotry. “I just want to go [to the United States] like a small child and see what’s going on,” he said. Caricatures are part of a cultural critique implicit in Arrieta’s Boiseland. Boise’s Jaialdi celebration—and much of its promotional material— relies on romanticized images of Basque people, including Basques wearing traditional berets and red, white and green clothing. Representations of Basque people in Arrieta’s paintings share those visual cues, but by juxtaposing them with caricatures from other cultures, Arrieta said he is making a statement about national identity. “All the people I meet here are Basques, but they’re American, too. I’m creating a window to another world,” he said. “I talk about selling the culture. What does it mean to be Basque?” Arrieta’s work has proved popular with its Boise audience, with dozens of people turning out for the July 24 opening of the Boiseland exhibition. The evening was a success even beyond attendance: Arrieta sold nine paintings at the reception, where he mingled with gallery regulars and visitors who had come to celebrate Jaialdi, and discussed his work and love of American Western movies. According to Arrieta, reinvisioning seemingly familiar American cultural images through an international lens is part of what makes his art accessible. “I’m first a universal artist—then I’m Basque,” he said.

Fewer than 50 years after Christopher Columbus made his landings in the Caribbean and at around the same time Ferdinand Magellan embarked on his circumnavigation of the globe, Basque whalers were plying the waters around Newfoundland and Labrador. As early as the 1520s, sailors from the Basque region of the Pyrenees arrived in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, chasing cod across the Atlantic Ocean. By the 1530s, the fishermen had expanded their hunt to include whales and, by the 1540s, had begun to establish a vibrant network of whaling stations at ports along the jagged coastline. Meanwhile, nearly 2,000 miles to the south, it would be 50 years before settlers founded the colony of Jamestown, Va. The history of the first Basque presence in North America is mostly lost amid flashier expeditions such as those of Jacques Cartier, who claimed the land that would become Canada for the French, and Samuel de Champlain, who established New France and the city of Quebec. In honor of Jaialdi 2015, New York-based 5A Incentive Planners is showcasing the late-medieval Basque whaling 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol industry with the Blvd., Boise, 208-333presentation “In 8000. basquewhalers.info the Footsteps of Basque Whalers in Newfoundland and Labrador,” on Thursday, July 30 at the Grove Hotel. “It’s a story that very few people know,” said 5A owner Ignazio Arizmendi, who added that the event is meant to drum up interest for a cruise around the old Basque whaling areas. “We charter a boat and we’re going to sail for a week all around Newfoundland,” he said. Centered on sites including St. John’s, Fogo Island and Red Bay—the latter which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site—“In the Footsteps of Basque Whalers” explores the “bold navigators of yesteryear,” who ventured from the shore in specialized skiffs to harpoon right and gray whales—hauling them back to port for processing into meat and oil for export. The trade, considered by historians to be the first commercial European whaling enterprise, made the Basque home cities among the most prosperous in Europe and set the template for future whaling practices—including the Basque ship design, which remained largely unchanged for 200 years. It was in Red Bay, Arizmendi said, that a sunken galleon was found, establishing the area as a historic site. “In Boise we’re going to do a presentation because we expect a lot of Basque people from all over the world will be there,” he said. —Zach Hagadone BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 21


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MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY JULY 29 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: AMUMA SAYS NO BASQUE NIGHT—4 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza CHAPPO—With Yukon Blonde. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: AMUMA SAYS NO, JULY 29, GROVE PLAZA This week, Alive After Five is technically Alive After Four (the show starts at 4 p.m.) and Jaialdi is turning Boise Basque, something local band Amuma Says No has been doing with audiences since 2006. Amuma Says No—Basque for “Grandma says no”—blends traditional Basque music with contemporary pop, rock and jazz. Four of Amuma’s six members are Amerikanauk (American Basque), and songs are built around the accordion and tambourine and sung in Euskara (Basque language). The band describes its sound as “energetic, exciting, contemporary and unique, like the Basques,” proving that completely on its new release, Gatz and Berakatz (2015). The band has performed not only in Boise but at the Kennedy Center and in the Basque Country as well. Say “yes” to Amuma Says No, but be careful: You might catch a serious case of dancing feet. —BW Staff 4 p.m., FREE, Grove Plaza, 850 W. Front St., amumasaysno.com

22 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

JOE ‘KING’ CARRASCO—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

JEFFERY MARTIN AND ANNA TIVEL—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TRIPLE THREAT AND BEVERLY CAROTHERS—7 p.m. FREE. The Owyhee Penthouse

LIKE A ROCKET—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MOSS ROSES—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

KAITLIN HENDRIX—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District

RATATAT—8 p.m. $23-$45. Knitting Factory

MARY BETH WHITAKER AND SCOTT OLIVER—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

THURSDAY JULY 30

CYMRY—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

ANA POPOVIC—7:30 p.m. $22$27 adv., $27-$32 door. Sapphire Room

DOUGLAS CAMERON—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

BARTON AND BOLLER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

GEORGE DEVORE AND THE DEVIL MAKES FOUR—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GREG AND JOHNNY WITH FRIENDS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 LIL’ SMOKIES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s NATIVE ELOQUENCE—Oaklandbased composer-saxophonist Adam Hirsch. 9 p.m. $TBA. MING Studios PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

DAVE MCT—7 p.m. FREE. ShangriLa EMILY STANTON BAND—10 p.m. FREE. Yacht Club McCall FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: STEVE EATON BAND—6:30 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden HIGHWAY 16 LIVE: CURTIS/SUTTON AND THE SCAVENGERS—6 p.m. FREE. Crooked Flats JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SHON SANDERS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 STEVE AND GRACE WALL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe THE SWIRL—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

MOUNTAIN HOME COUNTRY MUSIC FEST—July 31-Aug. 2. $75$250. mountainhomefestival.com. REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

FRIDAY JULY 31

ROB HARDING—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

BOISE CITY SWING VINTAGE JAZZ FESTIVAL: KINGS OF SWING—8 p.m. $25. Mardi Gras

SHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

DOUGLAS CAMERON—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SAWYER FAMILY—With Urban Outfielders and Gorcias. 9 p.m. $6. The Shredder

SHOT GLASS—8 p.m. FREE. Six Degrees Nampa SLY MOON SUTRA— 10 p.m. $5. Reef

FUNHOUSE—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

SMOOTH AVENUE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

THE HOOT HOOTS—With CAMP and Up Is The Down Is The. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

TALLGRASS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JACK HALE TRIO—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

WIZ KHALIFA—With Tory Lanez and DJ Drama. 7:30 p.m. $40-$85. Ford Idaho Center Amphitheater

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE SATURDAY AUG. 1

MONDAY AUG. 3

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

AFROSONICS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JASON ISBELL—7:30 p.m. $35$45. Morrison Center

BLIND MICE—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s BOISE CITY SWING VINTAGE JAZZ FESTIVAL: FRIM FRAM FOUR—8 p.m. $25. Mardi Gras BUFFALO JAY—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CLAY MOORE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel GAYLE CHAPMAN—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar IMAGINE DRAGONS—With Metric and Halsey. 7 p.m. $30-$80. Taco Bell Arena JEREMY D. WRIGHT—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District K.C. FROM THE BROKEN OUTLAWS—4 p.m. FREE. Artistblue THE LIKE ITS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid SEAN HATTON AND BERNIE REILLY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TUESDAY AUG. 4

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MIKE RUTLEDGE—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s OUTLAW FIELD: MICHAEL FRANTI AND SPEARHEAD—6:30 p.m. $36-$211. Idaho Botanical Garden SEAN HATTON AND BERNIE REILLY—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar SUMMERLAND TOUR 2015— With Everclear, Toadies, Fuel and American Hi Fi. 8 p.m. $20-$135. Revolution

A.J. DAVIDSEN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 AMANDA X—With The Spirit of The Beehive. 7 p.m. $8-$10. The Crux

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

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MANDARIN DYNASTY—With Hoop. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage MICHAEL BLUMENSTEIN—7 p.m. FREE. Crooked Flats MIKE CRAMER AND BALDY MOUNTAIN—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar MOUNTAIN HOME COUNTRY MUSIC FEST—$75-$250. mountainhomefestival.com. REX MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill SACK O’ STOATS—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La SOUL SERENE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

SUNDAY AUG. 2 BERMUDA—With 2X4, The Prestige, Forsythia and Consumption. 6 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. The Crux BOISE CITY SWING VINTAGE JAZZ FEST: PAMELA DEMARCHE SCOTT—8 p.m. $25. Mardi Gras BREAD AND CIRCUS—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar MOUNTAIN HOME COUNTRY MUSIC FEST—$75-$250. mountainhomefestival.com. PATRICIA FOLKNER—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar POSSUM LIVIN’—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

WIZ KHALIFA, JULY 31, FORD IDAHO CENTER With “See You Again ft. Charlie Puth” from the Furious 7 soundtrack smoking up the Billboard chart to stay at No. 1—and the mother-of-his-child drama he’s embroiled in being so public— Wiz Khalifa could be a basket case, but the lanky tattooed rapper always looks so laid-back. Whether Khalifa likes to keep his emotions in check (except on Twitter) or owes his mellow mug to recreational activities—he’s a keen skateboarder and a devoted pot smoker—he seems to store up any extra kinetic energy for use at shows, where he hops, jumps and moves across the stage while delivering rapid-fire lyrics without losing even a modicum of enthusiasm. Khalifa nabbed two MTV Video Music Award nominations— Best Hip-Hop Video and Best Collaboration—and if he wins one or both when the award show airs on Sunday, Aug. 30, it’s a good bet he’ll take it in stride. —Amy Atkins With Tory Lanez and DJ Drama. Doors 6:30 p.m., show 7:30 p.m., $40-$85. 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-4423232, fordidahocenter.com. BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 23


WINESIPPER BASQUE WINES

2014 SENORIO DE ASTOBIZA TXAKOLI, $18.99 Astobiza’s Txakoli (chock-oh-lee) is the official wine of the football club Athletic Bilbao. The vineyards of this tiny region hug the Atlantic coast in the province of Alava. Something like a Vinho Verde, it offers crisp fruit flavors, saline minerality and an oh-sorefreshing finish that’s just the thing on a hot summer day. 2014 SOLAR DE RANDEZ ROSADO, $14.99 This family estate sits just outside the town of Laguardia in the Rioja Alavesa, the Basque region of Rioja. Their rosé is 100 percent garnacha and pours a pale, salmon pink. Bright rhubarb and gooseberry aromas are backed by a touch of clover. The ripe citrus flavors are balanced by a racy hit of acidity, while a hint of mineral comes through on the crisp finish. 2013 GARDACHO GARNACHA, $16.99 This garnacha is composed of grapes from 50-year-old vineyards situated on the slopes of the Pyrenees in Navarre. It offers deep, dark aromas of black cherry and berry. Tart cherry fruit flavors lead off, followed by a ripe berry middle, finishing with a food friendly hit of acidity. A lighter-bodied red perfect for summer sipping. —David Kirkpatrick

24 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

FOOD

KE L S E Y HAWES

The three provinces of the Basque Autonomous Community, along with Navarre, comprise the Spanish side of the Basque country. World renowned for its beauty, the diversity of the landscape and its cuisine, the Basque country also produces some of the finest wines in Spain. In honor of Jaialdi, the celebration of all things Basque that attracts visitors from around the world to Boise, here are three wines from that wonderful community.

FULL STEAM BISTRO AND GRANT’S OPEN Plus beer at Jerry’s Market and popu-up barbecue at Soulcraft TARA MORGAN Boise just got its second steampunk-themed coffee purveyor, Full Steam Bistro. Unlike Stream Coffee & Tea Bike, this coffee shop slings shots in a fixed location—the newly constructed 951 building off East Park Boulevard. Full Steam Bistro, which celebrated its grand opening July 10, offers a selection of Italian-style coffee and espresso drinks made with beans from Seattle’s Caffè Umbria. “When we started up the coffee shop here, we were trying to use somebody local, but the problem was local people were everywhere already. … To be different you have to be different and so we decided to go with Caffé Umbria,” said co-owner Koby Funderburg, who moved to Boise from Portland, Ore., with his wife, Patricia. Full Steam Bistro—which boasts a patio—also serves French pastries from Gaston’s Bakery and a limited assortment of lunch items, like the prosciutto sandwich ($5.95) with prosciutto, salami, Swiss, tomato and arugula on ciabatta. “Right now we have paninis, sandwiches, salads, we have soups, we have smoothies, we have pizza margherita, we do parfaits, oatmeal, we do breakfast wraps,” said Funderburg. “So it’s not a large menu, but whatever we do we want to make sure it’s going to be the best quality we can put into it.” The spot’s steampunk aesthetic, which Funderburg describes as “old world tries to become new,” includes a handful of industrial light fixtures and an antique exhaust fan from an old wood mill. “We’re going to continue to put more decorations up,” said Funderburg. “The next step is we have some mechanical gears going up that are going to be spinning at all times on top of the shelving.” Full Steam is described on Facebook as a coffee shop/beer garden, but the suds aren’t flowing yet—Funderburg is currently applying for a beer and wine license. For more info on Full Steam Bistro, visit fullsteam920.com. Speaking of beer and wine licenses, Jerry’s 27th Street Market just received one. Now patrons can enjoy Hiral and Jerry Fandel’s eclectic assortment of homemade Indian dishes and Chicago-style specialty sandwiches with icy cold beverages.

Full Steam Bistro brings a steampunk aesthetic to The 951 building off East Park Boulevard.

“You’re able to get any of our beers in our cooler and drink out on our patio along with the food,” said Hiral. “We also started doing local live music on Friday evenings.” Currently, Jerry’s only offers food in the warmer months—Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hiral said beginning Monday, Aug. 3, Jerry’s will open at 7 a.m. to offer grab-and-go breakfast items. For more info on Jerry’s 27th Street Market, call 208-344-0302. In opening news, Grant’s Neighborhood Grill is now offering farm-to-table fare at 1835 W. Cherry Lane in Meridian. The small bistro is owned by Mike Grant, owner of Papa Joe’s Italian Restaurant and Bar across from Boise State University on Capitol Boulevard. “Everything’s organic, everything’s fresh,” said self-described “Marketing Guy” Kristian Hohenbrink. “We shop literally every day. There’s no food trucks, so in other words there’s no Sysco and distribution.” Chef Aaron Sheets sources products from local purveyors, including Sweet Valley Family Farms, Acme Bakery and M&N Cattle. Sheets’ “New American” menu includes items like the spinach and fennel salad ($8) with pickled red onions, house-made bacon lardons, crumbled blue cheese and fresh berry vinaigrette; braised pork belly ($9) served over apple and potato puree with herb coulis; and a jerky board ($8) with house-made beef jerky, pickled red onions and a petite green salad. The bistro also offers rotating seasonal chalkboard specials. In addition to a full bar, Grant’s Neighborhood Grill also has an outdoor patio with live music on Saturdays after 8 p.m. Hohenbrink said brunch offerings will join the menu in the next couple of weeks. Grant’s is currently open 10 a.m.-10 p.m., seven days a week, and will host an official grand opening party in the middle of

August. For more info, call 208-884-4278 or visit facebook.com/grantsgrillmeridian. In more meaty news, Soulcraft Barbecue has a pop-up shop set up at the Indian Lakes Golf Club, at 4700 S. Umatilla Ave. Every Friday night from 6 to 9 p.m., pitmaster Greg Newton serves an assortment of slow-cooked favorites like brisket, pork shoulder, tri-tip and pork spare ribs. “I’m kind of a traditionalist,” said Newton. “It’s an all-wood fire. Long cooks if you’re doing brisket, pork shoulder.” In addition to his scratch-made sides—like potato salad with new and sweet potatoes, red pepper coleslaw, mac ’n’ cheese and ranch-style pinto beans—Newton also offers a range of unique barbecue sauces. “We’ve got three sauces: the Austin, which is more of a central Texas-style; the Charleston, which is basically our take on a South Carolina mustard-style sauce; and the other one I just call our Original sauce, which is basically the first sauce that I came up with that I ended up making more than once,” said Newton. “They’re all very vinegar-based; none of them are super sweet.” Though Newton is reluctant to define his barbecue style by any particular region, he said he’s drawn to the “simple, time-proven” central Texas approach. When Newton took a trip to Austin, Texas, he made friends with pitmaster John Lewis, of La Barbecue, one of the town’s most buzzed about barbecue trailers with a line that snakes down the street. Lewis is now helping Newton design a custom barbecue pit. “He’s kind of like my technical consultant on the pit construction,” Newton said. In addition to his Friday night pop-ups at Indian Lakes, Newton also offers off-site catering. You can find Soulcraft Barbecue on Facebook, facebook.com/soulcraftbarbecue, or contact Greg Newton directly at 702-355-5858 or greg@ soulcraftbarbecue.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


SCREEN WOODY ALLEN GETS AWAY WITH MURDER

Joaquin Phoenix rises again in Irrational Man GEORGE PRENTICE In the opening frames of Irrational Man, we see Joaquin Phoenix as a whiskey-soaked professor Joaquin Phoneix (right) is so fine in Woody Allen’s Irrational Man that his acting trumps one of the truly worst performances of the summer from Emma Stone (left). Abe Lucas—his flask is rarely out of reach— weaving his own id through Franz Kafka’s nearly derailed his filmmaking once again. There found the perfect companion piece to Crimes theories of morality and murder. A few moments later, we hear Emma Stone as Jill, a naive and Misdemeanors, which so aptly considered the isn’t a single frame in this film in which Stone comes across as a believable, and I’m afraid she’s immorality of taking a fellow human’s life. college student. In a less-than-poetic narrative, dangerously close to living in James Franco-land, One of the best things I can say about Irratioshe says of the malcontented Lucas, “I think he a place where they don’t say no to many film nal Man is that this murder mystery really isn’t was crazy from the beginning.” Deep into the much of a mystery at all. Allen’s economical script projects. Memo to Emma Stone: Sit some out. film, we hear Lucas again: “I’m Abe Lucas; and is built on a sober, through-line narrative in which You’re a fine actress, but please be patient. Wait I have murdered.” Therein lies the quite typical for the appropriate roles and, for goodness sakes, the audience knows exactly where it’s heading: frame of Irrational Man, an atypical dramatic stop saying “yes” to every project. achievement from writer/director Woody Allen. Cold-blooded murder (thus, the film’s R rating). On a positive note, kudos for the superb use To that end, I found Allen’s story similar to a Allen has been down this road before, but he of the Ramsey Lewis Trio’s classic 1965 recordclassic episode of the 1970’s TV series has rarely been better, and he ing of “The In Crowd” as the foundation of Columbo, where the viewers identify has Joaquin Phoenix to thank. IRRATIONAL MAN (R ) Irrational Man’s soundtrack. It swings and sways the murderer and the crime at the It is in Phoenix’s performance Directed by Woody Allen when necessary and even occasionally tightens the outset, but spend the next 90 minutes that Irrational Man exudes Starring Joaquin proceedings, almost like a noose. It’s Allen’s best unraveling what at first appears to be a a tension and authenticity Phoenix, Emma Stone use of music since his Gershwin-themed 1979 perfect murder until some element of making this Allen’s best full-on opus, Manhattan. imperfection is ultimately revealed. drama since 1989’s Crimes and Opens Friday, Aug. 7 at The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton For the record, I’m a huge fan of Phoenix and Unfortunately, Joaquin Phoenix is Misdemeanors. St., 208-342-4288, can even excuse some of his odd career choices. saddled with carrying a bit too much of Allen has danced with death theflicksboise.com. In fact, there are times when I think he chanthe water when it comes to the acting on the big screen on multiple nels his acting skills from another era. Many of in Irrational Man. He’s opposite an occasions, but he had nearly his performances have more in common with embarrassing (and perhaps irrational) miscastworn out his dance card when it came to hackMontgomery Clift, James Dean or even a young ing of Emma Stone as a college co-ed and Lucas’ neyed plots of the “perfect murder” in multiple Marlon Brando. In Irrational Man, it’s no mystery flops and near-misses: Cassandra’s Dream, Match paramour. Stone nearly mucks up the entire he’s one of the best of his generation. Because of proceedings and is apparently the latest in AlPoint, Scoop and the ever-dreadful Manhattan his performance alone, Irrational Man is already len’s infatuation with casting young actresses as Murder Mystery. In Irrational Man—primarily due to Phoenix’s performance—Allen has finally fictional nymphs—and his apparent obsession has one of my favorites of the year.

SCREEN EXTRA 39 ROOMS FILM FESTIVAL PRESENTS BASQUE SHORT FILMS AT MING STUDIOS Think of it like a sequel. In 2014, The Modern Hotel and Bar raised the curtain on its 39 Rooms Film Festival, a permanent festival of independently produced short films that were screened at the landBOISE WEEKLY.COM

mark Boise hotel. Now 39 Rooms organizers have teamed up with Ming Studios to expand the festival by showing 15 Basque short films in celebration of this week’s Jaialdi Festival, set to take place July 29-Aug. 2. “Some of these films are really great, and a couple in particular are spectacular,” said Modern co-owner Robert Tullis. “These Basque films

are some of the best films I’ve seen all year long.” Screenings of the Basque shorts are at 9 p.m. Thursday, July 30; Friday, July 31; and Saturday, Aug. 1 at Ming Studios. Admission is $5, each showing runs about an hour and five films will be shown each night. “I’m excited to be contributing to the Boise community by opening

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a forum for artists and filmmakers, providing access to more types of cultural resources,” said Ming Studios founder and Executive Director Jason Morales. —Keleah Pinto See the ad in this week’s Boise Weekly or visit mingstudios.org for a full list of films.

208.342.100ōņ¬ 1025 Main Street On the corner of main & 11th Tues–sat 9–6 BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 25


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51 Asian capital 52 Canadian N.H.L. team, on scoreboards 53 Lender’s security 55 Dearie 56 Loped 59 Long, in Lahaina 60 Damage to a wall made in hanging a picture 62 Mouth, slangily

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BY ELLEN LEUSCHNER AND JEFF CHEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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AVIONICS TECHNICIAN OK3 AIR, a certified FAA 145 Repair Station located at the Utah Heber Valley airport, is hiring an Avionics Technician. Job duties include, but are not limited to performing scheduled and unscheduled Aircraft Avionics maintenance including trouble shooting and installation. A FCC License and minimum of two years Avionics experience are required. Benefits after 60 days, including health insurance and matching 401k are offered. This is a full time position. Hours are M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm. Salary dependent upon experience. OK3 AIR is a pre-employment drug testing employer .Please email resume to: maintenanceadmin@ok3air.com. No phone calls please.

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34 ____ contendere 37 Hooey 39 Short lines at the checkout? 40 To whom Dionne Warwick asked “What’s it all about?” in a 1967 hit 43 Idol worshiper? 45 From scratch 47 Idol worship 50 ____ of Abraham (place of comfort)

24 Like dough after baking 25 Actress Suvari of “American Beauty” 26 Mercedes-Benz competitor 27 Panama part 28 Remove a piece from? 29 “The Phantom Menace” in the “Star Wars” series 31 Feminist of 1970s TV 32 “Silas Marner” girl 33 Chemical ending

1 Drug charge? 6 Petition 10 War ____ 13 Govt. health org. 16 Conductor’s resistance 17 Mark’s replacement 18 Laugh syllable 19 Scenic drapery fabric 21 Novella that served as the basis for “Apocalypse Now”

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63 Comment that might start with 96-Across 64 Maui or Bali: Abbr. 65 Having more liabilities than assets 66 Secret spot 68 Catch 69 Milan’s La ____ 71 Primitive kind of camera 72 Fracking opening 73 Atlanta sch. 74 Some written rants 76 StubHub purchase: Abbr. 79 Like fine wine 81 It may be filled in with a No. 2 pencil 82 Postpone 83 Paris’s ____-Coeur 85 Batting positions 87 “Aargh!” 89 Drinking songs? 91 Go after following a hung jury, say 92 “Casablanca” escape-route city 93 50 or more people? 95 Tour grp. since 1950 96 “Incidentally,” in a text 97 Button material 99 Biblical spy 101 “Friday the 13th” movies, e.g. 106 Sign up to receive email alerts, say 107 Like 108 Tree spirit 110 Jordan’s Queen ____ International Airport 111 Hollywood director Sam 112 Tightrope walker’s concern 115 Unlike wild horses 116 Multinational bank 117 Cry outside an airport 118 Glacial ridges 119 Ending with walk or run 120 Idiot 121 River with a “dreadful shore,” in Shakespeare 122 They line many ski runs

DOWN 1 Sound like a bird 2 Certain Arabian 3 Soar above the sea, say 4 Fed, e.g.: Abbr.

5 Quaint sign starter 6 Caution for drivers on city streets 7 Party on a beach 8 Blows it 9 “Ready for takeoff!” 10 Pair of figures in Raphael’s “Sistine Madonna” 11 Remains 12 Rubber stamps 13 Change places 14 Avoidance maneuver 15 Priests, e.g. 16 “Heavens!” 19 “You have a point” 20 Tangle up 22 Greens ____ 23 What L.A. is represented in twice 30 Baseball’s Buck 31 Place to set a trap 35 Poet’s planet 36 Tax dodger’s discovery 38 Madeline of “What’s Up, Doc?” 40 Put an end to 41 French play that inspired an Italian opera 42 1987 Michael Douglas/ Glenn Close blockbuster 44 Tire hazard 46 Palestinian political group 48 ____ Fein (Irish political group) 49 Savory dish with a crust 51 Toy poodles, e.g. 54 Nothing 56 Old Olds 57 Santa Claus player in a 2003 comedy 58 “Clair de Lune” composer 61 “Dancing With the Stars” judge Goodman 62 Ogle 65 “But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks?” e.g.

96 Undeserved reputation 98 Woman of Camelot 100 “The Lord of the Rings” creature 102 Not keep up 103 Like Navy SEALs 104 Some contents of a Masonic manual 105 “____ who?” 108 “Darn!” 109 Classic theater name 113 Mork and Worf 114 Jackie’s Onassis

67 “Yeah, whatever you say” 70 Singer with the 1997 3x platinum single “How Do I Live” 75 Ski area in the Wasatch Mountains 76 Small, dirty, uncomfortable room 77 The middle of this puzzle’s grid, symbolically 78 Ship window 80 Game with rings 83 Nursery purchases 84 Heart test, for short 86 Ivy League home 87 Certain angels 88 Great Plains Indian 89 Mythical monsters 90 Simple solution 94 Mimosa, for one L A S T S I F T

A R I A

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I B Q I S T P T A S E R I R E D E N E R S O N O R T U O T E T E T R A T Q U I U N T A W R I K S S E

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Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S E A R E D

M I S T S

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G A T E A M U R S I N G L I S A A N N T G I D E U C S P I U S C T J H E C E P R E S S U P T U S A P T C G O C E N R A L S U T F O N E I L E R N E

A S S U O M V E E N C A A N N T Y O P O R T E R

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BOISE WEEKLY.COM


COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Now accepting Visa/Mastercard. Call or text Richard at 208-6959492.

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS JULY SPECIAL Shu’s Idaho Running Company is donating food to the Idaho Foodbank

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for the month of July. Bring in two cans of food and as a thank you, receive $10 off any regularly priced pair of shoes! 1758 W State St. MERIDIAN ARTS COMMISSION NEED YOU What kind of public art do you want to see in Meridian?We want your feedback! Look through each of the current public art finalists here: http:// www.meridiancity.org/local_government.aspx?id=20022 and send in your opinions and comments by July 31, 2015 to Hillary Bodnar: hbodnar@meridiancity.org. NOTHING BUNDT CAKES AUGUST SPECIAL! If you haven’t had our cakes, now is a great time to come in! August 3-6 buy 3 get 1 free bundlets. 1400 N Eagle Rd in Meridian. www.nothingbundtcakes.com. TATTOO SUPPLIES AND BODY JEWELRY Symmetry Studio & Supply is a new business located in Meridian that specializes in tattoo supplies and body jewelry. I focus on high quality product that speaks for itself, at a price that makes you happy to

look again and again and again. It’s my job to make you happy to walk in the door. THURSDAY NIGHT RUN/WALK AT IDAHO RUNNING COMPANY Join our Mileage Club and Earn Great Prizes! Regardless of rain, snow, sleet or hail we meet for a 3, 4, and 5 mile run/walk every Thursday night. It takes place year round and is a great way to meet new running or walking buddies. All abilities are welcome! The Run/ Walk starts at 5:30 p.m. sharp. First timers should come a few minutes early to sign up. 1758 W. State Street- or call 344-6604.

CRISIS

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OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

EVENTS

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

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(208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com KATRINA: I’m a velvety soft snuggler and head bonker. Let’s brighten each other’s lives.

GENE: I’ll be the best cat you’ve ever had. We’ll have playtime, cuddling, and more.

BELLE: I’m a soft sweetheart who loves being brushed and petted—let me show you.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

FAMILY

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

MCDONALD’S ‘SECRET’ MENU There may be no place on earth less exclusive than McDonald’s. It’s harder to get into most gas station bathrooms than it is to pop a squat at Mickey-D’s. Still, everyone likes to feel special. For those who seek an elite fast-food experience, there is the McDonald’s Secret Menu. Hitherto only whispered about on the kinds of websites where gluttony meets monomania, the clandestine board of fare was reportedly confirmed by an anonymous McDonald’s manager from Scotland during an “Ask Me Anything” session on Reddit. Since then, the curtain has been lifted on such culinary oddities as the “Land, Sea and Air” burger (beef, fish and chicken); “Big McChicken” (a Big Mac with chicken instead of buns); and the egregiously named “McGangbang” (a McChicken sandwich jammed inside a McDouble burger). secretmenus.com If the latter isn’t Caligulean for you, try the “Monster Mac”—described by whoever runs secretmenus.com as eight beef patties stacked atop one another in a “jaw-dropping creation.” Lest we overhype the secrecy of this so-called “secret menu,” the unnamed Scottish McDonald’s manager made it clear—as did McDonald’s management—that most of the unofficial items are either “grill orders,” meaning they’re no different than asking to hold the pickles on a Big Mac, or do-it-yourself projects. In other words, if you really want a McGangbang, order a McChicken and a McDouble and mash them together at your table (and get ready for the disgusted looks of your fellow eaters). —Zach Hagadone BOISE WEEKLY.COM

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. JYNX: 8-year-old, male, Siamese mix. Extremely friendly. Does well with other mature animals. Good with kids. Prefers a settled environment. (Kennel 112- #14839239)

SNOWFUR: 3-year-old, female, Siamese mix. Chatty, engaging, curious and playful. Enjoys attention and being brushed. Lean and lanky physique. (Kennel 101- 27706802)

SARAH: 9-week-old, female, domestic medium hair. Nervous little thing. Needs a relaxed home. Ready to do lots of cuddling and socializing. (Kennel 106- #28630038)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT VIANEY: 9-week-old, female, domestic medium hair. Loves toys and playing with other cats. Will add lots of entertainment to any home. (Kennel 109#28268348)

MOOSE: 8-year-old, male, German shepherd/Labrador retriever mix. Good with older kids. Needs a cat-free home. Prefers calm dogs. (Kennel 414#26956163)

BEAUTY: 7-year-old, female, Labrador retriever. Good with older kids. Would prefer to be an only pet or fed separately from other dogs. (Kennel 417#7294788)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 27


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Sockeye Brewery. Food vendors include: Kona Grill, Big Al’s and Waffle Me Up, and more. Join us! Produced by Plan Ahead Events and presented by the City of Meridian.

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KLEINER PARK LIVE Summer Schedule: August 6th – Hillfolk Noir. August 13th – The Fabulous Chancellors,Pre-concert activities begin at 5:30 p.m. and the concerts run from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Kleiner Park is located at 1900 N. Records Ave, right behind the Village at Meridian at Eagle and Fairview. Beer and wine garden provided by

TOO HOT! Misting systems installed & proper-

someone to come along and corrupt you. Succumb to the darkness yourself.” The text in the advertisement for this product adds, “Follow your nightmares... Plot your own nefarious path.” Although this counsel is slightly funny to me, I’m too moral and upright to recommend it to you—even now, when I think there would be value in you being less nice and polite and agreeable than you usually are. So I’ll tinker with Evil Supply’s message to create more suitable advice: “For the greater good, follow your naughty bliss. Be a leader with a wild imagination. Nudge everyone out of their numbing routines. Sow benevolent mischief that energizes your team.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Much of the action in the world’s novels takes place inside buildings, according to author Robert Bringhurst, but characters in older Russian literature are an exception, he says. They are always out in the forests, traveling and rambling. In accordance with astrological omens, I suggest you draw inspiration from the Russians’ example in the coming days. As often and as long as you can, put yourself in locations where the sky is overhead. Nature is the preferred setting, but even urban spots are good. Your luck, wisdom and courage are likely to increase in direct proportion to how much time you spend outdoors.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Every time you resist acting on your anger and instead restore yourself to calm, it gets easier,” writes psychologist Laura Markham in Psychology Today. In fact, neurologists claim that by using your willpower in this way, “you’re actually rewiring your brain.” The more you practice, the less likely it is that you will be addled by rage in the future. I see the coming weeks as an especially favorable time for you to do this work, Scorpio. Keeping a part of your anger alive is good, of course—sometimes you need its energy to motivate constructive change. But you would benefit from culling the excess.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Has a beloved teacher disappointed you? Are there inspirational figures about whom you feel conflicted because they don’t live up to all your high standards? Have you become alienated from a person who gave you a blessing but later expressed a flaw you find hard to overlook? Now would be an excellent time to seek healing for rifts like these. Outright forgiveness is one option. You could also work on deepening your appreciation for how complicated and paradoxical everyone is. One more suggestion: Meditate on how your longing for what’s perfect might be an enemy of your ability to benefit from what’s merely good.

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LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I am very much in love with no one in particular,” says actor Ezra Miller. His statement would make sense coming out of your mouth right about now. So would this one: “I am very much in love with almost everyone I encounter.” Or this one: “I am very much in love with the wind and moon and hills and rain and rivers.” Is this going to be a problem? How will you deal with your overwhelming urge to overflow? Will you break people’s hearts and provoke uproars everywhere you go, or will you rouse delight and bestow blessings? As long as you take yourself lightly, I foresee delight and blessings. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In her io9.com article on untranslatable words, Esther Inglis-Arkell defines the Chinese term wei-wuwei as “conscious non-action ... a deliberate and principled decision to do nothing whatsoever, and to do it for a particular reason.” In my astrological opinion, the coming days would be a favorable time to explore and experiment with this approach. I think you will reap wondrous benefits if you slow down and rest in the embrace of a pregnant pause. The mysteries of silence and emptiness will be rich resources. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I always liked side-paths, little dark back alleys behind the main

road—there one finds adventures and surprises, and precious metal in the dirt.” The character named Dmitri Karamazov makes that statement in Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov. Now I’m thinking that you might like to claim his attitude as your own. Just for a while, you understand. Not forever. The magic of the side paths and back alleys may last for no more than a few weeks, and then gradually fade. In the meantime, the experiences you uncover there could be fun and educational. I do have one question for you, though: What do you think Dmitri meant by “precious metal in the dirt”? Money? Gold? Jewelry? Was he speaking metaphorically? I’m sure you’ll find out. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Sometimes the road less traveled is less traveled for a reason,” says comedian Jerry Seinfeld. His implication is that rejecting traditional strategies and conventional wisdom doesn’t always lead to success. As a professional rebel myself, I find it painful to agree even a little bit with that idea, but I do think it’s applicable to your life right now. For the foreseeable future, compulsive nonconformity is likely to yield mediocrity. Putting too much emphasis on being unique rather than on being right might distract you from the truth. My advice: Stick to the road more traveled.

28 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I expect you to be in a state of constant birth for the next three weeks. Awakening and activation will come naturally. Your drive to blossom and create may be irresistible, bordering on unruly. Does that sound overwhelming? I don’t think it will be a problem as long as you cultivate a mood of amazed amusement about it. (P.S. This upsurge is a healthy response to the dissolution that preceded it.) VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Expiration dates loom. Fond adieus and last laughs and final hurrahs are on tap. Unfinished business is begging you to give it your smartest attention while there’s still time to finish it with elegance and grace. So here’s my advice for you, my on-the-verge friend: Don’t save any of your tricks, ingenuity or enthusiasm for later. This is the later you’ve been saving them for. You are more ready than you realize to try what has always seemed improbable or inconceivable before now. Here’s my promise: If you handle these endings with righteous decisiveness, you will ensure bright beginnings in the weeks after your birthday. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A company called Evil Supply sells a satirical poster that contains the following quote: “Be the villain you were born to be. Stop waiting for

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): French and Italian readers may have no problem with this horoscope. But Americans, Canadians, Brits, and Aussies might be offended, even grossed out. Why? Because my analysis of the astrological omens compels me to conclude that “moist” is a central theme for you right now. Research has shown that many speakers of the English language find the sound of the word “moist” equivalent to hearing fingernails scratching a chalkboard. If you are one of those people, I apologize. But the fact is, you will go astray unless you stay metaphorically moist. You need to cultivate an attitude that is damp but not sodden; dewy but not soggy; sensitive and responsive and lyrical, but not overwrought or weepy or histrionic. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Which signs of the zodiac are the most expert sleepers? Who best appreciates the healing power of slumber and feels the least shame about taking naps? Which of the 12 astrological tribes are most inclined to study the art of snoozing and use their knowledge to get the highest quality renewal from their time in bed? My usual answer to these questions would be Taurus and Cancer, but I’m hoping you Pisceans will vie for the top spot in the coming weeks. It’s a very favorable time for you to increase your mastery of this supreme form of self-care. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


com or call 344-2055 for a quote. SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SHASTA IN MATTER OF THE ADOPTION PETITION OF: WYATT JAMES PRINDIVILLEMORERO Adopting Parent Case No.: 14A5547 CITATION TO PARENT THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO: GINGER YOUNG By order of this court you are hereby advised that you may appear before the judge presiding in Department 11 of this court on 9/16/2015 at 4:00 p.m. then and there to show cause, if any you have, why WYATT JAMES PRINDIVILLE-MORERO should not be declared free from your custody and control for the purpose of freeing WYATT JAMES PRINDIVILLE-MORERO for placement for adoption. The following information concerns rights and procedures that relate to this proceeding for the termination of custody and control of said minor as set forth in Family Code Section 7860 et seq.: 1. At the beginning of the proceeding the court will consider whether or not the interests of the minor child require the appointment of counsel. If the court finds that the interests of the minor do require such protection, the court will appoint counsel to represent him, whether or not he is able to afford counsel. The minor will not be present in court unless he requests or the court so orders. 2. If a parent of the minor appears without counsel and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless the parent knowingly and intelligently waives the right to be represented by counsel. The court will not appoint the same counsel to represent both the minor and his parent. 3. The court may appoint either the public defender or private counsel. If private counsel is appointed,

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he or she will receive a reasonable sum for compensation and expenses, the amount of which will be determined by the court. The amount must be paid by the real parties in interest, but not by the minor, in such proportions as the court believes to be just. If, however, the court finds that any of the real parties in interest cannot afford counsel, the amount will be paid by the county. 4. The court may continue the proceeding for not more than thirty (30) days as necessary to appoint counsel to become acquainted with the case. Date: JAN 16 2015 PUB July 15, 22, 29 and August 5,2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Shawn Dale Hansen. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1511200 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Shawn Dale Hansen, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Shannon Marissa Hansen. The reason for the change in name is: This name better suits my identity. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Sept. 08, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 11, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB July 15,22,29 and August 5, 2015. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN IN THE ESTATE OF DOMINIC DEL DUCA, Case No. CV IE 15-08654 that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the abovenamed decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent

or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Christine Del Duca C/O Susan Lynn Mimura & Associates PLLC, 3451 E. Copper Point Dr., Ste 106, Meridian, ID 83642. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN IN THE ESTATES OF SHERYLYN JEAN CROSS AND ARBY DANIEL CROSS Case No. CV IE 15-10300 that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the abovenamed decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Danica Cross C/O Susan Lynn Mimura & Associates PLLC, 3451 E. Copper Point Dr., Ste 106, Meridian, ID 83642.

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AT COSTA VIDA DOWNTOWN I watched you meticulously use your last tortilla as a napkin, and then you ATE it! Still trying to decide if you are super-gross or an absolute genius. Hello, I was leaving the Balcony, walking home, suddenly a man with his bicycle stopped me to say that he loves my hair. I blushed. I just wanted to let you know that you made my day. Thank you.

BW CONFESSIONS I WIPED THE BEST I COULD When we went camping in June- I lied about what happened to your towel....I feel really badly, but the combination of nachos and smores really got to my stomach. Anyways, hope it washed out and I hope you forgive me.

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Simply Cats Adoption Center sells low cost spay/neuter vouchers? For more information, call 208-3437177. ONE STOP EXOTIC REPTILE SHOP Boise’s Rockin Reptile carries an exotic variety of reptiles and amphibians: chameleons, dart and tree frogs and green tree python just to name a few. Specialty orders custom cages available! Open Tues-Sat 10-6, Sun 12-5 and Mon appt. only. Come in and see us today: 2210 S. Broadway Ave. or call J.C. at 571-0400.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | 29


PAGE BREAK TOP 10

FORECAST

Biggest Wildfires in Idaho

Jon Stewar t : “ You’ve also got senioritis. What do you got, a b o u t a yea r ? ” Barack Obama : “ You know, I c an’t believe that you’re leaving before me.”

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

1. Great Fire of 1910: 3 million acres (August 1910) 2. Murphy Complex: 652,016 acres (July 2007) 3. Mustang Complex: 332,000 acres (July 2012)

Dear Minerva, I’ve been considering taking PrEP [Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, brand name Truvada, is a pill that prevents HIV infection], but I’m worried about how people will react. I don’t want to stop using condoms, but life happens sometimes, right? I hear “Truvada Whore” tossed around often, and it gives me a stomach ache every time I do. I really just want to protect myself, and I think this might be a good way, but I honestly don’t think I have the courage to deal with the haters. What do you think? —Needing a PrEP Talk

#boiseweeklypic

— J O N STE WA RT TA L KI N G 4. Long Butte: 306,000 acres, (August 2010)

TO PRES I DE NT BA R AC K OBAMA DURING HIS L AST I NTERVI E W WITH TH E

5. Foothills: 257,000 acres, (August 1992) 6. Cox Wells: 219,000 acres, (August 1996) 7. Idaho City Complex: 154,000 acres, (July 1994)

Dear PrEP Talk, You don’t have the courage to deal with the haters? Do you have the courage to deal with HIV or passing it along to a partner? Taking charge of your sexual health is not shameful and doesn’t make you a whore. If you want to start PrEP and you think it is right for your sexual wellbeing, do it. Yes, life happens, but PrEP will not protect you from other STDs and STIs, and there have been significant STD breakouts in Idaho. Don’t ditch the condoms: You owe it to yourself and your partners to be as responsible as possible. With more than 50,000 new cases of HIV in the United States each year, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of treatment, because sugar, there is no cure. Talk to your doctor about PrEP, including cost, insurance coverage and side effects.

8. Jefferson: 109,000, acres (July 2010) 9. Sundance: 56,000 acres (August 1967) 10. Cramer: 13,845 acres (July 2003)

PRESIDENT, JULY 21.

“ When I see a Jell- O p udding , it c o m e s f l o o d i ng b a ck . B i l l C o s by, that encounter, that one time, played a major fac tor in the direc tion my life took, toward the dark side.” — S A M M I E MAY S , A WRITER

Source: National Interagency Fire Center

WH O S A I D C O S BY ATTAC KE D H E R I N 1 9 8 6 AT A TELE VISION CONVENTION, SPE A KI NG FOR A

Sweet Shots! Espresso Dolce Fine shots at Full Steam Bistro. Delizioso! Taken by Instagram user dr_kelso.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT “How many people do you think will attend Jaialdi 2015?”

0-10,000: 11.48% 10,000-20,000: 22.95% 20,000-40,000: 32.79% 40,000+: 32.79%

N E W YO RK M AG A ZI N E

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

A RTIC LE.

Disclaimer: This online poll is not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s amp le of l o c a l, statewi d e o r n ati o n a l o p i n i o n.

73

3/3/1

11

704

5,892

10

500

Acres burned in the Boise Foothills after a cyclist lit used toilet paper on fire. (Bureau of Land Management)

Suppression efforts took three helicopters, three single-engine air tankers and one heavy air tanker, as well as ground crews. (BLM)

Institutions in the Idaho Department of Correction. (Idaho Department of Correction)

Women incarcerated in Idaho as of Dec. 2014. (IDOC)

Men incarcerated in Idaho as of Dec. 2014. (IDOC)

People on death row in Idaho—nine men and one woman. (IDOC)

Boiseans who belong to Euzkaldunak, Boise’s Basque club. (jaialdi.com)

30 | JULY 29 – AUGUST 4, 2015 | BOISEweekly

30,00040,000 People expected to attend Jaialdi 2015. (euzkaldunak.com)

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Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue 06  

Ongi Ettori: Be a Jalaldi here with our A-to-Z guide of all things Basque

Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue 06  

Ongi Ettori: Be a Jalaldi here with our A-to-Z guide of all things Basque