Page 1

BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

M AY 2 7 – J U N E 2 , 2 0 1 5

“Try to go a bit beyond the University of Google.”

7

Signs Traffic of box a artStruggle contract stirs up a ruckus among sign makers

18

Crown Jewell

Eilen Jewell’s new album explores the good, bad and ugly of her home state

VO L U M E 2 3 , I S S U E 4 9

NEWS 9

20

Beer and BIM

Boise International Market celebrates first World Village Festival with special brew FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com Associate Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, John Rember, Ben Schultz Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2015 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE YOU PAID FOR VITO BARBIERI TO ATTEND A BILL MILL CONFERENCE IN DALLAS On May 22, a video from an Atlanta TV station started popping up in my Facebook news feed. The headline read “The Back Room: Where Georgia Bills are Made.” The segment detailed a reporter’s failed attempt to access a meeting between state lawmakers and representatives of the American Legislative Exchange Council. The station’s outrage at being denied entry was followed by a shocked explainer of what ALEC is: a conservative, free market think-tank that writes corporate-driven “model” legislation that its member-lawmakers then introduce as their own at statehouses around the country. While people in Atlanta—and on my Facebook feed—are all riled up about ALEC, it seems like a good time to remind BW readers about an Associated Press report that came out on May 12, which detailed the travel expenses of Idaho lawmakers. The legislator who ran up the highest bills was Dalton Gardens Republican Rep. Vito Barbieri, with $9,689 for in- and out-of-state travel. Barbieri is well known as an arch-conservative from North Idaho, whose first act once elected in 2010 was to propose the state nullify Obamacare. Since then, he has been on the far-right fringe of almost every major issue to come up at the capitol. He’s also a committed member of ALEC, traveling to the group’s conferences in 2012, 2013 and 2014. His attendance in Salt Lake City in 2012 and Dallas in 2014, according to reports, were at taxpayer expense—$1,226 for the 2014 conference alone. In a video posted to YouTube following the 2013 ALEC gathering in Chicago, Barbieri said he’s drawn to the group for “its fellowship of like-minded individuals looking at conservative principles and ideologies to take home and, you know, implement.” It’s also a good emotional support group, apparently. “It’s good to know that I’m not off,” he said. “That we are espousing an important ideology here in terms of free markets.” You don’t need a think-tank to see that there may well be something “off” about a lawmaker who “espouses” small government and low taxation while asking citizens to foot the bill for his “fellowship” meetings with corporate lobbyists. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Veiko Valencia TITLE: “Process of Conflict #6” MEDIUM: Oil on Bristol paper ARTIST STATEMENT: As an immigrant from Peru, I have experienced many confrontations in the U.S. that involve issues of culture and identity. There is pressure on newcomers in America to assimilate and accommodate to the culture. Ironically, I have seen this within minority groups, each expecting the “others” to adapt to the American system.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

What you missed this week in the digital world.

METHADON’T POLICE ARE LOOKING FOR A MAN SUSPECTED OF ROBBING A MERIDIAN ME THADONE CLINIC ON MAY 26. DESCRIBED AS WHITE, ABOUT 5-FEE T, 6-INCHES TALL AND WEIGHING 130 P O U N D S , H E WA S L AST S E E N WE A RI N G A DARK BLUE HOODIE, JE ANS AND A WHITE BANDANNA , AND DRIVING A DARK- C OLORED TOYOTA CAMRY. MORE ON N E W S / C IT YDES K .

GONE GILLISPIE The former executive of upstart nuclear developer Alternate Energy Holdings Inc. is the subject of a bench warrant after skipping out on two court dates. Get the details on News/Citydesk.

PLAGUED Idaho public health officials reported on May 22 that a ground squirrel found in the desert south of Boise tested positive for plague. Read more and see a map of the affected area on News/Citydesk.

OPINION

BODY ID The identity of a woman found in the Ridenbaugh Canal on May 21 has been released. Her body was discovered by a passerby at Shoshone and Rose Hill streets. More on News/Citydesk.

CAN’T WA IT TO SEE HOW SMILING DON LOOKS IN PRISON OR ANGE.”

—boi22toy, via boiseweekly.com, News, Citydesk, “Two Courthouse No-Shows Trigger Bench Warrant for AEHI Exec Don Gillispie,” May 23, 2015.

MAIL IT’S NOT ABOUT JEFFERSON STREET The public debate on St. Luke’s Master Plan has focused on the potential closing of Jefferson Street. The bigger question is whether the current location is the best place for a regional medical campus. The Master Plan envisions a new 4-story children’s pavilion, 4-story central plant/parking facility, 3-story shipping and receiving building, 9-10 story building on Jefferson Street, 6-9 floor building extending over 1st Street, and an office building on Main Street. St. Luke’s anticipates 13,262 additional car trips per day and patients traveling from a 350mile radius to this campus. How will the addition of a closed campus with large buildings impact Boise? What route to/from I-84 will regional patients travel? Broadway? Front/Myrtle or Main/ Idaho through downtown? How will the already crowded intersection of Broadway and Main Street accommodate projected traffic, even with changes? Will a much busier State Street create a barrier between the North End and downtown? St. Luke’s is a critical economic player and service provider for Boise and the surrounding area. The proposed regional medical facility is likely to provide economic and health care benefits to the

region. Wouldn’t the City still benefit from additional jobs and visitors if the campus was farther from downtown where projected population growth is likely to occur and St. Luke’s could continue to expand? Would the cost be significantly different? The City recently committed special funds for the new Esther Simplot Park. Perhaps funds could be dedicated to hiring independent consultants to consider alternative locations for the proposed campus and work with interested parties to find the best solution for Boise, the Treasure Valley, and St. Luke’s. If expansion at the current location is the best option then, yes, let’s debate whether Jefferson Street has to be closed. Kathy Stearns Boise

“Great ‘headline’ on this post BW [‘The stuff of nightmares’]. You’ve joined the rest of the dumbass media in this country by click baiting the ignorant masses so you can increase your FB reach. Nothin like a bunch of people with little to no science or medical background, who can’t be bothered to even read an article and research a few facts about the subject matter, going off in a panic and spreading misinformation about the ‘nightmare plague’ in Idaho. This country is going right down the crapper and the media is helping to flush.” —Dina Perugini “I see your plague and raise you a dose of modern medicine.” —Jake Blow

CUE THE MONTY PYTHON JOKES

DAMMED IF YOU DO...

From our top-viewed story of the week on Facebook, News, Citydesk, “A Treasure Valley Ground Squirrel Just Tested Positive for Plague,” May 22, 2015:

From our second mostviewed story of the week on Facebook, Rec, Feature, “Dam Proposal on the Weiser River Trail Calls for Sacrifice,” May 20, 2015:

“I knew Idaho was backwards, but medieval? Now that I think about it I guess that makes sense.” —Ted Vanegas

“Weiser River has a largely low altitude watershed and does not get much snowfall. I seriously doubt that they could ever fill it. Also the geology of that area has many layers of lava flow with plenty of opportunity for water leakage. And I think the tufa layers are problematic. As an oldster who witnessed the last salmon run on the Weiser jumping the Galloway dam this makes me sad.”

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Every item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 4 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

“Bring out yer dead! Bring out yer dead!” —Alvin Siron

—Ron Yankey BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION HUMPTY DUMPTY COUNTRY Where will Republicans be when the lights go out? BILL COPE Coincidentally, just a day before _____________ Dam in the state of ___________ collapsed and a wall of water and mud swept through the _____________ Valley, destroying all and everyone before it, the U.S. Congress once again cut by half the budget for the Federal Corps of Dam and Reservoir Integrity, leaving only three inspectors to appraise condition and safety concerns of nearly 75,000 dams spread from coast to coast. As relief workers from the various volunteer non-governmental agencies that have struggled to take the place of the long-defunct FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) worked their way to the scene of the disaster, they were hampered by highways in such dismal states of repair that their trucks were disappearing into potholes the size of alpine glacial crevasses, and the freight cars carrying in relief supplies were derailing at a rate of one out of every two. President ________ had to survey the devastation from the air, as there were no airports within a reasonable distance of the scene on which it was safe enough to land Air Force One, due to crumbling tarmacs and flight control facilities that had not been upgraded since before she was born. It is estimated that two thirds of the casualties expired in the days following the tragedy—freezing and starving to death for the most part—simply because no one could reach them to help. ••• Oh, hey. Didn’t mean to alarm. None of that’s happened—yet. I was just trying to imagine the future of America as Republicans must see it. That would assume Republicans see a future for America, wouldn’t it? It would assume they have the capacity and curiosity to extrapolate the inevitable consequences of their domestic infrastructure policies—which basically boil down to 1.) deny Democrats the funding to build new infrastructure; 2) underfund every existing sector of public works they can get away with; and 3) transfer the money saved to the richest people in America in the form of tax cuts. Of course, it would assume they give a good goddamn whether there is a future for America, yes? What brought it up was the recent Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia on what is referred to as the Northeast Corridor, the most intensely traveled rail transportation network in the country. Not to say all the other train lines and highways and flight lanes—bridges and tunnels and traffic control systems—crisscrossing America are any less important. Certainly not, especially to any Californian or Kansan or Dakotan who might be crushed when a decaying overpass pancakes, drowned when a neglected levee fails BOISE WEEKLY.COM

or incinerated after an airliner skids off a runway over-due to be extended. But then, as we know, the infrastructure in all those less-celebrated places is going to shit, too. So in the larger sense, when it comes to the prospect of our country falling apart around our ears, we’re all in this together. If the GOP can’t bring itself to keep such a beehive of moving parts so fundamental to America’s vitality as the Northeast Corridor up to code, what hope do the rest of us have that the overall mechanics of our country—the conduits and the plumbing, the wiring and the structural integrity—will be safe for prolonged use? So far, all I’ve been talking about is the deterioration of the stuff bequeathed us by earlier people. Better, wiser people. People who understood the necessity to build for the future. Our Republican leaders can’t even see the need to keep that old stuff up to snuff, let alone the need to build any new stuff. So what’s wrong them anyway? Don’t they want their children and grandchildren to inhabit a modern country that can compete—or at least compare—to the rest of the civilized world? Could they actually want Asia and Europe to race forward to the 22nd century in their fancy 200mph bullet trains, while our citizens clump along in decrepit passenger cans that fly off the rails if the slightest thing goes wrong, simply because nothing was done to prevent it from happening? Seriously, are they so beholden to their billionaire backers that they would let America slip ever further behind, just so a future Koch or Adelson, a future Trump or Gates or Buffet, might be the first trillionaire in the history of Mankind? Would they still refuse to tax the very people who can afford more taxes, even if it meant we lost our status as a first-world nation, because their obedience to the regal rich is stronger than any lingering sense of duty they feel to the rest of us? Perhaps they aren’t planning on staying around long enough for the continuing decay to inconvenience them. Almost 20 years ago, the mayor of Meridian (a Republican) admitted to me that he was doing absolutely nothing about trying to get a second Meridian exit installed on I-84, a project that would have offered some relief to a then-small town swamped in not-so-small traffic, because he was going to retire soon and move to Arizona—to where Meridian’s problems wouldn’t be his to give a damn about anymore. Could it be that I was given a glimpse with that mayor’s attitude into the future of the GOP’s approach to public service? Get all you can, get out and screw the ones who stay. BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 5


OPINION BEGINNING OUR DESCENT Three tales of the Bakken JOHN REMBER

CAPITOL

CELLARS

Idaho Wine Month in June

FEATURED WINEMAKER DINNERS · RSVP REQUIRED June 3 – Weston Winery • June 10 – Huston Vineyards June 17 – Split Rail Winery • June 24 – Telaya Wine Co. 5th & Main, Boise, ID • 208-344-WINE (9463) • capitolcellarsllc.com

1.

A month ago I was in North Dakota or Montana. I can’t be more specific than that. It was almost night, and I was five miles in the air. The only bright lights down there were the burning flares of oil wells. The flames looked like stars in deep space. For a moment, I thought the Boeing 737 I had boarded in Chicago had delivered me to a point light-years from Earth. I would arrive in Boise with a lifetime supply of frequent flyer miles. Sagebrush deserts became drifting clouds of dark matter. Mountains became shadowy nebulae. Small towns became dim and distant galaxies, their streetlights red-shifted to near invisibility. None of my fellow passengers seemed to notice. Most were sleeping, but here and there a reading light flashed on, a newspaper rustled or someone stood in the aisle, stretching. Flight attendants eased by, collecting trash and adjusting blankets. I fell asleep inside the cocooning, comforting hum of the jets, and woke only when the pilot announced we were beginning our descent. The slap of the 737’s tires against the tarmac put an end to interstellar travel for the night. A short time later I was at the carousel, waiting for my bag, thinking that humans have a genetic compulsion to obliterate time and space. I had begun the day on the other side of a continent that people used to take months and even years to cross. Show a 737 to an Oregon Trail immigrant who has taken a long month to cross Wyoming, and he’d think starship. Arthur C. Clarke, the great science fiction writer, said that any sufficiently advanced technology would be indistinguishable from magic. Even though I have some idea of how a big silver bird can fly, it still seems like magic to climb into one, sit and read for less than a day and find that 5,000 miles have disappeared while I wasn’t paying attention.

the price of oil takes a dive, the fracking economy gets depressed. If oil sells for enough to make fracking profitable, everybody else gets depressed. These days the price of oil is so low that every tank car of crude heading from the Bakken to an ocean port is losing money for somebody. I succumb to my usual impulse to make helpful suggestions. Why not capture the methane they’re burning off and sell it? Why not use it to light cities, or make electricity, or lift hot-air balloons, or melt tar sands? Turns out that it’s cheaper to burn it than to collect it and compress it and transport it. Hence the photos taken from windows of the International Space Station, the ones that show the flaming outlines of the Bakken against a shadowed Earth.

3.

The Bakken Formation is a synecdoche. That’s not a geological term or even a polite term for fracking. It’s a specialized form of metaphor, occurring when a small hard piece of something begins to stand for the giant whole of it. The Bakken—drilled, fractured, drained, its farmland become trailer parks, its groundwater poisoned, its ranching and farming culture reduced to murals on restaurant walls—serves as a synecdoche for the planet these days. The Bakken is also a small, hard distillation of our civilization’s economy. Enormous resources have gone into holes in the ground. Fracked wells typically don’t produce much after a year and often don’t recover exploration and drilling costs. Fracked oil is gassy, explosive stuff, and for that reason the tank cars that carry it are described as rolling bombs. One explanation for Saudi Arabia’s increased oil production these days: The Saudis are trying to economically destroy the North American oil shale, tar sands and fracking industries before they—however improbably—become profitable. An oilfield lit by methane torches evokes unfamiliar metaphorical destinations. You Another more conspiratorial explanation: The instinctively want a guide. Dante recruited Virgil, U.S. government has prevailed upon the Saudis a virtuous pagan, for his tour of the Christian In- to destroy the price of fracked oil before fracked ferno. If you were really bad, according to Dante, oil destroys the U.S. When future accountants—if they still exist in you spent eternity sunken in torch-lit pits of ice. a barter economy—tally up the costs and profits Dante took pains to place recognizable portraits of Bakken oil production, the bottom line will be of his political enemies in the ninth and deepest circle of Hell, proof that if you want a reputation red. Once-solid bank assets are going to disappear that will last through the ages, just piss off a poet. and quantitative easing will be required to keep banks afloat. Sound familiar? Reading Dante is enough to convince me I We’ll hang on as long as we can. An expanse never want to work in the oilfields of the Bakken of torches among the pumpjacks suggests a peasFormation, especially not in winter. Those jobs are going away, anyway. Fracked oil ant uprising, but it’s not. It’s just us Baby Boomdoesn’t pencil out unless you can sell it for $100- ers, working against time to use up all the world’s recoverable resources before we die. I think we’re plus a barrel, and if you sell it for that much, going to make it. modern industrial economies don’t pencil out. If

2.

6 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


JES SICA MURRI

NEWS

CITYDESK

OUTSIDE THE BOX

The art of fighting city hall over traffic boxes

Boise citizens have added their own signs alongside the formal notification of the trees’ demise.

GEORGE PRENTICE You win some, you lose some. That was the reaction from Mike Tankersley, president and owner of Signs2U, when he received a letter, dated May 5, from the city of Boise that his Boise-based company had lost a $44,000 contract bid to fabricate 39 traffic box art wraps. “I wasn’t angry at all,” Tankersley told Boise Weekly. “Some bids you win, some you lose. In fact, my company recently won a city bid. We’re fabricating some new signs for Zoo Boise.” But Tankersley still wanted to learn more details about the request for proposal, which carried a two-year option to wrap even more of the boxes. “I wasn’t even the lowest bid; I was closer to the middle of the pack,” he said. “But then I saw that the company with the highest bid, Trademark Sign [Company], actually won the bid.” Tankersley told BW that his proposal to digitally reproduce artists’ work, print it on vinyl and wrap the Boise traffic boxes came with a price tag of $1,130 per box. Compare that with the lowest bid from 24-7 Sign Shoppe, of $563 per box, and the highest bid from Trademark, at $1,474 per box. In all, seven companies—all but one of them Boise-based—competed for the project. “So, when I saw that the highest bidder had won, I began to get a little frustrated. I’m a business owner but I’m a taxpayer, too,” Tankersley said. “So I called Colin Millar.” As purchasing manager for the city of Boise’s Financial Services Division, Millar oversees the purchasing/bidding of goods and services, and professional services/construction contracts. “At that stage, all I still wanted was to make sure my company was doing the best job possible in competing for a bid,” said Tankersley, who submitted a formal public records request with the city asking for the complete packages from each of the companies that had bid for RFP-15-168. “When I reviewed the bids, that’s when I started to get pretty angry,” he said. “It was obviously fixed.” But Millar told BW, “We never said we were going to go with the low bid. Looking back at our scoring, it seems very fair.” Tankersley said that’s not good enough; putting the debate over low vs. high bids aside, he’s more concerned about a scoring process that he said favors “a dynasty syndrome,” benefiting companies that previously won favor with officials. Boise officials insist nothing could be further BOISE WEEKLY.COM

CITY OF (MULCHED) TREES

AD

AM

ROSE

NLU

ND

from the truth, but Tankersley has gone as far as securing legal representation and delivering a formal notice of protest to Millar, Boise Mayor Dave Bieter and Boise City Attorney Robert Luce, which sets up a probable showdown for Tuesday, June 9 when the Boise City Council will ultimately be asked to scrutinize the process.

BOXED IN / BOXED OUT By most accounts the city of Boise Traffic Box Art project is a major success and it continues to grow, as evidenced by the city’s decision to request bids for 39 more wraps. “It all started when [Downtown Boise Association Executive Director] Karen Sander saw some similar traffic box wraps in a Canadian city,” said Karen Bubb, public arts manager for the Boise City Department of Arts and History. What began with five traffic boxes in 2009 has now evolved into 103 wraps, with 39 more on the way. “The original estimate was that most of them would last five years—we’re now looking at 10year life spans,” said Bubb. “That’s in large part because contractors who have done the wrapping have used high-quality materials.” Selected artists, who must live in Idaho, are paid $1,000 for their designs. The artists retain their work and copyrights, with the city essentially licensing the image for the traffic box. The fabrication and installation process is approximately $1,500 per box; some smaller boxes might cost closer to $1,100. Funding comes from a combination of sources: the city of Boise, the Capital City Development Corporation and Community Development Block Grants. The locations are chosen by CCDC at intersections within the district’s urban renewal zones, and primarily from neighborhood associations

from throughout the city that apply for CDBG funds to pay for the installation. “It has become very competitive among artists. For this latest round, we have more than 129 artists apply to have their work wrapped on the 39 traffic boxes,” said Bubb, who added that she facilitates an art selection panel that includes representatives from neighborhood associations, CCDC, the City Council and Boise Arts and History Commission. The most recent selection process was a marathon session, Bubb said, with each artist submitting 10 examples of their work and the panel pairing up appropriate art for selected locations. It’s an entirely different process, which city officials insist is less subjective, to select a sign company to create the traffic box wraps. Bubb said she’s on that review committee, which also includes representatives from the Ada County Highway District, which actually owns the boxes; CCDC; DBA; community artists; and some neighborhood associations. While public funds are used to fund the work, it turns out that the cost of installation represents only 16 percent of the scoring system used to award the city bid. Budd confirmed that the protest was precedent-setting. “We’ve never had a protest before,” she said. “Trademark Signs actually presented the highest price-per-box but they won the bidding process,” said Tankersley. “It’s because the city says it puts much greater emphasis on qualifications. But if that were true, then I’m even more confused.” The formula for the RFP indicates that a perfect score would be 600, with 100 points awarded for the lowest bid; 100 points awarded for superb qualifications; 8 200 points for what the city calls “basic” qualifications, which include the firm’s

One hundred trees throughout Boise’s downtown now have public notice signs nailed to their bark. “This tree is to be removed after ___ days for the following reason,” the signs read. The reasons, written in Sharpie, range from “Construction” to “CCDC Streetscape Project.” Most of the trees lining the north side of Idaho Street from Fifth Street to Capitol Boulevard will be torn out for new sidewalks. That’s not a bad thing, according to City Forester Brian Jorgenson, adding that the new sidewalks will be more “tree-friendly,” explaining that the new sidewalks will be built on top of Silva Cells, which are basically big boxes of soil allowing large trees to grow and roots to spread. The sidewalk is then suspended above the soil. Right now, trees in the sidewalk survive in small boxes that compromise their roots. Jorgenson said the Silva Cells also manage stormwater more effectively. “I’ve wanted to try this in Boise for 10 years,” Jorgenson said. “I’m happy to see we’re making progress in that way. It’ll make for a healthier downtown.” The trees that work crews will remove from the sidewalks can’t be replanted though, either because they’re too large or their roots are too gnarled from the confined soil. They’ll be mulched or sold as firewood. Boiseans will continue to see public notice signs spreading from tree to tree in downtown this summer as the sidewalks are replaced. Jorgenson said that around 100 trees have been removed from city property since October 2014. He has a strict replant rule, though. For every one tree removed, he strives to plant two more. So far, 220 trees have been planted. Trees aren’t only being removed from downtown’s streets. There are 30 trees slated for removal between Capitol Boulevard and the Idaho State Historical Museum to make way for the museum’s 15,000-foot expansion. The trees are around 40 or 50 years old, according to an estimate by Jorgenson. Idaho State Historical Society Executive Director Janet Gallimore said the decision to remove so many trees wasn’t made lightly. “We don’t take down trees in a non-thoughtful way,” Gallimore said. She said many of the trees being removed have 8 reached the end of their lifespan and needed to come out anyway. BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 7


CITYDESK

JES SICA MURRI

NEWS

City officials say they try to plant two trees for every one that they have to remove.

She’s worked with the architects of the project to protect some of the older oak trees next to the pioneer village. “We changed the building design to work around [the trees],” she said. In order to preserve the oak tree, construction crews have to be careful not to disturb it during the renovation and re-landscaping. Toby Norton is the parks resource planning manager for the city, and the landscape planner for the museum’s facelift. He told BW that the oak tree will be fenced off to keep construction crews from parking too close or storing equipment beside it. He said it’s important to keep the critical root zone intact. “We have literally moved buildings to save some of the trees that are there,” Norton said. “Anything we can do to help those trees stay healthy during construction.” Norton and Gallimore are still at the drawing board for new landscape designs, but Norton said the grassy berm separating the sidewalk and the museum will now be leveled. The sidewalk will be offset from Capitol Boulevard and the grounds of the museum will incorporate more plants from the pioneer village area. “It’s going to be a really nice landscape design,” Norton said. “There was a strong effort to tie the inside of the museum to the outside grounds. The plants will pick up themes that are going on inside and bring them out.” Gallimore estimates the museum will be complete and open again between the summer and winter of 2017. She acknowledged that a green footprint is important to the city, and said the new design will provide more shade in different areas. As for the 30 that will be torn out for the landscape redesign, they’ll be mulched or sold as firewood. Despite those and other trees being removed from Boise’s downtown core, Norton insists the practice is done sustainably. “We’re not in the business of removing trees,” he said. “We do what we can to save trees and replace and mitigate for the ones that do get removed.” Beyond the Parks Department’s mission to plant two new trees for every one taken down, other programs exist to fill out the Treasure Valley canopy, including residential tree giveaway projects through Idaho Power and the Boise City Forestry Division. 7

—Jessica Murri 8 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

size, history, personnel and expertise; and another 200 points awarded for “specific” 7 qualifications, including ability to work with high-resolution art, vinyl printing and installation. Trademark received perfect scores of 200 for both “basic” and “specific” qualifications. “And that just doesn’t make sense to us. Trademark has been in business for six years. We’ve been in business for eight years yet we got less than half the points they did,” said Tankersley. “More importantly, look at Artsign Designs. They’ve been doing this for a half-century in Boise, yet they only received about 170 points in those qualification categories. And Advanced Sign and Design, they’ve been in business since 1986 and their qualification scores were even lower.” That’s when Tankersley talked to some of his competitors and they were none-too-pleased. “I was blown away,” said Jennifer Boyd, owner of Artsign, which opened its doors in 1975.

SIGNS OF SKEPTICISM Boise city officials said they encourage bids from firms and business enterprises deemed “disadvantaged,” meaning they are owned by women and minorities. In fact, RFP 15-168 states plainly, “Women-owned and minority-owned firms are encouraged to submit a proposal.” “The city contacted me and asked me to bid because I’m a female-owned business,” Boyd told BW. “I was under the impression that it might help us get a little closer to the top of the stack.” But when she saw the scoring process, Boyd said there was no indication that being a so-called “disadvantaged business entity” had given her any advantage at all, let alone scoring points. “It didn’t factor,” she said. “Which I guess is OK. But after talking to Mike [Tankersley] about the outcome, I too put in a public record request to look at the details of the bids.” Boyd said she was intrigued to see that Trademark, in its winning bid proposal, had included

an image of a Boise police cruiser in its packet. “We did the designs for Boise police cars for years, and a few years ago the police department said they wanted a new look, so we worked with them on that,” said Boyd. “But the next thing we know, the department was sitting down with Trademark. We’re the oldest sign company in the city, and we didn’t get that way by telling clients, ‘Hey we know the other guy is doing it, but we’ll do it cheaper.’ Look, our business has been around [40] years and we have 150 cumulative years of experience in our building. You’re telling me that Trademark has more qualifications?” Trademark says it has plenty of qualifications. In its proposal, the company pointed to previous partnerships with the cities of Boise and Nampa, ACHD and numerous Boise neighborhood associations. Its packet also included photos of previous work for Dish restaurant, Treefort Music Fest and even a previous traffic box wrap. But its photo of a Boise police vehicle gave Boyd pause, who said initial design work had been crafted in her shop. “All we know is that the city wasn’t happy with the designs they had,” said Trademark co-owner John Yarnell. “We helped facilitate the wants and needs of the [police] department. Honestly, we don’t know who came up with that initial design. This a huge surprise to me.” Yarnell said it was more important to focus on the fact that Trademark had a solid working relationship with the city. “We actually helped them develop the original traffic box art program. Every year has been a little bit different and now it has turned into such a big process,” he said. “It’s the first year it’s gone out for bids. We don’t know a lot of the inner workings, but we love working with the city, especially with art.” But Boyd said Trademark was resting on that laurel with its most recent traffic box art bid. “I smell something funny,” she said. “At this point, I’m just watching from the sidelines. We

don’t have time to micromanage all of this. If I had the time, I would absolutely jump into the middle of it.” The man in the “middle of it” is Tankersley. “I guess the thing that really upset me the most is when someone in Colin Millar’s office at the city told me that the best thing we could do is have a meeting with the Arts and History Department,” he said. “I appreciate what they were saying, but then I started to think, more and more, that everything was fixed.” “Basically, they were saying, ‘Be friends with the people who would decide the outcome,’” said attorney Jessica Pollack. Pollack, with Boise-based law firm Carey Perkins LLP, is more than Tankersley’s lawyer. She’s also his wife. “I don’t know how often people challenge bids like this,” Pollack said. “Trust me, the decision to take on the city of Boise has not been taken lightly. But it’s about doing the right thing.” Tankersley took a long breath when BW asked about the possibility that he might be jeopardizing a future working relationship with the city by challenging its bid process. “I’m fully aware of what kind of target this might put on my back,” he said. “But the only thing that makes sense is to re-bid this. There is a significant problem here. These companies that had previous contracts with the city are simply able to sweep in and win a new contract, even when their cost is significantly higher.” But in a letter dated May 20 and addressed to Tankersley and Pollack, Millar stated his office had reviewed Tankersley’s complaint but, “I have decided to deny your protest.” “We intend to escalate the denial,” Pollack told BW, pointing to Tankersley’s right to appeal the denial, setting up a public hearing before City Council as early as Tuesday, June 9. Millar and Bubb said that was fine with them, because the city’s intention is to complete the installation by the end of the summer. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


NEWS FOR FEAR OF ‘FRANKENFOOD’ Environmentalist reignites Idaho’s GMO debate HARRISON BERRY According to environmentalist Mark Lynas, denying the scientific consensus that genetically modified organisms are safe to eat is the same as saying that vaccines are unsafe or climate change isn’t real. Lynas was being provocative, but his rhetoric was a hook for a more sophisticated message: If you claim to believe in science, you have to accept science’s conclusions, even if they contradict what you believe. “People aren’t forming their opinions based on empirical evidence,” Lynas told an audience that filled about two-thirds of Boise’s Egyptian Theatre on May 19. “The science has a tough time confronting emotion.” Attendance was diverse at Lynas’ talk, titled “GMOs are Green: How One Environmentalist Changed His Mind.” The people who showed up represented a range of opinions about genetically modified crops, from farmers who grow GM corn to anti-GMO activists, and they left with new tools for thinking about a technology that is either a lifeline for farmers and a hungry world, or unethical experimentation on the part of chemical companies and agribusiness. Not everyone was convinced by Lynas’ argument. One attendee, Dr. Alice Blake, cited the 1932-1972 Tuskegee experiments—in which black men in Alabama were secretly infected with syphilis to track the disease—and other examples of scientific malpractice when asking Lynas for comment on GMOs. “I question at times what the scientific community does,” she said. GMOs are organisms that have been manipulated on the genetic level. Scientists splice genes from one life form into another to promote certain characteristics, which can include heat-, drought-, virus- and insect resistance, as well as enhanced nutritional properties. But GMO detractors are wary of the potential health and environmental consequences of the technology—and worry that multinational corporations like Monsanto are pushing GM crops before they’ve been adequately assessed. “We hear all these stories about cooking the books. How can we believe science anymore?” asked Terry Jones, a Weiser farmer who grows BOISE WEEKLY.COM

GM corn, during a question-and-answer period following Lynas’ talk. Online commenters were quick to address other facets of the debate. “Our protest is rooted in the effects produced by multinational corporate manipulations and lies that are counter to living in harmony with the natural world for the sake of profits,” boiseweekly.com user Heinrich wrote. “Allowing crops to grow in harsher conditions would get the food to where it’s needed,” wrote Facebook user Travis Herman. The divide between the public and scientists prompted the board of directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science to issue a statement in 2013 affirming that there is consensus among scientists that GM foods are safe to eat. In January 2015, a Pew Research Center study showed that while 88 percent of AAAS scientists believe it is safe to eat GM foods, just 37 percent of adults in the United States believe the same. GMO Free Idaho President Jenny Easley told Boise Weekly that scientific consensus on GMOs has been widely touted by the technology’s proponents, but described it as “a fairly limited argument.” “Yes, scientific communities have embraced GMO technology, but I don’t think that the question to the scientific community has been posed in different ways,” she said. Genetically modifying plants is a relatively new phenomenon—the first commercially available GM plant was the FlavrSavr tomato in 1994—which means that few long-term studies have been performed on GM crops to assess what effect they’ll have on the environment. One common genetic enhancement, which includes splicing a protein from the soil-dwelling Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria into crops’ genes, provides some insecticidal properties but has generated controversy over its alleged role in killing monarch butterflies and contributing to bee colony collapse. Studies conducted by the National Academy of Sciences and the USDA, however, concluded that Bt crops did not contain sufficient concentrations of the insecticide to kill monarch butterfly larvae. There is ongoing debate about the role of Bt crops in colony collapse disorder, with a variety of studies drawing and discrediting correlations between Bt crops and the phenomenon. Easley doesn’t believe adequate research has been conducted into whether Bt crops are safe for human consumption, citing scientists’ focus on whether GM crops directly affect human health and what she said are insufficient safety testing regulations.

“The scientific community isn’t asking questions beyond the DNA itself,” she said. “Pharmaceuticals use genetically modified genes a lot in the creation of medicine, but they have a rigorous safety testing mechanism in place. There’s a whole framework in place to track potential problems, and that’s not the case with genetically modified food.” Another source of angst is who is developing GM crops. In many cases, these crops aren’t developed by independent scientists, but by laboratories at agricultural and biotech companies like J.R. Simplot Company and Monsanto, in part because of the high cost of developing GM technology. Late last year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture approved Simplot’s Innate potato, which resists bruising and releases less of a potentially carcinogenic chemical when fried. Nonetheless, Simplot’s oldest business partner, McDonald’s, as well as ConAGra and McCain Foods, have said they will not purchase the potatoes, though McDonald’s does source some GMO products for its food. “Regulatory compliance and consumer acceptance for the use of any new technology will guide our actions,” McCain said in a statement. While GM foods available to the public meet regulatory standards, Lynas seeks public acceptance of those same foods, but syncing public and scientific understanding of GMOs is no easy task. During his talk, he, again being provocative, suggested that people be discerning in how they educate themselves on the issue. “Try to go a bit beyond the University of Google,” he said. BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 9


CITIZEN

IN

GH

AM

your attention and pulls you, momentarily, from whatever madness you have going on. Steen: We have a number of things in our day-to-day lives that protect us from being hurt or angry; there are things that you simply can’t get away from: love and fear. But it takes great care to execute something like that in the theater and in our case, it’s all about Charlie Fee. I adore having him as a director. My thought process and personality really jibes with the way he communicates.

JE

RE M

Y

LA

NN

NICK STEEN AND ROBYN COHEN

Dial “M” for Murder co-stars help launch Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s 39th season GEORGE PRENTICE No one really “dials” anything anymore: The rotary phone has gone the way of television tubes and fax machines. The title of Dial “M” for Murder triggers black-and-white memories of Grace Kelly fighting off a killer in the masterpiece that was Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 cinematic adaptation of the successful 1952 Broadway play. Dial “M” is a crackling crime thriller that is still entertaining 60 years later, which makes it perfect for launching Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s launch its 2015 season—it previews Friday, May 29, and opens the following night—with Producing Artistic Director Charlie Fee at the helm as director. Boise Weekly sat down with Dial “M” co-stars Robyn Cohen and Nick Steen (the femme fatale and the paramour, respectively) to talk about their journeys in life, and ultimately, to Idaho. Steen, in his second year with ISF, is a self-professed “gear head” who loves long-distance drives between Boise, Los Angeles and his hometown of Dallas. Cohen, who’s in her first year with ISF, was still recovering from her own 15-hour drive from LA, where she had just come off the set of a movie. Their journeys are not dissimilar. Since childhood—his in Texas, hers in Maryland—they have both been dreamers. “When I was a kid, all I needed was a stick and the flatbed of a truck, and I’d be entertained for hours,” said Steen. “I had received something so magical,” said Cohen, recalling the moment when she saw a touring ballet company. “I remember thinking, ‘Who are these people who gave me this incredible gift?’ I wanted to do that.” Can I assume that you’ve seen the 1954 Hitchcock film? Cohen: Several times; it’s an incredible film. The hardest part for a 21st century actress is to really get into the mindset of those relationships. It’s a very different kind of relatedness between men and women, very distinct. Nick, we saw you last year in ISF’s production of Deathtrap. Isn’t there a connection there? Didn’t [playwright] Ira Levin say that he had great affection for Dial M for Murder? Steen: Absolutely. If you look at the two plays side-by-side, there are some wonderful similarities. 10 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

Was there any part of you that didn’t want to return to the thriller genre so soon after appearing in Deathtrap? Steen: Not at all. I was incredibly excited to do this. It’s great fun to come back with this genre. Cohen: He is wonderful in this play. I love acting with him. Steen: Right back at you. And there’s something very exciting about doing a thriller. I get to scare you, and you keep guessing. Have you taken some time to examine why audiences love so much to be scared? Cohen: It gets us out of our heads. It grabs

How is he different from other directors? Steen: Some directors walk in with assumptions that they know everything about the play and the story that they want to tell. I have no doubt that Charlie knows all these things, but he’s not afraid to get down in the mud with you and dissect a play, walking through every miniscule step to piece together a great story. Cohen: Charlie is the most dynamic director I’ve ever worked with. He’s a winning combination of a brilliant, meticulous drill sergeant and a huge-hearted, hilarious companion. He’s very gentle, and he’s always on your side. And I’ve worked with a lot of directors. I want to pause you there. You’ve worked with some of America’s best directors. Can you talk about Wes Anderson? [Cohen appeared in Anderson’s The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and a commercial directed by Anderson]. Cohen: He’s the only living filmmaker where you could see only one frame of a movie and instantly know that it’s a Wes Anderson film. He knows more about what he wants than any other artist I’ve worked with. On set, sometimes he’ll film 30 or 40 takes. You’ve both been with this production at the Great Lakes Theater in Cleveland since February. Can you speak about the experience of taking this same play from a traditional theater to [the] outdoor amphitheater here in Boise? Steen: When I got here with Deathtrap a year ago, I thought it was all about doing the same play in a different space. But what I learned was it was a reimagination of how to tell that story. I see it now as a gift. I felt so more connected with the production and my fellow performers in Idaho. Talk to me about performing for Idaho audiences. Steen: They’re so willing to go with you. In theater, sometimes you’ll get “sit back and show me” audiences. But Idaho audiences are so much more open-armed. You’ll be hard pressed to find a more loving and appreciative audience than you’ll find here. Cohen: That’s so great to hear. I can’t wait. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY MAY 27 Festivals & Events CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET— 3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com. IMP MONDAY MEET-UP—Meet filmmaker Steve Goodall, who’ll discuss his efforts to document climate change. Dinner, snacks and drinks will be available. 6 p.m. FREE-$5. Juniper Kitchen and Cocktails, 211 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-1142, juniperon8th.com. WINE UP WEDNESDAY—Enjoy music, local vendors with fun stuff, wine tasting and/or education and half-price bottles of wine. FREE parking. 7-11 p.m. FREE. AEN Playhouse, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, aenplayhouse.com.

On Stage SUPERSECRETSITESPECIFICSOMETHING—Enter the familiar world of “Supersecretsitespecificsomething,” or “S5,” where audiences can get closer to the action than they’ve ever been. It’s the theater equivalent of highdefinition television, with more vivid, realistic action on the streets of the City of Trees. Each performance “walks” 30 people. Call the ticket office or go online to check availability. S5 isn’t included in BCT’s season ticket package program. 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. $20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes KNOW THE 10 SIGNS OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE—Separate the facts from fiction, and dispel common misconceptions about Alzheimer’s disease at this FREE wellness program. Christine Bubb, community outreach specialist with the Greater Idaho Chapter of

the Alzheimer’s Association, will teach you the 10 warning signs. You’ll also see video clips from those who have the disease, find out how you can recognize the signs in yourself and others, and learn why early detection matters. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 215 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800, nampalibrary.org/ calendar. LOCAL MATTERS: IDAHO PHILANTHROPY IS ENTREPRENEURIAL—Local Matters 2015 is a series of intimate, focused gatherings through which we’ll explore and connect our region’s many distinctive, innovative approaches to building stronger, more resilient communities. Local Matters: Idaho is an opportunity to explore how free-market, socially-motivated and philanthropic capital can be blended and matched to support community development, education, job creation and food systems. 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. $75$159. Trailhead, 500 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-871-9139, trailheadboise.org.

Art THE ART OF FISHING—Through May 31, 12-6 p.m. FREE. Fulton Street Showroom, 517 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-869-4713.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

BENJAMIN JONES SOLO EXHIBITION—Wednesday-Saturday through May 30 or by appointment. 12-4 p.m. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-4330593, stewartgallery.com. CO-CREATION PROJECT—Artists Karl LeClair and Mark McGinnis worked with children in the Cooperative Preschool to create two collaborative works of art that will be on display in BAM’s ARTexperience Gallery through September. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. LAURA MCPHEE: CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY—Mondays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. The Community Library, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208726-3493, thecommunitylibrary. org. MOVING PICTURES: EARLY ANIMATION AND ITS INFLUENCE—Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

RATS AT THE LIBRARY—Mondays-Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-4722941, notaquietlibrary.org. RED CIRCLE PRESS: TRANSLUCENCY—Through July 12. FREE. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise. 208426-1242, finearts.boisestate. edu.

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 11


CALENDAR TVAA SPRING AWAKENING— Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org. WEATHER OR NOT—Weather or Not presents a selection of artworks from BAM’s permanent collection in which artists reflect on the relationships between humans and nature. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. WENDING WOODING: LANDSCAPE AND COLOR—MondaysSaturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

Literature RUMI NIGHT—Rumi is the 13th century Persian poet and mystic philosopher whose writing continues to be studied and honored worldwide. Both newcomers to his

work and longtime admirers are invited for an evening of poetry, conversation, Persian desserts and tea. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844076, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness 9TH ANNUAL WEISER RIVER TRAIL BIKE RIDE—Rders have a choice of two distances: 28 miles (New Meadows to Council) or 48 miles (New Meadows to Cambridge). The trail is hardpacked gravel (old railroad grade). Fee includes shuttle, lunch and T-shirt. Meet at the WRT Council Trailhead. Riders and bikes will be shuttled from each meeting place to the New Meadows trailhead. Cutoff date to register for both rides is June 1. Proceeds support Friends of the Weiser River Trail. For more info, contact edgart@ frontiernet.net $40-$60. Weiser River Trail Head, Council, Council. 208-630-4386, weiserrivertrail. org/junebikeevent.html.

FRIDAY, MAY 29

water and soil quality, and GMOs. 6:30-9 p.m. FREE-$30. Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 4950 W. Bradley St., Garden City, 208-3771477, i-61.org.

COMEDIAN SEAN PEABODY—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

Festivals & Events

LIBERTY, JUSTICE AND BINGO FOR ALL—Join the ACLU of Idaho for a fun evening of food, drinks, Bingo and prizes--all to support a good cause. Includes dinner, beer, wine and one Bingo card. Additional Bingo cards are only $5 each. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $15-$30. Municipal Park, 500 S. Walnut St., Boise. 208-344-9750, acluidaho. org/event/liberty-justice-andbingo-for-all.

Art

BCT ANNUAL BLOCK PARTY—Party down with the folks at Boise Contemporary Theater and maybe win tickets to the 2015-16 season and other concerts. There’ll also be a silent auction, Payette Brewing beer, food from Pie Hole Pizza, Archie’s Place and Funky Taco, and live music by The Country Club, Thomas Paul and New Transit. All proceeds support BCT operations. 6-10 p.m. $5-$10. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. I-CARE SUMMIT: LOCAL/GLOBAL FOOD CRISIS—Local experts and national speakers address the topics of sustainable food production, nutrition and health, creation stewardship, climate change, chemical vs. organic,

On Stage BLT: DAISY PULLS IT OFF—Follow scholarship girl Daisy Meredith as she attempts to find acceptance in the snobby confines of Grangewood School For Young Ladies. 7:30 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

SATURDAY, MAY 30

Uxoricide most foul.

IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL OPENING NIGHT: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER On Friday, May 29, Idaho Shakespeare Festival opens its 39th season not with a production by the Bard, but with a play made famous when the Master of Suspense adapted it to film: Frederick Knott’s Dial “M” for Murder. ISF’s production stars Robyn Cohen and Nick Steen (see Citizen, Page 9) as Margot and Tony Wendice, a socialite and former professional tennis player respectively, whose marriage is fraught. Tony’s plan to blackmail a former acquaintance into killing Margot is merely the beginning of the treachery, lies and murder in this suspenseful thriller. 8 p.m., $18-$70. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

12 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

THURSDAY MAY 28

For those who still believe in discovery.

INSERT FOOT IMPROV COMEDY— 8 p.m. Pay what you can. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-2879200, reefboise.com.

CHRIS BINION: THE WAYS OF EMPTINESS—Thursdays through June 19. 3-8 p.m. FREE. Enso Artspace, 120 E. 38th St., Ste. 105, Garden City, 208-991-0117, ensoartspace.com. COOL CARS AND FINE ART— Enjoy an evening of great classic cars and great car art by artist Ron Pridmore. 5:30-9 p.m. FREE. Eagle Art Gallery, 50 2nd St., Eagle, 208-938-6626, eagleartgallery.net. MARIJN VAN KREIJ: TRACES— Thursdays-Saturdays through June 27. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise,

208-949-4365. mingstudios.org/ exhibitions.html. TONE SQUARE MILE FINE ART SHOW—Check out One Square Mile, a juried exhibition inspired by a place, person or object found one square mile from the artist’s home, with all work presented in square format. The show runs May 28 through August. 5-8 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208888-9898, finerframes.com.

Talks & Lectures PRESERVATION MONTH READING SERIES PART 3—This series discusses natural and cultural resource preservation topics and issues raised at the Fettuccine Forum discussion on May 7. To register or for more info, contact Brandi Burns at bburns@cityofboise.org, or 208-433-5676. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org, 208-433-5676.

MONDAY, JUNE 1

Shabby chic.

INTERNATIONAL OBSCURA DAY

PUT IT TOGETHER JUNE: ASSEMBLAGE ART

Craters of the Moon, one of the most unusual landscapes in the country, was used to train NASA astronauts in 1969, features 1,100 square miles of lava fields and contains the deepest rift on earth. It’s the perfect setting for the local celebration of International Obscura Day. More than 150 events take place in 39 states and 25 countries, commemorating the world’s strangest places. AtlasObscura.com, a definitive guide to curious places worldwide, highlights miniature cities, books bound in human flesh, flaming holes in the ground, bone churches and Craters of the Moon. Pathfinders can explore the otherworldly national monument on a guided cave walk. Space is limited to only 25. Participants need closed-toe shoes, a flashlight and a water bottle. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., FREE, Craters of the Moon National Monument, 18 miles west of Arco on Highway 20, atlasobscura.com.

The mission of the nonprofit Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance is “to forge connections among visual artists in the Treasure Valley, to create opportunities for creative collaboration and to support the artistic community.” TVAA also makes connections between artists and the public with events like Assemblage en Juin or Put It Together June: Assemblage Art. Artists Marilyn Cosho, Pam McKnight, Cyndy Lounsbury and Kay Seurat will be joined by James Castle scholar Dr. Kathleen Keys for a panel discussion on assemblage art. Then, on Saturday, June 6, at 10:15 a.m., McKnight will lead a Dumpster-diving expedition (no registration required) at the Idaho Youth Ranch Distribution Center, 5465 W. Irving St., 10:15 a.m. 6-8 p.m., FREE, Idaho Parents Unlimited, 4619 W. Emerald St., 208-342-5884, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR Citizen DOING WHAT WE CAN MAY MEETING—Take your ideas and join the discussion of current climate change issues and ways to take action. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3424222. doingwhatwecan.org. IDAHO LEGISLATORS: PUBLIC Q&A PANEL DISCUSSION—Join COMPASS for a panel discussion with Rep. Joe Palmer (District 20, Meridian) and Sen. Bert Brackett (District 23, Twin Falls), chairs of the House and Senate Transportation committees. You’ll learn about the legislative process, issues the committees grappled with and what’s next for transportation policy in Idaho. RSVP to ctorkelson@compassidaho.org. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. COMPASS: Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho, 700 N.E. Second St., Ste. 200, Meridian, 208-855-2558.

FRIDAY MAY 29 On Stage BLT: DAISY PULLS IT OFF—8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. C’EST MAGNIFIQUE—Join Soprano Sue Patchell Hamilton, Baritone Brett Hamilton, Tenor Stephan Craig and Pianist Sean Rogers for an eclectic mix of jazz, cabaret and modern storytelling. 7:30 p.m. $10-$15. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com. COMEDIAN SEAN PEABODY—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER— When murder calls… hang up! Deception, betrayal, passion and greed prove potent ingredients for a

MONDAY, JUNE 1

perfect mystery in this intense and darkly gripping thriller, famously filmed by Alfred Hitchcock. 8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. LYRICS4LILY—Lyrics4Lily is an event put on by the underground hip-hop artists of Boise to support the Ross family. Lily Ross was diagnosed with Leukemia earlier this year at the age of 3, and all proceeds will help her parents, Jacob and Jana, pay medical expenses. 7:30-11 p.m. $5. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., Boise. 208-404-4576.

24

2015 VALLEYRIDE EYRIDE SUMMER S YOUTH PASS

$

only y

ALL SUMMER

SUMMER FOR AGES 6 –18

h t  Y pass

STAGE COACH: LAST CHANCE ROMANCE—A quirky romantic comedy by Sam Bobrick, the writer of The Andy Griffith Show, Get Smart and The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. 8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

JUNE • JULY • AUGUST UNLIMITED BUS RIDES I

SUPERSECRETSITESPECIFICSOMETHING—7 p.m. $20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Albertsons Stores • ACHD Commuteride • WINCO on Myrtle • WINCO in Eagle Boise City Hall • Valley Regional Transit in Meridian

TVCC SPRING CHORAL CONCERT—Enjoy “Our Favorite Things,” a choral concert featuring Rutter’s Requiem. The TVCC Chorale, Concert Choir, Vocal Jazz and Orchestra will perform, under the direction of Rebecca Replogle. 7:30 p.m. $3-$5. Meyer-McLean Theatre, 676 S.W. Fifth Ave., Four Rivers Cultural Center, Ontario, 541-881-8822. tvcc.cc/academics/fine_and_performing_arts.

: VAILABLE BEGINNING MAY 23RD AT THESE LOCATIONS PASSES A

345-RIDE

345-RIDE

Workshops & Classes 3-D PRINTING CLASSES—Learn about 3-D printers, the software and hardware it takes to make them run, and the types of design projects that can be created using the Library’s printers. For adults and teens. 10 a.m.-noon and 3-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208384-4076, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Video killed… everything.

EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE: LEGENDS Watch a creationist/ventriloquist lose a scientific debate with his own dummy; find out what soda blowup dolls drink; and “tap the source” with a “filmmaker, artist, poet, creative bodybuilder” who makes his own pants. If that sounds like a bunch of gobbledygook, don’t blame us: It’s your culture, revealed in bizarre found-footage clips lovingly curated by Everything is Terrible, “this world’s only psychedelic found footage comedy website that tours the earth with face-melting live shows.” EIT is currently on its Everything is Terrible: Legends nationwide tour and, as with the content of the videos, the live, interactive show defies explanation. Suffice to say, it is an “unforgettable sensory experience that is just as crazy as it is funny.” 9:30 p.m., $8-$10. Crazy Horse, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208982-4294, watch.everythingisterrible.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

MEMOIR AND FICTION WORKSHOP WITH JUDITH MCCONNELL STEELE—Let Judith McConnell Steele help you shed light on your writing path. In six three-hour classes, she will give you short writing prompts followed by positive discussion toward revision in a supportive setting. On the last Friday of the month through July 31. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. $250-$288. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

Literature AUTHOR ELIZABETH GEORGE— Rediscovered Books hosts bestselling author Elizabeth George, who will read from and sign copies of her new YA mystery, The Edge of Shadows. 7 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-376-4229.

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 13


CALENDAR Animals & Pets LIZARD BUTTE KENNEL CLUB DOG AGILITY TRIALS—Watch canine athletes jump, weave, tunnel and run a course against the clock. Indoors with concessions on site. 8 a.m. FREE. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 111 22nd Ave. S., Caldwell, 208-455-8500, lizardbuttekennelclub.org.

SATURDAY MAY 30 Festivals & Events BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-3499. seeyouatthemarket.com. INTERNATIONAL OBSCURA DAY—International Obscura Day is a celebration of exploration and discovery, with more than 160 curious and awe-inspiring

real-world expeditions taking place in 35-plus states and more than 25 countries, all on a single day. Right here in Idaho, you can get in on the fun with a tour of America’s only officially “weird” national monument, Craters of the Moon. Sponsored by AtlasObscura. com, the online compendium of the world’s hidden wonders and curiosities. For more info and to RSVP, check the website. FREE. atlasobscura.com/events/obscuraday-2015-craters-of-the-moon. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square, Intersection of 14th and Front streets, Nampa. PIONEER CEMETERY DECORATION DAY—The Boise Columbian Club offers informative tours of Pioneer Cemetery. Refreshments, nostalgic postcards, flowers and supplies for gravestone rubbings will be available for purchase. Proceeds will go the the Parks Department for its Pioneer Cemetery Trust Fund. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Pioneer Cemetery, 460 E. Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-938-4252. STAGE STOP MARKET—10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Stage Stop, 23801 S. Orchard Access Road, I-84 off Exit 71, Boise, 208-3431367, boisestagestop.org. WALKABOUT BOISE DOWNTOWN

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

WALKING TOUR—Get to know Boise better during this 1.5-hour guided walking tour through 150 years of history and architecture. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $10. Basque Block, Grove Street between Capitol Boulevard and Sixth Street, Boise. 208-424-5111, preservationidaho. org/walkaboutboise. WHAT A GIRL WANTS EXPO— Check out all the informative booths, as well as vendors sharing everything from handmade crafts, re-purposed furniture, health and beauty to inspirational authors and more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, yelp.com/events/boisewhat-a-girl-wants.

WRITER’S WORKSHOP—This two-day, 16-hour workshop will help you learn the psychology of story and how to express it with the latest developments in narrative structure. By familiarizing yourself with the Dramatica theory of story, you can become your own story guru. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $150. Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 716-471-0524, narrativefirst.com/idaho.

On Stage BLT: DAISY PULLS IT OFF—8 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. BRS END OF SPRING SESSION GIG—The future of rock ’n’ roll will be on display as more than 50 student bands take the stage in this all-day music festival. Proceeds benefit the BRS scholarship fund. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, boiserockschool.bandcamp.com. COMEDIAN SEAN PEABODY—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. SAHRA SAEEDA: ORIENTALE AND EGYPTIAN FOLKLORIC DANCE—Special guest Sahra Saeeda performs, along with regional world dancers, folk dancers and belly dancers. 7-10 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. The Alano, 3820 Cassia St., Boise. 208-297-6626, boisebellydancers.com. STAGE COACH: LAST CHANCE ROMANCE—8 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. STARBELLY SCHOOL OF DANCE STUDENT SALON—Watch the bellydance students show you what they’ve learned at Starbelly School of Dance’s quarterly student salon. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Boise International Market, 5823 W. Franklin Road, Boise, boiseinternationalmarket. com. SUPERSECRETSITESPECIFICSOMETHING—7 p.m. $20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes ESCUELA DE RITMO FLAMENCO CLASS—Escuela de Ritmo is teaching beginner flamenco classes

14 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

at Boise International Market Saturdays through June 6. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn from world-renowned Estefania “La Ishi” of Shimi Tree. Email estefania.ishi@ icloud.com to sign up. Saturdays through June 6. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Boise International Market, 5823 W. Franklin Road, Boise. boiseinternationalmarket.com.

Art JANYRAE SEDA—Check out art by JanyRae Seda at the Capital City Public Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, facebook.com/jany.seda.

Calls to Artists DAISY’S MADHOUSE THEATRE AUDITIONS—Daisy’s Madhouse Theatre seeks one man and one woman, age 20-something, for their production of An Infinite Ache, a heartfelt play about love, time and the infinite directions in which two lives can travel. Show dates are Fridays and Saturdays July 10-25. In the Simplot Room on the first floor. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. 208918-1351, daisysmadhouse.org.

Talks & Lectures 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE VIETNAM WAR COMMEMORATION SYMPOSIUM—The Warhawk Air Museum has teamed with the Department of Defense to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. They will be presenting six symposiums highlighting different aspects of the war in an effort to honor those who served and to teach visitors about the war. Museum will open early at 9:30 a.m. For more info on each session, check out the Warhawk website calendar of events. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-465-6446, warhawkairmuseum.org. DANCE ETHNOLOGIST SAHRA SAEEDA: DANCE STYLES OF EGYPT—Dance Ethnologist Sahra Saeeda presents a one-hour talk on the various dance styles of Egypt by geographic region. 12:30-1:30 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. The Alano, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-2976626, boisebellydancers.com.

Citizen SUICIDE HOTLINE VOLUNTEER TRAINING—Make a difference and help save lives in Idaho by becoming a community outreach volunteer, or “Hotline Ambassador” for the Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline. Ambassadors come from all walks of life and educational backgrounds. Call Nancy Pounds at 208-258-6994, email npounds@ jannus.org or visit the ISPH webpage at idahosuicideprevention.org. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE.

Kids & Teens SUMMER SPLASHTACULAR—Kick off the 2015 summer swim season with Nampa Parks and Rec at Lakeview Waterpark or Lincoln Pool. 1-4:45 p.m. FREE. 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Animals & Pets BOISE BULLY BREED RESCUE YARD SALE—Yard sale to benefit the Boise Bully Breed Rescue, with all proceeds donated directly to the rescue for medical, boarding and training needs. If you can’t go, but would still like to donate to the rescue, visit boisebullybreedrescue. com. 1147 E. Willowbrook Drive, Meridian 7 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. 208703-1727, facebook.com. BOISE HOST LIONS 2015 ANNUAL DOXIE STROLL ’N’ SHOW—The event starts with a casual stroll around Winstead Park. Following the stroll, there’ll be a costume contest, obstacle course and smell challenge. Participants can pick their events or all three. Prizes awarded including for overall “best in show.” Check in at 9:30 a.m. and the events start at 10 a.m. All proceeds go to charity. Find requirements, rules and entry forms on the Boise Host Lion’s Club website. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE to watch; $25-$30 dog entry. Winstead Park, 6150 W. Northview St., Boise, 208-860-9046. LIZARD BUTTE KENNEL CLUB DOG AGILITY TRIALS—Watch canine athletes jump, weave, tunnel and run a course against the clock. Indoors with concessions on site. 8 a.m. FREE. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 111 22nd Ave. S., Caldwell, 208-455-8500. lizardbuttekennelclub.org.

SUNDAY MAY 31 On Stage BLT: DAISY PULLS IT OFF—2 p.m. $11-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

ISF: DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER—7 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Literature SUMMER FEST KICK-OFF PARTY—Join the Library at Collister to register for the summer reading program and decorate a book bag to use all summer. 2-4 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness RUN FOR DUNN—Run for Dunn is an all-ages, all-abilities 3.75-mile run/walk for men, women and children. All participants will receive a Run for Dunn T-shirt and a postrace burger or hot dog. Dermatologists will be on site to conduct FREE skin cancer screenings. Packet pick-up will be the day of the race from 10 a.m.-noon at Julia Davis Shelter No. 1. Proceeds benefit the Amy Rae-Anne Dunn Get it Dunn Fund ICF Endowment and the Boise State University Amy Dunn #14 Soccer Endowment. 12 p.m. $15-$30. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. getitdunn.org.

Animals & Pets LIZARD BUTTE KENNEL CLUB DOG AGILITY TRIALS—8 a.m. FREE. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 111 22nd Ave. S., Caldwell, 208455-8500. lizardbuttekennelclub. org.

MONDAY JUNE 1 On Stage EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE: LEGENDS—The Chicago-based video blogging website that remixes clips of VHS tapes from the late 20th century is back with a new movie and show. But this time, the EIT mindfreaks have outdone themselves, making the show fully interactive. The audience gets to choose where the show will go. You’ll be laughing all the way down to the deepest, darkest depths of your consciousness. Watch the trailer on YouTube. 9:30 p.m. Crazy Horse, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-982-4294. watch. everythingisterrible.com. SUBTERRANEAN COMEDY—Yuk it up with some of Boise’s funniest comics. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement, 109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-2505, tomgraineys.com.

COMEDIAN SEAN PEABODY—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR Workshops & Classes PUT IT TOGETHER JUNE: ASSEMBLAGE ART—Join the Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance for this panel discussion and workshop led by Pam McKnight, with four other artists: Marilyn Cosho, Kay Seurat, Cyndy Lounsbury, and Dr. Kathleen Keys, who will represent outsider artist James Castle. All panelists will bring examples of assemblage work and be available for one-onone visits after the panel discussion. Then on June 6 and June 13, TVAA will hold a Dumpster dive and two assemblage workshops. See treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org for more info and to register for the workshops. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Idaho Parents Unlimited, 4619 Emerald, Ste. E, Boise, 208-342-5884. treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

Human Rights Memorial weekly on Tuesdays. Meet at the Statue of Anne Frank in the memorial. 12:151 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, 777 S. Eighth St., Boise. 208-345-0304. SNAKE RIVER BOAT TOUR AND PICNIC—Join Nampa Parks and Rec for a 2-hour boat tour down Idaho’s scenic Snake River. Sights will include Sand Springs Falls, Blue Heart Springs and more. Afterward you’ll head to Hagerman Wildlife Management Area for a picnic lunch and sightseeing. Tour includes transportation, admission and snacks. Participants need to take lunch, water and camera. Depart and return: Nampa Rec Center. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $35. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Talks & Lectures

On Stage

MANAGING CHRONIC HEART FAILURE—Join St. Luke’s Meridian for a FREE educational session on “Understanding and Managing Chronic Heart Failure.” Dr. Andrew Chai of St. Luke’s and a panel of medical professionals from Saint Alphonsus will provide important information on CHF and ways to manage it. Sponsored by Boise Chapter 380 of Mended Hearts. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. St. Luke’s Meridian, 520 S. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-3812592, MHBoise.org.

4TH ANNUAL LIQUID THROWDOWN ROUND 1— 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com.

Kids & Teens BIODIVERSITY BASICS SUMMER DAY CAMP—Kids entering fourth and fifth grades are invited to explore the incredible variety of life in the world. You’ll hike through habitats, create your own field guide and find out what it’s like to be a biologist in this weeklong day camp. Register by May 20. June 1-5, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. FREE. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor’s Center, 13751 Upper Embankment Road, Nampa, 208-467-9278, fws. gov/refuge/deer_flat.

Workshops & Classes DROP-IN WORKSHOP WITH A.K. TURNER—Memoirist, humorist and fiction writer A.K. Turner will host the workshop with a brand-new prompt to help jump-start your writing, plus time to share your work and invite critique. 6:30 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

QIGONG—This four-week class is for individuals who want an introduction to Qigong, an ancient Chinese practice of aligning body, breath and mind for health and wellness. Teacher: Carla Kyle, Dipl. ABT, NCCAOM Tuesdays, 12-1 p.m. Continues through June 23. FREE. The Cancer Connection Idaho, 2504 Kootenai St., Boise. 208-345-1145, cancerconnectionidaho.org/healingmovement. TAKING YOUR POWER BACK—Join this engaging and fun eight-week series group therapy event. Topics include Exploring the Power of Laughter, Making Friends with Stress, Changing Perspective, Minimizing Distraction, Enhancing Self Care, Eliminating Panic Attacks, Having Fun and learning at the same time. Breakfast included. 10-11:30 a.m. $120. Maui Wowi Hawaiian Coffee & Smoothies, 520 E. Franklin Road, Ste. 105, Meridian. 208-9192520, lisaschirocounseling.com/ TakingYourPowerBack.en.html.

Art INITIAL POINT GALLERY RECEPTION—Join the Meridian Arts Commission for monthly artist receptions at Initial Point Gallery, located on the third floor of Meridian City Hall. Various artwork is displayed, including watercolor, sculpture, photography and more. IPG is open to the public weekdays 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Visit the MAC website for more details. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-489-0422, meridiancity.org/ mac.

Saving energy is as easy as sealing out the heat. And sealing in the savings. Make sure you’re cooling your house — not the great outdoors. Plug leaks with caulk, spray foam or weatherstripping to keep cooled air inside. We even offer free weatherization to electrically heated homes of income-qualified customers. Live comfortably. Save money. Start here.

idahopower.com/save Program continuation, eligibility requirements and terms and conditions apply.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

TUESDAY MAY 2 Festivals & Events 2015 ESTO PERPETUA AWARDS CEREMONY AND RECEPTION— Help the Idaho State Historical Society honor nine individuals and two organizations for outstanding accomplishments in preserving and promoting Idaho’s heritage at the annual Esto Perpetua awards celebration. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $20. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-334-2844. history.idaho.gov/ esto-perpetua. IDAHO ANNE FRANK HUMAN RIGHTS MEMORIAL TOURS—Enjoy 45-minute docent-led public tours of the Idaho Anne Frank

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 15


LISTEN HERE

BRS END OF SPRING SESSION GIG, MAY 30, BOISE WATER COOLER The idea of watching kids play adult-sized instruments may elicit an “awww,” but when students from Boise Rock School take the stage “awww” turns into admiration. Since 2008, BRS has not only been teaching young people to play rock instruments but also how to rock: how to work with other members of a band and how to perform on stage, along with music fundamentals and technique. BRS has expanded its classes and now offers instruction for infants and adults, as well as classes on recording, songwriting, making music videos, making concert posters and more . As much fun as it must be to take a class, it’s an equally great time watching BRS students play; and, for a suggested donation of only $5, you can see more than 50 student bands perform at the upcoming end-of-session gig on Saturday, March 30 at the Boise WaterCooler. Proceeds benefit the BRS scholarship fund. —Amy Atkins 10 a.m.-9 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., boiserockschool.bandcamp.com.

16 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY MAY 27

THURSDAY MAY 28

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

APOCALYPTICA—8 p.m. $25-$55. Revolution

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

HOKUM HI-FLYERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BOY EATS DRUM MACHINE— With Fly Moon Royalty and Customary. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

JACK LOYD GISH—3 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio JAM NIGHT—Hosted by Blind Mice. 8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JOEL KASSERMAN AND THE ELEMENTS—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY— Electronic music and DJs. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid LIVE GERMAN MUSIC—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten REFLECTIONS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SHON SANDERS AND DANIEL JUMP—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio

BRENT MARCHBANKS—11:45 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La DAN COSTELLO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365. FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s GAYLE CHAPMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio GLASS ANIMALS—With Gilligan Moss. 8 p.m. $14.50-$30. Knitting Factory

MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL— 7 p.m. $6-$8 adv., $7-$9 door. Sapphire Room SONS OF THUNDER MOUNTAIN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

FRIDAY MAY 29 AJ DAVIDSEN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE LIKE ITS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio LIVE GERMAN MUSIC—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten LYRICS4LILY—Underground hiphop artists of Boise fundraiser to benefit the Ross family. 7:30-11 p.m. $5. The Crux

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

MARY BETH WHITAKER & SCOTT OLIVER—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

PATRICK RICE—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

REVOLTREVOLT AND MINDRIPS—8 p.m. $TBA. Crazy Horse

BRYAN JOHN APPLEBY—With K. Skelton. 8 p.m. $10. Flying M Coffeegarage

SCOTT KNICKERBOCKER—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio

DJ MANEK—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

SOUL SERENE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

FELICIANA—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

THE SUPERVILLAINS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

JIM PERCY—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE SWIRL—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill-Cole

LIKE A ROCKET— 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

GO DEEP MONTHLY CLUB NIGHT—Featuring Mike Balance, Jeremiah, Curtis Porter and Big Ups. 9 p.m. $5-$8. Crazy Horse

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WAYNE WORTHEN—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE ZOSO: THE ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN TRIBUTE—With Breakdown Boulevard and Coin Slot. 8 p.m. $20-$35. Knitting Factory

SUNDAY MAY 31

PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SATURDAY MAY 30

THE BOURBON DOGS—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio

WILLISON ROOS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio

AUDIO/VISUAL DJ—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

DJ ANKIDO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

TUESDAY JUNE 2

BENJAMIN ANDERSON—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District

HIP-HOP SUNDAY RAP BATTLE CHAMPIONSHIP—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

BROTHERS OF THE SONIC CLOTH—7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CYMRY—6 p.m. FREE. McCleary’s DAVE MANION AND BERNIE REILLY—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio THE DEAD WOODS—With Point Break 2. 7 p.m. $5. The Crux

HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN— 2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio WOH— 10 p.m. FREE. Reef

MONDAY JUNE 1 HOP ALONG—With Field Mouse and Lithuania. 7 p.m. $10. Neurolux

SOUL SERENE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

DIZZY WRIGHT—With Jahni Denver and Demrick. 8 p.m. $10-$45. Revolution J BOOG—With Hot Rain, Westafa and Pause for the Cause. 8 p.m. $16-$30. Knitting Factory MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: MYSTIC BRAVES—With Mr. Elevator and The Brain Hotel, and The Creation Factory. 7 p.m. $10. Neurolux SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

DEFJAC—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La DJ WENDY FOX—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FOR BLIND MICE—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

GHOST TOWNS AND BENJAMIN ANDERSON—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District GREAT BAIT—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOHN MARTINEZ—4 p.m. FREE. Artistblue LIMEHOUSE—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar Patio LIVE GERMAN MUSIC—6 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten PATRICIA FOLKNER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE WEEPIES, JUNE 3, KNITTING FACTORY

TYLOR AND THE TRAIN ROBBERS— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

If someone ever says, “Never mix business with pleasure,” listen to The Weepies, the husband-and-wife duo of Deb Talan and Steve Tannen, who are proof-positive that mixing (on several levels) can not only work, but lead to something remarkable. Since The Weepies’ first full-length release in 2003, they’ve landed respectable spots on Billboard; had three children; moved to Iowa City, Iowa; had songs licensed for film and TV (How I Met Your Mother, Pretty Little Liars and Scrubs) and opened for Pink at the 63rd annual BMI Pop Awards on May 15. But in 2013 Talan was diagnosed with breast cancer. Throughout her treatment, they continued to record, and the result is Sirens (Nettwerk Productions, April 2015), the duo’s fifth full-length release and its first in five years. Their charming, folk-pop sound is intertwined with vulnerability and a sense of urgency, which makes it feel like a beautiful tone poem. Get in the mix with Sirens and then mix it up even more when The Weepies play Boise. —Amy Atkins

YELAWOLF—With Hillbilly Casion and DJ Klever. 8 p.m. $22-$45. Knitting Factory

With The Silent War, 8 p.m., $20-$35. The Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

PIRANHAS BC PUNK ROCK PARTY—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s SHAKIN NOT STIRRED—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel SHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub SOULPATCH—8 p.m. $TBA. Gold Mine Eatery & Spirits STEVE DORFF AND BOBBY TOMBERLIN—7:30 p.m. $25-$35. Sapphire Room THE DELTA BOMBERS—With Doug C. and the Blacklisted. 8 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder THIS END UP—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 17


OT TO KITSINGER

NOISE SONGBIRDS AND WORRIED MINDS

Eilen Jewell discusses Idaho, daughter, new album BEN SCHULTZ “Songbird,” the last track on Eilen Jewell’s new album, Sundown Over Ghost Town (Signature Sounds, 2015), features a surprise guest vocalist. If you listen closely, at around the 2:08 mark, you’ll hear Jewell’s infant daughter, Mavis— whose name comes from the Old French word for a small bird called the song thrush—crying in the background. Jewell and her husband, drummer Jason Beek, loved the happy accident, but they worried listen- thoughts on Idaho are complex. On the bluesy ballad “My Hometown,” Jewell looks back ers wouldn’t hear it. fondly on the summer days and friendly neigh“And then we thought, ‘Well, if they can hear bors of her childhood. By contrast, songs like it, would it be distracting? Should we do another take?’” Jewell said. “But we really felt like that was “Half-Broke Horse” and “Green Hills” meditate on the negative impact of development and the one. So we decided to keep it and give her industrialization. On “Needle & Thread,” Jewell guest-vocal credit on the album.” honors how Idaho City has helped shape her The unplanned cameo suits both the song—a while describing a place full of decaying buildtender tribute to Mavis—and the album as a ings and broken-down people. whole. Written in Idaho City and McCall and Jewell, who moved back to Boise with Beek in recorded at Audio Lab Recording Studio in 2012, admitted having mixed feelings about how Garden City, Sundown draws inspiration from the city has changed over the years. Jewell’s experiences in her home state of Idaho. “I really feel like the progress that Boise has Signature Sounds released the album on May 26, but Entertainment Weekly premiered the album on made has been a double-edged sword,” she said. “And it’s been pretty bittersweet its website on May 20, declaring to return to that—to return to Jewell’s “Americana-driven brand SUNDOWN OVER GHOST TOWN this place that is my hometown of country music sounds tailor(Signature Sounds, 2015) and yet I have to get to know made for sweltering, stagnant Available online at amazon.com it all over again because it has summer nights.” and itunes.com; and locally at changed so much.” While Jewell didn’t plan The Record Exchange, therecordTouring has also changed to make a Gem State-centric exchange.com. drastically now that Mavis acalbum, the focus for Sundown companies her parents. sharpened when she started “Sometimes, we’ll go to writing. bed—the earliest we can manage is at midnight— “Whenever I set out to write a new album and she’ll wake up randomly in the middle of the or even just a new song, I don’t go into it with night at 1,” Jewell said. “And then it’ll take awhile any expectations or any particular motive,” she for her to get back to bed. So it’s a lot of sleepless said. “I let the songs do their thing. And it just nights.” turned out this way: That everything that I was Still, they appreciate having their daughter writing seemed to be about—if not Idaho, then with them on the road. somewhere out West here—but mostly Idaho. “It’s really, really, really hard, but then I supThat’s really where my thoughts have been for the pose leaving her at daycare would be really, really past… well, forever, really.” hard too,” Jewell said. “So at least this way, we get Judging from Sundown’s lyrics, Jewell’s 18 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

Singer-songwriter Eilen Jewell is a true Idaho gem.

to bring her with us. We get to be close to her all the time and not have to leave her behind.” Jewell is also grateful for the support that Boise has given her and Beek. In August 2014, the couple’s promotion company, Mess Around Music, held its first show, a concert at Cinder Winery featuring Zoe Muth and Miss Tess. Jewell considered the show “a total success.” “Local fans really seemed to have a great time,” she said. “I think there were quite a few people who weren’t familiar with their music, or maybe they knew of one of the bands but not the other. So there were quite a few people who walked out of there saying, ‘Wow, I hadn’t heard these people before and now I’m a big fan.’” Jewell’s own music got some love recently, too. On April 11, Visual Arts Collective hosted a tribute show for Jewell as part of the new We Got You Covered series. The concert featured Bill Coffey, Rocci Johnson and other well-known local musicians performing her songs. “It was really great to see how much thought people put into these songs. Most people bothered to learn all the lyrics,” Jewell said. “That’s something I don’t even do with my own songs at first. It takes me awhile to learn the lyrics of my own songs.” For now, Jewell’s big plan is to learn how to balance her professional and her family life. She looks forward to seeing how her relationship with Idaho evolves, too. “I think any great love—of anywhere or anybody or anything—tends to be a mixed bag, at least for me,” she said. “But that’s part of what makes it so deep.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


SCREEN UNHAPPILY NEVER AFTER: TOMORROWLAND AND MAD MAX: FURY ROAD

Waxing by Lisa

Wake me when tomorrow is over GEORGE PRENTICE

Before the lights came down at a recent weekend evening screening of Tomorrowland, a commercial—tucked in among movie trailers and reminders to purchase a tub of popcorn and gallon of soda—flashed up on big-screen. The Walt Disney Company, masters of all things synergistic, apparently thought it was a good idea to bundle Tomorrowland—a tedious film with no beginning, middle or end, let alone a tomorrow—with a promotion urging the audience to visit “the real thing,” at the company’s legacy theme park in California. The big-screen ad included faded but lovely home movies of a family visiting Disneyland, circa 1964, when the park was only around 9 years old. The narrator of the advertisement was a 70-something grandpa type, beckoning the audience to return to Anaheim, Calif., with him. That’s pretty much all you really need to know about Tomorrowland, the movie: It’s a vision of a tomorrow, still frozen from the Cold War-era, which would be about the time grandpa (then a boy) first set foot inside the Magic Kingdom. In hindsight, Mr. Disney’s concept of “tomorrow” wasn’t overly stellar. It included Space Mountain, an indoor roller coaster covered by a facade and carrying visitors through his theme park on ridiculously slow-moving conveyor belts—they called them “people movers.” Now, the movie studio bearing Walt’s name echoes that onedimensional vision by unleashing 2015’s arthritic Tomorrowland. Spoiler alert: There’s a pivotal scene in Tomorrowland in which George Clooney flies through the air in a bathtub. I swear on a stack of Donald Duck comic books that’s true. Tomorrowland is practically irrelevant and impractically dull. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Back to the future: Charlize Theron (left) in Mad Max: Fury Road and Thomas Robinson (right) in Tomorrowland.

Several times during the screening, I glanced around to gauge the audience’s interest, or lack thereof. In the semi-packed theater, I counted six adults on their smartphones and a few dozen kids furious with their parents for dragging them to such a tedious bore. Nearly everyone appeared as if they wanted to be somewhere else instead of Tomorrowland—even the Disneyland of yesteryear would have been more exciting. I can’t recall being more disappointed in a movie for what it didn’t turn out to be. I was similarly disappointed in still another futuristic movie, Mad Max: Fury Road, but for what it indeed did turn out to be: a repetitive orgy of post-apocalyptic carnage and misogyny. Coincidentally, as I was leaving Tomorrowland, I noticed how many parents were dragging grade-school age children into Mad Max. Having seen the hard-R-rated film, I cringed and couldn’t help but wonder which kids had it worse-off: those dragged to see the bathtubpiloting Clooney or those forced to endure the hyper-violence of Mad Max’s angry, vengeful title character (played by Tom Hardy). Both Tomorrowland and Mad Max: Fury Road are doing boffo business. Tomorrowland had the top box-office numbers for the coveted Memorial Day Weekend, and Mad Max has reaped nearly $150 million in only two weeks, already matching its production budget. The critics have not been kind to Tomorrowland, but they have mad love for Max. The Hollywood Reporter’s Todd McCarthy called it “amazing.” A.O. Scott of The New York Times, described it as “humble and indomitable,” and Rolling Stone’s Peter Travers wrote writer/director George Miller is an “indisputable visionary genius.”

I respectfully disagree with McCarthy and Scott, and while I concede Travers’ labeling of Miller as a genius, I struggle with Miller’s vision. While many of the world’s top film critics have heralded Charlize Theron’s performance as Imperator Furiosa, a one-armed modern feminist heroine and Max’s equal, Theron’s machisma masks Miller’s insistence on pairing her with a female fivesome, each with perfect skin and all wearing some variation of a bikini. This bronzed quintet—looking like they just flew in from a Vanity Fair photo shoot—employs a preposterous mix of accents: one sounds like she’s from the East Side of Manhattan while another appears to be auditioning for the Royal Shakespeare Company. Mixed with the villains’ bizarre Cockney accents, Theron’s homogenized American accent and Hardy’s Australian growl, and the desert dialect is quite perplexing. Director Miller tends to let his machines do most of the talking in this film, however, and this Max, a reboot of Miller’s own 1979 classic (starring Mel Gibson), could have been outlined on the back of a matchbook. Thrill-seekers will be sated: Mad Max opens with a rather spectacular 15-minute overture of violence that dares its audience to look away; but in spite of the machines’ RPMs, Max really never goes anywhere. Instead, the story rinses and repeats its rage (actually it swishes and spits) for the better part of two hours. Tomorrowland is an idea in search of a movie, Mad Max: Fury Road is a movie in search of an idea. If this is what tomorrow looks like, wake me when it’s over.

20+ years experience Full Body Waxing, Eyebrow Design, Bikini To Brazilian, Male Body Waxing, Airbrush Make-up Artist

208.342.100ōņ¬ 1025 Main Street On the corner of main & 11th Tues–sat 9–6

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 19


WINESIPPER To my way of thinking, the best buy in wine for everyday consumption doesn’t come in a bottle, it comes in a three-liter box. I’m not talking about the cheap, nondescript box wines that line some grocery shelves. Most of those lack the flavor or character that makes me want to come back for more, but for the still bargain-priced equivalent of about $6 a bottle, you can find some eminently quaffable gems. Here are a few favorites that are warmweather and patio perfect. NV LA VIEILLE FERME ROSE, $26; 2014 ARRUMACO GARNACHE ROSE, $25 While no grape varieties are listed, the French La Vieille Ferme blend typically relies heavily on grenache (aka garnacha), which would explain the striking similarity between these two wines. The Spanish Arrumaco is a little darker in color, the La Vieille Ferme a bit more intense on the nose. Both are fruit forward and as charming as they are refreshing with cherry and berry fruit flavors. The French rose adds a little orange zest to its crisp finish, while the Spanish version finishes smooth and creamy. It’s hard to pick a favorite. 2014 SHANIA WHITE, $20.00 This wine from the Jumilla region in southeastern Spain is a blend of sauvignon blanc and malvasia, though you won’t find that information on the label (or on the Internet, for that matter). It’s a beautifully floral wine with bright citrus and melon aromas along with a touch of clover. Fresh, ripe citrus dominates the midpalate, colored by spicy apple up front, and followed by soft melon and peach. I’ll be drinking it all summer. —David Kirkpatrick 20 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

FOOD

JES SICA MURRI

WINE SIPPER: THINKING INSIDE THE BOX

THE REASON FOR THE SAISON Crooked Fence creates exotically flavored beer ffor the World Villagee JESSICA MURRI For Adam Dahl, brewing a beer doesn’t usually start with sticking his nose into exotic spices, but for Crooked oked Fence Brewing’s new World Villagee Saison, that’s exactly what the head brewer did. The Croo Crooked Fence Brewing team sniffs spices at the Boise International Market. Dahl and his team of brewers took ok a trip to the Boise International Market on n a rainy Nigerian superstar Fela Kuti, who pioneered commonly mixed day in April to find the perfect beer-infusinfusinto bbutter for Afrobeat in the 1970s and used his music as a ible flavor. The brewery agreed to make ake a platform for change. taste. special small batch of beer for the World Though the beer will start pouring at the kick“I haven’t Village Festival, June 19-21. off party, the World Village Festival takes place really come They sniffed spices like dosalette, giea few weeks later, Friday, June 19-Sunday, June across any so, atare and basobla in the midst off the 21. The festival originally started as part of the herbs like Boise International Market’s cramped d Hyde Park Street Fair four years ago but quickly that,” Dahl nts grocers. They sprinkled small amounts outgrew its small section of Camel’s Back Park. said. “It has a on their tongues and their faces often n Now, Ayodele is excited for the festival to nice bubblegum bu twinged at the peppery, powerful herbs. rbs. branch off on its own in Capitol Park, where it smell tto it.” d Dayo “That one is a little stronger,” said will be a showcase of multi-national performances He decided Ayodele—the main organizer for thee and bring cultures together through dance, to infuse the in World Village and executive directorr music, storytelling, poetry and food from several herb with of the nonprofit Global Lounge—ass ethnicities: Mexican, Basque, Native American, a light ssaison he guided the brewers through the spice pice Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Bosnian, with 6.5 percent alcohol by volume and an IBU racks. “This is tradition; they use this during a African, North and South American, Middle (International Bittering Units) of 22. He picked naming ceremony for children. After seven days, up yeast from Woodland Empire, let the beer fer- Eastern, Indian and Greek communities that this is something we do: we break it down and ment in an open tank and added the spice a little thrive in Boise. put it in the baby’s mouth, to welcome them to Ayodele, who is from Nigeria, came up with at a time until the taste was right. the culture.” the vision for the festival a few years after he Crooked Fence’s marketing and events direc“Really?” one of the brewers said, laughtor/resident artist, Kelly Knopp, went along to the moved to Boise. He told Boise Weekly he’s always ing. “They use this for babies? Wow, can you had a desire to see cultures come together like market to get inspiration for the label. He came imagine?” this. up with an image of two figures Dahl left the market with “As a little kid, I saw a commercial by Coke representing different cultures, seven spices for experimenWORLD VILLAGE FESTIVAL where they had all these ethnicities from everyintertwined around a globe. tation. He poured one of Friday, June 19-Sunday, June 21; The World Village Saison of- where, there in perfect harmony,” Ayodele said. Crooked Fence’s lighter beers Fri. 5-10 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; FREE. ficially releases on Thursday, June “That made a profound impact on me. I’ve always into a few growlers, bagged up Capitol Park, Boise, worldvillagethought the world needs to come together.” 4 at the festival kickoff party at the spices and herbs and let festival.com. When Crooked Fence heard about the World the Egyptian Theatre, though them sit in each growler for a Village this year, the brewery selected it as one of bottles can already be found on day or two. Then Dahl and his the handful of organizations it picks every year for shelves at select Fred Meyer stores. team got to taste each brew. their Hops and Hearts program. Thirty percent The kickoff party for World Village features a “Some of them weren’t great,” he said, adding live and silent auction with an opportunity to bid of sales from the special beer will go to Global that some spices weren’t pronounced enough in Lounge. Ayodele was thrilled. on a tequila tasting party hosted by the Mexican the beers, others weren’t “beer-friendly.” “I thought it was a really great, mind-blowing Basobla herb, on the other hand, tasted pretty Consulate and a few cases of wines from around idea,” he said. “The world is getting smaller as we the world. Live music and dancing are planned good. Dahl said it had a fruity flavor and aroma, know it, and you can find a lot of things just at for the evening, as well as a screening of Finding though it’s not known for flavoring beer. The the Boise International Market.” spice—from the east African nation of Eritrea—is Fela, a documentary that follows the career of BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BW OFFICE HOURS

CRISIS

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com MYRTLE: Sweet, sensitive, and quiet—I’m looking for a person who’s just like me.

HARRY: Looking for a great secret keeper and an attentive listener? Come make me purr.

MINERVA: I’m a purr-ific, fun, and verbose little sweetie. Let’s chit-chat and cuddle.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. NOODLE: 2-year-old, male, poodle mix. Great with other dogs his size and has lots of energy. Eager to learn new tricks and works hard for treats. (Kennel 303, #27806237)

SASHA: 3-year-old, female, pitbull mix. Enthusiastic and easy to work with. Loves people and is good with the dogs. (Kennel 308, #24997575)

BEAU: 2-year-old, male, spaniel/Tibetan mix. Independent, outgoing and affectionate. Needs daily exercise and brushing. (Kennel 307, #27805427)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT TEMPEST: 3-year-old, female, Manx. Curious and playful and loves to be scratched on her neck. Beautiful markings and an adorable face. (Kennel 102, #27736473)

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

FURIOSA: 10-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Warm and loving. Will do best in a calm, quiet environment. (Kennel 10, #27842255)

MACY: 1-and-1/2- yearold, female, domestic shorthair. Silky coat and striking light green eyes. Loves attention and is adventurous. (Kennel 108, #27809410)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 21


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY CA R E ERS BW CAREERS Looking for a person with good phone skills & a nice voice to set appointments for merchant services. Leads provided! Solid leads that lead to sales will be an extra $50 per sale. Passing out business cards for referrals. Give Rob a call at Central Payment, 830-3381, 15-18 hours weekly. MAKE $1000 Weekly!! Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience Required. Start Immediately. www.theworkingcorner.com

Start your Humanitarian Career at One World Center and gain experience through international service work in Africa. Program has costs. Info@OneWorldCenter.org

certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563.

BW CAREER TRAINING

HO U S IN G

AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads. TV. Film. Fashion. HD & Digital.40% OFF TUITION For Limited Time Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course. Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119. AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA

BW REALTORS

30 Proofer’s mark 32 “O, never say that I was false of heart …,” e.g. 34 “Not only that …” 35 Used a pouffe 36 Language whose own name is represented as ςϔϋϔϣιτ 37 Once, old-style 38 Competitor of Petro-Canada 40 Laura who wrote and sang “Wedding Bell Blues” 44 Join 46 “That’s a ____” 48 Stuck in a mess?

1 Exactly 5 Obama vis-à-vis Columbia 9 Deg. from Columbia 12 Much-anticipated nights out 20 Company with a fleet 22 Prefix with watt 23 Window shopper’s cry 24 Like the roots of democracy 25 Mario’s brother, in gaming 26 Breeding ground 28 Eventually became 29 Relative of a kite 1

2

3

4

20

5 21

25 30

35

8

56

67

68 74

79 83

85

92

93

102

103

113

114

115

119

120

121

125

19

40

41

42

43

60

71 77 82 89

96

97

90

98

99

105 110 116

112

117

118

122

123 130 131 137

138

139 140 141

146

152

153

156

157

158

160

161

162

100 101

106

111

128 129

22 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

18

65

88

144 145 151

17

70

135 136

142 143 148 149 150

16

59

81

126 127 133 134

51

76

104 109

132

69 75

95

108

50

39

58

87

94

15

64

86

107

124

57

80

84

14

34

49

63

73

78

38 48

55

13

69 Alternative to metal 70 Goddess in “The Tempest” 71 Win at auction, say 72 Warrior in the “Discworld” fantasy books 73 Small force 74 Form a coalition 76 Jokesters 77 Personnel list 78 ____ chi ch’uan 79 Travelers at the speed of light 80 Former Jets coach Ewbank 81 Tavern menu heading 82 One with a stiff upper lip?

28 33

47

62

72

12

MIND BODY SPIRIT

OPENING DOORS Energy balancing & Chakra cleansings. Call 208-724-4901.

BW BODY WORKS ULM Inc. 340-8377.

BW HEALTH & FITNESS BW BEAUTY

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com

BW ENERGY HEALING

HAIRLINES Ready for something new for Spring? Cut, color, perm, highlights or a whole new style? Call “ Lui The Hair Whisperer” for a appt. Call now 383-9009.

FLOWERING FIST TAI CHI I teach Yang Style, traditional form and TaijiFit, fitness moves that use Tai Chi positions and flow. It is similar to aerobics. Classes in Star at The Dance Academy from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. 907-7752751.

BY KEVIN G. DER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

24

37

54

66

11

32

46

61

10

27

31

45

53

9 23

36 44

91

7

26

29

52

6

22

50 “Ain’t gonna happen” 52 Heart 54 Imminent 56 Local theater, slangily 58 Ones in an annual hunt 60 Ulan-____ (capital of a Russian republic) 61 Vehicle with a folding top 62 Suffix with stink 63 Fulda tributary 64 Jack’s partner 65 Cousins 66 Goes for the gold? 67 Not quite right

down. Do you know if you qualify? There is no cost or obligation to find out but you need to hurry as prices and rates are going up!! Call Christine Carillo, Realtor with Group One at 208-724-1992. ccarillo@groupone.com. By the way, my buyers typically pay nothing out of pocket when they buy a house with me, so call today and let’s get started!

BW ROOMMATES

HOMES AS LITTLE AS $500 DOWN Stop paying your landlord’s mortgage. Many of my clients are getting house payments that are lower than their current rent AND they are paying as little as $500

NYT CROSSWORD | A TALE OF MANY CITIES ACROSS

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

147 154 155 159 163

83 Speed-skating champion Kramer 85 Captain’s spot 87 Kind of adapter 89 Act the rat 91 It’s folded before a meal 93 Dodge Aries, e.g. 95 “Walk ____” (1964 hit) 97 Red Rock dweller 99 Magazine mogul, familiarly 102 “Pretty Maids All in ____” 103 The sun’s “10th planet,” once 104 Half of a Senate vote 105 “This looks bad” 106 Singer ____ Rose 107 Barber’s supply 108 Routine response? 109 Kyrgyz province 110 Trite 112 Needle holder 113 ____ Paradise of “On the Road” 114 Was bankrupt, say 115 Blue shade 117 Stupefy 118 Like some missed pitches 119 Stupefy 120 Baritone in “The Mikado” 121 Dyspepsia reliever 122 All at the start? 123 Home of the Big 12’s Cyclones 124 One who’s behind 126 Solomonic 128 ____ colada 130 Plantation machines 132 Holes in Swiss cheese 133 Grasps 135 “The Night Circus” author Morgenstern 137 Chicago mayor Emanuel 139 Yamaha Grizzly, e.g., for short 142 Trunk part 144 Pond or sand trap 146 One of the Jackson 5 147 “____-haw!” 148 Long-running event? 152 “Et voilà!” 154 One following an order 156 Countermanded 157 Verdi’s “____ tu” 158 Power-play result, often 159 Pope’s vestment 160 They’re blown at some weddings 161 Yahoo! alternative 162 Do a body scan? 163 Meanie

DOWN 1 With 141-Down, author whose work is the basis of this puzzle’s theme 2 Shipmate of Spock 3 Brooklyn Heights school [U.S.; 3,9] 4 Yank 5 En route, as a tanker 6 Relaxing [U.K.; 6] 7 Host of the first World Cup, 1930: Abbr. 8 Michael of “Reservoir Dogs” 9 Spooky sounds 10 1988 Bon Jovi hit [India; 6] 11 Words said with a sigh 12 Witchy woman 13 Others, in Oaxaca 14 1996 Geena Davis thriller [China; 4,4] 15 Mountain ____ (soft drinks) 16 What chemists find attractive? 17 Cookie holder 18 “Dig in!” 19 ____-Cat 21 Leans 27 As an example 31 PBS craft show for 21 seasons [U.S.; 3,4] 33 Sci-fi narcotic 39 Military trial for a misdemeanor [India; 8] 41 “Get it?” [Japan; 8] 42 Send off 43 Popular party feature 45 Often-illegal turns, informally 47 “Hmm, gotcha” 49 Wolfe of mystery 51 Sugar suffixes 52 Benjamin 53 Mitchell heroine 55 Firehouse catching fire, e.g. 57 “Someone Like You” singer, 2011 59 Overdo it at dinner 68 Two-masted craft 73 Dr. of hip-hop 75 Ones pressed into service in the kitchen? [Egypt; 4]

76 Spitball, e.g. 77 Mens ____ (legal term) 84 Asseverate 86 Ambulance destinations, for short 88 Anatomical sac 90 Book before Esth. 91 Event often in a front yard 92 Passage between buildings 94 Stream 96 ____ Tate, onetime English poet laureate 98 Secretariat’s org. 100 Send off 101 Pilots 108 One-liner, e.g. 109 Stable bagful 111 Gets broadcast 112 McGregor of “Big Fish” 116 Dream 125 A neighbor 127 “Kind of” ending 129 Rainbow color

L A S T B R E A M A R I W I N D N O E T H L E C R

M A R C S

T R U I S M

W F I T V D E

D N A L A U M B S S S E D D O A S N M N A R A N A L T Y S R A K E A C O R L L E A A N T F S

131 “Ta-ta” 134 Lyric poem 136 Eager, informally 138 Overflow seating area 140 “Coffee, ____ Me?” 141 See 1-Down 143 Longfellow bell town 145 “Um, pardon …” 148 Rabble 149 A.I. woman in 2015’s “Ex Machina” 150 Std. 151 Old game console inits. 153 Dress (up) 155 1990s Indian P.M. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

S R E C O W A T T I M E N A R I O F L F L I O O Z O W T S I G H T R E A B A C A N E D A R E T E N N A T O

A N S W E R S

O M A O R P S K C H A P L A T H A H E E D E A W A R P M E A T C R P A C O I E H U E S I P A L E C T A F I R E T S U A S A M T C H A B A R K G R I A U R N A B A K A R M S H A

D D S S E E P S C A Y A P R N R O A S T O W V E A F L E L I M E S C N A P H R S S E T B O A H A N T S E A S H O M S R B A T U S A T A P A D S L B T O O O K A T A T E K I D Y E S

T O A D

E M O L N K S

A T E A S E

G U N S I T

G E E N A

T U L E B O Y B L E O R C S

L I P K S E S

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


VIAGRA 100mg, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement! Discreet Shipping. Save $500. Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1-800-404-1271.

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. Male Only. Private Boise studio. MC/ VISA. massagebyeric.com

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Enjoy a relaxing esalen massage by Betty. Open 7 days/week. By appt. only. 283-7830. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Call or text Richard at 208-6959492.

PETS BW PETS

CALL TO ARTISTS!

DID YOU KNOW...

Simply Cats Adoption Center sells low cost spay/neuter vouchers? For more information, call 208343-7177. STANDARD POODLE NEEDS A HOME Great dog. Doesn’t bark, very smart. I have to move & can no longer keep my dog. Please, call 342-1899. Thanks.

COMMUNITY

FIND

Designs $10 and up. Can’t make it then call 570-4247 to set up an appointment. We do Baby-Bump Blessings, Party Hennas and so much more.

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS Boise Henna will be at ~What A Girl Wants~ at the Boise Expo. Saturday, May 30th 10am to 6pm.

CAREERS

Meridian Summer Art Festival, August 22 & 23. All local artists/crafters & artisans needed! Deadline is June 6th. Please contact Ellen: 639-1378 or Deadbirdframing@ gmail.com

BW GRAY MATTERS HOME CARE Trusted home care for in the Treasure Valley. Home Helpers Boise. Making Life Easier. Call today 208-322-2068.

BW HOME DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $34.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888-992-1957 (AAN CAN)

GRAY MATTERS AYN RAND WRITES THE BABY-SITTERS CLUB? DEAR GOD, YES. Ayn Rand was a philosopher in the same way the Hamburglar was a gourmet chef. Rand’s works of fiction read like Bill O’Reilly but are longer and include less sex and violence. They’re vehicles for her philosophy of “objectivism,” which could be summarized as a synthesis of John Locke and Cliven Bundy, but with fewer scruples. While most responsible parents keep Rand’s books far from the hands of impressionable kids, Mallory Ortberg, founder of website The Toast (the-toast.net), wondered how Rand would bloviate on children’s literature. “When I say that I am the [Baby-Sitters Club] and the BSC is me, I mean that the others are merely instruments for carrying out my decisions. I am the will, they the body. You might call them useful tools,” muses Kristy Thomas, narrator of “Ayn Rand’s The Baby-Sitters Club,” as Ayn Rand Does Kids Lit penned by Ortberg. the-toast.net Ortberg has composed a handful of selections from popular children’s books as if they’d been written by Rand. Other titles include “Ayn Rand’s You’ve Got Mail,” “Ayn Rand’s Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” and “Ayn Rand’s Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.” For still more clever jabs, try out “Ayn Rand Reviews Children’s Books,” in which the stone-hearted dame of libertarianism weighs in on such classics as The Giver and the Encyclopedia Brown series. All of it can be found for free at the-toast.net, which probably has Rand spinning in her grave. —Harrison Berry BOISE WEEKLY.COM

I WILL CLEAN

Cleaning services available. 11 years experience, home or commercial. Great rates, trustworthy & professional with references. 208-409-3563.

TRANSPORTATION BW 4 WHEELS CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

BW LIVE MUSIC FAITHFUL SOUL PLAYS THE PATIO AT CRUSH! Simply put: THIS BAND ROCKS!! From the Temptations to Michael Jackson to Bruno Mars....these boys play them all! Weather permitting, we will be DANCING on the patio Friday, May 29 starting at 8pm. 78 E Eagle River St #115, Eagle.

BW AUTO SERVICES AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/ MONTH! Call 855-977-9537

FOR SALE BW NEED

BW SHOP HERE

COMPOST Refugee farmer needs compost of any kind. I have a truck & will pick up. Grass clippings... 409-3563. Thanks!

BW POURING MEAD HERE Try 16 year old mead at Tres Bonne Cuisine. Call to find out how! 658-1364. 6555 W. Overland Rd., Boise.

BW VOLUNTEERS CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS World Village cultural & music festival. At Capitol City Park, June 19-21, 2015. Contact bmp.50@ hotmail.com for details.

ANTIQUE REVERSE PAINTING ON GLASS Lovely piece antique frame, reverse painting on glass. c1930’s castle in Germany on the Danube River. A must stop and see at: ATOMIC TREASURES 409 S. 8th Boise. Open Tuesday-Saturday 11ish to 5ish. KESH KOUTURE THRIFT BOUTIQUE Not your average thrift store. We consign local arts & crafts. 4948 Morris Hill Rd. Checkout our Facebook page! QUE PASA Come and enjoy the best in Mexican expression! Thousands of items from Mexican master craftsmen. Sterling silver, pottery, blown glass, Talavera, Dragons , Fairies, Mermaids, and Day of The Dead. 409 S. 8th St. Between Broad and Myrtle.

BW YARD SALES

YARD SALE SALE HERE!

OBITUARIES BW OBITUARIES RIGHT HERE The Boise Weekly offers obituaries for close to half off the daily newspaper, plus a full week in the paper & online versus one day. Email classifieds@boiseweekly. com for a quick quote.

Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10 AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next edition. 344-2055. JUMBLE RUMMAGE SALE St. Michael’s Cathedral Annual Rummage Sale. 518 N. 8th St., between State & Washington streets. Near the downtown market. June 12th: noon-6pm and June 13th: 8am-4pm.

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 23


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY HEALING ARTS

HOME SERVICES

MUSIC

RENTALS

YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

LEGAL BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of:

2BR/1BA $725 BOISE 985 SQ. FT. 949-9506 bunchcourt@gmail.com

No. CV-IE-1504757 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (I.C. 15-3-801) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedents. All persons having claims against the decedents or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of the Court. Dated this 8th day of May, 2015. Suzanne Oliver c/o Leslie Smith, Attorney at Law, ISB 8965 P.O. Box 605 Eagle, ID 83616 Tel: (208)939-1107 Pub. May 13, 20, 27, 2015.

FLOYD E. OLIVER and FRANCES E. OLIVER, Deceased.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Alexandria Luna Claar Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1507536 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Alexandria Luna Claar, now residing in the City of Star, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Alexandria Luna Bastet. The reason for the change in name is: I dislike my current name and would like to change it to something of religious significance to me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) July 16, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change.

DEPUTY CLERK PUB May 20, 27, June 3 & 10, 2015. Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) proposes to build a 46-foot Monopole Communications Tower at the approx. vicinity of 376 South Latah Street, Boise, Ada County, ID, 83705. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30 days from the date of this publication to: Trileaf Corp, Sara s.spagnolo@trileaf.com, 10845 Olive Blvd, Suite 260, St. Louis, MO 63141, 314-997-6111. Pub: May 27, 2015.

Date May 12, 2015 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBBIE NAGELE

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Keith Moon played drums for the rock band The Who. He was once voted the second-greatest drummer in history. But his erratic behavior, often provoked by drugs or alcohol, sometimes interfered with his abilities. In 1973, The Who was doing a live concert near San Francisco when the horse tranquilizer that Moon had taken earlier caused him to pass out. The band appealed to the audience for help. “Can anybody play the drums?” asked guitarist Pete Townshend. “I mean somebody good?” A 19-yearold amateur drummer named Scot Halpin volunteered. He played well enough to finish the show. I suspect that sometime soon, Aries, you may also get an unexpected opportunity to play the role of a substitute. Be ready! TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The weta is a very large insect whose habitat is New Zealand. It looks like a robotic grasshopper, with giant black eyes on a long red face, enlarged hind legs bearing spikes and floppy, oversized antennae. The native Maori people call it “the god of the ugly things.” Please note that this is a term of respect. The weta’s title is not “the most monstrous of the ugly things,” or “the worst” or “the scariest” or “the most worthless of the ugly things.” Rather, the Maori say it’s the god—the highest, the best, the most glorious. I suspect that in the coming days, Taurus, you will have

a close encounter with your own version of a “god of ugly things.” Doesn’t it deserve your love and welcome? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You have successfully made the transition from brooding caterpillar to social butterfly. Soon you will be in your full, fluttery glory, never lingering too long with one thought, one friend or one identity. Some heavy-duty, level-headed stalwarts might wish you would be more earthy and anchored, but I don’t share their concern. At least for now, having a long attention span is overrated. You have entered the fidgety, inquisitive part of your cycle, when flitting and flirting and flickering make perfect sense. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Only one fear is worthy of you. Only one fear is real enough and important enough to awaken and activate the numb part of your intelligence. So for now, I suggest that you retire all lesser fears. Stuff them in a garbage bag and hide them in a closet. Then put on your brave champion face, gather the allies and resources you need, and go forth into glorious battle. Wrestle with your one fear. Reason with it. If necessary, use guile and trickery to gain an advantage. Call on divine inspiration and be a wickedly good truth-teller. And this is crucial: Use your fear to awaken and activate the numb part of your intelligence.

24 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the coming nights, try to see your shadow as it’s cast on the ground by the moon. Not by the sun, mind you. Look for the shadow that’s made by the light of the moon. It might sound farfetched, but I suspect this experience will have a potent impact on your subconscious mind. It may jostle loose secrets that you have been hiding from yourself. I bet it will give you access to emotions and intuitions you have been repressing. It could also help you realize that some of the deep, dark stuff you wrestle with is not bad and scary, but rather fertile and fascinating.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Long-distance flirtations may soon be just around the corner or across the street. Remote possibilities are taking short cuts as they head your way. I swear the far horizon and the lucky stars seem closer than usual. Is it all a mirage? Some of it may be, but at least a part of it is very real. If you want to be ready to seize the surprising opportunities that show up in your vicinity, I suggest you make yourself as innocent and expansive as possible. Drop any jaded attitudes you may be harboring. Let the future know that you are prepared to receive a flood of beauty, truth and help.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The ancient Greek statesman Demosthenes was regarded as a supremely skilled orator. His speeches were so powerful that he was compared to a “blazing thunderbolt.” Yet as a youngster he spoke awkwardly. His voice was weak and his enunciation weird. To transform himself, he took drastic measures. He put pebbles in his mouth to force himself to formulate his words with great care. He recited poems as he ran up and down hills. At the beach, he learned to outshout the pounding surf. Take inspiration from him, Virgo. Now would be an excellent time for you to plan and launch strenuous efforts that will enable you to eventually accomplish one of your long-range goals.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I suspect that marriages of convenience will begin to wither away unless they evolve into bonds of affection. Connections that have been fed primarily on fun and games must acquire more ballast. In fact, I recommend that you re-evaluate all your contracts and agreements. How are they working for you? Do they still serve the purpose you want them to? Is it time to acknowledge that they have transformed and need to be reconfigured? As you take inventory, be both tough-minded and compassionate. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Petrarch was an influential 14thcentury Italian poet whose main work was Song Book. It’s a collection of 366 poems, most of

which are dedicated to Laura, the woman he loved. For 40 years he churned out testaments of longing and appreciation for her, despite the fact that he and she never spent time together. She was married to another man, and was wrapped up in raising her 11 children. Should we judge Petrarch harshly for choosing a muse who was so unavailable? I don’t. Muse choosing is a mysterious and sacred process that transcends logic. I’m bringing the subject to your attention because you’re entering a new phase in your relationship with muses. It’s either time to choose a new one (or two?) or else adjust your bonds with your current muses. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The soul moves in circles,” said the ancient Greek philosopher Plotinus. Modern psychologist James Hillmans agreed, and added this thought: “Hence our lives are not moving straight ahead; instead, hovering, wavering, returning, renewing, repeating.” I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because you’re now in an extra-intense phase of winding and rambling. This is a good thing! You are spiraling back to get another look at interesting teachings you didn’t master the first time around. You are building on past efforts that weren’t strong enough. Your words of power are crooked, gyrate, curvy, labyrinthine and corkscrew.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s no coincidence that your libido and your mojo are booming at the same time. Your libido is in the midst of a deep, hearty awakening, which is generating a surplus of potent, super-fine mojo. And your surplus of potent, super-fine mojo is in turn inciting your libido’s even deeper, heartier awakening. There may be times in the coming week when you feel like you are living with a wild animal. As long as you keep the creature well-fed and well-stroked, it should provide you with lots of vigorous, even boisterous fun. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I always arrive late at the office, but I make up for it by leaving early,” quipped 19th-century English author Charles Lamb. I invite you to adopt that breezy, lazy attitude in the coming weeks. It’s high time for you to slip into a very comfortable, laidback mood... to give yourself a lot of slack, explore the mysteries of dreamy indolence and quiet down the chirpy voices in your head. Even if you can’t literally call in sick to your job and spend a few days wandering free, do everything you can to claim as much low-pressure, unhurried spaciousness as possible.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


ADULT BW ADULT MEET SEXY SINGLES Send Messages FREE! Straight 208-345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-4722200. Use FREE Code 3187, 18+.

BW CHAT LINES MEET SEXY SINGLES Browse & Reply FREE! 208-3458855. Use FREE Code 3188, 18+. WHERE HOT GUYS MEET Browse Ads & Reply FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 2619, 18+.

PEN PALS BW PEN PALS My name is Ibrahim Ramadan & I am 42 years old. I am looking for a bbw to be pen pals with and to see where things go. I like to hang out and watch movies. I also like to spend time outside and I am also a very hard worker. I am currently at SICI for the next 11 months and would love to hear from someone. Ibrahim Ramadan #88792 SICI Main Dorm 2-18 PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707. Hopefully, the 2nd time is the charm. My name is Bryan King IDOC #99572. I’m currently living on The Yard, ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I’ve been down for a little over 4 years now. I’m

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

looking for a female pen pal with no expectations. I’d rather write a letter to you, than talk to other men about typical subject in here. I could tell you what type of guy I am, but I’d rather you decide on your own. I will say that I have a decent sense of humor. Laughter is a language easily understood. I’m single, 6 foot, brown hair and eyes, and I’m in good shape. I love much of all kinds, and I value my family strongly. I will answer all letters, and I can send pictures. Don’t be shy and drop me a line. TTYS. Hello, I’m Thomas Proctor a 53 yrs old looking for pen pals to shoot me a few line’s, I would like to hear from you ladies who could use a spank in life, I have a sense of humor, love to laugh, I have a short time left behind theses bars and fences, so please let’s laugh together. Thomas Proctor #66642 ISCI 16A 53A PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Hi, my name’s Keagan. I’m 27 years old, 6 feet tall, white and athletic built. I have short brown hair, and brown eyes. I’m serving time for writing bad checks. Obviously I’ve broken the law, but that’s not all there is to me. I enjoy cooking too! Ok, seriously though I’m looking forward to meeting some new people and developing friendships. I enjoy working out, hiking, going to concerts and being spontaneous. I’m outgoing and very open minded. I have a sense of humor that keeps the glass half full. Mail is the highlight of my day so I will always write back to any letter I receive. So, drop me a line at: Kegan Kolander ISCC P-18-14 PO Box 70010 Boise, Id 83707. Fifty year old native American looking for penpals to write. Please write to Ron Porter #22562. Unit: 7c 21a IDOC, ISCI P.O. Box 14 Boise, Id 83707.

My name is Jael Perez # 104604. I’m a twenty–two year old single white bisexual female that’s looking for friendship and maybe more. Adventurous open minded, free spirited. I’m 5’8 160 pounds hazel eyes, auburn hair that’s past shoulders and wavy, write me at Jael Perez #104604 15 N 2nd east Rexburg, Idaho 83440. If you’re interested. I will be relocating to Ada County and am looking for someone to spend some quality time with.

Hello! My name is Soledad Lopez. I am currently incarcerated in PWCC in Pocatello Idaho. I have brown eyes, brown hair. I am also Hispanic. I have lots of tattoos everywhere. I am looking for some penpals to help my time go by quickly, as well as to meet new people in the boise area. If you want to know more about me you can write me at; Soledad Lopez #41796 C/O PWCC unit1 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID. 83204.

My name is Amanda Disher & I am 31 years old and I’m currently incarcerated in Bonneville county jail in Idaho falls. I have long blonde hair, bright blue eyes that change colors. I’m 5’3” and I’ve got curves in all the right places. I love to draw, listen to music and spend time in the outdoors. I am a girly girl on the outs and love to get dressed up and go out but I also enjoy hanging inside in my sweats cuddled up on the couch watching movies. I’m looking for someone who can make me laugh and loves to have a good time. I need someone to help keep me in touch with all 5 of my senses while away. I have 17 months till my fixed time is up and looking forward to really getting to know someone for a possible relationship. Hope to hear from someone real soon. Amanda fisher #100432 Bonnevill County jail 605 N.Capital Idaho Falls, ID 83402.

I’m a 44 year old man who is currently finishing my sentence of 2 years in Idaho State Correction. At Po Box Boise Idaho 83307 my number is 113983 I am look to write letters and share my art with someone. I am single and I have a lot of ? ? I love the outdoors and traveling and talking to new people. So if you’re interested in a good friend and some fun and some cool conversation hit me up.

Blonde hair blue eyes s.w.m. 6’1”, 165 lbs attractive 31 year old. looking for an angel to write to help pass these hard times till I can parole out. I have a picture for you when I get yours. I have no expectations just write a good hearted man at John Rhoden #69294 ISCC D1-213-A PO BOX 70010 Boise Id. 83707.

I am 6’1, 190 pounds. I am not from Idaho & am hoping to meet new friends. I am Latino & Caucasian & am looking for anyone who is fun, honest & interested in meeting a great friend. Mail is something we always look forward to & I will always write back & will be excited to hear from anyone. Cameron Tirrell #106602 ISCC Po Box 70010 Boise, ID 83701. Hi my name is Jacob Freeman. I am a 33 year old white male 6’0 180 pounds. I love to workout & a very outgoing person. I am look for a woman 25-50 years old to be friend or even more. I have been locked up for 2 years I am in the tc program in ISCC and have only 8 months left until my release. I would love to have someone to talk

to for the remainder of my time. My info is Jacob Freeman #104468 ISCC unit P3 Bunk 38B PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. Hello. My name is Georgia Smith. I’m currently incarcerated & am looking for a pen pal. I don’t have much contact with the outside world, I’m from Boise so it will be nice to me some people in the Boise area. I’m 5’6 & 180 pounds. I have brown hair & green eyes. Write me at: Georgia Smith #82451 c/o PWCC unit 1-21A 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204.

ADULT

Wanting new friendships, 35 year old female releasing in eight months to the Boise area. I have a sense of humor am open minded and love adventures. I have long curly brown hair, blue eyes and a beautiful smile, pictures available contact tammy Jennings #95464 @ PO BOX 8509 SICI-PRC Boise, Id 83707. James Gorham #75369 age 29 birthday June 30 I am single and am looking for a pin pale if you are interested please write me at James Gorham #75364 Isci unit 15 teir B bank 34b po box 14 Bosie ID 83707. I am looking for someone to give me something to look forward to in the mail. I am 21, very outgoing & love talking about anything. My hobbies include music, working out & cars.

JEN SORENSEN HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 25


PAGE BREAK TOP 10

QUOTABLE

Most-watched network TV show finales since Pope Francis swore off the boob tube on July 15, 1990:

“The OMG communit y continue s to sp read i t s te n t a cl e s throughout all facet s of government.”

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH Dear Minerva Jayne, My father is an alcoholic and my stepmother is lying, manipulative and controlling. Their love is conditional and brings me more angst than happiness. I’ve just had a baby and in order to have a relationship with my grandparents, I have to play my parents’ games. How do I know when enough is enough? Is it time to break ties entirely? How do I live with myself? Sincerely, Genetically Tested

1. Cheers, May 20, 1993: 84.4 million viewers 2. Seinfeld, May 14, 1998: 76.3 million 3. Friends, May 6, 2004: 52.46 million 4. The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, May 22, 1992: 50 million 5. The Cosby Show, April 30, 1992: 44.4 million 6. Home Improvement, May 25, 1999: 35.5 million

Dear Genetically Tested, It seems the relationships of at least six people are being controlled by two people bent on having their own way. What I can tell you is that while blood is thicker than water, sometimes blood isn’t thick enough. Sometimes relationships grow anemic, sometimes they hemorrhage. Your father’s alcoholism and stepmother’s manipulation are no doubt the result of some seriously unchecked issues within their own lives and while you have to take into consideration the relationship your new baby deserves to have with relatives, you also have to consider the health of those environments. Just because someone is related by genes and marriage, they aren’t automatically granted VIP access past the velvet rope of your heart. I think you need to have a conversation about how you are planning on raising your child. If they can’t respect that, you can act accordingly with a clear conscience. Good luck!

7. Frasier, May 13, 2004: 33.7 million 8. Dallas, May 3, 1991: 33.3 million 9. Everybody Loves Raymond, May 16, 2005: 32.9 million 10. Star Trek: The Next Generation, May 23, 1994: 31 million

Source: Wikipedia, “List of most watched television broadcasts in the United States”

— E XCERPTED FROM TH E A LC O H O L , TOBAC C O A N D F IRE A RMS REP O RT “OMGS AND THE MILITARY 2014,” DE TAILING THE MEMBERSHIP OF SO - CALLED “OUTL AW MOTORCYC LE GROUP S ,” WHIC H IN C LUDES L A RGE N UMBERS O F L AW EN FORC EMENT A N D MILITARY PERSONNEL.

“I have not watched T V since 1990. It’s a promise that I made the Virgin of C armen on the night of 15 July 1990. I told my self : ‘It’s not for me.’” — P OPE FR ANCIS IN AN INTERVI E W WITH A RG E NTI N IA N N E W S PA PE R L A VOZ DEL PUEBLO O N MAY 2 5 .

SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

212

828 MILLION

206 MILLION

400, 125

$15 MILLION

Number of years since the start of the Napoleonic Wars on May 18, 1803.

Square miles of territory purchased from Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson on May 2, 1803, aka the Louisiana Purchase.

Total number of gallons of oil spilled in the Gulf of Mexico from the BP Deepwater Horizon well explosion, which, on May 27, 2010, was declared the worst oil spill in U.S. history.

Number of miles of coastline in Louisiana, number of miles of Louisiana coastline polluted by the BP oil spill.

Price, in 1803 dollars, of the Louisiana Purchase.

(history.com)

(Time.com)

(datesinhistory.com)

26 | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | BOISEweekly

(dosomething.org)

#boiseweeklypic

(U.S. Department of State, Office of the Historian)

Taken by Instagram user dr_kelso

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT How many times per year do you visit McCall?

12%

0 times: 16% 1-5 times: 72% 5 or more times: 12% Disclaimer: This online poll is not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s a mp l e o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r nati onal op i ni on.

$312.5 MILLION Approximate cost, in 2015 dollars, of the Louisiana Purchase. (davemanuel.com/ inflation-calculator)

$43 BILLION

200

Amount set aside by British Petroleum to pay for fines, legal settlements and cleanup costs associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Number of years since the end of the Napoleonic Wars, at the Battle of Waterloo, on June 18, 1815. (Smithsonian Magazine)

(bbc.com)

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

MASSAGE

shop here

HOME SERVICES

CLASSES

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MAY 27 – JUNE 2, 2015 | 27


Boise Weekly Issue 23 Vol 49  

Crown Jewell: Eilen Jewell’s new album explores the good, bad and ugly of her home state

Boise Weekly Issue 23 Vol 49  

Crown Jewell: Eilen Jewell’s new album explores the good, bad and ugly of her home state