Page 1

BOISE WEEKLY LOCAL AND INDEPENDENT

DECE MBER 24–30, 2014

V O LU M E 2 3 , I S S U E 2 7

“In the end it was panic that carried the day. / On November 4, the dumb stooges held sway.” COPE 5

7

Lifeline

How the Marian Pritchett School helps two generations at once

11

Christmas at the VA Idaho veterans and their loved ones share stories of holidays spent in uniform

16

That’s a Wrap

Boise Weekly ends a year of film reviews with a bracket ranking 2014’s top flicks FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com

EDITOR’S NOTE

Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com Associate Editor: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Interns: Farzan Faramarzi, Brandon Walton Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Tara Morgan, John Rember Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com Ian Roth, ian@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jenny Bowler, jenny@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2014 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

A LONG WAY TO TIPPERARY Clearly no one knew what they were getting into when the First World War began in earnest in August 1914. Soldiers marched, sailed, boarded trains and, in some cases, rode taxis to the front fully expecting—as many of their newspapers and leaders claimed—“the boys will be home for Christmas.” One hundred years ago, on Dec. 24, 1914, French, British and *erman soldiers were most deÀnitely not home—they were freezing in trenches dug into the Belgian and French countryside. What happened that night, on Christmas Eve 1914, has taken on mythic proportions: In some sectors of the front, soldiers began decorating their positions and singing carols across no man’s land. In a few spots along the German and (mostly) British lines, combatants laid down their weapons and met to exchange small gifts and even play football. The dead were buried, defenses were repaired and soldiers rested. The so-called Christmas Truce was far from universal and lasted only through Christmas Day in some places, clear to New Year’s Day in others. It was mostly hushed up at the time, as the belligerent governments feared it would lead to more fraternization. Still, in letters home, participants told their families how they had spent the holiday safe—if brieÁy—from harm. The story has been mythologized in print and Àlm—even a gauzy, cinema-quality advertisement for English grocery chain Sainsbury’s. Its staying power draws from a simple truth: being separated from family—especially while in uniform and even more so during the holidays—is a miserable experience. In this Christmas Eve edition of Boise Weekly we explore the experience of spending the holidays away from family, with stories from veterans collected by staff writer Harrison Berry at the Boise Veterans Home (see Page 11). Some are sad, some are funny, but all are important to share. We thank them for their time and service, thank you for your continued support of BW, and wish everyone a happy, safe holiday. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Tarmo Watia TITLE: “Messing with Turquoise” MEDIUM: Acrylic ARTIST STATEMENT: True visual art begins where words leave off.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

#BLACKLIVESMATTER WHEN STUDENTS AT THE DEC. 6 BOISE STATE VS. FRESNO STATE FOOTBALL GAME RAISED AWARENESS FOR #BLACKLIVESMATTER, THEY WERE IGNORED BY MEDIA COVERING THE GAME. BUT BOISE WEEKLY INTERN FARZAN FARAMARZI CAPTURED THE SCENE ON VIDEO. SEE HIS INTERVIEW WITH THE ORGANIZERS ON CITYDESK.

CYCLEMAS The Boise Bicycle Project donated more than 300 bikes at its eighth annual Christmas Kids Bike Giveaway Dec. 20. Do yourself a favor and check out a video of the happy kids on Citydesk.

CHIEF BONES

TRAVEL SAFE

Boise Mayor Dave Bieter announced 22-year BPD veteran William “Bill” Bones will take the top cop spot from retiring Chief Mike Masterson at the end of January. More on Citydesk.

If you’re planning to hit the road for the holidays, you’re far from alone. Want to know how many fellow Idahoans will be joining you (and what you’ll be paying for gas)? Find out on Citydesk.

OPINION

4 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


OPINION YULE LIKE THIS

And I won”t say ‘doggeral’ if you don’t BILL COPE This column will appear in print on Dec. 24. I can’t just write any old thing, can I?… knowing it’ll be Christmas Eve when you read it. So I’ve written a poem. A Christmas(ish) poem. And you’d better appreciate it because it took me a crap long time to write it. It rhymes and everything, and that ain’t easy. I could write a whole regular column in the time it takes to write two metered, rhyming lines, and this poem has 24 metered pairs of rhyming lines. One last thing: This poem is for Democrats only. As for the Republicans?… screw ’em. They had their Christmas seven weeks ago. I call it…

Yeah, It Was A Crummy Year, But… Two thousand, fourteen?… not our favorite year,

Filled as it was with a butt-load of fear. It started off rough with Obamacare woes, And Congress rife with Larrys, Curlys and Moes. We knew it’d be nasty as midterms drew nigh But who could have known just how low they would Áy? For those who believed the McConnells and Boehners, (Not to mention the rest of the GOP moaners), The good old U.S. was about to collapse To an immigrant’s heaven of socialist scraps. Howled out the Cruz, the Paul and the Gomert, “We’re doomed! We’re doomed!” then threw even more dirt. Obama could do nothing right they declaimed. For everything bad it was he whom they blamed. The rise of gas prices, Ebola and ISIS?… That conniving Kenyan had caused every crisis. He even took heat for the polar vortex It’s a wonder he didn’t get Àlmed having sex. Some called him “King” for his executive actions Others shrieked “Tyrant!”; there were several factions. Billions were spent in the war for the Senate, Just to elect a mere handful of numbnuts. It mattered for naught, the Democraters’ defense; The odds against them were just too immense. In the end it was panic that carried the day. On November 4, the dumb stooges held sway. One-Àfth of the people decided our fate. So pissed-off, they were, so seething with hate. Now the air is abuzz with talk of impeachment, Benghazi inquiries and fed’ral o’er-reachment Yet in spite of the sound, in spite of the fury, Our president seems to have little worry. He forges ahead, unilaterally, To slow global warming, to help Dreamers dream free, To up the ante on minimum wages, To end the abuse in Git-mo’s foul cages. The Obamacare woes have resolved to success, Thanks in large part to Obama’s Ànesse. We’re cozy with Cuba, employment’s contained By leadership from which his critics refrained This must be said, and let the Right frown, Be it ever so true: A good man won’t stay down. Soooooooo, As ye merrily carve into your Christmas hams, And rip the wraps from your new Dodge Rams, Take a moment of time to thank Baby Jesus For putting good Barack here on Earth to lead us. And as your family sups on your holiday hominy, Bless us all that it wasn’t Mitt Rominey! BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 5


OPINION BEHOLD THE MAN Xmas cheer, etc., etc. JOHN REMBER Julie informs me that I’m to write something cheery for this week’s column. She says I shouldn’t bum people’s trips on the eve of a major religious holiday. I agree that this is a week when people should be happy, not sad. Generous, not greedy. Empathetic, not intolerant. Kind, not vicious. Forgiving, not angry. Adventurous, not afraid. In fact, I think the values of the 1960s should be followed all year around. If people were to grow their hair long, wear striped bell-bottoms, stop freaking out over gender issues, establish communal gardens and reject a toxic culture-wide war-dependent money-worshipping materialism, it would be a far better world. A lot of the depressing things I worry about would go away, except for striped bell-bottoms. Normally I wouldn’t be optimistic about any of this. But last week folks in Sawtooth Valley met for a reading and potluck. Forty or so of us crowded into Beckwith’s Lodge in Lower Stanley, and people took turns reading from Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol—an abridged version, or we would have been there all night. But the shape and spirit of the story remained. The ghost-guided journey of Ebenezer Scrooge through past, present and future was familiar to me—I’d been in A Christmas Carol as a Àrst-grader at Ketchum Elementary School, bitterly disappointed to be cast as a street urchin rather than Tiny Tim. I also knew that Scrooge had saved himself by changing his stingy, miseryproducing ways. As I listened to his story with an adult consciousness, I started thinking about how rare such transformations are. If we were confronted with a contemporary Scrooge—if one of our Idaho billionaires, say, was to suddenly give up all his money to send poor kids to college—it would be huge news. But there would be people who would think there was a catch: a few hundred million in rainy-day petty cash had been subtracted from the deal, or the scholarship kids were required to give their Àrstborn children to a corporate sponsor, or a bunch of Idaho public lands had somehow become private property. Plenty of people would call our billionaire crazy, not the least of them the billionaire’s heirs, who might suddenly Ànd that the deepest and most cherished parts of their selves stemmed from being born into a rich family. The billionaire himself might Ànd that self and money are so intertwined that personhood doesn’t really exist without cash and a lawyer on retainer. Still, these radical changes of character do happen. Often, they’re the result of near-death experiences (NDEs), and I suppose you could 6 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

call Scrooge’s time with the ghosts of Christmases Past, Present and Future a literary NDE. People back from NDEs report that they’ve left their bodies, hovered over them, then felt a great and warm presence—often that of a loving and grieved-for family member—who escorted them to a tunnel of light. A sense of imminent homecoming overwhelmed them, but their journey was interrupted. Revived on operating tables or rescued from drowning, they felt a tremendous loss at having to return to this fallen world. Most people who undergo NDEs—billionaires or not—make major changes in their lives. It’s as if a curtain has been pulled aside for them, and they’ve seen a bigger, better picture than they saw before. They become more generous, loving and tolerant. They’re easier on the people around them. Many of them quit unsatisfying jobs and spend their lives doing the things they love. Neuroscientists have neurochemical explanations for all of this, but there are reports of other NDEs that involve leaving your body, being seized by hissing, scaly-skinned demons and devils, and dragged toward a tunnel of darkness, all the time being yelled at by family members that you’ve injured or disappointed. A surprising amount of publicly devout and upright Christians report this sort of NDE, which suggests that when it comes to the afterlife, the contents of your heart are more important than tithing or service to company or country. Scrooge’s story smacks of psychological and ethical truth. Even if you’re a neuroscientist and for you the afterlife is only the last Áaming of dying brain cells, it’s still a valid human experience, something that people have returned from and incorporated into their lives. It’s real. The curtain does get pulled aside. What you see behind it seems to depend on who you are. Which brings up Christ, who is the nominal reason for this season of commercial frenzy. Christ espoused a set of principles that would get you into the Kingdom of Heaven, which wasn’t a place you went to when you died if you were good. It was, rather, a condition within you where the warring parts of yourself could be reconciled, where you could forgive and be forgiven, where you welcomed lost selves—some of them better than the person you’d spent your life being—that you’d exiled from your consciousness. Entering the Kingdom was homecoming in the deepest sense of the word. “Behold the Man,” Pontius Pilate said of the scourged Christ, bloody, dispossessed, condemned, broken, on his way to torture and death, and—according to all the accounts we have—radiant with an internal light. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


JENNY B OW LER

A CHILD IS BORN

NEWS

UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

A Christmas visit to the Marian Pritchett School GEORGE PRENTICE

Yes, there is a separation of church and state, as any American government student at Marian Pritchett School might tell you, but it is a convergence of public and private entities— and a lot of faith from both—that has kept the doors open at the Boise facility for nearly a century. But if anyone thinks that a faithbased mission and a publicly funded school isn’t maintaining a delicate balance, they need look no further than the nativity scene standing on the front lawn of the modest campus in Boise’s North End. “It’s interesting, isn’t it?” said Maj. Rhonda Lloyd, who along with her husband, Maj. Robert Lloyd, are chief Boise Corps ofÀcers of the Salvation Army. “Yes, we have the love of Christ in us, and I’m pretty sure that the girls feel that love. But we never push that faith. I think it was Mother Teresa who said, ‘Preach the Gospel at all times and, if necessary, use words.’ Well, we use very few words at Marian Pritchett, but the girls know that we love them. It works out remarkably well.” The North End campus has seen a lot of change since 1921, when the Salvation Army opened a small hospital and home for unwed mothers on 24th Street. The young women primarily learned about cooking, housekeeping and typing while living in then-dormitories on the campus. In 1963, the Idaho Legislature decided to turn what was then called “the Booth Home” into a fully accredited high school. The school was renamed the Marian Pritchett School in 2002, to honor its longtime educator and principal. But what the Idaho Legislature giveth, the Legislature taketh away. In 2010, the Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee zeroed out speciÀc funding for the school, leaving it to the Boise School District to either Ànd more than $500,000 to keep the lights on, or shutter the nearly century-old institution. And yes, there were more than a few people who wondered if the school should remain open. “I remember people looking at us and asking, ‘Isn’t that kind of antiquated, to have a school for unwed mothers?’” said Lloyd. Chief Administrator Deborah HeddenNicely recalls reporters from the Christian Science Monitor visiting the school several years BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

The Dec. 2, 2014 issue of the Borah Senator included some very familiar words.

FOR THE RECORD…

Maj. Rhonda Lloyd: “I think it was Mother Teresa who said, ‘Preach the Gospel at all times and, if necessary, use words.’ Well, we use very few words at Marian Pritchett, but the girls know we love them. It works out remarkably well.”

ago, referring to a number of similar schools for pregnant girls on the East Coast that were closing their doors in increasing numbers. “They asked, ‘What’s your secret?’ And I told them it’s this unique private-public collaboration, and that private partner is faithbased,” said Hedden-Nicely. The Boise School District and the Salvation Army accomplished what many considered to be impossible. Hedden-Nicely said through a difÀcult combination of job cuts and service eliminations, a bare-bones budget was cut down to the marrow. “It was a minor miracle,” she said. Hedden-Nicely is more than a principal. Due to the cutbacks, she needed to take on a full slate of classes, teaching American Government, Economics, Early American History and 20th-21st Century American History. She joined 10 other teachers, counselors, tutors and assistants who juggle every element of the Boise School District’s high-school curriculum—from business and technology to physical education. “But it’s a kinder, gentler PE,” said Hedden-Nicely with a smile. “We walk the neighborhood on good days, and we do prenatal yoga and prenatal Pilates.” The easiest way to look at the Marian Pritchett School is that the school district handles all of the education and the Salvation Army owns and maintains the building

and provides support services for the unique student body. “The students are technically released to us on Wednesday afternoons,” said Lloyd. “That’s when we have life-skills courses, dealing with everything from custody and guardianship, to prenatal and parenting classes. Actually we call it ‘Adulthood 101.’ A lot of what the girls are dealing with are not the same things that a typical high-school girl might deal with.” Therein lies the secret for the school’s success of keeping unwed mothers in school, said Lloyd. “It’s estimated that 70 percent of young women who become pregnant drop out of school,” she said. Everything from stigmatizing to bullying are commonplace for a pregnant teen walking school halls among her peers. Worse yet is the physical endurance. “We see morning sickness on any given day,” said Hedden-Nicely. “But we get on the phone and say, ‘That’s OK; we can deal with that. But you need to get to school today.’ They can lie down here, get some juice and crackers, but at least they’ll be attending some classes.” And labor pains? That’s a reality, too, but school ofÀcials map out de8 livery dates and return dates and, quite often, have students take their Ànals

The latest chapter in the chronicle of Idaho’s newly elected Superintendent of Public Instruction Sherri Ybarra took a turn Dec. 3. But it didn’t play out at the Idaho Statehouse or the Department of Education. Instead, it occurred inside Boise’s Borah High School, where senior Harmony Soto was approached by a classmate who had read Soto’s article in the just-published Borah Senator—the school’s newspaper. “You’ve got some serious guts to do this,” said the classmate, pointing to Soto’s column titled “New Chief of Schools Plagiarizes to Win Elections.” The following day, a career counselor at the school walked into a classroom, waving the newspaper while asking, “Who did this?” Soto had become a minor celebrity at her school after she took Ybarra to task for copying, nearly verbatim, content from her opponent’s website at the height of this past fall’s election. “Welcome all to the Sherri Ybarra era,” wrote Soto, chastising the superintendent. As if that wasn’t controversial enough, Soto deliberately copied, nearly verbatim, from Boise Weekly. To be sure, the media loves a story about other media, but when you pepper that with stolen content and a student scolding the highest-ranked educator in the state, something’s got to give. The story gained steam on Dec. 17 when Idaho Public Television’s Idaho Reports co-host Melissa Davlin called BW to inquire about the origin of Soto’s article. For the record, I was contacted by Soto and her mother in mid-November, shortly after Ybarra secured 51 percent of the statewide vote to become Idaho’s newest superintendent of public instruction. Soto’s request was equal parts unique and controversial. She said she wanted to, quite simply, plagiarize my reporting—although there was nothing simple about the possible consequences. My reactions ranged from intrigue to apprehension, and I needed to talk to Soto’s teacher and 8 newspaper adviser, Michelle Harmon, before going forward. In a longer BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 7


UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

conversation with Harmon, a few days later, we talked quite a bit about how common it was for media outlets to aggregate, borrow and flat-out steal content from other outlets and how that could trigger greater conversations among Borah’s student journalists. “I started thinking about how many times in our English or history classes here at Borah that we’re lectured about how to cite your sources and give proper credit to people,” said Soto, who found particular resonance with Ybarra’s controversy of borrowing content and posting it to her own campaign website. A spokeswoman for the superintendentelect insisted that Ybarra had “apologized on behalf of her web team employees because that is what good leaders do.” As soon as Davlin’s Idaho Reports story on the controversy, titled “Plagiarism with a Purpose,” hit the web Dec. 17, the Associated Press followed suit, as did Idaho broadcast outlets and, yes, even the Idaho Statesman included the controversy on its Dec. 18 front page. In a case of class work imitating life, BW had only spoken with Davlin. In other words, all of those other media outlets were aggregating or “borrowing” from each other’s account of the controversy. Even national media pundit Jim Romenesko weighed in on jimromenesko.com, writing an online story headlined, “High School Newspaper: Our State Schools Boss Plagiarized, so We’re Doing it Too.” Meanwhile, back at Borah High, teacher Harmon said her email inbox was full, mostly from other teachers, applauding Soto’s efforts. “A lot of them wanted to say how great a ‘teachable’ moment this was,” Harmon told BW. One good controversy usually deserves another, leading more than a few people to wonder about possible consequences for the incident. “Any scholastic journalism teacher knows about the conflict between an institution and reporting on that institution, and in this case the student reporters are part of that institution. It’s a classic struggle,” said Harmon. “But I think a lot of people are really proud of us, and especially proud of Harmony.” 7

—George Prentice 8 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

ahead of time in case delivery comes near Ànals week. 7 “In a traditional school, it’s just not possible,” said Hedden-Nicely. “They’re dealing with too many students where they can’t make too many exceptions to the rule.” Then there are the babies, lots and lots of babies. A day care, managed by the Boisebased nonproÀt Giraffe Laugh, operates one of its centers right on the campus of Marian Pritchett. It’s used exclusively for students during the school year and the day care is open to the general public when the school is not in session. A typical school day begins with students arriving in the pre-dawn hours, dropping off their children—newborns to 3-year-olds—at the day care and heading off to class. If a child needs feeding, it’s not unusual to see a nursing mother and infant in the midst of an economics class. The new mothers pick up their children during the lunch break so that they can eat together—the school’s lunchroom has as many highchairs and boosters as adult chairs—and then the children are taken back to the day care as the students head back to class. The connection between the school and day care is getting even closer. Beginning this past semester, Marian Pritchett students have been taking a class called Childhood Professionals, where they learn about caring for other people’s children. At the end of the year, those students are certiÀed childcare professionals, meaning that they can be hired at any other day care and, presumably, be eligible for free- or reduced-cost childcare for their own infants. “It’s the Àrst year we’re doing that; it’s a very full class,” said Hedden-Nicely. Graduates of Marian Pritchett take much more with them than a high-school diploma and day care certiÀcation when they depart. To the person, nearly all of them have been accepted as undergraduates to Boise State University or the College of Western Idaho or have secured full-time employment. The high school boasts a 98 percent graduation rate. “I took students from one of my government classes down to the Ada County Courthouse the other day to watch dispositions and sentencings and up walks one of my former students. She has a criminal justice degree from Boise State and she works at the courthouse,” said Hedden-Nicely. That student is just one of the hundreds of young women who have walked the halls at Marian Pritchett. In fact, this year marks the 50th anniversary of the school’s unique relationship with the Boise School District. Many of its alumni returned to share their memories. “I deÀnitely wouldn’t have my diploma

GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

This article by student Harmony Soto created quite a stir inside and outside Borah High.

NEWS

Beginning this past semester, Marian Pritchett students have been taking a class called Childhood Professionals, where they learn about caring for other people’s children.

today if it weren’t for this school,” said 2013 graduate Amie Erickson. “I had to get up every morning with a kid and make my way to school. But it was a big family. We all bonded.” “Before I came here, I was a dropout, a runaway and obviously I got pregnant. I was lost in the crowd; I wasn’t successful and didn’t have anyone holding me accountable,” said 2006 graduate Caitlin Pierce. “But I had all these people telling me that my future mattered. I’m absolutely the mom I am today because of my time here.” Marian Pritchett graduates include scores of Idaho professionals, including small-business owners, attorneys and even the principal of Trail Wind Elementary School, Deborah Watts. Veteran teacher Diana Scott, who taught math and science at the school for 33 years— and still returns to Marian Pritchett as a substitute teacher—remembers all of the girls but, above all, remembers Marian Pritchett. “She was larger than life and saw the big picture,” said Scott. “She absolutely loved the girls but I remember her saying, ‘That girl is going to graduate whether she wants to or not.’” Pritchett, whose beaming portrait hangs in the hallway of the school, was the head teacher at what was then-known as the Booth Home. Following her death in 2002, the district named the school after her.

“I heard so many alumni say over the years that it if it wasn’t for Marian a lot of them would have dropped out,” said Scott. But Pritchett’s 20th century school has a very different look—quite literally—in the 21st century. “I think we’re approaching 50 percent of our students being English language learners. We have quite a few resettled refugees,” said Hedden-Nicely. “This year, we have students from Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Somalia, Rwanda, Congo, Mexico… oh my, there are a lot of nationalities.” Which introduces a new dynamic. “To tell you the truth, over the years we have had students from opposing tribes. They would be enemies,” said Hedden-Nicely. But the common bond found at Marian Pritchett is universal. “They’re all pregnant or they’re new mothers. And we need to get along, regardless of our tribal differences,” she added. Hedden-Nicely said that includes many faiths, in spite of the fact that the Salvation Army has provided the school’s foundation. “And that particular spirit of Christmas is here through much of the year,” she said. “Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims, Christians … we share our faiths, and above all it’s a gratitude and mindfulness of the love we have for one another, no matter what.” B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CITIZEN JER

EM

Y

L AN

NIN GH

AM

ELLAR COLTRANE

PATRICIA ARQUETTE

TOM FORD

CITIZENS OF 2014 This year’s graduating class GEORGE PRENTICE Should old acquaintances be forgot? Not a chance. We met an outstanding selection of citizens in 2014—caregivers, artists, lawmakers, faith leaders, athletes, foodies, you name it. War, peace, history and histrionics were all grist for the mill. Did we have favorites? Absolutely. Were some a bit more challenging than others? You bet. But to the person, they all passed the ultimate test of being fascinating individuals. So, here’s a toast to them and the New Year, which will introduce us to a host of new citizens. We spent most of the weeks of the 2014 session of the Idaho Legislature hearing from lawmakers from all corners of the state. Some were newcomers (Sen. Janie Ward-Engelking and Reps. Pat McDonald and Ilana Rubel), but we took particular interest in the insight of retiring Rep. Darrell Bolz who stepped away from the Statehouse after seven terms in the Idaho House. “I’m concerned about our state’s revenues for the coming year in terms of the drought,” Bolz told Boise Weekly. “Some of the rain we’ve seen lately is nice, but is it enough to change farmer’s plans? Will they grow higher-value crops of onions, potatoes and sugar beets that require more water? Or will they end up growing grains or beans that use a lot less water? I’m pretty concerned. Agriculture has driven this state’s economy in the last two or three BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

years at the height of the recession.” Speaking of nutrition, we spent time with some of Idaho’s most interesting cooks this year—from white-linen chefs to short-order cooks. “Life’s Kitchen saved me. It really did,” Kahootz Steak and Alehouse sous chef Joey Love told BW, recalling the days when he struggled with drugs, before becoming a trained chef. “Before Life’s Kitchen, I was doing a lot of bad things,” he said. “I was born with fetal alcohol syndrome, so I was drinking a lot. I felt there was nothing out there for me. They made me realize that family is so important and having a career that you love makes life that much better.” Over at Boise’s new high-end Ruth’s Chris Steak House, executive chef Bryan Forcina was extra proud of winning the Best Course of the night at this year’s Chef ’s Affaire. “People who don’t know who we are, think they can’t afford us,” said Forcina. “We have a prime-time menu: three courses for $49. You get to choose your salad, your entrée, your sides and your dessert. It’s $49 for an experience—in this beautiful setting with our service, which is polished beyond belief, and the food. You’re not going to get this steak somewhere else. You just can’t.” But the menu at Fanci Freez, the North End

icon, is dramatically simpler. It’s all about the burgers and fries and (mostly) the shakes. “We’re getting close to where we’re pushing 100,000 shakes per year,” said co-owner Chris Bauer. “Our Boston Shakes, for example, are 30 percent of our business for the whole year.” “We had one lady, her name’s Barbara and her husband passed away and he loved Fanci Freez,” said co-owner Meagan Bauer. “She was having his funeral at the Botanical Gardens on a Sunday and she ordered 600 shakes for the funeral.” We’re assuming that shakes will not be on the menu of the Motion Picture Academy Governor’s Ball, which follows the Academy Awards this coming February, but it’s a pretty fair bet that Patricia Arquette and Ellar Coltrane will be on the invite list. They starred in Boyhood, one of the best Àlms of this or any other year. “Boyhood became really personal. For most of the process, it didn’t even feel like a movie,” said Coltrane. “It was more of an exploration of the way humans experience time, and through that, our relationships with one another. I was 7 when we started Àlming; 19 when we Ànished last October.” “I would really like to see our director [Richard Linklatter] get an Academy Award,” said Arquette, who is also being mentioned as a sure-Àre Oscar nominee. “It was part of an incredible alchemy. We weren’t just putting a cast BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 9


CITIZEN JER

EM

Y LA NN

IN GH

AM

CLAIRE VAYE WATKINS

together with good actors. We were put together emotionally.” The emotions ran high (more than a few tears were shed) during our conversation with Tom Ford, who has been thrilling audiences at the Idaho Shakespeare Festival since 2002. “Our audiences have been nothing but endlessly supportive,” said Ford. “Really generous, sometimes very moving. I had a woman tell me once that she had never seen a play before I Am My Own Wife, and since then, she goes to the theater all the time.” We were pleasantly surprised how charming Lee Majors was when we sat down to talk during a break in his appearing in The Other Side of September, a feature-length comedy that Àlmed in Boise this past summer. “It’s all about the script. This movie could turn out to be a good little Àlm. Lately, I’m more on board with smaller independent projects,” Majors told BW. “I loved being in Boise. Let me tell you, this has been a very pleasant shoot and I loved spending time at the Plantation Place Retirement Home. When we’re done shooting, I enjoy going back there and having some one-on-one time, pose for pictures, sign some autographs.” Certain authors are celebrities, too, and it was standing-room-only this year when writers Douglas Brinkley and Claire Vaye Watkins came to Boise in separate appearances. The 54-year-old Brinkley has authored dozens of best sellers over the decades, but the 30-year-old Watkins has won recent acclaim, winning the Story and Dylan Thomas prizes. “Winning an award doesn’t make be a better writer,” Watkins told BW. “I still struggle with the same cycle of doubt and frustration I’ve 10 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

RICHARD HEINZL

always had. In some ways, success is a nice validation, but my old mentality is always asking: Is it good enough?” Brinkley was the keynote speaker at this year’s Frank Church Conference, where he talked about his many passions, including his latest project: a chronicle of the national parks of the Franklin D. Roosevelt era. We were anxious to hear Brinkley’s thoughts on Republican leaders at the Idaho Statehouse who are advocating for a state takeover of federal lands. “It’s a very bad idea,” said Brinkley. “This is an historical issue. Look at the Dust Bowl, caused by stockmen overgrazing of public lands in the 1920s. The entire West was a nightmare. It was the federal government that came in and began to properly run soil conservation programs, the Civilian Conservation Corps and replanting. FDR saw to it that 3 billion new trees were planted. Also, rivers don’t have borders. Migratory birds and animals don’t belong to a particular state. I would tell the people of Idaho to be proud of the system they’ve built. Idaho has become the capital of wilderness that works. The state should be proud of that instead of trying to unravel it.” Speaking of borders, we spent some time with Dr. Richard Heinzl who founded the Àrst North American chapter of Doctors Without Borders, the Nobel Prize-winning medical relief organization that cares for the planet’s most vulnerable populations. “When there’s warfare, insecurity or conÁict, the normal stuff in society falls apart,” said Heinzl. “When greed takes over from simple decency, it can shatter the basic things of society. But it doesn’t change my view of human beings in general. There are few very bad people. I don’t think anyone would want you to change what you

LAUREN NECOCHEA

believe in because something bad had happened.” Dr. Jill Gill, graduate director at Boise State’s College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs, is someone else who deconstructs our failings while looking for opportunities to improve the human experience. We asked Gill how Idaho might embrace, or even recognize, a 21st century civil-rights leader cut from the same cloth as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “If that new version of Martin Luther King came to us today as a gay man or woman, Idaho would have a horrible problem with that,” said Gill. “If he or she came to us as a Latino activist, they would probably have a problem there, too. It appears that the only kind of activists that Idaho likes are states’ rights activists. For some reason, any other kind of activist isn’t considered a patriot; he or she is considered a socialist or radical.” Lauren Necochea isn’t an activist, but she effects change, using facts and statistics. She’s the new executive director at the Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy, and we pressed her to remind us of the one statistic that everyone in Idaho should know. “Twenty-one percent. The child poverty rate in Idaho is 21 percent. And it has been going up over the last 10 years, even as we come out of the Great Recession,” she told BW. When we followed up by asking about Idaho’s high percentage of minimum-wage jobs, Necochea hinted that her center was certainly interested in drilling into that data as well. When we asked if her center might address the minimum-wage issue in the coming year, Necochea responded: “I’ll say this: we might.” We’ll be anxious to hear about that, too. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


A LONG WAY FROM HOME +ROLGD\VWRULHVIURPWKRVHZKRVHUYHG +ROLGD













     STORY

AND PHOTOS BY HARRISON BERRY

During a nickel tour of the Idaho State Veterans Home, Volunteer Coordinator Phil Hawkins talked about being pulled from the jungles of Vietnam one Christmas to see Bob Hope perform at a USO show. He said that on base he was treated differently for being a “grunt,” but he got to shake Hope’s hand. It was clear the encounter left a deep impression on him. “I got to look him right in the eye,” Hawkins said. Not everyone at the VA has such strong memories of holidays spent far from family and friends during their service. They came from all kinds of backgrounds and served their country in many different ways. One of them, Richard Seher, served in the Army’s 1st Cavalry Division in Vietnam; he spent part of one Christmas under enemy fire. Another, Billy Gibson, cut glass and repaired cars and trucks on base in Arizona during the 1950s, far from combat.

The VA holds a trove of such stories; walking through the facilities, Hawkins pointed out some of the things he’s proud of at the home. On a “wall of honor,” photos of veterans are pinned to a corkboard set at eye level for those residents who get around by wheelchair or walker. One wing of the facility is dedicated to caring for veterans who are nearing the end of their lives—Hawkins called it “going home.” Out front, a memorial with flags and stone markers honors soldiers whose sacrifice wasn’t recognized for decades because of their ethnicity. “It’s shameful,” Hawkins said of the discrimination that kept those service members from recognition. At the Idaho State Veterans Home, everyone is united in their service and sacrifice, which includes giving up time with the people they love—a price often paid most dearly during the holidays. Here are a few of their stories about what it was like to mark those special dates when they—or their loved ones— 12 were in uniform.

ILLUSTRATION BY ADAM ROSENLUND

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 11


11

ROSE EVANS

BILLY GIBSON

Paintings of WWII-era bombers, warships and American flags hung alongside still-lifes and landscapes on the walls of the VA’s arts and crafts room, but one of the paintings stood out. It was the iconic Rosie the Riveter cradling her rivet gun on her lap while pondering a sandwich in her left hand, with the Stars and Stripes as a backdrop.

Billy Gibson’s voice is rough and he speaks slowly. He’s not choosing his words, his words are choosing him, and they’re taking their time. Gibson sat alone at a workbench in the VA Home’s arts and crafts room gluing together a Piper L4 Grasshopper—a small, single-engine surveillance plane used in the latter part of WWII.

Rosie’s pose exudes confidence, but the artist who painted her, Rose Evans, was comparatively shy. Her voice was soft and hesitant—that is, until she started to reminisce about the holiday meals she ate with family in Dos Palos, Calif., while her first husband, Raymond Henry, served as a Green Beret in Vietnam. She fondly remembered huge quantities of cheesy beans, peas and dumplings, and sweet potato pie served to her nine biological brothers and in-laws.

Gibson didn’t work with Pipers when he served in the Air Force from 1955-1959, stationed at Luke Air Force Base in Glendale, Ariz. Instead, he served in an on-the-job training program performing auto body repair on trucks and cars, cutting and installing windshield glass. The Air Force had taken him from his home state of Missouri to Glendale, where he met his future wife, Sharon Bouma, on a blind date. She was a student at the time.

“His mom had to do it [cook],” she said. “And I had to do all the dishes! Well hey, I had my turn.”

“ THEY TOLD ME HOW IT WAS ON THE BATTLEGROUNDS. THEY SAID YOU SEE BODIES.”

It wasn’t just good times in the Henry household, however, and Rose remembers messages of love from her then-husband, as well as somber moments with her in-laws, many of whom served in WWII. “They told me how it was on the battlegrounds. You see all the wounded and the blood. They said you see bodies. They talked about it. It was better for them to get it out because they told me about the flashbacks and they needed somebody to talk to about it,” she said. Today, Rose lives in the VA Home with her second husband, Gene Evans, who served in the Navy during the Vietnam War.

“People kept saying, ‘Well, you’re robbing the cradle. She was 16. I was 21,” Gibson said. They spent the holidays with her parents in nearby Phoenix, eating “turkey or whatever.”

The Gibsons moved to Twin Falls in the 1970s, where they lived with Sharon’s aunt, and Billy worked at the sugar factory for 11 years. In the end, “things didn’t work out,” and the Gibsons moved to Filer, and finally to Boise. Gibson has been at the Boise VA Home for 11 years, and for much of that time, Sharon lived at the Life Care Center of Treasure Valley. They’d spend the holidays together eating ice cream, their meetings facilitated by both the Life Care Center and the VA Home. They were treated well, he said, “even when she was in her last days.” Sharon died on Sept.11, 2012. “I don’t have a hard time remembering that date,” Gibson said.

DON BRADEN

In his pale blue jeans, beige-colored sweater and double-thick crew socks, Don Braden looked like he belonged in front of a roaring fire reading a book. In fact, he was looking to pick up some new reading material from the VA Home’s stock of paperbacks before discussing a Thanksgiving he spent in California in 1951, geographically sandwiched between his father, who was at the time living in San Diego, and his mother, who was living in Washington state with her second husband, who’d fought in WWI—the only other person in Braden’s family who’d served in the military. It was the thick of the Korean War and Braden had been drafted into the National Guard in ’51. He was serving in an artillery unit out of McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, Calif. Specifically, he synchronized mechanical parts on 90-millimeter anti-aircraft guns to ensure that the shells loaded and ejected properly. The Thanksgiving feast, he said, was “nice”—canned turkey and cranberry dressing (also out of a can)—but the real treat was the beverages. A few of the other men in his outfit, he implied, had given perhaps too much thanks that year. “I had a little beer to wash it down,” he said. “Some of the other fellows did the same thing, but I didn’t get into the liquor habit.” The mess hall holiday contrasted with the quiet Christmases he spent with his mother, with whom he said he was close, and his stepfather, in Washington. Braden seemed to prefer the peace and quiet there, and mostly recalled his life in the military as anything but tranquil, even though he never saw combat. He described his unit as “kind of a bat outfit” led by “a little sergeant, three stripes on his arm. He wasn’t much good: He started goofing off and he got into trouble.” He also remembered an instance of leniency that impressed him. One evening, Braden left the base without signing out, and on his return, learned from his commanding officer that hed he’d been absent without leave for several hours. “My CO gave me a choice: I’d violated “M My C an article of war and faced a court

12 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


martial—or pulling extra duty,” he said. Braden opted d ffor extra work in the mess hall. “He gave me an earful but he was a nice fellow; he looked out for his men,” he said. When he was 24 years old, Braden visited his father in San Diego, but abandoned the sunshine and palm trees for Idaho to live with his mother and stepfather on a farm in Benewah County. He has been at the VA Home for a year and a half.

DWAYNE SHARPIN

One Thanksgiving, he and the crew were served from a 5-gallon can of turkey, and the cook managed to scrape together enough bread to serve dressing. Sharpin reminisced warmly about the Japanese beer served with the meals. “Yeah, we drank quite a bit. Japanese beer would knock you flat on your butt. Nippon, 12 percent alcohol. Boy, it’s really knockyou-flat,” he said. After his discharge with the rank of Third-Class Gunner, Sharpin shifted between Eastern Oregon and Western Idaho, receiving his high-school diploma in Pendleton, Ore., trying to serve as an Oregon State Police officer and the U.S. Forest Service, and finally settling on the Bench in Boise, where he worked at Pacific Recycling. He even took a crack at going to college, but his G.I. Bill could only be applied to a “class A” universities—the nearest being the University of Idaho. Sharpin has lived at the VA Home for three years and has always been an avid reader, claiming to have read “all them Westerns” in the Home’s library. Part of what makes him such a prodigious reader, he said, was his distaste for some of the Home’s group entertainments. “See, I don’t play Bingo. I hate that stupid game,” he said.

RICHARD SEHER

Dwayne Sharpin described himself as an “anchor clanker.” He served aboard the aircraft carrier USS Princeton during the Korean War, operating one of its many 5-inch guns. He didn’t mince words—apologizing for his occasional harsh language— but his boyish charm was marked by easy humor and strong opinions on just about everything.

Holidays didn’t mean much to Sharpin aboard the Princeton. His daily responsibilities were fairly static, “hanging around the gun” and swabbing down its massive barrel with Cosmoline, a vilesmelling, industrial-grade anti-rust grease. “Just the same as any other day,” he said. “Christmas was the same as Thanksgiving. I don’t miss ’em.” Holidays weren’t marked with time off, easy sailing or a reprieve from the threat of combat, but they were set apart from the rest of the year by the food, which Sharpin seemed to appreciate. BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

“All that came out of my mouth was HRRRRNNN! That’s the story of my horn,” Seher beamed. Seher served in the First Cavalry Division—one of the Army’s most decorated divisions, which had been converted in Vietnam from a conventional infantry unit into an air assault unit equipped with helicopters. Seher remembered helicopter delivery of “hot chow” every night, and “milk so cold it’d freeze your throat.” “I remember one time I was getting sniped at and Dillard tossed me a chicken wing. I reached up and grabbed it and I heard, ‘Ding ding!’” he said, making the sound of bullets plinking against metal. Seher spent one Thanksgiving in a rubber plantation near An Loc. That year, he was airlifted sliced turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, stuffing and cranberry sauce. For dessert, he had the unusual treat of chocolate ice cream. He described the holidays, like the danger he experienced in the field—for half an hour on that particular Thanksgiving he was under sniper fire—as “normal” and “routine.” He thought about his family “quite a lot,” but it wasn’t the only thing on his mind. “I just wanted to be in the Army,” he said. Seher moved to Boise from his hometown of Sacramento, Calif., to be closer to his son. At the VA, he said, holidays are a special treat. When BW spoke with him, he was looking forward to Thanksgiving, when residents are served two lavish-sounding meals instead of the traditional Thanksgiving dinner.

“I lived in a mining camp up in the Sawtooth range. My mother cooked for the crewmen. Nothing up there. I went to a class reunion. It was dead.” he said. “Anything’s better than living in Challis.” Sharpin said Challis was “dead” even before he hitched out of there to Pocatello, where he planned on enlisting in the Marines shortly after his 18th birthday. Instead, he joined the Navy in April 1950, for two reasons: first, he was too short (Sharpin’s stature would also preclude him from serving in the Oregon State Police); second, “I heard about [Navy] uniforms. They got a real pretty uniform, stripe down one leg,” he said.

of his enlistment and attended the prestigious NCO Academy in Germany, where he re-enlisted so he could fight in Vietnam. That’s when Seher contracted pneumonia, ran a fever of 106.2 degrees, sank into a two-and-a-half day coma and had to be packed on ice. He came to with the ability to make a brassy honking noise, of which he seemed especially proud. After waking up in a German hospital, he tried to ask a tall, blonde, blue-eyed nurse where he was and what had happened to him.

Richard Seher sat in his wheelchair at one of the tables in the VA’s dining area, his Army baseball cap covered with patches and pins. One of the patches read, “Will Kill for Peace.” Seher’s father served in the Army during WWII, distinguishing himself by capturing three Germans with a 35-caliber pistol. He later became a member of the Military Police, and was photographed shaking hands with a general. Seher described him as “sort of a boozer,” but the image of Seher’s father in his white MP helmet shaking hands with a general inspired him. He enlisted on Sept. 9, 1965. “I always wanted to be better than him,” he said of his father. Seher said he won his private game of one-upsmanship with his father. He achieved the rank of buck sergeant within 18 months

“Everybody else gets one meal—well, we get two. For lunch we get turkey and all the fixin’s, and pumpkin pie. That’s my favorite. I request a whole slice of pumpkin pie. Then for supper, we get ham. And I don’t know what we get for dessert. Won’t be pumpkin pie. They’re going to have something else. That’s going to be awesome,” he said. In 1971, Seher returned to Sacramento and went to work in a cousin’s auto body shop, where he helped to restore a 1953 Corvette. His father told him, “I could have put you in college.” Seher told his father, “I just wanted to go into the Army.” His feelings toward service changed dramatically in the time between his enlistment and when he received his discharge. Sitting in the Home’s cafeteria, Seher said he abhors violence. “It’s just too traumatic. When you’ve got to pull the trigger from a termite hill and blow some guy’s brains out, watch some guy’s head explode, watch buddies burned up alive,” Seher said. “I was through killing. I don’t want anything to do with it.” BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 13


JES S IC A M U R R I

RECREATION THE MARCH TO ARIZONA Getting the Boise State marching band to the Fiesta Bowl BY JESSICA MURRI For the past decade of his life—through both high school and college—Sean Evans has been out on the Àeld with his trumpet, marching in the band. The “super, super” senior at Boise State University can’t think of a better way to end his and his trumpet’s tenure than at the Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Ariz. “My Àrst Àve years, I could have gone to big bowl games,” Evans told Boise Weekly. “We could have been going to the Rose Bowl, the Sugar Bowl, the Orange Bowl. I could have had a pretty good run of years going to big bowl games. It would just come down to a loss of the team.” The Blue Thunder Marching Band watched the Dec. 6 Boise State Broncos football game against Fresno State with fervor. By the end of the game, they would know whether they’d soon be on the road to the Fiesta Bowl. This isn’t Evans’ Àrst Fiesta Bowl. He went with the Blue Thunder Marching Band to Arizona in 2010 and said it’s an experience he’ll remember his whole life. He’s excited to share it with the other 185 band members gathering for the Wednesday, Dec. 31 game. The road to the Fiesta Bowl was a challenge for the Broncos, but it’s also going to be a challenge for the Blue Thunder. Once the team scored its Ànal touchdown against Fresno State on Dec. 6, the scrambling began for the band. “It’s a short turn-around time,” said band director Joe Tornello. “Typically when you’re going on a trip like this, we have several months to plan. Now it all has to happen in three weeks.” That means getting hotel rooms booked, meals planned out, four charter buses rented and several plane tickets purchased for students living across the country. All of that has a price tag well into the six Àgures, according to Tornello. The money’s coming from the university’s athletic department as part of the payout from the Fiesta Bowl. Performing in front of a stadium that holds 63,400 people and the millions of people who will be watching from home—that doesn’t particularly bother Tornello. It’s getting his whole band onto the Àeld to perform that racks his nerves. “There are students as far away as Alaska, Hawaii and the East Coast,” Tornello said. “Once school’s done on Dec. 19, the students go home 14 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

Boise State’s Blue Thunder Marching Band is taking its show from the Smurf Turf to the Sun Belt.

for Christmas and they are literally coast to coast. Literally as far away as you can possibly be from Boise or Phoenix.” If one of the band members doesn’t make it, there’s no hiding it from the crowd. “If we don’t have people there, obviously there are holes,” Tornello said. “It takes us two weeks to learn a show, we don’t have that kind of time. We don’t have the ability to go back in and redo an entire Àeld show performance [if someone doesn’t make it].” On a overcast, windy Friday in mid-December, the marching band held its one and only rehearsal for the Fiesta Bowl before it travels south. It came in the midst of Ànal exams and semesterend projects, on a day when the clouds looked dark enough to rain and gusts reached 30 miles per hour. “We’ve done rain and we’ve done snow,” Tornello told his band through a microphone echoing across the empty stands in Albertsons Stadium. “Wind is nothing.” The band practiced for the Fiesta Bowl’s Àve-and-a-half-minute pregame set and the sevenminute-long halftime routine using songs from the Àrst game of the season—all ’80s themed. The setlist includes “I Love Rock and Roll,” “All Night Long,” “Footloose” and “You Give Love a Bad Name.” Once they get to Arizona, band members will have one rehearsal on the Àeld and one standing music practice. Most of them won’t even have a chance to practice on their instruments before then, since they leave them behind when they leave town. While band members are excited for the trip—which will take nearly 24 hours on charter buses—they have their own logistics to Àgure out. Ivana Mullner has played the trombone since

she was 8. Now, she’s a senior at Boise State, Ànishing her last semester of marching band after four dedicated years. She lives in Boise, relieving the stress of relying on air travel to make it to the bowl game, but she said the short notice is still a challenge. “Now everyone has to Àgure out all those plans they made for Christmas break,” she said. “Like, ‘I told my boss I would work and now I can’t be there,’ or, ‘My family is in town. What do I do?’ A lot changes very quickly and that’s exciting, but also, you have to make it work.” Another challenge that has sophomore alto saxophone player Ashley Pyell nervous is the new Àeld. “It’s harder because you don’t have the same Àeld markings as you would on the blue, where we always rehearse and we’re used to it. Nowhere else has a blue turf, so it looks different,” Pyell explained. She said she uses the Albertsons logos on the Àeld for her sets, as well as the Bronco head and the Mountain West Bank logo. “We have lots of little cheater marks here.” Andrew Kinsey, a freshman mellophone player, said he’s a little intimidated to play next to the Arizona marching band, which is easily double the size of the Blue Thunder. He also thinks about the number of eyes that’ll be on him on Dec. 31. “The stadium can seat almost twice as many people as our stadium, which is pretty exciting because that’s 10 times as many people than ever came to a high-school game,” Kinsey said. It’s as awe-inspiring a way for Kinsey to kick off his career in the Blue Thunder Marching Band as it is for Evans and Mullner to end theirs. “It’s something only, what, 16 other schools in the country have had this opportunity [to do],” Evans said. “This puts the icing on the cake.” B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 15


SWEET 16

ELITE 8

FINAL 4

FINAL 4

ELITE 8

SWEET 16

Rosewater

THE WHOLE TRUTH

Life Itself

Birdman

Movie Madness

Life Itself

The Best of 2014 A bracket-busting look at a year at the movies

The Hobbit

TINY HEROES

THE LEGO MOVIE The Lego Movie

Guardians of the Galaxy

BIRDMAN American Sniper

TOP 2 THE IMITATION GAME

Whiplash

Two Days, One Night

St. Vincent

Two Days, One Night

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

THE IMITATION GAME

The Imitation Game

Boyhood

Into the Woods

Foxcatcher

STRONG WOMEN

Wild

Love is Strange

16 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL

Wild

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Unbroken

While difficult to choose, my favorite four films of 2014 were (alphabetically) Boyhood, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Guardians of the Galaxy and The Imitation Game. My two favorites? If hard pressed, I would have to say Boyhood and The imitation Game.

The Theory of Everything

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Have a safe and warm holiday, and I’ll see you at the movies in 2015. —George Prentice

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

Top Five

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

LAST RESORTS

Force Majeure

Ida

Sound familiar? It’s a tip of the hat to the NCAA basketball tournament— better known as March Madness—and it has become a year-end tradition for a few years now.

The Theory of Everything

THE POWER OF LOVE

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL

BOYHOOD Approximately 1.3 billion movie tickets are sold each year in the United States—that’s about 2.3 films per year per person. But we know that Boise Weekly readers are way above average. I sit through more than 200 feature-length films each year (for the record, I don’t recommend it), but after sifting through all of them, I narrow the list down to 32, then a sweet 16, an elite eight, a final four and the two best movies of the year.

Still Alice

MUSICAL/ COMEDY

The Grand Budapest Hotel

BOYHOOD BOYHOOD

Selma

The Imitation Game

CODE OF SILENCE

Into the Woods

Foxcatcher

HISTORY OF VIOLENCE

Whiplash

Leviathan

Boyhood

BOYS TO MEN

THE ARTISTS

THE IMITATION GAME

Pride

LABOR PAINS

American Sniper

DEAD AIM

Mr. Turner

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

Guardians of the Galaxy

Big Eyes

A Most Violent Year

The Lego Movie

Interstellar

STAR WARS

Birdman

DIVINE MADNESS

WAR AND REMEMBRANCE

Unbroken

Citizen Four

CITIZEN FOUR Citizen Four

A Most Wanted Man

SPY GAMES

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 17


CALENDAR WEDNESDAY DEC. 24 Festivals & Events BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY HOLIDAY CLOSURES—All locations of the Boise Public Library will close at 1 p.m. on Christmas Eve, and will be closed Christmas Day. Boise Public Library, boisepubliclibrary.org. BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO: A CHRISTMAS CAROL—The Morrison Center continues its holiday tradition and collaboration with Boise State Public Radio with the rebroadcast of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, recorded live in 2011 as a part of the Velma V. Morrison Center’s Family Reading Series. The rebroadcast can be heard on KBSU 90.3 FM in the Treasure Valley, KBSM 91.7 FM in McCall and KBSW 91.7 FM in the

Magic Valley. The performance can also be heard by live stream at boisestatepublicradio.org. 7 p.m. FREE. HOLIDAY LIGHTS TROLLEY TOURS—Boise Holiday Lights Trolley Tours offers hourlong jaunts every night through Saturday, Dec. 27 (closed Christmas Day) aboard the vintage 31-passenger open air “Molly Trolley,” so dress warmly. Hot drinks, cookies and other concessions are available for purchase. Most tours start at 7 p.m. but times vary. Check americanheritagetrolleytours.com for details and tickets. $4-$16. Evergreen Business Mall-Library Plaza, corner of Cole and Ustick, Boise. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW— Don’t miss your chance to see the dazzling display of more than 300,000 sparkling lights artfully displayed throughout the holiday season. Daily through Jan. 4. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, DEC. 26-27

On Stage LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Art AHMAD EJAHALI: TIME FOR ALL TIME 3—Check out the Iraq-born artist’s socially and politically charged works that evoke healing for both artist and viewer. Through Jan. 5. FREE. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. ARP, MIRO, CALDER—Featuring three modern masters who pushed color, line and form beyond convention and became innovators in art of the 20th century. For more info and a complete listing of programs and events, visit the website. Through Jan. 11. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$5. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

FORAY IV: PUSHING THE ENVELOPE—Check out this collection of recent works by 46 Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance members, featuring 55 pieces in a dazzling array of media and styles. Get more info at treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org. In the Boise State Public Radio offices through Jan. 30. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Yanke Family Research Park, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise. QUILT EXHIBITION—“The Narrative Thread,” an exhibition of quilts and stitched artworks, features work by 37 quilters representing the Panhandle, Eastern Idaho and the Boise Valley. Through Feb. 8. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705, capitolcommission.idaho.gov. SILVERCREEK ART DECEMBER SHOW—Check out works by Bellevue painter Nolina Burge and Boise ceremicist Jerry Hendershot. Through Dec. 28. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Silvercreek Art, 331 Leadville Ave., Ketchum, 208-7204093, silvercreekart.com.

SATURDAY-WEDNESDAY DEC. 27-31

Funny ho ho.

Whiz kids.

CHALIVERA AND GENERATION ME

HOLIDAY SEASON ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS

Treat your post-Christmas blues with local duo ChaliVera at the Crazy Horse as they combine stand-up and storytelling with hip-hop and EDM to create a zany show. They’ll be joined by host Kaz Gable (winner of Boise’s Funniest Person 2014) and special guest Dylan Hughes. The next night, duck into Neurolux for the return of Reggie Melbrough and his semi-annual Generation Me Comedy Show. Melbrough has made some marks on the stand-up scene in his adopted home of Washington, D.C., but each year, he brings it back to Boise. He’ll be joined by Ryan Noack, Eric Lyons, Chad Heft and [??TK] Alisha Donahue. Dec. 26: 8 p.m., $5, Crazy Horse, 1519 W. Main St., 208982-4294, crazyhorseboise.com Dec. 27: 7 p.m., $3, Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-3430886, neurolux.com.

Swing by the Main Boise Public Library Monday, Dec. 29-Friday, Jan. 2, from 2-3 p.m. for Festivus, offering kids crafts, activities and games. For young ’uns with a bent toward engineering, head to the Discovery Center, where kids can take part in a challenge to build paper helicopters on Saturday, Dec. 27, 1-4 p.m. The West YMCA is hosting an International Camp, where kids can learn about a variety of cultures through food, arts and crafts, Monday, Dec. 29-Wednesday, Dec. 31, 10 a.m.-noon. Festivus: 2-3 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, boisepubliclibrary.org; Helicopter Challenge: 1-4 p.m. FREE-$10. Discovery Center Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org; International Camp: 10 a.m.-Noon, West YMCA, 5959 W. Discovery Way, Boise, 208-377-9622, ymcatvidaho.org.

18 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ROCK ‘N’ ROLL—Celebrate an art form with uniquely American origins and its impact on our culture. Featuring paintings, photography, sculpture, contemporary and historic show posters and a timeline of the 1960s created by Sage School students that illustrates the connections between rock ‘n’ roll and social, political, musical and historical events. Through Jan. 30. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter. org. WINTER GROUP EXHIBITION— Don’t miss your chance to check out works by 10 groundbreaking artists during this show’s 48-day run. Through Jan. 9. 12-4 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 2230 Main St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com.

Kids & Teens

SMOKY MOUNTAIN PIZZA HOLIDAY PARTY—Smoky Mountain Pizzeria (in Eagle only) will host a free pizza party for Treasure Valley children. The party will feature free pizza and pop, a special appearance by Santa, holiday music and exciting activities. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain Pizzeria Grill-Eagle, 127 E. State St., Eagle, 208-939-0212, smokymountainpizza.com. WINGS CENTER CLUB KID HOLIDAY CAMP—Shake things up this holiday with two weeks of all-day, holiday-themed excitement. Activities include field trips to Idaho IceWorld and Overland Park Cinemas, rock climbing, Planet Kid, team-building games, inflatables, making gingerbread houses, winter art and science, international New Year’s Eve traditions and more. For ages 3 years to eighth grade. For more info, visit the website or call the business office. Through Jan. 2. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, wingscenter.com/ child-care/holiday-daycamp.

MONDAY, DEC. 29

“Six bucks and my right nut says we’re not landing in Chicago.”

STORY STORY NIGHT: PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES In the 1987 film Planes, Trains and Automobiles, an uptight ad exec gets trapped in the vortex of holiday travel with a schlubby shower-ring salesman. They inevitably overcome their differences and arrive at an unexpected destination: friendship. It sounds super cheesy, but it was the ’80s and odd-couple movies ruled. Road stories, however, are timeless. Send 2014 packing with the final Story Story Night of the year, Planes, Trains and Automobiles: “Stories of Getting There,” hosted by Jessica Holmes (SSN co-founder and Boise’s Funniest Person 2013) and featuring music by DJ Stardust Lounge. For tickets or more info, visit storystorynight.org. 7 p.m., $10. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., 208-343-0571, elkorah.org. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CALENDAR Food CHRISTMAS AT BERRYHILL— Berryhill & Co. will be open for regular business from 11:30 a.m.9 p.m. on Christmas Eve, and will open at 5 p.m. Christmas Day for a special prime rib dinner buffet for $29 adults and $16 kids under 10 years. FREE admission. Berryhill & Co. Restaurant, 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3873553, johnberryhillrestaurants. com. CHRISTMAS EVE DINNER AND CANDLELIGHT SERVICE—Enjoy a turkey dinner with candlelight service to follow at Living Waters Church, 3967 Pershing Drive, Boise. 6-8 p.m. FREE, 208-3927579, facebook.com/events/777 242292343410/?ref=22.

THURSDAY DEC. 25

at boisestatepublicradio.org. 7 p.m. FREE.

Festivals & Events

CHRISTMAS COMEDY SHOW WITH SEAN PEABODY—Sean Peabody, AKA The Hawaiian Comedian, has opened for many big-name comedians such as Robin Williams. His style of comedy is high energy and relatable for all ages and “all walks of life” folks. If you want to laugh ‘til it hurts then you’re in for a fantastic show. Followed by Comedy Open Mic, with sign-ups at 9:30 p.m. and the show at 10 p.m. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY HOLIDAY CLOSURES—All locations of the Boise Public Library will be closed Christmas Day. Boise Public Library, boisepubliclibrary.org. BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO: A CHRISTMAS CAROL—The Morrison Center continues its holiday tradition and collaboration with Boise State Public Radio with the rebroadcast of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, recorded live in 2011 as a part of the Velma V. Morrison Center’s Family Reading Series. The rebroadcast can be heard on KBSU 90.3 FM in the Treasure Valley, KBSM 91.7 FM in McCall and KBSW 91.7 FM in the Magic Valley. The performance can also be heard by live stream

On Stage

THURSDAY COMEDY OPEN MIC—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Odds & Ends

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 31

LADIES LOUNGE—Featuring a raffle every half-hour. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3315666, willibs.com. TRIVIA—Hosted by Matt, with a $25 bar tab to the winning team. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208331-5666, willibs.com.

Food CHRISTMAS AT BERRYHILL— Berryhill & Co. will open at 5 p.m. Christmas Day for a special prime rib dinner buffet for $29 adults and $16 kids under 10 years. Berryhill & Co. Restaurant, 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, johnberryhillrestaurants.com.

FRIDAY DEC. 26 Time for a potarty.

SECOND ANNUAL IDAHO POTATO DROP Last year’s first Idaho Potato Drop was, shall we say, a ’mashing hit. This year promises to be even better. Event organizers have put together three stages—a main stage on Bannock Street, a family stage at Tenth and Main and an adult stage at Sixth and Main. They’ve also gathered nearly 20 food trucks, created two VIP areas on the Grove and at Flatbread’s downtown location, pulled together a small army of street performers and organized fireworks. Of course, the great Subaru-sized potato weighing nearly 1,000 pounds will drop over Eighth and Main streets on the countdown to midnight See the Wednesday, Dec. 31, edition of Boise Weekly for a full guide to the event. 8 p.m., FREE, various locations in downtown Boise, 208954-5077, idahopotatodrop.com. BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

Festivals & Events ANNUAL BOISE CHRISTMAS CHURCH WALK—Take this self-guided walking tour to look at Christmas decorations, hear special music and view the architectural styles of the various churches. Then end the evening with a Christmas Music Sing from 5:30-6 p.m. at St. John’s. Sponsored by the Les Boise chapter of the American Guild of Organists. For specific church info and maps, visit agoboise.org. 3-6 p.m. FREE. St. John’s Cathedral, 775 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-3511, boisecathedral.org.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 19


CALENDAR CHRISTMAS LIGHT HELICOPTER TOURS—See the festive lights of Boise like you’ve never seen them before with Silverhawk Aviation. Flights are available select evenings through Jan. 3. Call Krista at 208-453-8577 for reservations or gift certificates. Get more info at silverhawkaviation.net. 6-10 p.m. $125-$150. Western Aircraft at Boise Airport, 4300 S. Kennedy St., Boise, 208-338-1800, westair.com.

On Stage CHALIVERA—Imagine watching an old-time radio show being recorded live right in front of your eyes. This is ChaliVera. Featuring special guest Dylan Hughes and host Kaz Gable. 8 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208982-4294, facebook.com COMEDIAN SEAN PEABODY—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. COMPANY OF FOOLS: PETER AND THE STARCATCHER—Set sail with a wildly theatrical, hilarious and innovative retelling of how a miserable orphan came

to be Peter Pan. For more info, visit sunvalleycenter.org/companyoffools. Through Jan. 3. 7 p.m. $15-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org. LIQUID MIDNIGHT MIC—Comedy open mic. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

SATURDAY DEC. 27

On Stage COMEDIAN SEAN PEABODY—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. GENERATION ME COMEDY SHOW—7:30 p.m. $3. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-3430886, neurolux.com. LIQUID MIDNIGHT MIC—Comedy open mic. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Art Festivals & Events STOCK YOUR CELLAR EVENT—Explore new wines from the Iberian Peninsula and get ready for your New Year’s celebration at the same time. You’ll taste festive wines and sparkling cava perfect for the new year, accompanied by light tapas. At the end of the night, you save 10 percent on the featured wines. Seating is limited; call to reserve your seats. 6 p.m. $25 adv., $30 day of. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket. com.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

RAISE A GLASS TO THE SAWTOOTH NRA—Stop by for this second annual celebration of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area with its main advocate, the Sawtooth Society. Enjoy delicious brews from Sawtooth Brewery, stunning photos of the SNRA by local photographer James Bourret and information about the SNRA and the Sawtooth Society. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Mountain Images Gallery/ James Bourret Photography, 400 E. Sun Valley Road, Ketchum, 208-994-1654, sawtoothsociety. org. SILVERCREEK ART DECEMBER CLOSING RECEPTION—Don’t miss the party as Silvercreek Art closes out its December show, featuring works by Bellevue painter Nolina Burge and Boise ceramicist Jerry Hendershot. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Silvercreek Art, 331 Leadville Ave., Ketchum, 208-7204093, silvercreekart.com.

SUNDAY DEC. 28

MONDAY DEC. 29

FRANKLY BURLESQUE—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344, facebook. com/PengillysSaloon.

Citizen BOISE DEPOT OPEN HOUSE AND TOY DRIVE—Check out the interior of the historic building dressed in its holiday best while you donate new, unwrapped gifts for Toys for Tots. Continues Sundays and Mondays through Jan. 5. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, parks.cityofboise. org/parks-locations/parks/boisedepot.

20 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

| SUDOKU

On Stage MONDAY COMEDY OPEN MIC—6:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. STORY STORY NIGHT: PLANES, TRAINS & AUTOMOBILES—Usher out the old year with “Stories of Getting There.” Hosted by Jessica Holmes, with music by DJ Stardust Lounge. Get more info and tickets at storystorynight. org. 7 p.m. $10. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-0571, elkorah.org. SUBTERRANEAN COMEDY— Yuk it up with a lineup of some of Boise’s favorite comics. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement, 109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208345-2505, tomgraineys.com.

Citizen BOISE DEPOT OPEN HOUSE AND TOY DRIVE—Check out the interior of the historic building dressed in its holiday best while you donate new, unwrapped gifts for Toys for Tots. Continues on Sundays and Mondays through Jan. 5. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, parks. cityofboise.org/parks-locations/ parks/boise-depot.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Citizen

TUESDAY DEC. 30

On Stage COMEDIAN SEAN PEABODY—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

On Stage REAL TALK COMEDY WORKSHOP—Followed by local comedy showcase at 8 p.m. and open mic at 9:30 p.m. 6 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Workshops & Classes LIZ READS—LIZ Reads is a thought club for business leaders. This month, Calie Labit breaks down The 10x Rule by Grant Cardone. Be sure to RSVP for this opportunity to learn and grow as a business. Parking available across the street at St. Luke’s. 6:307:30 p.m. FREE. Idaho Heritage Inn, 109 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-514-7238, facebook.com/ events/363600937133942.

TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward. Event is nondenominational. Tuesdays, 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

Odds & Ends JEOPARTY—Compete for free drinks and prizes in fast-paced rounds of Jeopardy-style trivia. 7 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s, 109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-3452505, tomgraineys.com. LAST CALL TRIVIA WITH FRANKLY FRANKIE—Enjoy $2 well drinks until close. 8-10 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344, facebook.com/PengillysSaloon. MAKE YOUR OWN GLASS ART AND GIFTS—Walk-in projects are 25 percent off. All ages welcome. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. $4$30. Fusions Glass Studio, 135 N. Second St., Eagle, 208-9381055, fusions-idaho.com.

WEDNESDAY DEC. 31 Festivals & Events BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY HOLIDAY CLOSURES—All locations of the Boise Public Library will close at 6 p.m. on New Year’s Eve and will be closed New Year’s Day. Boise Public Library, boisepubliclibrary.org. NAMPA NEW YEAR’S EVE— Ring in the New Year with dinner, dancing to live music by The Mystics, and a champagne toast. 7:30 p.m. $75. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE IDAHO POTATO DROP 2014-15—The second annual NYE Idaho Potato Drop has more than doubled its footprint with three stages, national recording artists, and a new drop location at the intersection of Eighth and Main streets. There

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CALENDAR will also be fireworks to ring in the new year. For more info, visit idahopotatodrop.com. FREE. Eighth and Main streets, Boise. NEW YEARS EVE OPEN MIC—Ring in the New Year at this open mic night, featuring Anna Moreno. There’ll also be a silent auction to benefit Send Hope, a local charity founded in 1989 that currently supports more than 300 full-time pastors, school teachers and orphanage workers in India. Get more info at sendhopenow.org. 8 p.m. FREE. The District Coffee House, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208343-1089, districtcoffeehouse. com. UNDER THE HOLLYWOOD STARS NEW YEARS EVE PARTY—Dance the night away with JoyRide. Call for more specifics and reservations. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $30, or $50 for two. Boise Hotel and Conference Center, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-343-4900, theboisehotel. com/packages-rates/new-yearseve-party.

Art

Kids & Teens

CHARLES HAMAN—Check out this printmaking and oil painting exhibit by local artist Charles Haman during regular library hours. Through Feb. 3. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2942, facebook.com/ events/324384827764269.

NEW YEAR’S EVE LOCK-IN FOR KIDS— Kids will enjoy movies, swimming, games and a pizza party. A male and female supervisor will be with the children all night. For ages 6-12. 7 p.m. $20$25. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, namparecreation.org.

Citizen SVCA NEW YEAR’S EVE BUBBLY BASH— Welcome in 2015 with fellow supporters of the arts at this benefit for the Sun Valley Center for the Arts. Revelers will enjoy free champagne from 9-10 p.m. and a midnight toast. Hollywood favorite DJ Shark and his unstoppable percussionists will provide the soundtrack for the party everyone will be talking about. For 21 and older. Get advance tickets at sunvalleycenter. org. 9 p.m. $65 adv., $75 door. River Run Lodge, At the Base of Bald Mountain, Sun Valley, 208622-2133.

Food NEW YEAR’S EVE AT BERRYHILL—Ring in the New Year with a special buffet, plus entertainment by pianists Eric Grae and Jason Buckalew 6-9 p.m., and “Greg & Johnny” with friends until midnight. 5 p.m. $55. Berryhill & Co. Restaurant, 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, johnberryhillrestaurants.com.

Calls to Artists WRITERS IN THE ATTIC ANNUAL ANTHOLOGY CONTEST—The Cabin is now accepting submissions from Idaho poets, fiction and nonfiction story writers on the theme “animal.” Entries will

be accepted through 5 p.m., Friday, Feb. 27. Selected works will be published as part of the Writers in the Attic 2015 anthology. Competition guidelines and submission forms can be found at virtualcabinidaho.com. $10$15. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Each week’s cover of Boise Weekly is a piece of work from a local artist. One stipulation of publication is that the piece be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. The artist will receive 30 percent of their piece’s auction price. A portion of the auction proceeds are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded. For more info, email production@ boiseweekly.com or call 208344-2055. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-3442055, boiseweekly.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 21


MUSIC WEDNESDAY DEC. 24

THE WOOLY BUGGERS—10 p.m. $5. Tom Grainey’s

CHUCK SMITH AND FRIENDS—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SATURDAY DEC. 27

CHUCK SMITH SOLO PIANO—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CLINT BUDGE—6 p.m. FREE. Cylos KARAOKE—7:30 p.m. FREE. High Note LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THURSDAY DEC. 25 BEN BURDICK AND DAN COSTELLO—5 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CHRISTMAS DAY DANCE PARTY: DJ DOUG—10 p.m. FREE. Neurolux CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

FRIDAY DEC. 26 B3 SIDE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill DAN COSTELLO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper DJ DAVE THE FAVE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

BROCK BARTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s BROKEN DOWN GUITARS—10 p.m. $5. Tom Grainey’s CERBERUS REX—With Braided Waves and Velvet Hook. 8 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DJ FOOSE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement FRANK MARRA—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers HILLFOLK NOIR—9:30 p.m. FREE. Juniper HOLLOW WOOD—With Kris Orlowski and Lost Ones. 8 p.m. $10. The Crux HOLODECK HUSTLE DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Reef JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KIP ATTAWAY—7 p.m. $10-$12. Sapphire Room MICHAEL GRAY—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District MIKE RUTLEDGE—6 p.m. FREE. Berr yhill PATRICIA FOLKNER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

DJ VERSTAL—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

STEADY RUSH—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper

EMILY STANTON PROJECT—8 p.m. FREE. Cylos

TAUGE AND FAULKNER—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

FRANK MARRA—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s MYSTERIOUS SKIN—Ellen’s Going Away Party with Deep Creeps, Grocery List and Mr. Lester’s Stink Hole. 7 p.m. $5. The Crux REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TUNDRA BROTHER EP RELEASE PARTY—With Transistor Send, Michael Grey and The Crows Nest. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

22 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

BIG WOW BAND—8 p.m. FREE. Cylos

SUNDAY DEC. 28 AUDIO/VISUAL DJ—10 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s HIP-HOP SUNDAY—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s KEN HARRIS—10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Bella Aquila NOCTURNUM: INDUSTRIAL GOTH DJS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY DEC. 29 CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Dan Costello

TUESDAY DEC. 30 BLAZE AND KELLY—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill BRETT REID—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DC3: DAN COSTELLO TRIO— 7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MIKE RUTLEDGE—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

DAN COSTELLO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 MONDAY NIGHT KARAOKE— 10 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

WEDNESDAY DEC. 31 THE 904 BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Cylos BERRYHILL NEW YEAR’S EVE—Featuring pianists Eric Grae and Jason Buckalew 6-9 p.m.; Greg and Johnny with friends until midnight. 6 p.m. FREE. Berr yhill

CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DJ FOOSE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement HILLS BROS. AND AARON ALKIRE—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow KARAOKE—7:30 p.m. FREE. High Note KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—6 p.m. FREE. Sofia’s LIKE A ROCKET—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s MERKABA NEW YEAR’S EVE— Featuring Planewalker, Vaporizing Dreams, Hive Mind, Chiron and Indjneous with live painting by Alex Vega and bellydancing by Cairo Fusion. 9:30 p.m. $5. Liquid NEW YEAR’S EVE: INNOCENT MAN, BREAD AND CIRCUS AND DRIFTER STILL—9 p.m. $5. Tom Grainey’s NEW YEAR’S EVE: MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $5. Kay and Traci’s 127 Club

NEW YEAR’S EVE POTATO DROP WATCH PARTY—Featuring Brandon Pritchett. 9 p.m. FREE. Piper NOAH HYDE—9 p.m. $5. Neurolux PILOT ERROR—10 p.m. $10. Reef RECKLESS KELLY AND MICKY AND THE MOTORCARS—With Muzzie and Billy Braun. 8 p.m. $29.50-$79.50. Revolution RESOLUTIONS NEW YEAR’S EVE—Featuring Rubicon 7, Skape, KC Jonez, Brady Green and Miner va Jayne. 8 p.m. $12$20. Knitting Factor y ROB HARDING AND CLAY MOORE—6 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.12:15 a.m. FREE. Bar 365 ROCKEOKE NEW YEAR’S EVE—9 p.m. $5. Crazy Horse SMOOTH AVENUE—With Wayne White. 7 p.m. $TBA. Sapphire Room TERRY JONES AND DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

JENNY BOWLER

LISTEN HERE

LISTEN HERE

HOLLOW WOOD, DEC. 27, THE CRUX

THE BLUES ADDICTS, DEC. 27, LINEN BUILDING

In the Dec. 17 edition of Boise Weekly, we made a list of some of our favorite 2014 local album releases. Though they were in no particular order, intrepid music writer Ben Schultz may have subconsciously put Hollow Wood’s Seasons EP at the top. The band of young musicians is quite accomplished considering it hasn’t been on the scene long and has earned accolades, a following and respect from its peers and others in the music biz. Hollow Wood’s smart, layered indie-pop is expressed equally well in live performances and the studio, and the band makes intelligent choices about who is in its inner circle, too: Read Extra on Page 25 to learn what Ron Torres had to say about directing Joe Conley Golden and Tom Willmorth in the music video for Hollow Wood’s “Oh My God.”

Downtown Boise may break some kind of record as more than 50,000 people are expected to ring in 2015 at the second annual Potato Drop. If crowds of that magnitude make you uncomfortable but you still want to celebrate (a few days early) with a night out on the town, you could take your favorite dance partner to the Linen Building for the annual Blue Year’s Eve with The Blues Addicts. The local band covers classics by icons like Eric Clapton, Derek and the Dominos, JJ Cale and Muddy Waters. The Acoustaholics will kick off the party, which includes door prizes, a CD giveaway for the first 50 people through the door and three sets by The Blues Addicts. A November show at The Sapphire Room (Riverside Hotel) sold out, and last year’s NYE party came close to doing the same, so you might want to get tickets in advance at the Linen Building or online at brownpapertickets.com/event/956426. —Amy Atkins

—Amy Atkins With Kris Orlowski and locals Lost Ones, 7 p.m., $10. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., facebook.com/thecruxcoffeeshop. BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

8 p.m., $10. The Linen Building, 1402 Grove St., 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com. BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 23


WINESIPPER PERFECTION AT A PRICE

BOLLINGER SPECIAL CUVEE BRUT, $90 A favorite of the British royals, this family-owned house is famous for its richly styled, long-lived wines. The blend is dominated by dark grapes (60 percent pinot noir and 15 percent pinot meunier, with 25 percent chardonnay) and the wine is marked by bright and creamy citrus aromas. Apple, lemon and lime flavors up front turn to grapefruit and orange zest on the finish. KRUG GRAND CUVEE BRUT, $199 A nonvintage, entry-level Champagne that sells for more than Dom Perignon? Such is the rare and (deserved) reputation of the House of Krug. A torrent of bubbles carries dusty yeast and fruit aromas. Round, ripe and layered, the palate is filled with lush apple and Asian pear. This wine is well worth the splurge. TAITTINGER PRESTIGE ROSE BRUT, $86 A beautiful salmon pink, this is the most aromatic of the trio, with heady cherry and currant fruit pouring from the glass. This is a delicately structured, charmingly complex Champagne with almost Burgundian flavors of cherry and berry, and a Chablis-like minerality on the finish. This highly respected French-owned house dates back to 1734.

FOOD LAURIE PEARMAN

While grower champagnes (those that only use grapes from their own vineyards) are all the rage, the negociant houses (those that source many of their grapes) should not be overlooked. While it’s true that they have to strive to produce a consistent style from year to year, in many cases, that style is exceptionally fine. Here are three pricey but excellent examples.

INNOVATIVE WINTER COCKTAILS Warm up with these four unique libations TARA MORGAN From Irish coffee to hot buttered rum, winter cocktails tend to be warm, sweet and boozy. But not everyone wants to tread into toddy territory during the holiday season, so we rounded up a few more innovative (and less sugary) takes on winter cocktails.

MAI THAI: JULEBUKK Julebukk, a Norwegian word that means “Yule buck” or “Christmas goat,” describes the tradition of donning masks and costumes and going door-to-door between Christmas and New Year’s seeking food and drink. At Mai Thai, the term refers to a delicate mix of Aquavit, Dolin dry vermouth and Aperol served in a chilled coupe glass and topped with green Chartreuse air. According to bartender Michael Reed, the Chartreuse air is made with powdered soy lecithin. “It’s basically a hydrocolloid suspension agent or stabilizer,” said Reed. “Hydrocolloids are usually some type of fat or protein compound, but you use them basically to suspend things. … It creates a really light, tight foam, so we call it an air.” After mixing the drink and spooning on the Chartreuse air, Reed unveils a rose-hued cocktail with wafts of green peppercorn on the nose and subtle hints of caraway and anise on the palate.

THE MODE: THE IRON ROD According to General Manager Brian Livesay, The Mode’s Iron Fist is a take on the Áip, a class of cocktails that often contain egg whites and were Àrst popularized in Colonial America. “In the wintertime, you’d go to your local pub house and the bartender would have an iron poker in the Àre just staying hot,” explained Livesay. “And then you’d order a drink and they’d

pour a little bit of beer, a little bit of rum, maybe some brandy, maybe a little bit of citrus—if they were lucky enough to have some laying around— some sugar and maybe an egg yolk for protein. It was just kind of this catch-all. You put it all in a big glass and then shove that red-hot poker into it and it would foam and froth and kind of actually cook it a little bit.” The Mode’s take on this cocktail contains a red Flemish ale, Stroh 80, Lemon Hart 151 and brandy. Livesay constructed his own iron poker from industrial grade iron, which he heats for about 30 seconds using a blowtorch before plunging it into the cocktail. Not only does the iron heat the cocktail rapidly, making it froth and sputter, but Livesay said it also caramelizes the sugars and changes the drink’s chemistry. “It makes the beer kind of yeasty and sweeter,” he added. Though the end result looks like a glass of tea, the taste is more complex, with apple pie aromas mingling with tart, toasty and sweet Áavors.

BONEFISH GRILL: COLD SNAP BLACKBERRY FROST Though BoneÀsh Grill’s Cold Snap Blackberry Frost is essentially a vodka bramble, what makes it unique is the glass it’s served in. Reyka Vodka, which makes an appearance in the cocktail, also makes trafÀc cone-orange molds that produce lowball glasses formed entirely of ice. Mike Moreau, bartender at Boise’s BoneÀsh Grill in BoDo, walked us through the process of building the cocktail. “I start with Àve fresh blackberries and muddle in my housemade brown sugar syrup,” said Moreau. “And I’ll pack it with some ice and add some Reyka vodka, which is an Icelandic vodka, add a little blood orange Solerno, squeeze

of fresh lemon juice, two dashes of bitters and give that a good 10 shakes.” Moreau then strains the pretty purplish concoction into the ice glass and garnishes it with a blackberry and a sprinkle of nutmeg. An orange plastic rim clings to the bottom of the glass so you can sip the cold cocktail comfortably. “People really like the design and the novelty of the ice glass. … If the glasses are properly formed then they should last long enough for you to get through your drink,” said Moreau.

GRIND MODERN BURGER: DANDY SHAMMY Grind Modern Burger’s delicious Dandy Shammy isn’t a terribly complicated cocktail. “On the bottom, it’s our hard ginger beer and Áoated on top is our Dry Rye Irish Stout and a squeeze of lemon,” said GM Justin Zora. What makes the lovely layered cocktail innovative is that PostModern Brewers makes the 4 percent hard ginger beer in house. “It’s a mixture of fresh and candied ginger. It’s 100 pounds of ginger per batch and a batch is 20 kegs, or 10 barrels,” said Head Brewer Marvin Kinney. Kinney explained that he takes a proprietary, taste-neutral fermented base and blends it with a separate base of ginger, honey, citrus and sugar. The result is a sweet, low-alcohol ginger brew. “For your non-craft beer people, cider people, moscato drinkers, it just gave us an ability to bring more people into what we’re doing,” said Kinney. Zora said the ginger beer saves on bar expenses for popular cocktails like the Moscow Mule. “Having a hard ginger beer on tap cuts your costs dramatically,” said Zora. “Our No. 1 selling drink in house is our Jack Mormon, which is Jim Beam Honey with ginger beer.”

—David Kirkpatrick 24 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BW C A RE E RS

MUSIC EXTRA GR ANT C OLLETT

PLACE YOUR FREE AD NOW 24/7

BW CAREERS

boiseweekly.adperfect.com $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine opportunity. No experience required. Start immediately. www. mailingmembers.com Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others and create a sustainable future. 1, 6, 9, 18 mo. programs available. Apply now! OneWorldCenter.org or 269-5910518 info@OneWorldCenter.org AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads, TV, Film, Fashion 35% OFF TUITION - SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818980-2119. DO YOU HAVE A PASSION FOR HELPING PEOPLE? Chiropractic and Nutrition Assistant. Our busy natural health and chiropractic clinic is currently seeking a full-time Chiropractic and Nutrition Assistant to run our front office and assist patients. This is a unique opportunity to do work that is meaningful and will impact people in a positive way. This position will run day-to-day front office operations and be a main point of contact for patients. The successful candidate will be motivated, professional, sharp, kind, and “on top of it”. As the face of our clinic, the successful candidate will make patients feel welcome and comfortable in our office, maintain their privacy and dignity, assist patients as instructed by the doctor, keep finances current and accurate, and run a tight ship. Contact Andrew Rostenberg at (208) 284-8684. RedMountainClinic.com PHONE ACTRESSES From Home Must have dedicated land line and great voice. 21+ Up to $18 per hour. Flex HRS./ most Wknds 1-800-403-7772 Lipservice.net PT LINE COOK & DELIVERY DRIVER The Boise Co-op Deli is looking for an experienced Cook to work early mornings shifts on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, approx. 20-30 hours per week. We will accept applications until we find the right candidate. Please read the job description on the JOBS page of our website for qualifications and responsibilities. To apply: complete an online application and submit to jobs@boisecoop.com along with a resume. Or pick up a hard copy from our Customer Service desk. Complete the application, attach a resume, and leave with our Customer Service staff.

BW CAREER TRAINING Free GED Classes. 877-516-1072. $SCHOLARSHIPS$ For adults (you). Not based on high school grades. Stevens-Henager College. 800-959-9214.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

(Left to right:) Joe Conley Golden, Ron Torres and Tom Willmorth on set during filming of Hollow Wood’s new music video for “Oh My God.”

THE FOOL SQUAD STARS IN NEW HOLLOW WOOD MUSIC VIDEO, AND IT’S SERIOUSLY GOOD. During the two decades Joe Conley Golden and Tom Willmorth performed as the Fool Squad, they often made Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s Green Shows as much worth the price of admission as the main attraction. They seldom showed a serious side but there was never any doubt they had the chops, which are on full display in a new music video for local band Hollow Wood, posted Dec. 18. The song “Oh My God,” off the band’s recently released Seasons EP, is an anthemic track that invokes the layered indie-pop jubilance of The Polyphonic Spree but plumbs some emotional depths: “We have a hundred years / filled with pain and fear / open the door and ‘Oh my god,’ I scream.” With homages to The Odd Couple, Grumpy Old Men and even The ’Burbs, the video opens with an angry voiceover followed by Golden and Willmorth standing nose-to-nose in what is clearly the preface to some kind of confrontation. In fewer than four minutes, they go from arguing to retaliation to being forced to confront a dark secret. It’s a brilliant bit of filmmaking that came about as a result of both talent and serendipity. “I pitched a few ideas. [The neighbors] facebook.com/hollowwoodmusic idea was the last one,” said Ron Torres, who directed the video. Torres had built a reputation as a producer (he worked with filmmaker Tyler T. Williams on music videos for Youth Lagoon) but wanted to direct. More than that, Torres had been a fan of Hollow Wood’s music and wanted to direct something for the band. “I immediately fell in love with their sound,” Torres said, and he immediately started thinking about visuals to go with the music. He has a “good working relationship” with Mark Doubleday, Hollow Wood’s manager. “When you get to that conversation with the band about a music video, I’d like to have my name thrown in,” he told Doubleday. Torres also had a relationship with Golden, who was one of his professors at the College of Idaho. When Torres heard the Fool Squad was retiring from ISF, he felt compelled to ask Golden and Willmorth to star in the video. “I studied acting and directed under Joe,” Torres said. “I grew up on the Fool Squad. They are very much my performance role models. … This is going to sound strange, but I thought it would be great to give them a kind of epilogue, a swan song together in a way people wouldn’t expect.” —Amy Atkins BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 25


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY MIND BODY SPIRIT BW BODY WORKS ULM Inc. 340-8377.

BW CHILDBIRTH PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana.

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. Male Only. Private Boise studio. MC/ VISA. massagebyeric.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759. Mystic Moon Massage. Betty 2837830. Open 7 days 1pm-10pm. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Call or text Richard at 208-6959492.

CAREER TRAINING

SHOP HERE BW SHOP HERE HOLIDAY FESTIVE WEAR Plus...formals, hats, boots, snow gear & coats! Shift Clothing Exchange & Design. 18th & State St, Boise. THE 2015 VIP PASSES FOR BOISE RANCH & LAKEVIEW Ten 18-hole rounds of golf. Ten buy-1-get-1 free 18- or 9-hole rounds of golf. $3 off 9-hole cart rentals, $5 off 18-hole cart rentals, $2 off medium & large buckets of range balls. The 2015 Lakeview VIP Pass includes the following: Ten 18-hole rounds of golf, ten buy-1-get-1 free, 18 or 9-hole rounds of golf, $2 off large buckets of range balls, 20% off food in bar & grill. Both passes are $140 (includes tax and shipping). Visit www.teetiming.com to view the cards & order online.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

CRISIS

EAT HERE BW EAT HERE

$5.99 LUNCH

Mount Everest Momo Cafe. Try our Indian, Tibetan & Himalayan cuisine. 2144 S. Broadway Ave. Lunch served 11-3.

BAKERY IN HYDE PARK

FIND SPONSORED BY

Unbelievably good small batch bakery, all natural & delicious. Join us for goodies, cookies, pies & more. 375-7999. 13th & Eastman.

FIND CAREERS

GOGIRL If you haven’t found the perfect gift for that special lady in your life, we have a suggestion. Consider giving her freedom and liberation with a simple piece of medical-grade silicone: the GoGirl, a pink funnel that allows women to urinate standing up. Wait, wait. You might be thinking, “Ewww,” but stay with us. It’s actually not as gross as you might think. The GoGirl is great for a day on the slopes as an alternative to trekking back to the lodge, peeling off gear, fumbling with gloves, and pulling down layers of snow pants and long underwear in a public bathroom. Many a woman has spent an agonizing night tossing and turning in a tent, trying to decide if it’s worth it to crawl out of a warm sleeping bag and stumble around looking for a bush or tree to squat behind. The best part about having go-girl.com, $12.99 the GoGirl on a camping trip is minimizing the risk of hunching down and encountering poison ivy or stinging nettles. The GoGirl—also known as the Lady J, the “shenis” or the Female Urination Device—is ideal for climbing Mount Denali or a long road trip, and it’s easy to clean with just soap and water. With its discreet travel tube, the GoGirl could be the perfect stocking stuffer or a funny but practical white elephant gift idea. Some women like jewelry. Others just want to pee in the woods. —Jessica Murri 26 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

BW LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL BW NOTICES I, Barbara Anne Davis Medley Gafford, am not responsible for anything that is said or done by anyone using my personal identity information except myself.

LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email jill@boiseweekly.com or call 344-2055 for a quote. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

LEGAL NOTICES Legal Notice Section 45-805 Lien Sale/Vehicle BOISE VALLEY TOWING 6381 Supply Way, Boise, ID 83716 208.389.9707 On December 26, 2014 between the hours of 8:00am and 12:00 pm the following described vehicle will be sold on a sealed bid process. Vehicle will be sold on an AS IS-WHERE IS BASIS ONLY. Odometer reading may not be the actual mileage. NO KEYS AVAILABLE, payment terms are cash or credit card (with 3% convenience fee) only, vehicle will not be released until credit card is cleared. Viewing of Abandon Vehicle and bidding process will take place on the DAY OF SALE ONLY. NO EXCEPTIONS COLOR/YEAR

LIC/VIN

LEGAL OWNER (Reg/Titled) Lien Amount

White/1985 Chev Caprice

1A2A339 (ID) 1G18N69H4FY202056

Ashtyn Lamb

$1894.00

Green/1997 Nissan Pathfinder

1A4532B (ID) JN8ARO5Y0VW184566

Tanner Wells

$1831.00

Black/1998 Honda CRV

78C8581 (ID) JHLRD1840WCO81245

Cassondra Leigh Nelson

$1984.00

White/1981 Datsun Pickup

JA5J937 JN6MD0159BW008987

Lyndall Irene Williams Russell Roger Webb

$1958.00

Owners of vehicle may claim vehicle on the date of sale by paying the Lien amount before 12:00PM. All documents necessary to Title Vehicle will be furnished at the time of sale.

OFFICE HOURS

FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Joshuea Jacob Reed Legal Name DOB 12-11-90

ADOPT-A-PET

MAILING ADDRESS

Case No. CV NC 1420150

P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Joshuea Jacob Reed, now residing in the City of Star, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Joshuea Jacob Wilder. The reason for the change in name is: to use the name of the man who has acted on my behalf and as my dad for over twenty two years. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) JAN 06 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date NOV 05 2014 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Dec. 10, 17, 24 & 31, 2014. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF GEM

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com ELLIOTT: Who can resist these charming blue eyes and a personality to match?

QUINCY: I’m a purring love machine who needs a calm, affectionate human like you.

FRECKLES: I have a cute face, but you must meet me to hear my tiny chirps, meows and purrs.

Case No. CV 2014-725 In The Matter of the Estate of Lester M. Rose, deceased.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER ROWDY: 7-year-old, male, Chow Chow/Australian cattle dog. Likes kids and calm, big dogs. Needs a home without small animals. (Kennel 307 #16059197)

GINGER: 7-year-old, female, American bulldog mix. Affectionate and strong, enjoys fetch. Needs to live indoors and with older kids. (Kennel 302- #16223981)

MUMFORD: 6-month-old, domestic rabbit. Curious and interested in people. Good with gentle, respectful children. (Small Animal Room at IHS Shelter- #23996987)

Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT

ELSA: 9-month-old, female, domestic shorthair. Larger-than-life personality, dislikes her shelter cage. Loves being held and petted. (Kennel 108- #23682527)

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

SWAN: 18-month-old, female, domestic shorthair. Easy going and engaged with people. Enjoys a good scratch on the chin or long pets. (Kennel 17- #24407917)

COCOA: 8-year-old, female, pit bull terrier mix. Mature, with plenty of excitement for life. Fairly laid back, enjoys toys and fetch. (Kennel 306- # 22869726)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 27


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY

NYT CROSSWORD | SEASON’S GREETINGS 1 Something put on the spot? 7 Without a mixer 11 Likely feature of a college town 19 One may be removed 20 ___-American 21 Red or white sticker? 22 Homer that leaves people yawning?

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

19

8

36

27

28

38

39

43

47 55

61

62

56

57

63

72 79

84

85 89

90

97

98

102

34

45 50

17

18

65 69

73

74

92

93

75 82 87

94

77

83 88

101

104

105

109

110 117

111

118

119

121

122

123

124

125

73 ‘‘Dedicated to the ___ Love’’ 74 Siouan speaker 75 Filch 78 Around 79 Zion National Park material 82 Coast along, with ‘‘by’’ 84 Reader of the Deseret News 85 Break off 86 They’re above abs 88 ‘‘It Came ___ a Midnight Clear’’ 89 ___ tide 91 Barn dance that’s free to attend? 96 Seeks change? 98 Hematite, e.g. 100 Together 101 Actress Strahovski of 2000s TV 102 What vinegar has a lot of 103 Proctor’s charge 105 Gawks at 107 Computer addresses: Abbr. 108 Believe it! 109 R.S.V.P., e.g.: Abbr. 110 Where the big buoys are? 111 Makeshift wig, maybe 114 Vagrant after getting kicked off a train, say? 117 Stuff your dad finds ridiculous? 120 Gentle treatment, metaphorically 121 Temple University’s team 122 Saharan nomad 123 ‘‘The Shawshank Redemption’’ setting 124 Nursing need 125 Charles Schwab competitor

DOWN

106

120

28 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

76

95

100

116

53

66

81

91

52

60

68

99

46 51

59

86

108 115

58

80

103

107

16

30

41

64

78

15

33

49

67 71

14

40 44

48

54

13

29

32

37

12

51 World of Warcraft creatures 54 Navratilova rival 56 Starts recycling, say 60 First lady from Texas 61 Nav. rank 62 War stat 64 Bleacher feature 65 Where a director directs 67 Backstabbing pal? 70 Soon gonna

24

26

42

114

11

BY JOEL FAGLIANO / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

21

31

96

10

23

25

70

9

20

22

35

35 ‘‘Pick me, pick me!’’ 38 Sauce with a name derived from the Italian for ‘‘pounded’’ 40 Risky chess move, informally 41 Some briefs 42 Southwest tribe after a fistfight? 45 Pad ___ (noodle dish) 47 Part of E.T.S.: Abbr. 48 Piano sonatas, e.g. 49 ___ generis

24 ‘‘Shucks!’’ or ‘‘Pshaw!’’? 25 Go astray 26 Father-son activity 27 They can be fertilized 29 Pale ___ 30 Majors in acting 31 Domineering 32 Give rise to 34 ‘‘The less you wear, the more you need ___’’ (slogan)

ACROSS

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

112

113

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Feel deep compassion Way out Germany’s ___ Basin Pac-12 team, for short Steve Jobs’s successor at Apple Minuses, basically House speaker after Dennis Hastert I will follow it ‘‘___ we done?’’

10 Hockey Hall of Fame locale 11 Playbill info 12 World capital once conquered by Augustus 13 Return to one’s seat? 14 Roy Rogers’s real last name 15 Raven’s cry 16 Cause for a quarantine 17 Moon of Neptune 18 Church leaders 21 Sound of a fly swatter 23 ‘‘___ no biggie’’ 28 Cognac bottle letters 31 Lawn game 32 ‘‘Or so’’ 33 Bone to pick 34 Celtic battle, say 35 Like President Taft 36 Bygone 37 Trucks, maybe 39 Sedgwick in Warhol films 43 Warrior or downward dog 44 Rhone tributary 46 Some Christmas decorations 50 Computerdom, informally 52 ’Fore 53 Got the chair? 55 Composer whose name is an anagram of SANTA + ME 57 Bear 58 Put-downs 59 Like used cigars, maybe 63 Suffix with social 66 ‘‘Personally, I think . . . ,’’ in texts 67 Kate Middleton, e.g. 68 Complex thing? 69 Tree whose pods have sweet pulp 70 Lead-in to pressure 71 Was gullible 72 Crush, e.g.

75 Fattened fowl 76 Nickname for Orlando 77 Pasta with a name derived from the Italian for ‘‘quills’’ 80 Auntie ___ (pretzel chain) 81 German auto 83 ‘‘Good job by you!’’ 87 Trendy coffee order 90 Joint business venture? 92 Look 93 Special newsstand offering 94 ‘‘Illmatic’’ rapper 95 Balance 96 Regal and Encore 97 Lively intelligence 99 Take off 104 Ski resort near Santa Fe 106 Beauty L A S T L O K I

I M I N

N I T S

E T T A

S A W T O

O C E A N

S T I E G

A A N D P

W H I T E G L O V E S

S O R T I E S

A G U A

A M I G R M O O E S S E S K

N U S N Y L I N E C A N L A O C D A L E R O T A N I E S O D A N I N A A L O V A P E R E R I N T D E E E D D

108 ___ of Man 110 Stillwater’s home: Abbr. 111 ___ Liasson, NPR political correspondent 112 & 113 It’s full of opinions 115 Mil. rank 116 Son of, in Hebrew names 118 Get behind 119 It’s hard to shoot Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S P A T T I P A G E

E N U F

D R A G N J E O T A N E N T E Y M S O N Y

N O R A D

D O G L I K R E E A D I E R K E A D E I P O U U N C O H P E P R

S K Y V A N E S R U M B A G O D N O

A N S W E R S A N N A

T O E N A A N J I T A L E L A V E P I E A C R I I T E E G S T O T R O A P N G A R J T A D E M S

O T T A W A

M A I L O R D H E E R C T I A C R E E E S T O P B E E E L S

D R Z E O G L T I A N N S T D I O N O C D T L I E V R E S L A W

T I N A

N A N U

A P S E

S T O O P

T E N T S

C A N E S

A G E N T

I N D Y

E G O S

B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

CARTOON

B OISE W E E KLY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Angel M. McKenzie has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons or entities having claims against the said deceased or estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice or within sixty (60) days after the undersigned mailed or delivered a copy of this Notice to such person or entity, whichever is later or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be (a) presented to: Angel M. McKenzie, Personal Representative c/o William F. Lee, Attorney at law, 629 E. Main Street, Emmett, ID 83617,and (b) filed with the Court. DATED: October 21, 2014. /s/ William F. Lee Pub. Dec. 17, 24 & 31, 2014. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Brock Vincent Teretto Legal name of child Case No. CV NC 1417774 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Brock Vincent Teretto, a minor, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Brock Vincent Teretto Wilkosz. The reason for the change in name is: The child wishes to have this father’s/guardians last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) JAN. 27 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date SEP 26 2014 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Dec. 17, 24, 31, 2014 & Jan. 7, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Donald Jay Leesch Legal Name

Date 09 2014 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Dec. 17, 24, 31, 2014 & Jan. 7, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Blake Alan Smith Legal Name

ADULT BW ADULT MEET SEXY SINGLES Send Messages FREE! Straight 208-345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-4722200. Use FREE Code 3187, 18+.

Case No. CV NC 1422338 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Blake A. Smith, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Blake Alan Smith Brennan. The reason for the change in name is: Child lives full time w/ Mom and brother that have Brennan as last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) JAN 27 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date DEC 03 2014 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK PUB Dec. 24, 31, 2014 & Jan. 7 & 14, 2015.

BW CHAT LINES MEET SEXY SINGLES Browse & Reply FREE! 208-3458855. Use FREE Code 3188, 18+. WHERE HOT GUYS MEET Browse Ads & Reply FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 2619, 18+.

BW PEN PALS Single male, 33, Native American, athletic 6’2”, 210lbs of solid fun, looking for someone to share thots with, and who kno’s where it may lead. Jared Market #73749 SAWC #186 125 N 8th West St. Anthony, ID 83445. Hi my name is Rich. I’m 54 year old. 6’ 190 lbs. Currently incarcerated in Boise. I’m looking for someone to write back and forth with. I’m tired of playing games, I always seem to lose. I will return all letters, picture upon request. I hope to find someone special that will continue on the outside. If you think you might be interested please write to Richard Brennan #66636 IDOC, ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707.

ADULT

Case No. CV NC 14 22764 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Donald Jay Leesch, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Sam Jay Leesch. The reason for the change in name is: Sam is the nickname I have always been known as. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) FEB 03 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 29


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY FOR SALE BW FOR SALE VINTAGE WEDDING GOWNS & ACCESSORIES Hundreds of UNWORN and gently worn, vintage wedding, bridesmaids, flowergirl, MOB dresses and accessories like gloves, hats, shoes, jewelry, slips etc. IN WEISER! 550-4479.

BW INSTRUMENTS POWERED FLOOR MONITORS 2 Behringer Eurolive F1220A powered floor monitors. 125 watt, 12” speaker, EQ, Feedback filter. These sell for $230 new. Asking $150 each. Very good condition. Good for a small PA. 208-8306553.

COMMUNITY BW HOME ORGANIC.CHILD SAFE.PET SAFE Plus, local! The best pest control services in the valley. PROTEC, call Brett at 284-1480. TWO MEN AND A TRUCK BOISE We offer free estimates. Have questions about your move coming up? Let us know. We are here to help! Our commitment is to continuously strive to exceed our customer’s expectations in value and high standards of satisfaction. For more information, call the Boise Two Men And A Truck® at 208-495-7111 or visit twomenboise.com

BW PROFESSIONAL Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies,

liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 844-753-1317. DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.). SAVE! Regular Price $32.99. Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888-992-1957. PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZER I provide organizing services for homes and businesses. Competitive rates starting at $30/hr. Visit my website myreshuffle.com or email info@myreshuffle.com

BW GRAY MATTERS HEIR ESTATE SALES Heir Estate Sales...an Estate to remember. Providing clients the assurance that their belongings will always be in good hands. Our services, which include cleaning, organizing, pricing, and hosting the final sale, are provided in Boise and the surrounding area. No sale is too small. With our passion and experience in

Estate Sales, we ensure the most professional and caring service, start to finish. 871-9939. amcope@outlook.com

HO U S IN G BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com

BW FOR SALE 1 ACRE LOT Building Lot For Sale. A fabulous 1 acre lot to bring your own builder and come discover what Eagle Elevated is all about! Great community pool and play area planned for this Phase, outdoor eating area

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

as well. Call the Jennie Johnson Team at 278-6048 for more information. TheJennieJohnsonTeam. com 2014 PARADE OF HOMES Ashbury Eagle home for sale. Call us today for more information. Jennie Johnson at 278-6048 to personally show you this 2014 Parade of Homes in Ashbury. TheJennieJohsonTeam.com BUILDING LOTS WITH A VIEW In Boise on Burnett. Bring your own builder! Beautiful view of the foothills and Bogus Basin in great location. 1.89 acres, plenty of room to build your dream home. Drive by and see it today. Call The Jennie Johnson Team at 631-6402 for more information. TheJennieJohnsonTeam.com STEVEN SPRINGS COMMUNITY STAR 3BD, 2BA, energy star home in Star Id! Great location. Come see it today. TheJennieJohnsonTeam. com, Jennie Johnson with Keller Williams Realty Boise at 278-6048.

TRANSPORTATION BW 4 WHEELS CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com

BW HAVE AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/ MONTH! Call 855-977-9537.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Hell is the suffering of being unable to love,” wrote novelist J.D. Salinger. Using that definition, I’m happy to announce that you have a good chance of avoiding hell altogether in 2015. If there has been any deficiency in your power to express and bestow love, I think you will correct it. If you have been so intent on getting love that you have been neglectful in giving love, you will switch your focus. I invite you to keep a copy of this horoscope in your wallet for the next 12 months. Regard it as your “Get Out of Hell Free” card. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Beetles are abundant and ubiquitous. Scientists have identified more than 350,000 species, and they are always discovering new ones. In 2011, for example, they conferred official recognition on 3,485 additional types of beetles. I’m seeing a parallel development in your life, Taurus. A common phenomenon that you take for granted harbors mysteries that are worth exploring. Something you regard as quite familiar actually contains interesting features you don’t know about. In 2015, I hope you will open your mind to the novelties and exotica that are hidden in plain sight. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Auguste Escoffier (1846-1935) was an influential French chef who defined and standardized

the five “mother sauces.” But he wasn’t content to be a star in his own country. At the age of 44, he began his “conquest of London,” bringing his spectacular dining experience to British restaurants. He thought it might be hard to sell his new clientele on frogs’ legs, a traditional French dish, so he resorted to trickery. On the menu, he listed it as “Nymphs of the Dawn.” According to my reading of the omens, this is an example of the hocus-pocus that will be your specialty in 2015. And I suspect you will get away with it every time as long as your intention is not selfish or manipulative, but rather generous and constructive. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The entomologist Charles P. Alexander (1889-1981) devoted much of his professional life to analyzing the insect known as the crane fly. He identified more than 11,000 different species, drew 15,000 illustrations of the creatures and referred to his lab as “Crane Fly Haven.” That’s the kind of single-minded intention I’d love to see you adopt during the first six months of 2015, Cancerian. What I’m imagining is that you will choose a specific, well-defined area within which you will gleefully explore and experiment and improvise. Is there a subject or task or project you would have fun pursuing with that kind of intensity?

30 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In Don DeLillo’s novel Underworld, Cotter Martin is a young boy living in New York in the 1950s. The following description is about him. “In school they tell him sometimes to stop looking out the window. This teacher or that teacher. The answer is not out there, they tell him. And he always wants to say that’s exactly where the answer is.” I propose we regard this passage as one of your themes in 2015, Leo. In other words, be skeptical of any authority who tells you where you should or should not be searching for the answers. Follow your own natural inclination, even if at first it seems to be nothing more than looking out the window.

Thompson, “that a car with the gas needle on empty can run about 50 more miles if you have the right music very loud on the radio.” In 2015, I invite you to adopt some of that push-it-to-theedge attitude for your personal use, Libra. Maybe not full-time; maybe not with the same manic intensity that Thompson did. Rather, simply tap into it as needed—whenever you’ve got to up your game or raise your intensity level or rouse the extra energy you need TO ACHIEVE TOTAL, WONDROUS, RESOUNDING VICTORY!!! The coming months will be your time to go all the way, hold nothing back, and quest for the best and the most and the highest.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “It is always important to know when something has reached its end,” writes Paulo Coelho in his book The Zahir. Use this advice heroically in 2015, Virgo. Wield it to clear away anything that no longer serves you, that weighs you down or holds you back. Prepare the way for the new story that will begin for you around your next birthday. “Closing circles, shutting doors, finishing chapters,” Coelho says, “it doesn’t matter what we call it; what matters is to leave in the past those moments in life that are over.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Twenty miles long, the Onyx River is the longest body of moving water on the continent of Antarctica. Most of the year it’s ice, though. It actually flows for just two or three months during the summer. Let’s hope that continues to be the case for the foreseeable future. It would be a shame if global warming got so extreme that the Onyx melted permanently. But now let’s talk about your own metaphorical equivalent of the Onyx: a potentially flowing part of your life that is often frozen. I’d love to see it heat up and thaw. I’d love it to be streaming and surging most of the time. And in 2015, I think that’s a distinct possibility. Consider making the

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “On some nights I still believe,” said rascal journalist Hunter S.

following declaration your battle cry: I am the Flow Master! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The best way to keep a prisoner from escaping is to make sure he never knows he’s in prison.” That quote is attributed to both Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky and Russian author Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Regardless of who said it, I urge you to keep it in mind throughout 2015. Like all of us, you are trapped in an invisible prison: a set of beliefs or conditioned responses or bad habits that limit your freedom to act. That’s the bad news. The good news is that in the coming months, you are poised to discover the exact nature of your invisible prison, and then escape it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): When he was 37 years old, actor Jack Nicholson found out that Ethel May, the woman he had always called his mother, was in fact his grandma. Furthermore, his “older sister” June was actually his mom, who had given birth to him when she was 17. His relatives had hidden the truth from him. I suspect that in 2015 you will uncover secrets and missing information that will rival Nicholson’s experience. Although these revelations may initially be confusing or disruptive, in the long run they will heal and liberate you. Welcome them!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Meupareunia” is an English word that refers to a sexual adventure in which only one of the participants has a good time. I’ll be bold and predict that you will not experience a single instance of meupareunia in 2015. That’s because I expect you’ll be steadily upgrading your levels of empathy and your capacity for receptivity. You will be getting better and better at listening to your intimate allies and reading their emotional signals. I predict that synergy and symbiosis will be your specialties. Both your desire to please and your skill at giving pleasure will increase, as will your understanding of how many benefits you can reap by being a responsive partner. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Be good and you will be lonesome,” said Mark Twain. Do you agree? I don’t—at least as it applies to your life in 2015. According to the long-term astrological omens, you will attract an abundance of love and luck by being good—by expressing generosity; deepening your compassion; cultivating integrity; and working for justice, truth and beauty. That doesn’t mean you should be a pushover or doormat. Your resolve to be good must be leavened by a determination to deepen your self-respect. Your eagerness to do the right thing must include commitment to raising your levels of self-care. B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M


MASSAGE

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

CAREER TRAINING

MUSIC LEESSONS

shop here

HOME SERVICES

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | 31


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY MIND BODY SPIRIT BW BODY WORKS ULM Inc. 340-8377.

BW CHILDBIRTH PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana.

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. Male Only. Private Boise studio. MC/ VISA. massagebyeric.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759. Mystic Moon Massage. Betty 2837830. Open 7 days 1pm-10pm. RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Call or text Richard at 208-6959492.

CAREER TRAINING

SHOP HERE BW SHOP HERE HOLIDAY FESTIVE WEAR Plus...formals, hats, boots, snow gear & coats! Shift Clothing Exchange & Design. 18th & State St, Boise. THE 2015 VIP PASSES FOR BOISE RANCH & LAKEVIEW Ten 18-hole rounds of golf. Ten buy-1-get-1 free 18- or 9-hole rounds of golf. $3 off 9-hole cart rentals, $5 off 18-hole cart rentals, $2 off medium & large buckets of range balls. The 2015 Lakeview VIP Pass includes the following: Ten 18-hole rounds of golf, ten buy-1-get-1 free, 18 or 9-hole rounds of golf, $2 off large buckets of range balls, 20% off food in bar & grill. Both passes are $140 (includes tax and shipping). Visit www.teetiming.com to view the cards & order online.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

CRISIS

EAT HERE BW EAT HERE

$5.99 LUNCH

Mount Everest Momo Cafe. Try our Indian, Tibetan & Himalayan cuisine. 2144 S. Broadway Ave. Lunch served 11-3.

BAKERY IN HYDE PARK

FIND SPONSORED BY

Unbelievably good small batch bakery, all natural & delicious. Join us for goodies, cookies, pies & more. 375-7999. 13th & Eastman.

FIND CAREERS

GOGIRL If you haven’t found the perfect gift for that special lady in your life, we have a suggestion. Consider giving her freedom and liberation with a simple piece of medical-grade silicone: the GoGirl, a pink funnel that allows women to urinate standing up. Wait, wait. You might be thinking, “Ewww,” but stay with us. It’s actually not as gross as you might think. The GoGirl is great for a day on the slopes as an alternative to trekking back to the lodge, peeling off gear, fumbling with gloves, and pulling down layers of snow pants and long underwear in a public bathroom. Many a woman has spent an agonizing night tossing and turning in a tent, trying to decide if it’s worth it to crawl out of a warm sleeping bag and stumble around looking for a bush or tree to squat behind. The best part about having go-girl.com, $12.99 the GoGirl on a camping trip is minimizing the risk of hunching down and encountering poison ivy or stinging nettles. The GoGirl—also known as the Lady J, the “shenis” or the Female Urination Device—is ideal for climbing Mount Denali or a long road trip, and it’s easy to clean with just soap and water. With its discreet travel tube, the GoGirl could be the perfect stocking stuffer or a funny but practical white elephant gift idea. Some women like jewelry. Others just want to pee in the woods. —Jessica Murri 26 | DECEMBER 24–30, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O ISE W E E KLY.C O M


Boise Weekly Vol. 23 Issue 27  

Christmas at the VA: Idaho veterans and their loved ones share stories of Holidaays soec=ent in uniform

Boise Weekly Vol. 23 Issue 27  

Christmas at the VA: Idaho veterans and their loved ones share stories of Holidaays soec=ent in uniform