Page 1

SIGNS OF THE TIMES Effort kicks off to fill downtown Boise with new “wayfinding” signage NEWS 9

NOT JUST WEDDINGS From death to taxes, Idaho’s ban on same-sex marriage affects nearly every aspect of life FEATURE 11

‘TITS DEEP’ Women paddlers work their way into the North Fork Championship kayak race REC 26

THE CAMOUFLAGE CLOSET

“Oh! Our gay people, yay! The judge will marry you.” VOLUME 22, ISSUE 52

BOISEWEEKLY.COM

Documentary explores the struggles of LGBT service members FEATURE 11

SCREEN 31

JUNE 18–24, 2014


2 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com

NOTE

Office Manager: Meg Andersen Meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com Associate Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri Jessica@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Sam Hill Sam@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Interns: Kelsey Crow, Nate Lowery, Kelsey Meeker, Jasmine Verduzco Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Tara Morgan, John Rember, Ben Schultz Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd Brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Tommy Budell, Tommy@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Brian St. George, Brian@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, Darcy@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Directors: Kelsey Hawes, kelsey@boiseweekly.com Tomas Montano, tomas@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Bobby Gaytan, Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow, John Webster Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Janeen Bronson, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

HISTORY ON THE FAST-TRACK History is happening all the time, but most of it is too boring to notice. Even if you tweet it, the amazing dinner you made/ate/saw someone else eat last night will be remembered by precisely no one. With so much inconsequence going on around us, it can sometimes come as a bit of a shock to realize that capital-H History is happening in the here and now. For an example, look no further than the case for LGBT equality. As of this writing, President Barack Obama is poised to sign an executive order barring federal contractors from discriminating against employees on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity (similar to, but not as far-reaching as, ordinances passed in more than half a dozen Idaho cities). According to some estimates, the measure could grant protection to upwards of 14 million people. Two openly LGBT federal judges—Darrin Gayles, in Florida, and Staci Yandle, of Illinois—were confirmed to the bench this year, and, in case you haven’t been paying attention, there are 74 lawsuits aiming to overturn same-sex marriage bans in 32 states, including Idaho. That’s what is called the “tide the history,” whether antigay culture warriors like it or not; and while bigotry has often taken solace in the glacial pace of social change, LGBT equality is quickly approaching its tipping point. This week Boiseans celebrate Pride Fest on Saturday, June 21, and Boise Weekly has devoted a good portion of the coverage in this edition to LGBT-related stories. First, on Page 8, News Editor George Prentice checks in with Madelynn Taylor—the 74-year-old Navy veteran who is still waiting for the right to be buried next to her wife in the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery. On Page 11, staff writer Jessica Murri takes an in-depth look at the economic and legal ramifications of marriage equality in Idaho. On Page 31, Prentice profiles the documentary film The Camouflage Closet, which sheds light on the struggles faced by gay, lesbian and transgender service members. This time last year, BW freelance writer Carissa Wolf wrote a piece on the patchwork of laws governing the lives of LGBT people; in 2012, Wolf explored hate crimes against members of the LGBT community, and, in 2011, I contributed a piece comparing the struggle for LGBT equality to the civil rights movement of the 20th century. Here’s hoping that in 2015, we get to write the story: “Marriage Equality: One Year Later.” —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Marianne Konvalinka TITLE: “These Dreams” MEDIUM: Mixed media

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2013 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

ARTIST STATEMENT: I enjoy playing with a variety of media and seeing where things take me. I am constantly learning and experimenting, taking inspiration from the great wide open. Find me at the Art Source Gallery, any BOSCO event, and www.greatwideopenart.com.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 3


Seek

experience .

BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

LGBT IN C-TOWN Caldwell might be the next Idaho city to consider enacting protections for members of the LGBT community. Eight cities have already done so. Read more on Citydesk.

IT’S BACK First it was Crazy Horse, then J.D. and Friends, Terrapin Station and Red Room. Then it closed. Now it’s reopening… as Crazy Horse. Full story on the resurrected punk club on Cobweb.

MINE MESS Polluted sediment from Atlanta Gold’s mining project made its way into the Middle Fork of the Boise River. Among the nastiness: arsenic and iron. Get more info on Citydesk.

OPINION

KEEPING SUN VALLEY COOL SINCE 1936 WITH WORLD CLASS ICE SHOWS UNDER THE STARS.

Gracie Gold

July 4

mirai nagasu

July 19

2014 Olympic Bronze Medalist 2014 US Gold Medalist 2013 US Silver Medalist

US Olympic Competitor 2X US Bronze Medalist

JASON BROWN

2014 US Bronze Medalist 2013 US Gold Medalist

2014 Olympic Bronze Medalist 2014 US Silver Medalist NATHAN CHEN

2014 Jr. World Bronze Medalist 2014 US Jr. Gold Medalist

Ryan bradley

July 12

2011 US Gold Medalist US Silver Medalist

MAX AARON

alissa czisny

July 26

2X US Gold Medalist US Silver Medalist JOSH FARRIS

2013 World Jr. Gold Medalist 2013 World Jr. Silver Medalist

sunvalley.com/iceshows

4 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 5


OPINION/BILL COPE

THINKING HANDS No texting while we listen to my new theory Ask any accomplished pianist, she’ll tell you. And by “accomplished,” I mean someone who can play with all 10 fingers. And by “play,” I mean to generate elaborate patterns and variations of movement with those fingers moving independently of one another, rather than shaping one’s hands into inflexible claws in order to bang out block chords on “My Baby Does the Hanky Panky.” Ask her how on earth she ever managed to memorize all of Bach’s Partitas, every one so fugueishly complex as to make it sound like four melodies playing at once (which is exactly what is happening). Or how does one brain, no matter how musically inclined it may be, hold all 32 of Beethoven’s piano sonatas? She will tell you it’s in her fingers, this vast store of musical data-bytes. We call it “muscle memory.” That’s what all the practicing is for, to get your fingers in line with your brain in order to produce the sounds you wish to produce in the sequence you wish to produce them. Good musicians are “thinking” with pieces of flesh and sinew and bone located far outside the skull. So it would come as no surprise to Johann and Ludwig that evidence is gathering which indicates those children who are writing their assignments out in longhand are retaining more of what they write, and are stimulating more of their brain, than ones who spend their school days glued to a computer keyboard. UUU I knew as a junior-high kid that if I really wanted to firmly grasp whatever I was reading, especially the stuff that was the hardest to comprehend and retain—you know… the stuff that always ended up on tests—it would become more clear and stick to my brain more solidly if I wrote it out. I would copy entire paragraphs, passages, even pages if I had to. Sometimes it felt like I was etching the material onto the back of my eyeballs. I’d forgotten I ever did that until I read a report recently of the research being done to establish the different sort of reactions in the brain and results in the learning process, depending on whether the child is longhand writing or typing. In study after study, psychologists and neuroscientists are finding that research subjects writing in longhand retain more and are more facile at creating new ideas than those doing the same functions on a keyboard. There are even indications that cursive writing—that often elegant calligraphy so quickly going the way of the dodo and the eight-track tape—is more powerful than printing when it comes to memory and general brain activity. Now, no one is claiming—at least, not in the report I read—that writing longhand makes you smarter. But exactly what is being smarter, if not memory strength, idea generation and increased brain activity? And I am here today to carry these revelations to an

6 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

even more unsubstantiated claim, being: If there is indeed a relationship between handwriting and brain activity—a “unique neural circuit,” as one researcher describes it—then wouldn’t that make our hands an extension of our brains? And wouldn’t it imply that the more intricate and complicated demands we make on our hands—writing in fluid cursive, for instance, or playing a Mozart sonata—the more our brains are improved? Stimulated? Enhanced? Activated? Might this explain how so many masters of both the quill and the Age of Reason— Voltaire, Rousseau, Ben Franklin—seem so extraordinarily lucid? Think about it: There isn’t a single signature on the Declaration of Independence written out in sloppy block letters, is there? UUU And might it also explain why we don’t seem to have an overabundance of smart people around today? Let’s suppose that the big leap in human intelligence levels, the one which anthropologists still haven’t satisfactorily explained, came in direct juxtaposition with more sophisticated use of our pre-historic hands—e.g., back when we went from clubbing our dinners to death, to fashioning sharp objects for stabbing? Might the very act of turning a rock into a crude spearhead have triggered something under those heavy supraorbital ridges that led to more and more refined spearheads? Might the whittling of straight shafts into arrows have inspired the groggy Cro-Magnon mind to consider carving out the likeness of a cave bear from a hunk of firewood, or the shaping of a rudimental clay water jug led in the imagination to Grecian urns and Ming vases, all because the hands and the brain were working as complementary, synergistic units, feeding each other and off each other? And might the biggest jumps of all have occurred when we started to turn the grunts and sputterings of early man into written symbols? That the very act of handwritten communication inspired deeper levels of thought to communicate? And that the more refined and intricate our symbols became—which could not have happened without a more refined and intricate use of the hands—the more refined and intricate our thinking became? Yeah. That’s my new theory. It’s not entirely new, and it sure as hell isn’t entirely mine. And it has a depressing flipside to it that bodes ill for the future of Mankind, because if it’s true, then it stands to reason that as handwriting fades into the past with all the other hands-on stuff technology has enabled us not to do anymore, so will the accompanying intellectual growth. Another day, perhaps we can explore the question: Is Tweeting making people stupider?… or were they stupid for taking up Tweeting in the first place? B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


JOHN REMBER/OPINION

NONE OF THE ABOVE The learned helplessness civics lesson

Like a lot of older Idahoans, I used to vote for Democrats. Decades ago, as a hopeful person, I supported decent wages and working conditions for ordinary people. I recognized that well-funded public education would make people wealthy and wise. I backed school bond issues and health-related environmental protection. I don’t do any of that any longer. If I vote this fall, I’m voting a straight Republican ticket, not so I can feel like a winner, but to see what believing in nothing feels like. You might call me nihilismcurious. I’ve been that way since Idaho became a one-party state. I still believe in decent wages and working conditions for ordinary people, quality public-funded education and clean air and water. But I’ve stopped thinking a vote for a Democrat can advance any of these things. It’s like those experiments where scientists trained lab rats to avoid severe electric shocks by pressing a lever. Then the experimenters disconnected the lever and still administered the shocks. Eventually the rats just sat quivering in the corner of their cages, not pressing the lever, not even looking at it, just waiting for the next agonizing jolt of electricity. The experimenters called the rats’ condition Learned Helplessness. Any Democrats in Idaho who haven’t achieved Learned Helplessness are slow learners. It’s only a matter of time and a few more elections before they realize the lever on their voting machine isn’t connected to anything. Cases in point: Jerry Brady’s gubernatorial losses to Dirk Kempthorne and Butch Otter. If you look at everybody’s resumes—not to mention their video clips—it’s hard not to conclude that Brady is superior, morally and intellectually, to his two opponents. But he received 42 percent of the vote against Kempthorne and 44 percent against Otter. Democrats still point to those numbers with pride—an indication of how far they’ve fallen. In two-party states you don’t brag about landslide losses. In a more extreme example, Nicole LeFavour got 34.8 percent of the vote against Mike Simpson, whose overexposure to the mutagenic effects of lobbying has made it impossible for him to have a recent photo on his website. LeFavour is smart, articulate, committed to human rights, courageous, principled and determined not to be a typical politician—in deep contrast to what can kindly be characterized as the go-along-to-get-along practices of the Idaho congressional delegation in general and of Simpson in particular. Idaho politics are at the point where the Republican Primary is the only election worth holding. Republicans hold supermajorities in the Idaho Legislature. Anti-union and procorporate bills, no matter how destructive to families or small businesses, are assured passage. Education, especially in rural communities, has been neglected to the point where our colleges teach what our high schools used to. In happier days, the Democratic response BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

would be for a party leader to go out to the counties and begin organizing at the grassroots level, pointing out to what remains of the middle class that there’s a political party that has their interests in mind. That’s what Phil Batt did as Republican Party chairman in 1991, and his success, however disingenuous, created the current situation. I don’t see any Democrat on the horizon who possesses Batt’s political will, or his demonstrated willingness to garner votes by appealing to voters’ fears and prejudices. Not that I’m recommending the latter—I’m recommending an articulate and moral defense against the latter. But not this year, and not this year’s Democrats. It would be more effective—and certainly more humane—for the Democratic Party to disband completely at next weekend’s convention in Moscow. Committing suicide as a party would show more integrity than what they’re doing now: serving as Idaho’s mute minority, being humiliated, mocked and beaten every November, and giving Republicans straw-men and -women to vote against. Making Idaho an official one-party state might shock Idaho voters into the realization that choice has become an echo here. What echoes from Bonners Ferry to Bear Lake is the cynical contempt of Idaho officials toward the people who vote for them. Tom Luna’s unsuccessful sale of Idaho school curricula to out-of-state cronies is one example of this contempt. Butch Otter’s aborted attempt to privatize the Idaho prison system is another. Jim Risch’s transfer of property taxes from corporations to fixed-income grocery-purchasers is yet another. Two more are the Ag-Gag and the Guns-Go-to-College bills. With all due apologies to Nietzsche: In a state full of people who will vote for you if you cater to the worst in them, anything is permitted. The Idaho Democratic Party has had a couple of decades to counter the mean and nasty small-town nihilism that masquerades as Republican rule. They have yet to come up with a strategy that would defeat a party whose priorities are destroying social safety nets; auctioning off federal land; getting rid of sane regulation of mining, logging and transportation; eliminating the division between church and state; and selling Idaho children’s futures to the highest bidder. When a political party can’t offer an attractive alternative to people as mad, bad and venal as Idaho Republicans, you have to wonder what they’re good for. I wasn’t serious when I said if I voted, I’d vote Republican. The risks are too high, especially for someone whose mother told him not to make nihilistic faces or one day they’d stick. But I am done voting for Democrats. I do think they should disband, and stop providing two-party cover for a one-party system—a system that consistently elects amoral placeholders whose loftiest goals are (a) getting elected again and (b) crapping on the ordinary people they’ve sworn to serve.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 7


CITYDESK/NEWS PATR IC K S W EENEY

NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

STILL WAITING Vista neighborhood residents were more than anxious to participate in the June 9 workshop.

Boise Weekly catches up with Madelynn Taylor GEORGE PRENTICE

GETTING SPECIFIC AnaMarie Guiles looked at her watch: It was 6:45 p.m. Then, she looked out the door of the Whitney Community Center to see the gorgeous early summer evening that begged people to be anywhere but inside on June 9. “I really hope we have a turnout tonight.” said Guiles, city of Boise Housing and Community Development manager. “I’m a little nervous.” She had no reason to worry. By 7 p.m. scores of citizens from every corner of the Vista neighborhood had streamed through the door to see if what the city had promised about the so-called “Energize Our Neighborhoods Initiative” was true (BW, News, “A New Way to Look at Boise,” April 9, 2014.) “We talk a lot at City Hall about Boise being the most livable city in the country. That sounds great, but what does that mean?” asked Guiles. Minutes later, she stood before a packed room and told the gathering that the city had little desire to “impose things on you.” “We’re here to listen to you about what you think makes a livable neighborhood,” she said. “Maybe it’s safety, access to transportation, more opportunities for kids.” But she kept her remarks short. It was all about listening on this particular evening. The neighbors then gravitated to one of eight tables that framed the back and sides of the room. “We have eight focus areas: children and youth, arts and history, sustainability, housing, crime, community services, transportation and economic development,” Guiles told BW. “After tonight, we’ll be meeting with the neighborhood watch, business owners, a number of groups. We’ll come back to the neighborhood association a couple of times this summer. And then we need to get a solid plan, a commitment, by this fall.” But Guiles said she’s not a fan of wellwritten plans that sit on the shelf. “It’s all about executing the plan,” she said. “I expect entire implementation in the next one to three years.” And through the course of 90 minutes, attendees talked about housing, traffic, programs for kids, more green space and public safety. “This has huge potential,” Boise Police Department Deputy Chief William Bones told BW. “This has to be the new model for us to work with neighborhoods.” Indeed, that’s the plan, said Guiles. “I’m overwhelmed by the support,” she said by evening’s end. —George Prentice

8 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

When Boise Weekly tells a personal story with profound public consequence, we have learned to expect that such reports generate a fair amount of conversation and even more Internet traffic. And then there’s our story of Madelynn Taylor—and if you haven’t heard of her by now, welcome back from that rock you’ve been under. “My phone rang off the hook after the first story was printed. My email inbox was packed,” said Taylor, reaching for a stack of cards, mostly from media outlets. “And look at all of these business cards that were handed to me.” Soon after BW first reported about how Taylor, a U.S. Navy veteran, had been turned away after asking that she and her wife be interred at the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery (BW, News, “With Malice Toward None,” April 23, 2014), the story went viral. From ABC News to the Washington Post, the U.K.’s Daily Mail and Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show, millions have read, watched and listened to how Taylor proudly served her nation—yet the state of Idaho did not consider her an equal to other veterans because she loved a woman. “Look at this,” said Taylor pointing to published letters from fellow vets to editors of several daily newspapers. “And this letter… and this… and this.” To the person, the veterans supported Taylor’s request for her, and her wife’s, burial at Idaho’s veterans cemetery. “That’s because veterans have worked with gay people their whole lives.” said Taylor. “If I had the chance, I’d like to thank them for their support. I guess they know better than the governor.” And the men and women employed at the Idaho Division of Veterans Service, who denied Taylor’s burial request, work at the pleasure of Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter. And the governor dug his boot heels in a bit deeper a few days after BW chronicled Taylor’s dilemma. “The veteran’s cemetery rules require a valid marriage certificate in order for a spouse to be buried with a veteran. Idaho’s constitution does not recognize same-sex marriage,” wrote Otter in an April 20 statement. “I am defending … the Idaho Constitution in federal court, so I’m not going to comment any further.” But Otter lost that fight less than a month later, when U.S. District Court Judge Candy Dale declared that the Idaho Constitution had relegated Taylor and Idaho’s LGBT citizens to a “stigmatized second-class status” (BW, Citydesk, “Historic Ruling,” May 13, 2014).

Much has happened since Boise Weekly first met Madelynn Taylor, but she’s still waiting to be treated with equal respect at the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery.

Boise-based attorney Deborah Ferguson was a victor in that court battle, along with co-counsels Craig Durham and the National Center for Lesbian Rights, all representing four Idaho same-sex couples. “I think It’s quite lovely that veterans are supporting Madelynn, and I think it goes right to the heart of the argument. Treating people with respect and fairness trumps any preconceived notion of discrimination against gay people,” Ferguson told BW. While Taylor was not a plaintiff in the initial federal court lawsuit against the Idaho Constitution, the 74-year-old Navy veteran “would have been a wonderful plaintiff to include in the marriage equality case,” according to Ferguson. “Madelynn’s plight really shows the full coverage of this same-sex marriage issue,” said Ferguson. “Madelynn’s denial of the right to be buried with her spouse at the Idaho veterans cemetery shows the full arc of the issue.” But Ferguson’s courtroom battle against Idaho for gender equity is not over—not by a long shot. “The governor and the Idaho attorney general have to file their general brief to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals by Thursday, June 19. And our response to that brief on behalf of the plaintiffs is due to the court by Friday, July 18. Then, our oral arguments will take place before what we expect to be a three-judge 9th Circuit panel during the week of Sept. 8.” Meanwhile, Otter has made the unusual request of asking that the 9th Circuit be comprised of an 11-judge panel instead of its traditional three-judge panel in September; but Ferguson, who has argued before the 9th Circuit on numerous occasions, said Otter shouldn’t hold his breath. “I don’t know of any decision like that in my career—and I’ve been practicing almost 30 years—where a full-panel presided over an original matter. Something like that request usually comes when there’s a reconsideration

of a ruling from a court of appeals,” said Ferguson. Simply put, Otter has already telegraphed his next move. Should his appeal fail before the 9th Circuit, the governor has already indicated that he’s anxious to keep bumping up against the issue until he hears a judge tell him what he wants to hear. That doesn’t intimidate Ferguson. A visitor to her downtown Boise law office might want to take note of a rather impressive framed certificate on her wall; it includes the image of a very familiar marble building in Washington, D.C. “Yes, that’s a certificate to argue before the United States Supreme Court,” said Ferguson. “So, we would be more than ready.” The case of the four couples challenging Idaho’s constitutional ban on same-sex marriages, formally known as Latta v. Otter, is not simply about wedding ceremonies. Tax law, parenthood and even end-of-life decisions are all at stake. “Idaho’s marriage laws deny same-sex couples the economic, practical, emotional and spiritual benefits of marriage,” wrote U.S. Judge Dale in the May 13 ruling. “Plaintiffs suffer these injuries not because they are unqualified to marry, start a family, or grow old together, but because of who they are and whom they love.” And Taylor loved Jean Mixner. After meeting on Saint Patrick’s Day 1995, the two were inseparable—marrying in an Oregon church in 1995 and again in California, at the San Bernardino County Courthouse, in 2008. But Jean died in April 2012, succumbing to complications related to emphysema, at their home in Apache County, Ariz. “I recently returned to Arizona. It’s the first time I was back there since Jean died,” Taylor told BW. “I think enough time had passed. Our house is up for sale.” 9 But Taylor still has Jean’s ashes. She has visited the Idaho State Veterans B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS

PLACE YOUR FREE AD NOW 24/7 boiseweekly.adperfect.com

OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO (IN BOISE) Citizen teams help choose Boise’s ‘wayfinding’ GEORGE PRENTICE Presume for a moment that you’re standing in the middle of downtown Boise and a visitor asks you for directions to, let’s say, the zoo. How good would your directions be? Or how about to the Greenbelt? The Discovery Center? Or any of the downtown parking garages? In spite of the crazy quilt of signage, much of it from public entities, a visitor is hardpressed to negotiate from Point A to Point B (let alone our mind-numbing abundance of one-way streets). So with all of the dramatic changes to the city’s landscape—everything from JUMP (to be completed in 2015) and the City Centre Plaza (2016)—the Capital City Development Corporation and the Downtown Boise Association think that the timing couldn’t be better to incorporate a big and (hopefully) simpler way of finding your way. It’s, quite literally, called “wayfinding.” “Every wayfinding system is different,” said Susan Jurasz, principal in charge with Oregon-based Sea Reach Ltd. Jurasz should know. Her firm has already designed wayfinding systems for Seattle, portions of Los Angeles, and the Oregon cities of Portland and Beaverton. Wayfinding offers a uniform network of direction and identification signs. If some of the examples that Sea Reach unveiled at two recent work sessions in Boise’s Rose Room were an indication of signs of the times—ranging in design from clean, modern looks to simple, modular rectangles to more classic styles, with textures of brick and sandstone—the face of downtown Boise will change even more, and sooner than later. The Sea Reach team has spent the better part of this year familiarizing themselves with Boise. “For this city, we wanted to promote the walkability,” Jurasz told Boise Weekly. “These aren’t signs for motorists. We want people to

Signs of the times? Sea Reach has crafted scores of preliminary designs for citizen stakeholders to consider. Best case scenario: “wayfinding” may come to Boise in 2015.

get out of their car, so we present them at a pedestrian or bicyclist level.” But one person’s idea of downtown Boise might include nearby neighborhoods, while another person’s concept might only include a four- or five-block square. So, before deciding on a firm to help them find the way (Downtown Boise Association Executive Director Karen Sander said companies from across the United States expressed interest), the DBA and CCDC first had to define “downtown.” “This was the fun part, because we started with all of these different maps, all the geography. But then we have to bring in all of the new, different plans that will change downtown,” said Sander. “But when you layer those on top of one another, it can be pretty confusing.” Ultimately, they decided to frame downtown Boise, at least for the first phase of wayfinding, from 16th Street east to Broadway and from the Boise River north to State Street. “That’s the first area of this, but it’s growable,” said Sander. After months of research, the Sea Reach team was ready to share some preliminary design options. But preliminary designs in the 20th century might have included some artists sketches on a white board. A 21st century preliminary design looks much more polished (see the above examples) because of computer imagery. “That can be deceiving because people may say, ‘Oh that looks pretty good. We’re done.’ But these designs are just the equivalent of sketching,” said Peter Reedijk, Sea Reach’s creative director. “We’re presenting these options to these

Cemetery—twice now—to inquire about the possibility of Jean’s ashes accompanying her own in one of the cemetery’s granite 8 columbariums. “And when I went back to the cemetery I officially filled out a burial application form,” said Taylor. “The cemetery supervisor said he would send me an answer to my application. But this time, BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

groups,” he added, looking out on a packed June 11 work session. And attendees liked what they saw—some examples more than others. More important, they were asked to contribute to a list of nearly 50 downtown destinations, another list of 20 destinations on the periphery of downtown (Boise State University, Hyde Park, Ann Morrison Park) and 25 more destinations farther than a 30-minute walk from downtown. It’s also important to remember that wayfinding is not geared for Boise natives. “No, wayfinding is for a visitor, without question,” said Jurasz. “But that isn’t to say it doesn’t aid a resident.” Another key to putting up new signs is taking down a lot of the existing ones that might add to the confusion. “We took an inventory of signage and identified those that might work against wayfinding,” said Sander. The next step? Sea Reach is expected to return to Boise, sometime right after Labor Day, and present a final design. “We’ll have a mock-up, so that people will be able to see how big they are, and we’re hoping that we’re dead-on with their recommendations,” said Reedijk. CCDC and the DBA would ultimately put out another request for proposal from companies to fabricate and install a wayfinding system. “The end result? More people will explore downtown, they’ll spend more time here, they’ll explore our businesses,” said Sander. “This process has been fantastic. This has been one of the most vigorous responses to a project that we have ever had.”

I said, ‘Send it to my lawyer.’” And that would be, you guessed it, Ferguson. “Madelynn is an absolutely fascinating, resilient person—lots of grit but very charming,” Ferguson told BW, adding that it was important for the legal team to focus on September’s 9th Circuit arguments. “First thing’s first,” she said.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 9


CITIZEN

M

Y

LAN

NIN

GH

Can I ask what you’ve been working on lately? I just sent a new novel to my editor this week. A futuristic, pre-apocalyptic story about the culmination of a severe drought in the Southwest.

AM

JE

RE

stuff, the things that haunt you for a long time. I vividly recall images of a house, way out on a hill, and wondering about the people living in there. I keep returning to that, over and over.

CLAIRE VAYE WATKINS Getting a sense of her landscape, success, memories and an infamous father GEORGE PRENTICE There are so many reasons to doubt the youth of Claire Vaye Watkins, not least of which is wisdom beyond her 30 years, especially in her writing. The winner of the Story and Dylan Thomas prizes, the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Watkins’ collection of short stories, Battleborn, was named one of 2012’s best books by NPR, the San Francisco Chronicle, Boston Globe and Time Out New York. She’s also a professor at Bucknell and Princeton universities and is the co-founder (with husband Derek Palacio) of the Mojave School, a creative writing workshop for teens in rural Nevada. “When I was a teenager I attended a writing camp and it was there that I discovered that art-making can be a vibrant part of your life. Up until then, I never had looked at actually having a job in the arts. I thought it was quirky and esoteric.” It’s more than a living today for Watkins, it’s a passion that she shares with more fans than she could ever imagine. And before she meets some of those admirers in a special reading Sunday, June 22, at The Cabin, Boise Weekly talked with Watkins about her inspirations and success. And no, we couldn’t avoid asking about her father’s close connection to Charles Manson.

Have either of your younger sisters ever made their way into your writing? I think they might recognize elements of our sisterhood in my stories. But they probably didn’t recognize themselves as much as other people would have. A good story usually makes you feel that the people are real, coming alive in your mind.

10 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

Your short stories are so vivid. Where did you store them over the years? In your head? Your heart? A shoebox or journal? I think germs of them have been with me for a long time. I keep a journal with me pretty much at all times. I write down images, fragments and phrases. But you really don’t have to write down the really, really deep

Did that come from your experiences, or did it jump from the headlines? I think the story started with an image I had in my head of a sand dune field. I recall my mother talking to tourists who had come into her museum and rock shop, near Death Valley, and she would remind them that the sand dunes were a shifting landscape and you could get lost very easily. I thought that would be a scary place to set a story: at the edge of a huge sand dune field. Do you still have items from that shop in your home today? I do. If you saw my house, you would probably notice my rocks—I have some turquoise and quartz crystal—and some cacti. I would be remiss if I didn’t ask you about your father [Paul Watkins was once a member of Charles Manson’s family, who prosecutors said would “procure” young girls for the convicted killer. Paul Watkins died when his daughter was 6]. Did you learn about him, or access him, through research or reading about him? One day, one of my sisters and I asked our mom about our dad. And she pointed us to Helter Skelter [the bestseller written by prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi]. I was 10 years old at the time. That’s interesting because Helter Skelter is how many of us learned about Charles Manson and your father. You would think I would have an inside

line, but not really. I did what most people did: read about him. But it was a bit different for me; I was looking for an emotional subtext. I’m suspicious of the process, but it was still tempting to do things that way. Not everyone has a parent without a big cache of media to look at. Do you have a sense of what his motivations were with Manson? That’s a good question. [Long pause.] I don’t think so. It’s not hard for me to envision getting caught up in that scene if you’re coming from a background where you’re not accepted at home, but yet you’re accepted by a new group of people. How do you handle your success as a writer? That’s another funny question to answer. Winning an award doesn’t make me a better writer. I still struggle with the same cycle of doubt and frustration I’ve always had. In some ways, success is a nice validation, but my the old mentality is always asking: is it good enough? It’s clearly good enough. I would like to read you what The New Yorker’s Rebecca Bengal wrote about you in May 2013: “Watkins works in the intersections between public history, private memory and imagination, the known and the far more alluring unknown.” I think she nailed it. It’s a privilege that people who read your work take the time to read about it. What’s your favorite thing to do when you’re not working? I used to love jogging. But I’m actually seven months pregnant now. Wow. How many baby books do you own? I’m a little embarrassed to tell you. I would like to preface that many of them were gifts, but we have six. That’s not many at all. Are you ready to be a mom? I guess I better be.

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOBBY GAYTAN

ForBetter, ForWorse, ForRicher, ForPoorer An economic boost ahead, marriage equality for same-sex couples and the fight to keep it from happening JESSICA MURRI

teve Martin (not the actor) and his partner, Jim, have been married three times. The first wedding was on Oct. 11, 1998—National Coming Out Day—at the Bishop’s House next door to the Old Idaho Penitentiary. It was a nice autumn day. They wore suits and ties, had a cake and a reception, a photographer, and both a DJ and a band. Some 80 guests watched as Martin’s mother and sister walked him down the aisle. “We wanted to celebrate our lives together with our friends and family, and we did,” said Martin, who left a career in journalism to become regional development organizer of Pride Foundation for Idaho. “It was long before marriage equality was happening anywhere, and we didn’t think it was ever going to happen, really, in our lifetime.” They thought that was the end of it. Then, in 2001, Vermont legalized civil unions and the couple thought, “Why not?” They flew back east and had a their civil union with a justice of the peace on a summer day, next to a lake. They wore shorts and Hawaiian shirts, knowing the ceremony wouldn’t be officially recognized back home. They definitely didn’t plan on another marriage, until rules governing federal benefits started to change and allowed same-sex couples to file their federal taxes together.

12>

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 11


<11

NEW CELEBRATION, SAME PRIDE Earlier this spring, the city saw the end of Boise Pride Week when the nonprofit that ran the festivities dissolved. Boise Pride, Inc. ran out of money and no sponsors stepped forward to fund it. But two months ago, Pride was reincarnated as Boise Pride Fest. Rodney Busbee, the new organizer of the festival, said he hasn’t even touched his couch since he took on the the task of putting on Pride Fest. This year, the celebration will look entirely different: Instead of taking over Ann Morrison Park as it has done in years past, Pride Fest will pop up in the middle of BoDo on Saturday, June 21—along with a party the night before at the Lucky Dog Tavern and a rally and parade starting at the steps of the Capitol at 10 a.m. on Saturday. Busbee said he hopes the move will lead to a larger economic impact, higher visibility and more allies. Another huge change this year: Pride Fest isn’t free. “A wristband is $20,” Busbee said, “and that gets you into, like, a little mini-Treefort. You can go to the Lucky Dog Tavern, the Balcony, Liquid and the Knitting Factory.” Busbee said he has booked more than 30 acts to perform across those locations, as well as on a main stage in the streets of BoDo, on Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Acts vary from an Elton John tribute, musician Eric Himan, singer-songwriter Alana Davis, Boise’s Gay Men’s Chorus and the Caravan of Glam traveling cabaret. Dawn Rising, of local company Delicate Design Wedding and Event Planning, jumped on board with the festival and plans to have a booth up all day. She said Delicate Design has only planned two weddings for same-sex couples, but she can’t wait to do more. “Everyone’s love is amazing,” Rising said. She said it’s helpful for same-sex couples to have wedding planners because a lot of couples feel they have to ask their DJs or photographers or wedding caterers to be OK with a same-sex wedding. “It’s awkward for them to have to ask. But as their planner, I take care of that for them,” Rising said. By having a booth onsite, Rising said Delicate Design is showing it supports the LGBT community and if/when the time comes for same-sex couples to marry, “They’ll know who to turn to,” she said. According to Busbee, there hasn’t been much negative feedback over the new format, and he hopes this will generate money for the community. He plans to give 80 percent of the profits to the Pride Foundation, which will then allocate money to scholarships for LGBT students. He also thinks being in the middle of BoDo will help drive traffic from people who wouldn’t normally go to a Pride festival. “It’s about having people realize this is a normal group of people like anybody else,” Busbee said. “Their skin is just like mine, their skeleton is just like mine. The only way you can do that is to be in the middle of people who are your future allies. In the park, we weren’t doing that. The only people who were there were people who went out of their way to be there.” —Jessica Murri

12 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

“So we went to Seattle and got married on our 15-year anniversary—15 years to the day,” Martin said. Their third wedding took place at the Bacon Mansion, a bed and breakfast in the city. Their home state, of course, refuses to recognize any of their marriages. That means Martin and his husband have to worry about things most heterosexual couples never even think about; things like visiting each other in the hospital, making life decisions for one another in moments of crisis, not being able to see each other in a near-death situation, not being able to file state taxes together, not being able to share health insurance, not benefiting from each other’s Social Security—not being able to legally introduce each other at a party as “my husband.” “Being a gay person, living in the state of Idaho, there’s always a layer of extra stress on your life that’s always there no matter what, because you don’t have protections on a statewide level. It’s like you’re always trying to justify your existence all the time,” Martin said. As gay marriage is legalized around the country, it is fast becoming a routine part of society. Yet anti-gay rights groups and conservative leaders like Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter fear catastrophe will ensue if same-sex couples are allowed to legally marry. For the 19 states that have already made the transition, catastrophe hasn’t happened. The states have seen a slight economic boost as well as a handful of administrative headaches disappear. Will the legalization of gay marriage radically change Idaho? Probably not so much. But the impact it will have on same-sex couples who reside in this state will be inarguably significant. Martin said he looks forward to his state recognizing his marriage as the federal government does. “We still go out to dinner, we still take out our trash, we still do all those things that other people do,” Martin said. “It just means that more people like me and my husband will be recognized as equals, like everyone else.” No matter what the fate of same-sex marriage is in Idaho, Martin said he and Jim definitely won’t be getting married to each other again.

Holding " Chaos" at Bay

According to a Gallup poll, 2.7 percent of Idaho’s population identify as gay or lesbian, equating to 31,665 adult Idahoans. That number, according to the Williams Institute, of the University of CaliforniaLos Angeles School of Law, is more like 3.5 percent at the national level—about 11 million people. When four lesbian couples were denied marriage licenses in Idaho, the women

filed a federal lawsuit against the state on Nov. 8, 2013. Their lawsuit was the first to challenge Idaho’s constitutional ban of same-sex marriage. On May 13, U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy Dale sided with them, striking down the ban and legalizing gay marriage; but only days later, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals granted Otter’s request to halt the lifting of Idaho’s same-sex marriage ban. The governor budgeted $1 million in public money to protect the ban. In a public statement, he said, “My first and highest responsibility is to defend the Idaho Constitution and the will of the people of Idaho as expressed at the ballot box. Idaho voters decided against this issue in 2006 by defining ‘marriage’ in our Constitution as a union between a man and a woman. As Governor, it is my duty to aggressively support that decision throughout the legal process. We did that before Judge Dale with arguments that go to the heart of Idaho’s values and respect for the family unit as it’s been embraced by society for millennia.” Otter’s public statements over the spring underscored his commitment to “upholding the will of the people and defending our Constitution.” When the stay was granted, he issued a statement of thanks to the 9th Circuit, claiming that if same-sex marriage was legalized, “chaos and confusion” would follow. Other organizations that act as opponents of same-sex marriage, such as the National Organization for Marriage, express fears of a slippery slope—claiming legalization of gay marriage would open the floodgates to any composition of marriage, including polygamy. Same-sex marriage has been viewed as a threat to religious liberty—most recently reflected in the failed “religious freedom” bills introduced by Boise Republican Rep. Lynn Luker, which would have granted legal protections to those who refuse to offer services on grounds of religious belief—or degrade the so-called “traditional” family. Some, like the Family Research Council, go so far as to fear that God will punish society should same-sex marriage become legally accepted.. “But we should not be surprised by this darkened understanding (Eph 4:18), it is the byproduct of a people who have forgotten God,” said Family Research Council President Tony Perkins on two Supreme Court rulings in favor of same-sex marriage. “Every follower of Christ should be troubled by our nation’s continued rejection of God’s revealed truth.” Though Otter repeats that he’s upholding the wants of his constituents in fighting same-sex marriage legalization in his state, the American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho presented several surveys of Idahoans’ opinions on similar issues having to do with discrimination. One statewide survey conducted by Moore Information in 2011 showed 81 percent of Idahoans believed it should be illegal to fire someone because of

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


their sexual orientation. Regardless, the legality of samesex marriage in Idaho will remain a question mark until the case is taken up by the 9th Circuit in San Francisco on Sept. 8.

Across the Board

California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington state and Washington, D.C., all recognize samesex marriage. An additional 12 states have issued rulings in favor of granting same-sex couples the right to marry, with stays similar to Idaho, including Arkansas, Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. Contrary to rhetoric of “chaos and confusion” or general social decay, states that have accepted same-sex marriage as a legal partnership have enjoyed slight economic boosts. One large area where spending increased: the wedding industry. According to Forbes, America’s wedding industry is worth $40 billion. M.V. Lee Badgett, research director at the Williams Institute, told PBS Newshour that same-sex weddings will boost that economy by $1.5 billion a year in spending on flowers, cakes, bands, meals, photographers, hotels, tourism in general, suits, gowns and jewelry. The Williams Institute also projected an $88 million boost to Washington’s state and local economy over three years of legalization. According to an NYC & Company report, New York state has enjoyed a $259.5 million boost annually from same-sex weddings. The Williams Institute calculated the average cost of a same-sex wedding in Washington falls around $6,350. Based on that number, and assuming every same-sex couple in Idaho got married (about 15,800 weddings), the economic windfall would total $95 million. But weddings are only the beginning. According to a University of Michigan study, federal tax revenue could increase up to $700 million annually with the legalization of gay marriage. Badgett also told PBS Newshour that same-sex couples in New York stand to lose up to $500,000 over a lifetime if they can’t marry; and, therefore, can’t get employers’ spousal health insurance. She said because of that, people in same-sex relationships are much more likely to be uninsured than

heterosexual couples. “They wind up costing us all,” she told Newshour. Having to file taxes separately, as in Idaho, also pushes same-sex couples into higher tax brackets and causes major headaches in tax preparation. Amy Biviano, a certified public accountant in Spokane, Wash., said she’s seen the change in same-sex couples’ refunds before and after Washington legalized gay marriage. Before 2012, when Washington didn’t recognize gay marriage, most of Biviano’s referrals came from same-sex couples. She was one of the only CPAs in the city willing to learn the extra steps for filing same-sex couples’ taxes. “Our same-sex couples would register their domestic partnership so the IRS would say, ‘OK, we get that you’re a couple, but you have to do the worksheet that shows your money is combined, and then file as single.’ The added complexity comes because there’s an additional form,” she said. “So you could see why so many practitioners were like, ‘I’m not touching that.’” Biviano said same-sex couples had to pay a tax preparer because popular online tax preparation service TurboTax can’t handle a conflict between state and federal law. She charges $250 to prepare taxes, compared to TurboTax, which files basic federal taxes for free and charges $35 for state. Once Washington recognized samesex marriage, gay couples could file like any other married couple, saving $250 in tax preparation alone. Biviano said the same-sex couples she filed for are now seeing higher refunds as well, on average around $250 more than they were getting from the state, which goes right back into the local economy. A burst of weddings is good for the economy, she said, but the long tail of economic growth stemming from gay marriage can’t be ignored. For Idaho, same-sex couples must file five different tax returns. Martin said that he and his partner were thrilled to file their federal taxes together for the first time this year. “Something about doing that gave us this feeling like, ‘Oh, we really do have some recognition somewhere,’” Martin said. “Most people are like, ‘Ugh, filing taxes,’ but we were like, ‘We get to file our federal taxes together. That is so cool.’ It’s the idea that we’re just like everybody else.” On a personal note, Biviano also added that she’s been married to her husband for 16 years. “How does the fact that the guys down the street from me cannot get married mean we’re any less married?” she said.

14>

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 13


<13

Becoming Mom(s)

Like Steve Martin and his husband, Jenna and Kiely Prouty-Porter have a couple of different wedding pictures from a couple of different weddings. The first happened in 2011, when the couple married in a quiet backyard in Boise. They went to New York a year later and got married—again—on their honeymoon. “When we had our ceremony in Boise, at the time, we didn’t think that we would ever have the chance to get married in Idaho legally, ever,” Kiely said, running a finger through her wife’s hair. “It’s funny how at the time, when you don’t think something’s possible, it’s sort of like you’re satisfied with what you can get and that [wedding in Boise] felt just as real to us, except we just didn’t sign a piece of paper at the end.” Getting legally married in New York was something fun to do while they were there, simply to see what it would feel like. They giggled in front of Judge Milton Tingling—the New York County Supreme Court justice who halted former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s controversial soda ban—who squeezed their union in at the very end of the day. “And then it was just so moving,” Kiely said. “It was like, ‘Wow, this is what that feels like.’” Kiely tugged at her short, curly hair while remembering back to that moment. She said the court clerks “were so excited. They were like, ‘Oh! Our gay people, yay! The judge will marry you.’” She said the judge seemed moved by their small wedding with just the two of them and a witness standing by. In the middle of the ceremony, he stopped and said, “I’m trying to imagine your lives in Idaho and I can’t even imagine.”

UÊ*iÀVi˜ÌʜvÊ`>…œÊ>`ՏÌÃÊ܅œÊ>ÀiÊ gay: 2.7% (according to a Gallup poll) UÊ Õ“LiÀʜvÊ}>ÞÊ>`ՏÌÃʈ˜Ê`>…œ\Ê 31,665 UÊ*iÀVi˜ÌʜvÊ1°-°Ê>`ՏÌÃÊ܅œÊ>ÀiÊ gay: 3.5% (according to the Williams Institute) UʘVÀi>Ãiʈ˜Êvi`iÀ>ÊÌ>ÝÊÀiÛi˜ÕiÊ annually if same-sex couples could marry: $500 million-$700 million ­>VVœÀ`ˆ˜}Ê ÌœÊ >Ê 1˜ˆÛiÀÈÌÞÊ œvÊ ˆV…ˆgan study) UÊ“œÕ˜Ìʜvʓœ˜iÞÊÃ>“i‡ÃiÝÊVœÕples could lose in a lifetime in New York if they can’t marry: $500,000 (according to M.V. Lee Badgett, research director of the Williams Institute) UÊ œÃÌÊ œvÊ Ì>ÝÊ «Ài«>À>̈œ˜Ê vœÀÊ >Ê married couple: $35 on TurboTax UÊ œÃÌÊ œvÊ Ì>ÝÊ «Ài«>À>̈œ˜Ê vœÀÊ >Ê same-sex couple that can’t marry: $250 to hire a CPA UÊÛiÀ>}iÊÌ>ÝÊÀiv՘`ÊvœÀÊÃ>“i‡ÃiÝÊ married couples after Washington legalized gay marriage: $250

14 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

Kiely told him Boise is a fairly liberal city—parts of it, anyway—but there are other places in the city where she and Jenna wouldn’t dare hold hands. “He listened to that and then he said, ‘Well, they can all go to hell.’” The couple didn’t take their federal status as a married couple too seriously, not expecting much of a benefit in Idaho. But they filed their taxes together this year and for the first time in eight years, Jenna didn’t need to pay any additional taxes. In fact, she got money back—$2,000. The couple fenced the backyard of their quaint, artsy home off Boise Avenue. It wasn’t until the couple (Kiely, to be exact) got pregnant, that they started to worry about Idaho not recognizing their marriage. “That’s when we started getting really scared,” Kiely said. Their baby boy, named Emerson, is almost a year old now, but Jenna can’t legally adopt him. “He’s not connected to me in any way legally,” Jenna said. The couple had to pay a lawyer to write up a living will, allowing them to see each other and Jenna to see Emerson if ever any of them land in the hospital. She could pay the state every six months to recognize her as a legal guardian, but she doesn’t want to spend that money. “There’s no part of the legal guardianship that even says, ‘I’m this person’s mother,’ which is a real slam to all those non-birth mothers out there,” Kiely said. “I mean, I’m his mom,” Jenna said. “He knows that.” If, or when, Idaho does recognize the couple’s marriage, Jenna’s already prepared her paperwork to adopt her son. She looks forward to signing her son’s birth certificate—no matter how old he is.

UÊœ˜iÌ>ÀÞÊܜÀ̅ʜvÊ̅iÊÜi``ˆ˜}Ê ˆ˜`ÕÃÌÀÞʈ˜Ê̅iÊ1°-°\Êf{äÊLˆˆœ˜Ê­>Vcording to Forbes) UÊ ˜˜Õ>Ê LœœÃÌÊ ÌœÊ Ì…iÊ Üi``ˆ˜}Ê industry if same-sex couples could marry: $1.5 billion (according to M.V. Lee Badgett) UÊ œ˜iÌ>ÀÞÊ LœœÃÌÊ ÌœÊ ÃÌ>ÌiÊ >˜`Ê local economy in Washington over three years from same-sex weddings: $88 million (according to the Williams Institute) UÊ iÜÊ9œÀŽ½ÃÊ>˜˜Õ>ÊiVœ˜œ“ˆVʈ“pact of same-sex weddings: $259.5 million (according to report by NYC & Company) UÊ *ÀœiVÌi`Ê ˜Õ“LiÀÊ œvÊ Ã>“i‡ÃiÝÊ marriage licenses in New York City annually: 8,000 (according to report by NYC & Company) UÊÛiÀ>}iÊVœÃÌʜvÊ>ÊÃ>“i‡ÃiÝÊÜi`ding in Washington: $6,350 (according to Williams Institute) UÊvÊ>Ê£x]nÎÓÊÃ>“i‡ÃiÝÊVœÕ«iÃÊ in Idaho got married, it would gener>Ìi\Êf™{°™Ê“ˆˆœ˜

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 15


BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

ALIVE AFTER FIVE You can’t win if you don’t get wet.

Geshmak.

making river history

THURSDAY-SATURDAY JUNE 19-21

PAYETTE RIVER GAMES

l’chaim IDAHO JEWISH FESTIVAL

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18 GREYHOUNDS Opening Act: Afrosonics Hall and Oates meet ZZ Top? That’s one way to describe the Austin, Texas-based duo of guitarist Andrew Trube and keyboardist Anthony Farrell. Another is a cross between Stevie Ray Vaughan, B.B. King and the Black Keys. Still another, according to Esquire, is “intoxicating, gut-wrenchingly lovely.” No matter, the Memphis soul-inspired sound of Greyhounds is get-down music that is by turns gritty, trippy and groovy. As CMTEdge put it, Greyounds is, “the past, present and future of soul.” 5 p.m. Grove Plaza, 900 W. Grove St., downtownboise.org.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY JUNE 20-22

For decades, visitors from across the Treasure Valley have flocked to Deli Days at Ahavath Beth Israel synagogue, savoring world-class favorites like corned beef sandwiches, desserts like kugel and baklava, and more. The synagogue—the oldest in continuous use west of the Mississippi River—moved to the Bench in 2003, and last year, expanded Deli Days into the Idaho Jewish Cultural Festival (now the Idaho Jewish Festival). What’s the difference? Expect music and dance workshops; performances by world-renowned klezmer musicians Yale Strom and Elizabeth Schwartz, the Fleet Street Klezmer Band and more; and visual arts exhibits. And that’s on top of Deli Days, June 19-20, when you can get your fill of knishes, bagels, slaws, sauerkraut, pastrami and corned beef. Thursday-Friday 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Saturday 2 p.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., 208343-6601, cabi-boise.org.

Organizers of the Payette River Games are launching the second year of the event with a theme in mind: inspiration. The PRG takes over Kelly’s Whitewater Park in Cascade, bringing more than 375 athletes from all over the world to compete in kayak freestyle events, boater cross and standup paddleboard races. The games offer one of the largest purses in river games histor y, with a total of $50,000 for paddlers and a worldrecord $50,000 for stand-up paddleboarders, with equal purses for men and women competitors. If that’s not inspiration enough, watch for Derek Rabelo, a blind sur fer from Brazil who will compete in river surfing events. The PRG goes beyond kayaking and paddling for sponsored athletes, too. Anyone can compete in other events including fishing, a dog-fetch competition, disc golf, beach volleyball, bocce ball, horseshoes and more. Last year, the inaugural PRG drew a crowd of around 14,000 spectators. Friday-Sunday, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Kelly’s Whitewater Park, mile marker 114.44 on Highway 55, Cascade, payetterivergames.com.

Trout Architects Congratulates BOISE BREWING on their Grand Opening June 21st

troutarchitects.com

16 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


W ILL JONES

FIND

PUBLIC BIKES Pachydermatous.

E pluribus unum in action.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY JUNE 20-22

SATURDAY JUNE 21

lions, tigers, bears, oh my

welcome home

SHRINE CIRCUS AND PARADE

WORLD REFUGEE DAY

Founded in 1906, the Shrine Circus has grown not only in popularity, but in scale and scope, taking aerialists, a human cannon, clowns, jugglers and all kinds of animals to cities across North America each year. The circus is in town June 20-22 at the CenturyLink Arena, with two shows each day, but before the first performer flies through the air or the first clown falls out of a car, the El Korah Shriners will present a tradition of their own, one that combines the traveling circus with some homemade fun: the Third Annual Circus Parade. The parade—complete with animals, performers and, yes, fez-wearing Shriners in their tiny Tin Lizzies—will take a jaunt around downtown, starting at Jefferson and 10th streets and ending at Bannock and 11th streets. Parade: Friday 10-11 a.m., FREE, corner of Jefferson and 10th streets. Circus: Friday 3 p.m. and 7 p.m., Saturday-Sunday 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Buy tickets at elkorah.org/events/shrinecircus: $20 reserved, $14 general, $7 kids. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd, 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com.

Boise constantly finds its way onto Top 10 lists for places to live, work and raise a family, and while many people grow up in the Treasure Valley or return after time away, some come from distant lands to make this their home. Refugees from all over the world come to Boise to escape conflict or seek opportunity, braving the challenges that come with making their home in an entirely new environment. With them, they bring their rich culture and unique skills, which are celebrated during World Refugee Day. The event, which takes place at the same time as the Capital City Market, features ethnic food, dancers, poetry and a naturalization ceremony where immigrants are sworn in as United States citizens. If there was ever an inspirational way to start your weekend, this is it. 9:30 a.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza, Eighth Street between Main and Front, idahorefugees.org.

S U B M I T

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

Buying a bicycle is obviously less expensive than buying a car… unless you fall down the bicycle rabbit hole—a highend mountain bike or road racer could set you back $8,000 or more. For fair-weather commuters and folks who only get their two-wheelers out of the garage occasionally, the arms race over which manufacturer has the lightest carbon fiber seatpost is probably pointless. Even those who ride regularly are sometimes more interested publicbikes.com in comfort and style than weight or speed. If you’re looking for a new bike but don’t want to get mired in the morass of technical specifications—or see your bank statement riddled with negative numbers—San Francisco-based Public Bikes might be the answer. These comfy commuters feature old-school, Schwinnstyle frame geometry, come in three sizes (depending on the model) and, for the month of June, are on sale—prices range from $299 for a single-speed cruiser to $799 for a seven- or 16-speed cruiser or road bike. Order online and, for an additional fee, the company will ship your new bike 99 percent assembled. If you want a little more get-up-and-go in your ride, Public Bikes has BionX, a line of electric bikes, which are a bit more expensive but are also on sale in June, and at $1,999 (regularly $2,599) are still cheaper than a used junker. A charge lasts between 15-30 miles and offers pedal assist up to 20 mph. —Harrison Berry

an event by email to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JUNE 18 Festivals & Events DA VINCI: MAN-INVENTOR-GENIUS & MAN-ARTIST-GENIUS— Get to know inventor-artist Leonardo da Vinci like never before. Exhibit runs through November. 10 a.m. $3-$15. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org.

On Stage 2014 SEVEN DEVILS PLAYWRIGHTS CONFERENCE—Playwrights from across the country travel to McCall to develop and present six new plays, plus an evening of new works by McCallDonnelly High students and two workshops. Daily through June 21. All events open to the public. Find a schedule of events at idtheater.org/this-years-conference. html. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Alpine Playhouse, 1201 Roosevelt Ave., McCall, idtheater.org. DEATHTRAP—ISF’s Charles Fee directs Ira Levin’s comedic, twisted tale of manipulation and murder. 6:30 p.m. $12-$42. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Workshops & Classes WEDNESDAY MEMBERS’ REPAIR CLASS—Each class covers a different hands-on repair topic. All repair, all the time. Get more info at the website. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

Kids & Teens PICNIC IN THE PARK—The Idaho Foodbank provides the USDA’s free summer feeding program at River Pointe Park. For all children up to age 18. For more info, call the Foodbank at 208-336-9643 or visit idahofoodbank.org. 11 a.m. Kids FREE, adults $1. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

THURSDAY JUNE 19

Strom and Elizabeth Schwartz. Visit cabi-boise.org for a complete schedule and menu. See Picks, Page 16. 11 a.m. FREE admission. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-3436601, cabi-boise.org. PEDAL 4 THE PEOPLE KICKOFF PARTY—Celebrate the cycling community and the joys of human-powered transportation with Boise Bicycle Project. Get more info about the 10-day festival at pedal4thepeople.org. 6 p.m. FREE. 10 Barrel Brewing Co., 830 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-3445870, 10barrel.com.

On Stage

Festivals & Events 13TH ANNUAL EAGLE RODEO— This is a great opportunity for the entire family to experience what an Idaho rodeo is all about. 6 p.m. FREE-$12. Eagle Rodeo Arena, Eagle, eaglerodeo.com. BOISE PRIDE FEST: BOISE VOICE XTRAVAGANZA 2014—Local vocal competition awards winner $300. Proceeds benefit Common Ground and Add the 4 Words. Register or buy tickets online at boisevoicextra.com. 8 p.m. $5-$25, $20 entry fee. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557. IDAHO JEWISH CULTURAL FESTIVAL: DELI DAYS—Traditional Jewish Deli food and homemade desserts will be sold, along with a beer and wine garden, tours of the historic synagogue, and a full slate of live music, featuring worldfamous klezmer musicians Yale

2014 SEVEN DEVILS PLAYWRIGHTS CONFERENCE—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Alpine Playhouse, 1201 Roosevelt Ave., McCall, idtheater.org. AS YOU LIKE IT—Comedy abounds in the fertile Forest of Arden, where a clandestine, gender-bending courtship ensues and a quartet of couples emerge in this timeless and transcendent romantic comedy. Suitable for all ages. 6:30 p.m. $12-$42. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. RAW: PANORAMA—This cocktail party features local artists, photographers, designers, musicians, makeup artists and hair stylists. 21 and older only. Advance tickets available at rawartists. org/boise/panorama. 7 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. PowerHouse Event Center, 23 621 S. 17th St., Boise, 208-331-4005.

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

Calls to Artists LIBRARY COMIC CON DRAWING CONTEST—Draw or paint your favorite comic book, television or movie character, or even invent a character of your own. Fill out an entry form—available at all locations or online at boisepubliclibrary.org/librarycomiccon—and take your art and the form to the checkout desk at any library location by 8 p.m. Thursday, July 31. Limit one entry per person. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844076, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Literature JOHN REMBER READING—The author and Boise Weekly columnist reads from his collection of short stories, Sudden Death, Over Time. Suitable for mature audiences only. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org. HAPPY HOUR BOOK CLUB— Author Christian Winn will lead a discussion of Claire Vaye Watkins short story collection, Battleborn. See Citizen, Page 10. 5:30 p.m. $5 donation. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org.

18 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


sCINEMAS sCAFE sVIDEOS sFUN

PALO ALTO

Inside: Special Events & July-September Film Schedule Additional films not listed may be shown. Check www.theflicksboise.com

Schedule is subject to change. VOL. 30, NO. 3

Opens June 13

Opens June 20

Opens June 27

'IA#OPPOLA, in her directorial debut, has adapted short fiction by *AMES&RANCO to tell the story of two shy teens (Emma Roberts and Jack Kilmer) in this winning coming of age story. Franco co-stars, but .AT7OLFF(The Fault in Our Stars), as the friend who is a bad influence, nearly steals the show.

Guy Pearce ANDRobert Pattinson STARFORDIRECTORDavid Michod (Animal Kingdom INTHISSTORYOF DESPERATEMENTRACKINGCRIMINALSINTO THEOUTBACK4HECINEMATOGRAPHY BYNatasha BraierANDUNIQUE SOUNDTRACKBYCOMPOSERSam Petty AREMESMERIZING â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fusing a hybrid of quasi-apocalyptic influences into a work with a pungent character of its own, The Rover suggests something like a Cormac McCarthy vision of Australia halfway between today and The Road Warrior times.â&#x20AC;?

Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning AND Peter Sarsgaard STARINTHIS Kelly ReichardtTHRILLERABOUT ECO ACTIVISTSWHOSEACTIONSHAVE CONSEQUENCESBEYONDTHEIR INTENTIONS"EAUTIFULLYFILMEDIN /REGON Night Moves WASNOMINATED FORTHEGolden LionATTHE6ENICE &ILM&ESTIVAL â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sharp and haunting.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;...a delicate tapestry of suburban gothic, romance and realism, with a surprising sweetness at its core and a wonderful star performance from Emma Roberts.â&#x20AC;? ANDREW Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;HEHIR, SALON.COM

Opens June 20 !DAPTEDFROMTHEDostoyevskyNOVELLA 3IMON*AMESJesse Eisenberg FINDSHIS MORECOMPETENTDOUBLEATHISDESK)N HISAPARTMENTBUILDINGHESEESTHEOBJECT OFHISDESIREMia Wasikowska BEING WOOEDBYTHEDOPPELGANGER$IRECTEDBY Richard Ayoade â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ayoade is indeed the real deal, an ambitious young filmmaker working in a register shared by far too few of his contemporaries.â&#x20AC;? #!,5--!23( &),-#/-

4/$$-##!24(9 THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

!/3#/44 .%79/2+4)-%3

NIGHT MOVES

THE

R OV E R

Opens July 2

Opens July 11

Opens July 11

Jenny SlateSTARSASASTAND UP COMICWITHRELATIONSHIPISSUESIN THIS3UNDANCEHITJake Lacy, Gaby Hoffman, David CrossANDRichard KindCO STARFORWRITER DIRECTOR Gillian Robespierre

3.%!+02%6)%7*5,9"%.%&)43 )$!(/(5-!.2)'(43#%.4%2

*OHN#ARNEY, who directed the delightful ul Once, now brings us a love story set in New York City. +EIRA+NIGHTLEYis a British songwriter ditched by her boyfriend, !DAM,EVINE, at the first sign of success. -ARK2UFFALO is a producer who could use a hit. Receiving a standing ovation at the 4ORONTO&ILM &ESTIVAL, many agreed that Oscar nominations ations could be on the horizon, especially for the he music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A warm, funny crowd-pleaser.â&#x20AC;? STEVE POND, THE WRAPP

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obvious Child is a romcom with a sting in its tail. And Slate is a dynamo, nailing every laugh while showing a true actorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gift for nuance.â&#x20AC;? 0%4%242!6%23 ROLLING STONE

OBVIOUS CHILD

Set in 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Communist Poland, 0AWEL 0AWILKOWSKIS drama has two main characters, a young novice (!GATA 4RZEBUCHOWSKA) ready to take her vows at a convent in the country and her newly discovered aunt (!GATA+ULESZA), a hard-drinking Warsaw judge. Believing she is an orphan, Ida is about to learn the truth of her heritage as they embark on a road trip. Subtitled in English. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A masterpiece.â&#x20AC;? STEVEN REA, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Likely to remain the best movie of the year.â&#x20AC;? JOHN ANDERSON, NEWSDAY

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

Opens July 18

BEGIN AGAIN

Life itself

&ITTINGLY THISDOCUMENTARYABOUT 0ULITZER0RIZEWINNINGCRITICRoger Ebert WASDIRECTEDBYSteve James WHOSEFILMHoop DreamsWASNUMBERONEON%BERTSTOPTENLISTIN %XPLORINGHISEARLYRISETOACCLAIMASACRITIC HISRIVALRYANDFRIENDSHIPWITHGene Siskel ANDHIS BATTLEWITHCANCER THEWORKISBASEDON%BERTS MEMOIROFTHESAMENAME.OTRATED â&#x20AC;&#x153;James cutsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as in all of his best workâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;straight to the human heart of the matter, celebrating both the writer and the man, the one inseparable from the other, largely in Ebertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own words.â&#x20AC;? 3#/44&/5.$!3 VARIETY

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24, 2014 | 19


Spies of Mississippi

Idaho Premiere of Ida Sponsored by IHRC

*5.%!40In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Concordia Law Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Public Interest Law Student Organization and ACLU Idaho will be showing this PBS documentary about the state sponsored campaign to defeat the civil rights movement- a journey into the world of informants, infiltrators and agent provocateurs in Old Dixie. Tickets are FREE and are available in advance at The Flicks, http://www.eventbrite.com/e/ spies-of-mississippi-film-screening-tickets-11782418531 and at the door.

R.GreyGallery

CUSTOM JEWELRY | BRIDAL | HOME FURNISHINGS | GLASS Handcrafted & American Made Over 125 Different Artists

Custom Designs Jewelry Repair, Cleaning, & Resizing

TODD REED

Wedding & Engagement Rings Appraisals Gift Wrapping Gift Certificates

415 S. 8th Street Downtown Boise in BoDo (208) 385-9337 www.rgreygallery.com

The Escape Artist

*5,9!40The Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial presents the premiere of the award-winning Polish Holocaust film Ida on Thursday, July 10 at 7PM. Tickets are $10 and are available in advance at the Memorialâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office (345-0304) and at The Flicks. Discussion to follow led by Dr Lynn Lubamersky , BSU History Dept.

Special Preview of Alive Inside 4(523$!9 !5'534  0The power of music will be discussed after the Idaho premiere of Alive Inside. This event supports Merina Healing Arts Foundation. Tickets are $12 in advance and $15 at the door and are available at The Flicks. More information at www.merinahealingarts.org.

The Flicks 30th Anniversary Gala 3!452$!9 3%04%-"%24(

Boise Public Library Presents Cartoon College A Library Comic Con Event

Join us for a Wine and Dessert Social at 7:30PM, followed by a special screening. Tickets are $10 and are available in advance (and at the door if any remain). Unlimited Annual Pass holders, please pick up your free ticket in advance as space is limited.More information at www.theflicksboise.com.

!5'534!40-

Death to Prom *5,9!40Join us for this musical romantic comedy about two quirky best friends who plan to go to prom together. Their bond is nearly broken when one of them accepts a date instead. Hosted by Honeychurch and Associates. Tickets are $9 for general admission, $7 for students and are available in advance at The Flicks and at the door.

REALSTEELâ&#x201E;˘

The best British mysteries, Sunday nights this summer... no ticket required! Endeavour

This inspiring documentary follows students trying to achieve their creative dreams while earning their Masters from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Free tickets are available at all Boise Public Library locations while supplies last.

Idaho Section of the American Water Resources Association Second Movie Night 3%04%-"%2!40Ticket includes a reception (cash bar), starting at 6PM. The movie starts at 7PM and is followed by a

PRESENTS The King and I in concert !UGUSTsPM

WWWOPERAIDAHOORG Tickets starting at $22 Call now: 208-345-3531 x2

Deathtrap May 30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 25 As You Like It June 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27 Les MisĂŠrables July 3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 31 Merry Wives of Windsor

Poirot

August 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;30

Homegrown & locally owned since 1973

Located in Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Historic North End 888 W. Fort St. Boise 208.472.4500 www.boise.coop Open Daily 7am - 10pm

20 | JUNE 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

discussion. Tickets can be ordered from IDAWRA@gmail.com or bought at the Flicks. Tickets cost $9 if purchased before September 12 and $10 September 12 to the 18th. For more information on the IDAWRA: http://state.awra.org/idaho/. IDAWRA motto is Community, Conversation, Connection.

Steel Magnolias September 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;28

Layaway Available! Laurie Birmingham*, Blithe Spirit (2013). *Member Actorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Equity. Photoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;DKM Photography.

www.idahoshakespeare.org or call 208-336-9221

Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F, 10 am to 5 pm

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


THE NEW

Boise Farmers Market

C L AS SIC A L LY TRAINED

Every Saturday- 9am-1pm

LO C A L LY I N SPI R E D

'ALLERYs#LASSES 3UPPLIESs%QUIPMENT 14 Varieties of Take-n-Bake Lasagnes Gourmet EntrĂŠes & Desserts U Dine-In or Take Out 1504 Vista Ave. U Boise U (208) 345-7150 www.cucinadipaolo.com

at 10th & Grove Farmers you can trust, Food you can trace.

Chef Richard Langstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

%LLEN3T"OISE'ARDEN#ITY %LLEN3TISACROSS#HINDENFROMTH

 

(RS4UES &RI 3AT 

Opens July 25 !CADEMY!WARD winning writer-director 0AUL(AGGIStells three intertwining stories set in Rome, Paris and New York, using the viewpoint of a Pulitzer Prize winning author played by ,IAM.EESON who sets out to write a definitive work on Love. +IM"ASINGER !DRIEN"RODY -ILA+UNIS -ARIO"ELO *AMES &RANCOand /LIVIA7ILDE also star. â&#x20AC;&#x153; Paul Haggis gives the world a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Crashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; course in love in this mature and mysterious relationship y PETER DEBRUGE, VARIETY study.â&#x20AC;?

208.472.1463 cafĂŠvicino.com 808 fort st.

Opens July 25

¡ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just pickedâ&#x20AC;? Fruits, Veggies & Herbs ¡ Free Range & Grassfed Meats ¡ Idaho Specialty Foods ¡ Award Winning Idaho Wines & Artisan Cheeses

Opens August 1

7RITER ACTOR DIRECTORZach Braff TENYEARSAFTERHISHITCOMEDY Garden State HASCREATED ANOTHERINDIEFILMFROMTHEHEART%XPLORINGTHEMESOF FATHERHOOD "RAFF PLAYSANOUTOFWORK ACTORANDFATHEROF TWOWHODECIDESTOHOMESCHOOLHISCHILDREN WHENHISOWNFATHERISDIAGNOSED WITHCANCERANDCANNOLONGER PAYFORTHEIRPRIVATESCHOOL Kate HudsonANDMandy PatinkinCO STAR â&#x20AC;&#x153;[A] funny and emotionally satisfying tale of thirtysomethings trying to come to terms with life itself ... â&#x20AC;&#x153;

!NNA+ENDRICK -ELANIE,YNSKEY -ARK7EBBER and ,ENA$UNHAM star for writer-director-actor *OE3WANBERG(Drinking Buddies) in this story of a young woman who crashes with her sister and brother-in-law and their adorable baby (*UDE3WANBERG) over the holidays after a break-up with her boyfriend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Short and slight, but undeniably charming.â&#x20AC;? HENRY BARNES, THE GUARDIAN

"/9$(/%)* HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Opens August 1

3OMEOFYOUMAYHAVE SEENAROUGHCUTOFTHIS)DAHOFILMATTHE3UN 6ALLEY&ILM&ESTIVAL WHENITWASCALLEDThe Unkindness of Ravens)TISAMOVINGDRAMA WRITTENANDDIRECTEDBYRussel FriedenbergAND Randy RedroadANDSTARRINGAmy Smart, Joshua Leonard, Will McCormack, Natalie Imbruglia ANDINTRODUCINGJohnny Sequoyah3EENTHROUGH THEEYESOFNINE YEAR OLD*OEY WESEE INNOCENCEANDDREAMSCONSUMEDBY MIDDLECLASSDESIRES.OT2ATED SUITABLEFORTEENSANDADULTS

Opens August 8

I

ORIGINS

4IM#AHILL (Another Earth) tackles metaphysics in his second feature. -ICHAEL0ITT plays a molecular biologist researching the eye when he makes a discovery that takes him half way around the world. !STRID"ERGES &RISBEY "RIT-ARLING 3TEVEN9EUN and !RCHIE0ANJABIco-star.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This sci-fi romantic drama is consistently engaging and unpredictable, growing in emotional impact as its mysteries start to slowly assert themselves.â&#x20AC;&#x153; TIM GRIERSON, SCREEN INTERNATIONAL

Opens August 8

Opens August 15

4HEBESTREVIEWEDMOVIEOF BoyhoodWASAMBITIOUSLYSHOTOVERTEN YEARSBY Richard LinklaterANDEVENTHOUGHITISFICTION ITHASTHEFEELING OFADOCUMENTARYASWEFOLLOW THELIVESOFA4EXASFAMILYEthan HawkeANDPatricia Arquette PLAYTHEPARENTSOFCHARACTERS PLAYEDBYLorelei Linklater AND Ellar Coltrane â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unshakable, witty and deeply felt, the film will be paying emotional dividends for a long, long time.â&#x20AC;?

The new romantic comedy from writer-director 7OODY!LLEN stars %ILEEN!TKINS, #OLIN&IRTH -ARCIA'AY(ARDEN (AMISH,INKLATER 3IMON -C"URNEY %MMA3TONEand *ACKI7EAVER. An Englishman (Firth) is hired to uncover a scam. As usual, highlights include an outstanding score; the stunning cinematography is by $ARIUS+HONDJI.

*/3(5!2/4(+/0& TIME OUT NEW YORK

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24, 2014 | 21


ADMISSION Bargain Matinees (before 6:00) ....................$7 Regular Prices: General Admission ................$9 Children, Students with ID, Senior Citizens 65+ ....................................$7 Active Military ..............................................$7 Flicks Card (10 admissions for 1 or 2 persons) ............$65 Unlimited Annual Pass (for one person) ....$250 Gift Certificates available in any amount.

The Flicks is now Solar Powered!

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

Thanks to the awesome team at Altenergy! Watch us generate power on our website, www.theflicksboise.com.

Non-credit short courses, lectures and events for the intellectually curious over age 50.

Become a member now! osher.boisestate.edu (208) 426-1709

Opens August 22

What if

...being friends has its benefits?

Wallace ($ANIEL2ADCLIFFE) attends a party after a year of laying low with a broken heart. He meets the lively Chantry (:OE +AZAN), who already has a boyfriend, and determines they can just be friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see how long that decision lasts. !DAM $RIVER 2AFE3PALL /ONA#HAPLIN and -EGAN0ARK co-star; -ICHAEL$OWSE directs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best indie rom-com since 500 Days Of Summer.â&#x20AC;? CHRIS BUMBRAY, JOBLOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOVIE EMPORIUM

Opens August 22 3.%!+02%6)%7!5'534ST0-

7RITER DIRECTOR PRODUCERMichael Rossato-BennettCREATEDASTIRAT 3UNDANCEWITHTHISEXPLORATIONOFTHE EFFECTOFMUSICONPEOPLEWITHDEMENTIA 3OCIALWORKERDan Cohen DEMONSTRATES Dr. Oliver Sacksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ASSERTIONTHATMUSIC IMPRINTSITSELFONTHEBRAINMORETHAN ANYOTHEREXPERIENCEBobby McFerrin ALSOAPPEARS.OTRATED SUITABLEFORTEENS ANDADULTS â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joyous and astonishing.â&#x20AC;?

Opens August 29

Opens August 29

!N)RISHPRIESTBrendan Gleeson ISTHREATENEDDURINGACONFESSIONANDMUST KEEPSINISTERFORCESATBAYWHILECONTINUINGTOSERVE HISPARISHIONERSAND HUMORHISMOTHER John Michael McDonagh (The Guard DIRECTS Chris Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dowd, Kelly Reilly, Isaach De Bankole, Josee Marie-CrozeAND M. Emmett WalshCO STAR

Former brothers-in-law take a vacation together to Iceland to cheer up after a recent divorce. They plan to eat well, stay in a nice hotel, soak in the hot springs, enjoy the scenery and make each other laugh. While they are at it, they make us laugh, too. ( for pot-smoking) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sublimely enjoyable.â&#x20AC;? ERIC D. SNYDER, FILM.COM â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paul Eenhoorn and Earl Lynn Nelson give pitch-perfect performances in this gently elegiac road comedy from helmers Martha Stephens and Aaron Katz.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your best advice is to sit back, hang on to your rosary beads and enjoy the ride while it lasts.â&#x20AC;? 8!."2//+3 /"3%26%25+

JUSTIN CHANG, VARIETY

Opens September 5 4HISMODERNLOVESTORYCENTERSONA COUPLEElizabeth MossANDMark Duplass HOPINGTOREIGNITE THESPARKINTHEIRMARRIAGE 4HEIRTHERAPISTTed Danson RECOMMENDSAWEEKENDRETREAT WHEREASURPRISINGTURNOFEVENTS MAYHELPTHEMTOJOINFORCES â&#x20AC;&#x153;...brisk, funny, smart, and artfulâ&#x20AC;? +!4%%2",!.$ &),-#/-

Opens September 5

*ON2ONSON adapted his book for the screen in this off-beat comedy about an office worker ($OMHNALL'LEESON) who is thrilled to tour with a band even though Frank (-ICHAEL&ASSBENDER), the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front man, always wear a big fake head. ,ENNY!BRAHAMSON directs, -AGGIE'YLLENHAAL co-stars. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Endearing enough to plaster a smile on any face hiding beneath its own ever-grinning facade.â&#x20AC;? WILLIAM GOSS, FILM.COM

We laughed so hard in 2011 at The Trip, set in England. Now 2OB"RYDONand 3TEVE#OOGAN reprise their roles as a food critic and his friend who goes along for the ride. Directed by -ICHAEL 7INTERBOTTOM; co-starring 2OSIE&ELLNER. Not rated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;British comedians and dueling partners Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon are back in this witty and incisive followup to The Trip.â&#x20AC;? COLIN COVERT, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE

Opens September 12 22 | JUNE 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Literature 18 SARAH TREGAY: FAN ART RELEASE PARTY—Author Sarah Tregay will read from and sign copies of her new book, Fan Ar t. Refreshments will be ser ved. 6 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks. org.

Kids & Teens KIDS SCIENCE AND MAGIC PROGRAM—See Brad Hatcher, the Magic Man, defy gravity and change speed, and hear concepts of vocabular y building, electronic circuitr y, physics, science, forensic science and chemistr y. For ages 4-12. 4 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Librar y Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, boisepubliclibrar y.org.

FRIDAY JUNE 20 Festivals & Events 2014 SHRINE CIRCUS—The 2014 Shrine Circus is coming to town for six per formances, bringing with it aerialists, a human cannon, clowns, jugglers and all kinds of animals. For more info and to purchase tick-

ets, visit elkorah.org/events/ shrine-circus. See Picks, Page 17. 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. $7-$20. Centur yLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centur ylinkarenaboise.com. EAGLE RODEO—See Thursday. 6 p.m. FREE-$12. Eagle Rodeo Arena, Field west of Idaho Athletic, Eagle. IDAHO JEWISH FESTIVAL: DELI DAYS—See Thursday. 11 a.m. FREE admission. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-3436601, cabi-boise.org. PEDAL 4 THE PEOPLE FESTIVAL—See Thursday. A complete schedule of events for the 10-day festival is available at pedal4thepeople.org or facebook.com/pedal4thepeopleboise. FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

On Stage 2014 SEVEN DEVILS PLAYWRIGHTS CONFERENCE—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Alpine Playhouse, 1201 Roosevelt Ave., McCall, idtheater.org AS YOU LIKE IT—See Thursday. 6:30 p.m. $12-$42. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Kids & Teens FRIDAY NIGHT POOL PARTY— Youth age 12-17 can enjoy contests, giveaways and music with a DJ from Wild 101. 9 p.m. $2. Ivywild Pool, 2250 Leadville, Boise, 208-384-1697.

SATURDAY JUNE 21 Festivals & Events 2014 SHRINE CIRCUS—See Friday. 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. $7$20. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-4242200 or box office 208-3318497, centurylinkarenaboise. com/home.aspx. BOISE PRIDE FEST 2014—The Pride Fest rally begins on the Capitol steps, followed by a parade ending in BoDo with a full slate of activities and 30 artists per forming on five stages. For a complete schedule, visit boisepridefest.com. 10 a.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705. EAGLE RODEO—See Thursday. 6 p.m. FREE-$12. Eagle Rodeo Arena, Field west of Idaho Athletic, Eagle. HIDDEN SPRINGS ART AND WINE FESTIVAL—Enjoy the first day of summer with wine and beer tasting, kids activities, food and a wide variety of arts and crafts. Family friendly event. 10 a.m. FREE. Hidden Springs Village Green, Hidden Springs Drive, Hidden Springs. IDAHO JEWISH CULTURAL FESTIVAL—See Thursday. For a complete schedule, visit facebook.com/delidaysboise. 2 p.m. FREE. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-343-6601, cabiboise.org. KETCHUM-SUN VALLEY BREWFEST—Sample beer from eight regional breweries. With food by Velocio, Zou 75 and Sun Valley Mustard, games and music. Noon. $15. Ketchum Town Square, Fourth Street and East Avenue, Ketchum, 208-7267820, ketchumidaho.org.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

WORLD REFUGEE DAY—Celebrate the international cultures and contributions to our society made by the newest Idahoans. Featuring live music, dance, storytelling and poetry, a naturalization ceremony, and ethnic food and crafts. Hosted by the Idaho Office for Refugees and local resettlement agencies, with support from the Capital City Public Market. See Picks, Page 17. 9:30 a.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise. ZOO DAZE—Kids (and parents) can enjoy activities, special animal enrichments and can check out the summertime Dinosaur and Butterflies in Bloom exhibits. Featuring special guest “Dr. Dino,” aka Chris DeLorey, director of education at the Brevard Zoo in Melbourne, Fla. 10 a.m. FREE-$10. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-6087760, zooboise.org.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 23


8 DAYS OUT On Stage 2014 SEVEN DEVILS PLAYWRIGHTS CONFERENCE—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Alpine Playhouse, 1201 Roosevelt Ave., McCall, idtheater.org.

BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY PRESENTS

SUMMER FEST JUNE 1 – JULY 31

AS YOU LIKE IT—See Thursday. 6:30 p.m. $12-$42. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org. GLITTERATI GALS BURLESQUE: NERDGASMIC—8:30 p.m. $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

Art

Read JOIN Listen

Discover

Create

our Summer Fest Reading Program.

We have programs for kids, teens and adults! Visit www.boisepubliclibrary.org/SummerReading to sign-up, or pick up a brochure at one of our locations: the Main Library in downtown Boise, the Library! at Cole & Ustick, the Library! at Collister or the Library! at Hillcrest.

IDAHO JEWISH FESTIVAL ARTISTS RECEPTION—Check out this exhibition of art by local Jewish artists. 6 p.m. FREE. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-343-6601, cabi-boise.org.

Talks & Lectures AFRICA TO IDAHO—Hear the power ful stor y of Abdi Korane’s journey with his family from the Ifo Refugee Camp in Kenya to Boise. The even includes cultural food and is suitable for all ages. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Librar y Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, boisepubliclibrar y.org.

SUNDAY JUNE 22 Festivals & Events 2014 SHRINE CIRCUS—See Friday. 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. $7$20. Centur yLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-4242200 or box office 208-3318497, centur ylinkarenaboise. com/home.aspx. SCANDINAVIAN MIDSUMMER FESTIVAL—Help decorate the midsummer pole before enjoying a potluck picnic. Take a main dish and a salad or dessert, and table ser vice. Festivities include singing and dancing with music by ScandiBand and much more. 12:30 p.m. FREE. Municipal Park, 500 S. Walnut St., Boise.

rework them to be more compelling, authoritative and elegant. Call to reser ve your seat. 3 p.m. $40-$50. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org.

Literature CLAIRE VAYE WATKINS AUTHOR READING—Join other literature lovers on the lawn for a free reading by Claire Vaye Watkins, recipient of the Stor y Prize and the Dylan Thomas Prize, and author of the short stor y collection Battleborn. See Citizen, Page 10. 7:30 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

WANDERLUST CIRCUS AND RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW— The Portland, Ore.-based circus brings its acrobats, aerialists, hand balancers, stilt dancers, trick ropers, jugglers, clowns and more—and all of the hijinks that go with them—to town for a special evening with Boise’s own Red Light Variety Show, with its vaudevillian cabaret of dancers, acrobats, actors and aerial artists. This will be a night of high-flying fun. 8 p.m. $15. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 25 Festivals & Events

MONDAY JUNE 23 Citizen DOG WASH-A-THON—Washes include shampoo, conditioner, towels, combs and brushes, as well as forced air dr yers. Proceeds benefit Camp Rainbow Gold. 9 a.m. $10 per dog. U Do Doggie Bath, 2100 E. Fair view Ave., Meridian, 208-898-1300, udodoggiebath.ne.

TUESDAY JUNE 24 On Stage DEATHTRAP—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. $12-$42. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org.

SUNSET SERIES: FIND YOUR RHYTHM—Carolyn Failla, Lisa Stravers and friends bring out the music in all of us, blurring the line between per former and audience. 7 p.m. FREE. Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

On Stage AS YOU LIKE IT—See Thursday. 6:30 p.m. $12-$42. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org.

Workshops & Classes IDENTIFYING BIRDS—Renowned bird expert Terr y Rich will help train your eye and hone your skills at finding and identifying birds. 8 a.m. FREE. Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

On Stage DEATHTRAP—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. $12-$42. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org. SUNDAY COMEDY SHOW—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

Workshops & Classes FIRST PAGES WORKSHOP WITH CLAIRE VAYE WATKINS—Attendees will have an opportunity to analyze the openings of their stories, then

24 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


Buy your tickets Pay Per

Play

2014 Plays

L AYAWAY

AV

Deathtrap BY IRA LEVIN

AILABLE

Sponsored by Stoel Rives LLP and Boise Weekly

As You Like It BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Sponsored by Hawley Troxell and Idaho Public Television

Les Misérables A NEW PRODUCTION OF BOUBLIL AND

SCHÖNBERG’S MUSICAL EPIC BASED ON A NOVEL

BY VICTOR HUGO. Sponsored by Parsons Behle & Latimer and Idaho Statesman’s Scene Magazine

Merry Wives of Windsor BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE Sponsored by Holland & Hart LLP and Boise State Public Radio

Steel Magnolias BY ROBERT HARLING

Sponsored by ACHD Commuteride and 107.1 KHits

Betsy Mugavero*, Lori McNally*, As You Like It (2014). Photo by DKM Photography. *Member Actors’ Equity.

SSeaaso Se aso sonn Sppons o or

SSeaaso sson onn Partnners ers

Get Your Tickets & Gift Certificates Online SEASON RUNS JUNE–SEPTEMBER

Seaason Sea asson on Me M dia iaa Pa Partn rtn tners ner eerss

Chec Ch eck ou out oouur w weebbssitite at at

www.idahoshakespeare.org or cal alll 33 3366 92221 21 MM–F, M– M–F – F 10 1 0 a.m. m. too 5 p. p m.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 25


NEWS/REC REC JOHN W EB S TER

WHITEWATER WOMEN Is this dam high enough?

COMMENTS SOUGHT ON RAISING ARROWROCK DAM A conversation about raising Arrowrock Dam that began in 2007 continues with a public comment period ending on Monday, June 23. The dam was the tallest in the world when it was built in 1915, at 350 feet. Now, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering raising it another 70 feet, which would double the reservoir’s capacity and reduce flood risk. The price tag is estimated around $1 billion for the project. One purpose of the projected expansion would be to keep up with water demands in the Treasure Valley, with the capability to handle drought years like this one. But “building a big slab of concrete doesn’t mean the water will come,” said Idaho River United’s Boise River Campaign Coordinator Liz Paul. She said her organization isn’t thrilled about the project. She said better water security could come from smarter irrigation methods, like drip irrigation and leak repairs. She also advocates for flood management, rather than reduction. She applauds city efforts that allow the river to make natural fluctuations, like the Marianne Williams Park in Barber Valley. The park is built to accommodate the floodplain, just as the proposed Esther Simplot Park off Whitewater Boulevard will do. The dam’s expansion could also impact the south and middle forks of the Boise River, which the Idaho Conservation League says will inundate seven miles of the river upstream and ruin habitat of endangered bull trout. Those areas are currently popular for angling, camping, hiking, floating and big game hunting. The Corps is viewing the Boise River downstream of the Lucky Peak dam as an “area of potential effect.” Paul said raising Arrowrock Dam would put less water in the Boise River. “So you build a multi-million dollar whitewater park and you get no water flowing through it,” Paul said. “You get dead cottonwood and poison ivy everywhere.” She said that could impact riparian areas and fish habitat, boost algae growth and fail to dilute wastewater poured into the river. The Corps has teamed up with the Idaho Water Resource Board to conduct environmental impact studies on the dam expansion. They extended their public comment period another month, ending on Monday. They want comments regarding the scope of issues and alternatives, including how this might affect commuting along the Boise Greenbelt, or how water rates could change. A decision on whether or not to proceed with the expansion of Arrowrock Dam is expected in the next 18 months.

Female kayakers fight to dominate at North Fork Championship JESSICA MURRI On June 13, Katrina Van Wijk got the words “TiTs Deep” tattooed along her rib. It was the day before the main event of the North Fork Championship kayak race down Jacob’s Ladder (a continuous Class V-plus rapid) on the North Fork Payette River. Van Wijk had learned that three racers wouldn’t Katrina Van Wijk: “Gender doesn’t matter, and we kayak because it brings us to these insane places.” be competing. As an alternate, she would now be in. She would also the first woman to compete in the top race since the champi“My friends and I, we’re in careers and the lives of experienced kayakers, though the onship began in 2012. have other things going on in our lives, and I race itself has never had any fatalities. The “‘Tits deep’ is something that me and my last death was June 5, 2013. Before that, two think that might be the difference between fegirlfriends started saying on the river as a male kayakers and male kayakers,” Lills said. died in 2011, only a month apart from each kind of morale boost,” Van Wijk said. “It “We usually have something else going on in just spread. The mission became to empower other. The summer of 2009 claimed another. the peripheral that makes it more important Tren Long has run safety during the race women in extreme sports—that we can do it to take care of ourselves rather than making for the past two years. He has been teaching like anyone else.” kayaking No. 1.” Getting on the prestigious list of the North swift water rescue classes for 15, and underLills said she wants something like the stands the severity of this run. Fork Championship elite race is one of the North Fork Championship to be in her “For me, it’s a weekend full of angst,” most “tits deep” things Van Wijk has done future, but like many men and women padLong said. “From a safety perspective, the yet. And it wasn’t easy. dlers, she weighs the risks. stats are against [the paddlers].” Qualifying is a complicated process: The “Think about how many female paddlers Long knows the problem areas on the 10 fastest paddlers from the year before are rapid and stores caches of rescue gear nearby. who you know of who have died on whiteguaranteed a spot, then applications are water,” Lills said. When none come to mind, But one of the biggest concerns on Jacob’s open. The original 10 vote on 20 applicants. she added, “Is that just because there’s less Ladder, Long said, is flush drowning. Out of those, 15 get to race and five spots of them kayaking? Or is it because they “It’s like getting water down the wrong are set aside for those who can make it to the top of the qualifier race a few days before the tube when you take a drink,” Long said, “ex- think differently, and they don’t take risks as often?” cept in a Class V rapid. You continue to inevent. Five alternates are selected, as well. A Even in her nine-foot, 79-gallon creek hale water and even if you’re not submerged, total of 30 paddlers race. boat, Van Wijk was knocked off her line you drown. It takes 45 seconds.” What’s more complicated, though, is during the June 14 main race. She made her Long said the mechanics of paddling can why more women aren’t on that list. Race way down the three-quarter-mile course into make a big difference for women. He said organizer and founder James Byrd said four there’s no strength requirement, but “if you’re the first drop, struggled to paddle around the women applied to race Jacob’s Ladder this a strong guy, it’s easier. Having less body mass first gate and was flipped upside down trying year. Only Van Wijk was picked and then, to cross the river to meet the second gate. She makes running big water more difficult.” only as an alternate. Emily Dickerson doesn’t disagree. She runs recovered and fought her way down the rest “Katrina is one of the boys,” Byrd said. of the course, flipping again near the bottom. the North Fork regularly and competes in He is adamant about not making a separaother races around the North- Van Wijk was upside down long enough for tion between men’s and west. But she has no interest in safety crews on the banks to start preparwomen’s divisions, as THIRD ANNUAL NORTH FORK ing throw bags. She finished the race in 3.24 competing in the North Fork most kayaking events do. CHAMPIONSHIP RACE RESULTS minutes—last place. But she is confident this Championship. “I want to leave that is only the beginning of women making their “Women, we have a difFirst place: Jules Domine (France), at home,” Byrd said. race time: 1:59 way into the NFC—beyond the qualifier ferent style of boating. Dudes “Let’s make it a level and boater cross races, both of which have a can power through things,” playing field: the best of Second place: Egor Voskoboynik (Russia), race time: 2:02 handful of female paddlers each year. Dickerson said. “We have the best. This is a hard “[There have] been times where you don’t to have finesse. We will get river. People die on it. It’s Third place: Evan Garcia (Bozeman, Mont.), race time: 2:03 knocked off our lines. We will know if you’re really welcome here or whata serious rapid, and not ever,” Van Wijk said, “especially when we have to do all sorts of things everyone can do it. There northforkchampionship.com were younger and the teenage boys always to get back on our lines. … are few women that are think this is a man’s world. But once they get People don’t break their legs strong enough or skilled over that and you get over that, you realize or scrape their arms kayaking like they do enough to run it. It’s definitely not a gender everyone’s out here for the same reasons: bedirt biking or playing soccer. But people die thing, it’s just for the best paddlers. … When cause we love it. Gender doesn’t matter, and in our sport.” I saw Katrina applied, I voted her in.” we kayak because it brings us to these insane Another area paddler, Lila Lills, said This section of the North Fork Payette places. And every rapid brings personal chalwomen aren’t as likely to paddle at this level is known as one of the hardest stretches of lenges and goals along with it.” because they have other things going on. whitewater in the world. It regularly takes

—Jessica Murri

26 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 27


GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 18 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: GREYHOUNDS—With Afrosonics. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza CHRIS GUTIERREZ—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

REBECCA SCOTT—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

JEWISH FESTIVAL: YALE STROM & ELIZABETH SCHWARTZ— World-famous Klezmer musicians. 12:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. FREE. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel

RED HANDS BLACK FEET—With Obscured by the Sun and Epistolary. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

OPIUO—See Listen Here, this page. 10 p.m., $12 adv., $14 at the door. Reef

STELLAR TIDE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

PLANNING FOR BURIAL—With The Finer Points Of Sadism and Libra. 9 p.m. $5. Bouquet

PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

GAYLE CHAPMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar GEORGE DEVORE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow HONYOCK—With The Come Ups, Limbosa and Atlas Novus. 7 p.m. By donation. The Crux JACKSONS COUNTRY STOMP!—With Thomas Rhett, Jon Pardi and Lindsay Ell. Tickets available at all Treasure Valley Jacksons Food Stores. 6 p.m. $25. Ford Idaho Center KAYLEIGH JACK—6 p.m. FREE. Banbury Golf Club KEVIN KIRK AND FRIENDS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY—Electronic live music and DJs. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THURSDAY JUNE 19

SOUL SERENE—7 p.m. FREE. Harry’s Hyde Park Pub STEVE AND GRACE WALL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TERRY JONES—6:30. FREE. Chandlers

BOISE ROCK SCHOOL SUMMER SESSIONS—6 p.m. By donation. The Crux

THERE IS NO MOUNTAIN—With Great Pogwah and Urquides. See Culture, Page 30. 8:30 p.m. $5. The Crux

BOISE VOICE—Local vocal competition, plus live performances by The Rebecca Scott Band, Frankly Burlesque, Thaddeus Marks (2013 BVX Winner) and Interstate. 8 p.m. $5-$25. Hannah’s

WHITE WATER RAMBLE—9:30 p.m. $5. Liquid

BREAD AND CIRCUS—7 p.m. FREE. Whole Foods Market

MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

PATIO CONCERT SERIES—Greg and Johnny with Friends. 7 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: BLUES BROS. REVUE—6:30 p.m. FREE-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

GUIDE/LISTEN HERE

FRIDAY JUNE 20 ANDREW CORTENS AND TOM JENSEN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill BIG WOW—9 p.m. FREE. Cylos-Eagle

28 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

TRACTOR BEAM—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s WE ARE THE STRIKE—With Brumby. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. The Linen Building

SATURDAY JUNE 21 AUDIO/VISUAL DJ—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement THE BUS DRIVER TOUR—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s CLAY MOORE TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CROSSFIRE—9 p.m. $3. 127 Club DJ DVNGEROUSBIRDZ—11:30 p.m. FREE. Neurolux ED AND THE RED REDS—8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffee/Concert Garage FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BILLY BRAUN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

HOPE RIOT—With The Division Men, Chelsey Heidenreich, Dane Thompsen and more. 7 p.m. $6-$8. The Crux

THE BUS DRIVER TOUR—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

JAC SOUND—8 p.m. FREE. End Zone

CROSSFIRE—9 p.m. $3. 127 Club

JEWISH FESTIVAL: YALE STROM AND ELIZABETH SCHWARTZ—Worldfamous Klezmer musicians. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel

DEVIANT KIN—8 p.m. FREE. End Zone

JOSEPH LYLE—6 p.m. FREE. Artistblue

DJ FOOSE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

EMILY TIPTON—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

KEVIN SHRUMM—7 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

JEWISH FESTIVAL: YALE STROM AND ELIZABETH SCHWARTZ—Worldfamous Klezmer musicians. 12:30 and 6:30 p.m. FREE. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel

LEE PENN SKY AND THE OLIPHANTS—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NEW TRANSIT—8 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing Company

JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

OPHELIA—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

CAGE9—With Cure For The Fall, Ripchain and Fault Paradox. 7 p.m. $5. Shredder

KEVIN KIRK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

OPIUO, JUNE 19, REEF

SOUL PARTY WITH DJ DUSTY C—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

MIPSO STRING BAND—7:30 p.m. $12-$18. Sapphire Room

MIKE RUTLEDGE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s SONS OF THUNDER MOUNTAIN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel A TASTY JAMM—7 p.m. $5. Helina Marie’s

To outsiders, Boise may not seem like an obvious tour kickoff spot. But high-energy, excited crowds often send off bands and musicians, pleasantly surprised and fired up for the weeks or months ahead. Opiuo, the DJ from Down Under (born in New Zealand, lives in Melbourne, Australia) is a master remixer and has been making a name for himself from 2010’s hypnotic track ”Robo Booty” to his most recent album, the highly addictive Meraki (Slurp Music, March 2014). The award-winning Opiuo is about to rack up some more impressive (and useful) awards: frequent-flyer miles. On his Meraki World Tour 2014, the DJ is taking his chill, funky drum-and-bass/glitch/dubstep EDM to British Columbia, California, Colorado, Israel, the Netherlands, South Carolina, Texas and the U.K. He’ll start his globe-crossing trek on the right foot with a show at Reef. —Amy Atkins

MUSIC ON THE PATIO WITH PATRICK RICE—5:30 p.m. FREE. Solid

Doors 8:30 p.m., show 10 p.m.; $12 adv., $14 day of show; 21 and older only. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., 208-287-9200, reefboise.com.

THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME—10 p.m. $18 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective

KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—10:30 a.m. FREE. Bella Aquila

POTBELLY AND RAID—With New Iron Front and The Headcases. 7 p.m. $5. The Crux

LARRY CLARK—Noon. FREE. Gelato Cafe

SUNDAY JUNE 22 ALEX RICHARDS AND FRIENDS—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s AUDIO/VISUAL DJ AND OSO NEGRO PRESENT RHYME PROGRESSION— 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s The Pimps of Joytime

FEA—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE M IC HELLE GILLETTE

GUIDE MUSIC FROM STANLEY: THE COPOETICS—5 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge NOCTURNUM! INDUSTRIAL GOTH DJS—9:30. FREE. Liquid

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD—8 p.m. $25-$45. Knitting Factory

OPEN MIC ON THE PATIO— Weekly, weather permitting. 2 p.m. FREE. Solid

TUESDAY JUNE 24

PINEGROVE AND TAWNY PEAKS—7 p.m. With Telescopes As Time Machines. $5. The Crux

BERNIE REILLY—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

EMBY ALEXANDER—With Poeina Suddarth and Mt. Joy. 7 p.m. $8. The Crux

YOUNG WIDOWS—8 p.m. With White Reaper and Trite. $10. Shredder

FOREVER GROWING—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

MONDAY JUNE 23

KEVIN KIRK WITH SALLY TIBBS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GRAHAM LINDSEY—With Billy Cook and Parade of Bad Guys. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

RADIO BOISE SOCIAL HOUR: DJ KAT FAUSETT—5:30 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

KEVIN KIRK AND FRIENDS— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WEDNESDAY JUNE 25

MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: GIRLS GUNS AND GLORY—With Buckskin Bible Revue. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

PATIO CONCERT SERIES—Rex Miller, Lawson Hill & Rico Weisman 7 p.m. FREE. Berryhill PATRICIA FOLKNER—6 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain Pizza Parkcenter PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

COOL GHOULS—With Flashbulb Fires, The Green Zoo and Mt. Joy. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $5. The Crux

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

JAMES MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe JARED STINTSON AND MATT SALKELD—With Jimmy Sinn. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LIQUID WETT WEDNESDAY— Electronic live music and DJs. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

AUDIO/VISUAL DJ—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

DOUG CAMERON—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

BEN BURDICK—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

STATE TO STATE—8 p.m. $5. Shredder A TASTY JAMM—6 p.m. FREE. Banbury Golf Club THREE DAYS GRACE—With Devour The Day. 8 p.m. $30-$65. Knitting Factory WAKA FLOCKA FLAME—8 p.m. $10-$65. Revolution

JEFF CROSBY AND THE REFUGEES—8 p.m. FREE. End Zone

EMA—With Ugly Hussy and Phantahex. 7 p.m. $10. The Crux

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

JOHNNY SHOES—6 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing Company

DEAD FRETS—9 p.m. $TBA. Grainey’s

1332 RECORDS PRESENTS PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m., FREE, Liquid

JOHNNY SHOES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Solid

PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

EMA

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

FLASHBULB FIRES, JUNE 25, CRUX The Crux has hosted some great music on its stage. Not only has the 21-and-older crowd been introduced to emerging bands but as an all-ages venue, The Crux has been integral in sharing music with a younger crowd that might not be able to see it otherwise (in an up-close setting). It’s win-win-win, because that opens up a whole new fan base for visiting bands. An act that will no doubt make new friends here in Boise is Denver, Colo.-based Flashbulb Fires. The self-described “indie haze-pop” quartet takes standard instrumentation and buoys it with less conventional gear like glockenspiel, melodica and omnichord to create soundscapes that ripple beneath faraway layers of choir-like backing vocals and the ebb and flow of singer Patrick McGuire’s voice. Flashbulb Fires is poised to become a “I-saw-them-beforethey-were-big” bands and makes its Boise stop on the heels of a Daytrotter Session. See Flashbulb Fires live—everybody wins. —Amy Atkins Opening for Cool Ghouls, with The Green Zoo and Mt. Joy, 7 p.m. $5. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., facebook.com/thecruxcoffeeshop.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 29


CULTURE/NOISE

Would you like to be their best friend?

SUGAR AND SAGACITY There is No Mountain mixes playful and profound BEN SCHULTZ “We found a couple different interpretaIf Kali Giaritta fears the unknown, she tions of the koan that it’s based on,” Harmon doesn’t show it. said, “but the meaning that I kind of take She met Matt Harmon at a party one from it—‘First there is a mountain / Then night while they were both attending college there is no mountain / Then there is”—is in Boston (Boston University for Giaritta, kind of like describing differences in perspecBerklee College of Music for Harmon). tives on things.” Although the two had never met before, Such an interpretation suits the multifacGiaritta walked up to Harmon and asked if eted songs on TINM’s 2013 self-titled debut. he’d be her best friend. “Whenever in my life I see someone I want Sweet, light harmonies and bubbly tunes meet with offhandedly dexterous guitar work to be my friend, I just ask them,” Giaritta and dramatic tempo shifts, which reflect explained. “And Matt was the coolest one [at the party], so I made a qualifier and I was Harmon’s jazz and classical training and Giaritta’s love of musical theater. like, ‘Would you like to be my best friend?’” The lyrics add another layer of complexThe two became not just friends but ity. On one of the album’s best songs, “Good romantic and artistic partners. Now marNews,” Giaritta sings about finding comfort ried and living in Portland, Ore., Harmon in death and existential meaninglessness over and Giaritta performed for six years with a bouncy African beat. Other songs like the five-piece band The Ascetic Junkies, which hectic vignette “Nail Salon” and the swingreleased two full-length albums and played ing, pro-agnostic “I’m Not Convinced” strike Treefort 2012. Their current two-person a similar balance of playfulproject, There is No Mounness and thoughtfulness. tain, was selected as one of According to Harmon, the 1859 Magazine’s “favorite THERE IS NO MOUNTAIN growing idiosyncrasy of his of-the-moment Oregon bands” With The Great Pogwah and and Giaritta’s songwriting led and played the Lincoln Center Urquides, 8:30 p.m., $5. them to disband The Ascetic of the Performing Arts in New The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., facebook.com/thecruxcofJunkies. York City as part of this year’s feeshop. “We started noticing that American Songbook series. the music we were writing was The duo plays The Crux on getting pretty far away from Thursday, June 19, with local what The Ascetic Junkies had been initially, openers The Great Pogwah (Adam Jones of which was a lot more folksong-structureHollow Wood) and Urquides. based,” he said. “And then we pared down Giaritta and Harmon self-deprecatingly to a duo so that we could tour—and that was refer to TINM’s music as “pop with a short supposed to be a temporary thing—back in attention span.” But nothing about them the first half of 2012, I think. We just started or their music is that simple, including their feeling weird about playing all these new band’s name, which comes from both the songs live for people when we were on tour… Donovan pop song “There is a Mountain” and then knowing that they were going to get and the Zen koan that inspired it.

30 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

home and put these [Ascetic Junkies] CD’s in and they were not going to sound anything like what they just heard.” In Giaritta’s view, playing as a duo gives TINM more room to stretch out sonically. “With a five-piece, you can only get so quiet unless you’re telling [the others], “OK, you four don’t play,’” she said. “You can really only play with dynamics so much. Whereas with a two-piece, we use all eight of our limbs to make sound sometimes and then other times, it’s just guitar and voice or something really simple, which I like a little bit better for myself.” Giaritta isn’t the only one who likes the duo’s new sound. A scout from the Lincoln Center caught a TINM set last year and walked away impressed. After another scout saw the group play and had the same response, Giaritta and Harmon were invited to play the American Songbook series: the lineup for the 2014 event included Deer Tick, Beth Orton, Marty Stuart and Jason Isbell. “It was a crazy experience,” Giaritta said. “I felt like we had jumped 20 rungs on a ladder playing there. They treated us better than we’ve ever been treated at a venue, times about a hundred.” Harmon and Giaritta are following that experience by working on a second TINM album, which will include a number of songs the duo wrote on the road. “I think when you’re on tour, you don’t know what’s going to happen on any given day,” Giaritta said. “So the unknowns are greater than any other normal day of my life, at least. … So for that reason, I think we both really love to tour because it’s kind of a crazy opportunity to grow and to learn new things.” B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

THE FEW, THE PROUD: THE CAMOUFLAGE CLOSET LGBT vets share their struggles, recoveries in powerful film Lani, a former U.S. Marine, shares her pain, hope and recovery in The Camouflage Closet.

GEORGE PRENTICE been screened across the nation at universities, film festivals and, most importantly, as At first, we can’t see her face. What we can part of LGBT veteran support groups. The see is her long, dark hair and her brightly film is being screened three times in Boise colored fingernails, but her features are blocked by a stack of index cards she holds this week: twice for veterans at the Boise VA Medical Center and once for the general up to the camera lens. public Wednesday, June 18, at the Boise “My name is Lani,” is written on the State University Student Union (followed by first card. “I’m currently 26 years old.” She turns another card. “…and a U.S. Marine veteran.” Those simple words open The Camouflage Closet, a must-see documentary that shares the stories of Lani and eight other veterans from all branches of the military, representing conflicts from World War II to the present. “I just haven’t told my family yet, though I live with them” reads another index card. “I am literally living a double a discussion). The screening is sponsored by life. I’m just scared my family will disown the Boise State Women’s Center, Veterans me.” This is in spite of the fact that her family—and yours and mine—live under the Affairs, American Federation of Governfreedoms Lani served so proudly to protect. ment Employees and Boise Pride Fest. “We started an LGBT support group We see Lani’s hands shake as she holds at the Boise VA in November 2012, and it the cards, dropping them one-by-one. has steadily grown ever since,” said Susie “Between the PTSD and depression, my Klepacki, Boise VAMC Local Recovery best coping method is isolation,” reads the Coordinator. “Our participants are all age next card. “I’m also male-to-female transgroups, veterans from gender.” all conflicts: AfghaniLater in the film, stan, Iraq, going all we see her face, THE CAMOUFLAGE CLOSET (NR) the way back to the beautifully painted Korean War. And all by the cosmetics that Wednesday, June 18, 7 p.m. ranks, absolutely.” she would hide in Boise State University Student Union, As one of only a her car so her family Barnwell Room; 1910 University Drive, sub. boisestate.edu, 208-426-4259. handful of the redidn’t learn of her gion’s veterans affairs other sense of self. medical centers to We also see a 2005 offer an LGBT supphotograph of Lani port group, the Boise VA is “a trailblazer,” as a man, in uniform, serving as a United Klepacki said, and The Camouflage Closet States Marine. is a compelling tool to support the vets. “I had no idea who I was. Somewhere “This film tells stories that a lot of our along the way I tried to overcompensate by veterans may already know, but I’m certain joining the military,” Lani says in the film. “Of course, it wasn’t what I expected. I was that the public doesn’t know,” she said. “But The Camouflage Closet also shares trapped in my cocoon.” stories of hope and recovery and how you But Lani has since emerged, along with the other veterans who share their stories in can manage; that allows us to open up dialogue about available resources at the The Camouflage Closet, which has already

Boise VA. “ Boise Weekly spoke with Michael Nedelman, the director of The Camouflage Closet, in between classes at the Stanford University School of Medicine. So, yes, soon he’ll be a physician/director. “Stanford is pretty unique in that it’s a medical school with a film institute,” said

I A M LI TE RA LLY LI V I NG A DOU BLE LI FE . I ’ M JU ST SCA RE D MY FA MI LY W I LL DI SOWN ME . ”

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

Nedelman, already a graduate of Yale University’s film studies program. “The idea of being a filmmaker and caregiver is a pretty great way to disseminate information. My love for telling stories as a filmmaker led me to patient care. And now, I’m involved in those patients’ stories, beyond the lens.” That’s what led Nedelman to convince the Stanford School of Medicine and Heliana Ramirez, a social worker and the film’s producer, to help make The Camouflage Closet possible; telling the stories of nine LGBT vets as part of their therapy at the Palo Alto VA Healthcare System. “The film started out to be about 15 minutes. Now, it’s 45 minutes,” said Nedelman. The end result is a powerhouse but solution-driven 45 minutes, rarely seen in a documentary short that covers an issue with such heft. “One of the most motivating factors for me was the idea that there are veterans out there who may not have access to the support they need, or maybe there are clinicians who need more help in dealing with LGBT issues. Nedelman said. “But they might see this film and know that they’re not alone. I’m so impressed by the resiliency of these vets.”

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 31


BEERGUZZLER/DRINK IT’S IN THE CAN

ANDERSON VALLEY THE KIMMIE, THE YINK & THE HOLY GOSE ALE, $1.79-$2.39 This beer, part of Anderson Valley’s Highway 128 Session Series, is a tribute to the sour style that originated in Goslar, Germany. In the glass, it’s a luminous straw color with a thick egg-white head that collapses quickly. The aromas open with freshbaked sourdough bread, lemon zest, coriander, mineral and a touch of ginger. The flavors are lightly tart with a lactic tang that’s nicely matched by juicy citrus and cracked wheat. SNAKE RIVER MONARCH PILSNER, $1.69$2.29 This lovely lager hails from Jackson Hole, Wyo., and pours a crystal clear lemon with a two-finger, chalk-white head that leaves a nice lacing. The floral hop aromas are subtle with a hint of sweet alfalfa. This is an eminently quaffable brew with earthy malt and grain flavors, a combo that reminds me of a certain Tumwater, Wash., brew back in the 1970s (a good thing). This is a perfect hot weather quencher. WORTHY BREWING IPA, $1.39-$1.89 A bright golden pour with orange highlights, this beer is topped by a thin, milk-white froth. There’s a nice aggressiveness to the hop profile on the nose, with woody resinous aromas backed by honeyed grapefruit, orange, lemon and a light hit of banana. The hops are less assertive on the palate, but they still pack an ample kick, especially on the finish. Tropical fruit flavors liven things up in this well-balanced brew from Bend, Ore.

FOOD/NEWS K ELS EY HAW ES

Cans cool down quickly, leave a small carbon footprint, are easily recycled and keep beer fresh—think of them as mini-kegs. When it comes to summertime activities, cans win hands-down over their bottled brethren. Cans are easy to pack in, easy to pack out and they won’t break when rolling around in a river raft. Here are three exceptional entries:

BREWFORIA EXPANDS DOWNTOWN Plus Deli George launches Erna’s Kitchen and The Modern serves brunch TARA MORGAN Call it the wandering bottle shop. Since Brewforia Beer Market started life at a storefront near Boise Towne Square Mall in November 2009, it has moved to Meridian, opened an offshoot in Bown Crossing (which later became Bier:Thirty Bottle and Bistro), then opened and closed a concept in Eagle that included the restaurant Grind Modern Burger. Now Brewforia has set its sights on downtown Boise. The brand is opening a new beer market and relaunching Grind Modern Burger in the recently shuttered TableRock Brewpub space at 705 W. Fulton Street. “We’ve just started the first little bit of demolition and the process to remodel and relaunch, hopefully in late August,” said owner Rick Boyd. According to Boyd, the space is getting a major facelift, with a repositioned entryway and roll-up garage doors leading to an indoor/ outdoor patio. The decor will also get an “upscale contemporary” reboot. “It’s very minimalistic and monochromatic—so a lot of very sleek, clean lines; a lot of grays, whites and blacks with touches of color here and there,” said Boyd. “The bar is going to be less pub-y and more upscale lounge.” Boyd said the spot will focus “almost exclusively” on burgers, with a few salads, salmon dishes and appetizers offered, as well. Though the burgers will be similar to those served at the previous iteration—a seasoned blend of ground beef and pork with various gourmet toppings—Boyd is upgrading the plating, presentation and service. “We’re really kind of splitting the difference between that $120 steakhouse and the $12 pub burger,” said Boyd. “So you’ll be able to have an experience that’s somewhere in between.” “It’s really closer to that fine dining experience, just with burgers instead of steaks and lobster,” he added. Though Grind will drop a few of its previous menu items, like pizza and mac ’n’ cheese, it’ll continue serving fresh-cut fries with a line of housemade sauces, including ketchup, habanero dill and yogurt cilantro. Boyd eventually hopes to bottle some of those sauces and sell them in stores. And TableRock’s brew system won’t go untapped. Though Boyd confirms he’s hired a

Brewforia plans to fill the former TableRock Brewpub space by late summer.

brewer to craft a line of beers on-site—including seasonal releases of re-tooled TableRock favorites—he declined to elaborate further. “It’s going to be a different approach than what most of the other places around town, or even here in the Northwest are doing,” Boyd said. “It’s going to be a lot more fun, a little less geeky and more geared toward taking an interesting spin on things and presenting them in a different way.” TableRock’s former private dining room space facing Capitol Boulevard will be transformed into a Brewforia Beer Market. The bottle shop will stock between 800-900 beers and offer at least 10 rotating taps. “We’re going to shift our focus a little bit with Brewforia and really focus more on beers that aren’t available in this market through our distributors in Northern Idaho,” said Boyd. Boyd said customers can expect to see a bigger selection from breweries in Montana and Colorado, including Bitter Root Brewing, Great Divide Brewing Co. and Avery Brewing Co. After a late-August soft opening, Boyd plans to host a grand opening party the third weekend in September. For more on Grind Modern Burger, visit the company’s website, grindmodernburger. com. For more on Brewforia, visit shop. brewforia.com. In other food news, longtime lunch staple Deli George debuted a dinner concept last weekend dubbed Erna’s Kitchen. Named after owner George Blumenschein’s German mother, Erna’s Kitchen will transform the Deli George space at 220 S. Broadway Ave. into a European-style restaurant every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night. “We close the deli at 4 p.m. and from 4 p.m. to about 5:30-6 p.m. begins the transition,” Blumenschein said. “We do some candles on the table and switch out a few things ... just class it up a bit and make it just a little bit different. And then our regular menu goes away.”

Erna’s Kitchen offers an assortment of hearty German fare—including four different types of sausage, red cabbage, German potato salad and yellow kraut—along with cheese and meat boards. “Right now I have Creminelli products,” said Blumenschein. “I have some sopressata; I have a beef prosciutto; I have a salami.” Though the spot doesn’t have servers, food is delivered to the tables and a selection of European beers and wines are be available for around $3.50 a glass. “The idea is that you just sit down, maybe have a glass of wine or a beer and maybe a little appetizer and just discuss the day,” said Blumenschein. For more info on Erna’s Kitchen, call 208323-2582 or visit Deli George’s Facebook page at facebook.com/DeliGeorge. In other debut news: The Modern Hotel and Bar launched its much-anticipated brunch program June 14. Spearheaded by Chef Alex Cardoza (full disclosure: He’s the author’s fiancee), The Modern’s brunch menu features a few re-imagined classics—like Greek yogurt topped with brandy-macerated fruit and a frittata with seasonal vegetables and fromage blanc—along with more eclectic offerings, like beet pierogi with smoked sturgeon and a poached egg. Another unique offering is the banh xeo, a Vietnamese rice flour omelet stuffed with shrimp and pork belly then served with greens, fresh herbs and nuoc cham. And if you want to brunch it up a notch, you can get a half dozen oysters on the side for $10. The Modern’s brunch also features a handful of specialty cocktails, including The Sparkling—with prosecco, Campari and sweet vermouth—and The Wild Card, made with gin, absinthe, lime, mint and egg white. Brunch is now served Fridays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., with cocktails available after 10 a.m. For a peek at the complete menu, visit boiseweekly.com. For more info on the Modern Hotel and Bar, visit themodernhotel.com.

—David Kirkpatrick

32 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 33


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY C AR EERS BW CAREERS $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately mailingmembers.com Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter. org

AIRLINE JOBS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844210-3935 Senior Pastor (Mountain Home, ID) needed to conduct worship svcs, provide pastoral svcs & religious education programs. Req. M. Div & Ordination as pastor. Mail resume to Mountain Home Korean Baptist Church, 206 Hamilton Rd. Mountain Home, ID 83647.

$SCHOLARSHIPS$ For adults (you). Not based on high school grades. Stevens-Henager College. 800-959-9214.

BW HELP AVAILABLE LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email jill@boiseweekly.com or call 344-2055 for the rate of your notice. Need to place an ad in the Boise Weekly? Email classifieds@boiseweekly.com for a quote.

BW CAREER TRAINING

BW ROOMMATES

Free GED Classes. 877-516-1072.

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: Roommates.com.

MIN D BO DY S P IRIT BW BEAUTY $49 HIGHLIGHTS*$10 HAIRCUT Introductory offer: $49 Highlight & Cut or a $10 Haircut! Amazing

CAREER TRAINING

RELAXING FULL BODY MASSAGE $40 for 60 mins., $60 for 90 mins. Quiet and relaxing environment. Call or text Richard at 208-6959492.

BW BODY WORKS ULM Inc. 340-8377.

HO U S IN G

CAREER TRAINING

rates! Call now, only available until end of July. Call for appt. 4014568.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

BW HEALTH FITNESS FOR YOUR HEATH Certified extra virgin olive oil at Olivin, olive oil & vinegar taproom, geniune health benefits. 218 N. 9th St, Boise. 344-0306. LOSE UP TO 30 POUNDS in 60 Days! Once daily appetite suppressant burns fat and boosts energy for healthy weightloss. 60 day supply - $59.95. Call 877-7612991

BW YOGA Yoga & Mindfulness classes for Depression and Anxiety. Integrative Counseling ~ Weaving Eastern & Western approaches to psychological health. Individuals. Couples. Families. Jessica Adams, LPC, NCC, 344-5440. jessica-adams.com

COUNSELING

BW CHILDBIRTH PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana.

ANNOUNCEMENTS BW CALL TO ARTISTS

BW MASSAGE THERAPY

CALL TO ARTISTS!

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. Male Only. Private Boise studio. MC/ VISA. massagebyeric.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Mystic Moon Massage by Betty. 283-7830. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231.

Meridian Summer Art Festival, July 5 & 6. All local artists/ crafters & artisans needed! Please contact Ellen: 639-1378 or Deadbirdframing@gmail.com

BW EVENTS STREET & DANCE PARTY*BOISE BREWING Grand Opening. June 21st. Starts at 5pm. Free event at 6th & Broad, Boise Weekly block. Food Trucks, Craft Beer, Music, Games!

BW VOLUNTEERS COME VOLUNTEER AT CCG’S FARM! Miscellaneous work at the farm! Bring work-friendly clothes & a water bottle, just in case. Work gloves, tools, & anything else you might need will be provided to you by the CCG Team. Come when you can & stay as long as you like! Groups welcome! Wednesdays from 9am-5pm & Saturdays from 9am-4pm (open field). 258-6800. kirsten@createcommongood.org

BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email jill@boiseweekly.com or call 344-2055 for the rate of your notice. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, INA ND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA RANDAL J. FRENCH, P.C. Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS R. THARP, Defendant. Case No. CV OC 1319950 SUMMONS ON VERIFIED COMPLAINT NOTICE: YOU HAVE BEEN SUED BY THE ABOVE NAMED PLAINTIFF. THE COURT MAY ENTER JUDGMENT AGAINST YOU WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN TWENTY (20) DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO: THOMAS R. THARP You are hereby notified that in order to defend this lawsuit, an appropriate written response must be filed with the above designated court within twenty (20) days after service of this summons on you. If you fail to so respond the court may enter judgment against you as demanded by Plaintiff in the complaint. A copy of the complaint is served with this summons. If you wish to seek the advice or representation by an attorney in this matter, you

MASSAGE

MIND BODY

YOGA TAKE OUT TENSION BODYWORK $55 Swedish, Deep Tissue, relaxation and hot stones Hours: Monday- Saturday 10:00-6:00 30 min, 60 min, and 90 min 208-863-8968 Tamilee98@gmail.com

34 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


should do promptly so that your written response, if any, may be filed in time and other legal rights protected. An appropriate written response requires compliance with Rule10(a) (1) and other Idaho Rules of Civil Procedure and shall also include: 1. The title and number of this case. 2. If your response is an answer to the complaint, it must contain admissions or denials of the separate allegations of the complaint and other defenses you may claim. 3. Your signature, mailing address and telephone number, or the signature , mailing address and telephone number of your attorney. 4. Proof of mailing or delivery of a copy of your response to Plaintiff’s attorney, as designated above. To determine whether you must pay a filing fee with your response, contact the Clerk of the abovenamed court. DATED this 5 day November,2013. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH, Clerk By KATHY BIEHL Deputy Pub. June 18, 25, July 2 & 9, 2014. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, INA ND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA RANDAL J. FRENCH, P.C. Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS R. THARP, Defendant. Case No. CV OC 1319950 VERIFIED COMPLAINT Fee Category: A Fee: $96.00 COMES NOW the Plaintiff, Randal J. French, P.C., by and through its counsel of record, Heather L. Conder of the firm Bauer & French, and for its Complaint alleges as follows: 1. That Plaintiff, at all times herein relevant, is a corporation with its principal offices in Boise, Ada County, Idaho. 2. That Defendant, at all times herein relevant, is an individual and resident of Boise, Ada County, Idaho. 3. At the request of Defendant, Plaintiff rendered certain legal services to Defendant. 4. Defendant has failed to pay for said legal services rendered, in spite of Plaintiff’s repeated demand for payment. 5. That the reasonable value of such services is $911.57, which includes interest at the contract rate of 18% through November 1. 2013, which is now owing and past due, plus interest of $1.77 through November 5, 2013. The total due as of November 5, 2013 is $913.34. 6. That timely demand has been made upon Defendant for payment of the same, that Defendant did not lodge any objection to the amounts as billed, and Defendant has failed and refused to pay the same.

BEAUTY

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

7. This is an action to collect on an open account, and in a commercial transaction. Plaintiff is entitled to an award of attorney fees in an amount of not less than $500.00, plus all costs incurred, in the event judgment is entered by default, or for such further and additional amounts as this Court determines if judgment is not entered by default. WHEREFORE, Plaintiff requests that this Court enter judgment in favor of Plaintiff and against Defendant as follows: 1. For the balance of $911.57, which includes interest at the contract rate of 18% through November 1, 2013, plus interest of $1.77 through November 5, 2013, for a total due as of November 5, 2013 of $913.34. 2. For interest thereon at the rate of eighteen percent (18%) from November 5, 2013, until date of Judgment, and at the legal rate thereafter until date of payment in full. 3. For attorney fees in the amount of $500.00 if judgment is entered by default and for such further amounts if judgment is not entered by default, plus costs incurred in pursuing this matter to conclusion. 4. For such other and further relief as the Court deems just and equitable in the premises. DATED this 5th day of November, 2013. BAUER & FRENCH Heather L. Conder of the firm, Attorney for Plaintiff. Pub. June 18, 25, July 2 & 9, 2014.

VERIFICATION STATE OF IDAHO ) ) ss. County of Ads ) Randal J. French being duly sworn, upon oath and by personal knowledge deposes and says: That he is the principal of the Plaintiff in the above entitled action; that he has read the foregoing Verified Complaint and knows the contents thereof; that the facts therein stated are true according to his best knowledge, information and belief. DATED this 5th day of November, 2013. BAUER & FRENCH Randal J. French SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN to before me this 5th day of November, 2013. /s/ Nichole Griffith Notary Public Idaho Residing at: Boise My Commission Expires: 8/02/14 Pub. June 18, 25, July 2 & 9, 2014.

21, 8am-7pm. 3528 Windsor Dr. Off Cassia, bet. Latah & Owyhee.

BW GARAGE SALES Lots of items including unique ones. Zella’s art, metal bed frame, Hoover Steam Vac, 4 snow tires, Kitchen items, Pergo flooring, leather cowboy boots size 9 M, nice photo frames, Books, Clothing, some toys, stand for flat screen TV, Lots and lots of miscellaneous items. 4900 Glenbrook Dr, June 21-22, 8am-4pm.

BW ESTATE SALES

BW YARD SALES

YARD SALE SALE HERE!

Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

ESTATE SALE

Many good things, cheap. Plus, neighbors joining sale. Sat., June

ADOPT-A-PET

729 N. 15th St. 208 344 5883 remedyskincareboise.com

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FOR SALE These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

DARKROOM Omega D II enlarger, Gralab electronic timer, enamel print trays, easel, safe lights, paper, more. $350. Call Jack 345-4691. Leave a message.

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com

SERVICES

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. OBSIDIAN: I’m an active, snuggly girl with a cute bunny tail. I love to roll around and play.

ROSABELLA: I’m fun and not afraid to come get your affections. Take me home this week!

SAVANNAH: You’ll have a blast with my antics and charms—let me win you over today.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

BEAUTY

* Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER

PUDDIN: 5-year-old, female, pit bull terrier mix. Best with older kids. Good with other dogs. Loves to play with soft toys. (Kennel 401#22744969)

PEPSI: 9-month-old, female, German wirehaired pointer mix. Bubbly and energetic. Will do best with an active family. Loves other dogs. (Kennel 417- #228592211)

SASSY: 4-year-old, female, miniature poodle terrier mix. Nervous little gal. Needs a patient, calm home. Does fine with cats. (Kennel 306#22910499)

boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products

OFFICE HOURS

Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT

MAGGIE: 6-year-old, female, domestic longhair. Loves lounging and napping. Will spend her days impersonating a big fluffy pillow on your couch. (Kennel 02-#21837278)

NEPTUNE: 4-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Chatty and loves meeting new people. Has extra toes on her front feet. (Zamzows Federal Way Store- #22846110)

SAMMY: 6-year-old, female, domestic longhair. Extra large-size gal can really fill your lap. Laid back personality. Will need brushing. (Kennel 01- #10417145)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 35


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B O I S E W E E K LY SHOP HERE

CLASSES

MUSIC INSTRUC.

T R A N SPO RTAT I O N BW 4 WHEELS CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

PETS SERVICES BW PETS BW PROFESSIONAL

DID YOU KNOW...

Simply Cats Adoption Center sells low cost spay/neuter vouchers? For more information, call 208343-7177.

KITTENS

Free to a good home. Call Donna for details: 297-2097.

NYT CROSSWORD | ENRICH 25 Alex of “Blazing Saddles” 26 Nixon’s veep 27 “Get ___!” 28 Lighten 30 Grub 31 Certain petty officer: Abbr. 32 Goal for a comic working the Strip? 38 Ballet and others 40 Court grp. 41 Awed

ACROSS 1 Sack lunch staple, for short 7 Bumbling sergeant on “Hogan’s Heroes” 14 Like a universal recipient 20 Night lights 21 Wyoming people 22 Chief Theban deity 23 Episode title for a cooking show featuring chicken recipes? 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

20

11

12

13

14

32

38

39 43 48

28 34

40

41

44

57

69

86

87

88 93

100

104

105 110

79 83

92

99

75

82

85

111

112

56

70

74

81 84

55

61

78

91

54

65

77

90

53

60

73

80

19

30

52

68

76

18

37

64

72

17

42

59

67

71

29

36

51

63

66

16

46

58

62

35

45 50

15

25

33

49

59 German geographical name suffix 61 “___ Street Blues” 62 Jane ___, Helen Mirren’s “Prime Suspect” role 64 Roberto Benigni’s Oscar-winning role in “Life Is Beautiful” 65 Writing tip 66 Ill. neighbor 67 Request to represent a Minnesota senator’s side of a debate?

22

27

31

109

10

42 Gere’s wife in “Dr. T & the Women” 43 Bit of needlework? 45 What a 9-5 worker worked on? 46 Caper movie plot piece 47 Informal advice to an overeager picker? 52 “O.K.” from Tom Sawyer 53 Spot, maybe 57 Warning 58 Floor

24

26

89

9

BY TONY ORBACH / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

21

23

47

8

113

PERSONAL CHEF Hire your own local chef specializing in seafood. $25/hr * Offering nutrition training, cooking classes, can cook any diet in your home. I have 20+ years experience. *typical meal is 1-2 hours plus food cost. Introductory offer. Email cookingnampa@aol.com

94

95

101

102

106

107

114

115

116

117

118

119

120

121

36 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

96 103

108

97

98

70 Word shouted immediately before “Feliz Año Nuevo” 71 Without exception 73 Journalist Pyle 74 Well maintained 76 Go for ___ 77 Additions and subtractions, of a sort 78 Lao-___ 79 Health care company in the Fortune 100 80 Command 81 Like one saying “I told you so!” 82 Tarzan’s response when asked if the noodles are cooked? 84 “You dig?” reply 86 Murder 88 Philip of “Kung Fu” 89 Tries to hear better, say 92 Either Abby or Martha in “Arsenic and Old Lace” 93 Carrying one is part of a tour duty 95 Performer of tricks? 99 Naval officer who’s an expert in astrology? 103 “I’ll pass” 104 Lupino and Tarbell 105 Scottish hillside 106 Basketball goaltending locale 107 Nimble 109 “Oh, no? I’ll show you!” 111 Religious ceremony for two Hollywood brothers? 116 Rearward 117 Portmanteau landmass 118 It comes as a shock 119 Whitfield of “The Real Housewives of Atlanta” 120 Flower parts 121 Cause for burning at the stake

DOWN 1 Fruit popular in Thai salads 2 Turkey ___ 3 Playground retort 4 “I don’t think so” 5 One might say “y’all” with one 6 Rattle

7 Cannabis ___ (marijuana) 8 Fiction genre 9 Vietnamese coin 10 Former “Veronica Mars” airer 11 “Well, ___-di-dah” 12 Option for “Which came first …?” 13 Like London Tube pricing 14 Points 15 Diva Sumac 16 Beauty ideal 17 Incense 18 Genesis mount 19 Like the lowest of low blows 24 Pequod captain 29 Most conservative 33 ___’acte 34 Indian bread 35 Supermarket chain 36 Head 37 Bugs, of a sort 39 Severe 44 A, but not B or C 45 Do some needlework 46 Pleasure seeking 47 Queen of “Chicago” 48 Title girl in a 1968 hit by the Turtles 49 Certain shoot 50 When repeated, a happy cry 51 Forked over 52 When tripled, blah, blah, blah 54 South Pacific archipelago 55 Truing: Var. 56 Kerr of “An Affair to Remember” 59 Muslim mystics 60 Need spelling, say 61 Not worthy of 63 Bando of baseball 64 Fellow 65 According to

94 Food critic Sheraton 96 Punctually 97 Bozos 98 Short-story award 100 Mugs 101 Politico Hatch 102 County near Limerick 108 Ancient artery 110 Iron ___ 112 Disco ___ 113 ’60s service site 114 Sugar suffix 115 Ultimate

68 Jolly Roger in “Peter Pan,” e.g. 69 One might be brought up in a brawl 72 Supervise 75 Showy bloom 77 Key of Dvorák’s Symphony No. 9 78 M&M color replaced by blue 81 Shank 82 Luxuriousness 83 River whose source is Mount Saint Helena 85 N.Y.C. sports venue 86 [Forehead slap] 87 1300 hours, to a civilian 89 Classic German cameras 90 – 91 People of Ghana: Var. 92 Paid for dinner, say 93 Title sneaker brand in a Run-D.M.C. hit L A S T M A S K

O H M Y

A R A R A T

R E G U L A R

E M B O S S E D

B L O C K A D E

P A I L R A B T O R U A R M S P L C E H E O N L E D Y T I P M E E N R N

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

I D I O V A M P E Y F A B I L E E N O D E T N S E S M A B E A L A C A N T I R E V E R G Y L S H O D O U B A R M T O M Y R E M A R C L S A

T I C I R E C E S T M P A O O R I K G N E U T Y E S D R O O L L O S T

A N S W E R S M O T H E A L E L S I C O I T

R J F E E N T P E A R Z I O E F O G A S P O U D E S E M I N U D

A S I A

A L L R I S S E E A N T A M R O R R E E D N O F I A L S E T T I S

M A B O S L T I O T O F W O U O E R A P S B E C A N E S T L I E N I D O T L E R I D E M M O D I I G H T N G E A A C R T T R E D U T S X

C I T A D E L S

S T A R E S A T

S N O C O N E

S O O N E R

M A K E

E Y E D

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


TEETH WHITENING

Grand Opening Special: June18July 16. One session-$89, 3 sessions-$99, 4 sessions-$149. Appts. available starting June 16th. Call Demetry at DaVinci Cosmetic Teeth Whitening of Boise: 9942636 or email Davinciteethboise@ aol.com Located in Downtown Boise, 720 W. Idaho St. WE CAN DO IT Sewing services & alterations. Plus, accepting hand made consignments at Shift Clothing Exchange, 1810 W. State St, Boise. 941-0971.

ADULT

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

WE ARE OUT Engagement~Wedding~Anniversary

Announcements for everyone! Boise Weekly welcomes all and does not discriminate against gay or straight couples. Call Jill at 344-2055 for a price quote!

BW RELATIONSHIPS RELATIONSHIP RENEWAL Time to renew your relationship? Free Consultations. 208-853-8888. Relationship enhancement with communication skills training. Call today 859-4367.

BW FOR SALE

BW ADULT BOOK OF THE SUMMER Exrta Virginity, featuring virgin olive oils from Olivin-Olive Oil & Vinegar Taproom, 218 N. 9th Street, Boise. 344-0306.

BW KISSES CITY OF BOISE For fighting the fight for bikes. Thanks! SAVOR IDAHO VOLUNTEER Thanks for loving Kicks & Kisses in the Boise Weekly. Send yours my way: classifieds@boiseweekly. com

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot.com VIAGRA 100mg, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement! Discreet Shipping. Save $500. Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1-800-404-1271

BW CHAT LINES ALL KINDS OF SINGLES Send Messages FREE! Straight

RELATIONSHIPS

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

208-345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-4722200. Use FREE Code 3187, 18+. Curious About Men? Talk Discreetly with men like you! Try FREE! Call 1-888-779-2789. www. guyspy.com MEET SEXY SINGLES Browse & Reply FREE! 208-3458855. Use FREE Code 3188, 18+. WHERE HOT GUYS MEET Browse Ads & Reply FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 2619, 18+.

BW I AM HERE TROUBLED BY SOMEONE’S SEXUAL BEHAVIOR? There is hope. S-Anon can help! S-ANON SOLUTION SEEKERS Wednesdays from 6:15-7:15 pm Orchard Plaza, 1111 S. Orchard Street Boise, Idaho Door 2, Room 112A Email with questions: sanonboise@gmail.com

BW PEN PALS I am 32 years old female looking to write male and females. Memori Lujan #80480 SBWCC unit 2-27B 13200 Pleasant Valley Rd Kuna, ID 83634. My name is Betty Saunders and I’m currently incarcerated at Gem County Jail. I would love someone to write to. I’m 45, brown hair, blue eyes, and a single lonely woman with lots of life. Betty Saunders 410 E. 1st St. Emmett, ID 83617.

SWM 25 years old. 5’11 196 pounds. Brown hair, blue eyes. I am currently an inmate at ISCI and am parole eligible in March 2015. I enjoy reading and music. I am looking for new friends and possibly more. I would appreciate a pen pal. If you want to write please do so at: Matt Cave #87330 Idaho Dept of Corrections ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Hello my name is Leonard Fisher. I’m Cherokee Indian and white. I have very long brown hair, blue eyes and tan skin. I’m 6 foot 200 lbs. I love to draw and write letters. I’m down to earth and straight up. I would like to meet new people. To send my drawings to and a nice lady would be cool. I don’t care what race you are. As long as your fun, outgoing and most of all happy, and like art. I see the parole board in September 2014. If you want a very good looking person to write, that would be cool to, and that would be me. Write me at Leonard Fisher #64420 ISCI unit 24-13B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707.

RELATIONSHIPS

ADULT

My name is Tanya Hardin. I’m 38 years old. I’m from Lewiston, Id grew up in Lewiston. I’m looking for a pen pal we can start off as friends and see where it goes from there. I like to hang out and just have fun even if it’s just cuddling on the couch watching TV. I pretty much like to do pretty much anything. Camping, floating the river, boating, sun bathing etc. I like the outdoors. Tanya Hardin #103944 Shoshone County Public Safety Bldg 717 Bank Street Wallace, ID 83873.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 37


BW

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you were alive 150 years ago and needed to get a tooth extracted, you might have called on a barber or blacksmith or wigmaker to do the job. (Dentistry didn’t become a formal occupation until the 19th century.) Today you wouldn’t dream of seeking anyone but a specialist to attend to the health of your mouth. But I’m wondering if you are being less particular about certain other matters concerning your welfare. Have you been seeking financial advice from your massage therapist? Spiritual counsel from your car repair person? Nutritional guidance from a fast-food addict? I suggest you avoid such behavior. It’s time to ask for specific help from those who can actually provide it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “My music is best understood by children and animals,” said composer Igor Stravinsky. A similar statement could be made about you Tauruses in the coming weeks: You will be best understood by children and animals—and by all others who have a capacity for dynamic innocence and a buoyant curiosity rooted in emotional intelligence. In fact, those are the types I advise you to surround yourself with. For now, it’s best to avoid sophisticates who overthink everything and know-it-all cynics whose default mode is criticism. Take control of what influences you absorb. You need to be in the presence of those who help activate your vitality and enthusiasm.

38 | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

protecting them from what might happen if you show them to the world? It may be time to revise that policy. (Thanks to Molly Oldfield’s The Secret Museum for the info referred to here.) LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the next two weeks, I hope you don’t fall prey to the craze that has been sweeping Japan. Over 40,000 people have bought books that feature the photos of hamuketsu, or hamster bottoms. Even if you do manage to avoid being consumed by that particular madness, I’m afraid you might get caught up in trifles and distractions that are equally irrelevant to your long-term dreams. Here’s what I suggest: To counteract any tendency you might have to neglect what’s truly important, vow to focus intensely on what’s truly important. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Writing at FastCompany.com, Himanshu Saxena suggests that businesses create a new position: chief paradox officer, or CPXO. This person would be responsible for making good use of the conflicts and contradictions that normally arise, treating them as opportunities for growth rather than as distractions. From my astrological perspective, you Virgos are currently prime candidates to serve in this capacity. You will continue to have special powers to do this type of work for months to come.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Nikhedonia” is an obscure English word that refers to the pleasure that comes from anticipating success or good fortune. There’s nothing wrong with indulging in this emotion as long as it doesn’t interfere with you actually doing the work that will lead to success or good fortune. But the problem is, nikhedonia makes some people lazy. Having experienced the thrill of imagining their victory, they find it hard to buckle down and slog through the gritty details necessary to manifest their victory. Don’t be like that. Enjoy your nikhedonia, then go and complete the accomplishment that will bring a second, even stronger wave of gratification.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, you are hereby granted a brief, one-time-only license to commit the Seven Deadly Sins. You heard me correctly, Libra. As long as you don’t go to extremes, feel free to express healthy amounts of pride, greed, laziness, gluttony, anger, envy and lust. At least for now, there will be relatively little hell to pay for these indulgences. Just one caveat: If I were you, I wouldn’t invest a lot of energy in anger and envy. Technically, they are permitted, but they aren’t much fun. Greed, gluttony and lust could be quite pleasurable, especially if you don’t take yourself too seriously. Pride and laziness may also be enjoyable in moderate, artful amounts.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts has a collection of Japanese art that is never on display. It consists of 6,600 wood-block prints created by artists of the ukiyo-e school, also known as “pictures of the floating world.” Some are over 300 years old. They are tucked away in drawers and hidden from the light, ensuring that their vibrant colors won’t fade. So they are well-preserved but rarely seen by anyone. Is there anything about you that resembles these pictures of the floating world, Cancerian? Do you keep parts of you secret,

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio novelist Kurt Vonnegut rebelled against literary traditions. His stories were often hybrids of science fiction and autobiography. Free-form philosophizing blended with satirical moral commentary. He could be cynical yet playful, and he told a lot of jokes. “I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over,” he testified. “Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can’t see from the center.” He’s your role model for the next four weeks, Scorpio. Your challenge will be to wander as far as you can into

the frontier without getting hopelessly lost. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Make a name for the dark parts of you,” writes Lisa Marie Basile in her poem “Paz.” I think that’s good advice for you, Sagittarius. The imminent future will be an excellent time to fully acknowledge the shadowy aspects of your nature. More than that, it will be a perfect moment to converse with them, get to know them better, and identify their redeeming features. I suspect you will find that just because they are dark doesn’t mean they are bad or shameful. If you approach them with love and tenderness, they may even reveal their secret genius. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Pet mice that are kept in cages need to move more than their enclosed space allows, so their owners often provide them with exercise wheels. If the rodents want to exert their natural instinct to run around, they’ve got to do it on this device. But here’s a curious twist: a team of Dutch researchers has discovered that wild mice also enjoy using exercise wheels. The creatures have all the room to roam they need, but when they come upon the wheels in the middle of the forest, they hop on and go for prolonged spins. I suggest you avoid behavior like that, Capricorn. Sometime soon you will find yourself rambling through more spacious places. When that happens, don’t act like you do when your freedom is more limited. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s transition time. We will soon see how skilled you are at following through. The innovations you have launched in recent weeks need to be fleshed out. The creativity you unleashed must get the full backing of your practical action. You will be asked to make good on the promises you made or even implied. I want to urge you not to get your feelings hurt if some pruning and editing are required. In fact, I suggest you relish the opportunity to translate fuzzy ideals into tidy structures. Practicing the art of ingenious limitation will make everything better. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s always important for you to shield yourself against our culture’s superficial and sexist ideas about sex. It’s always important for you to cultivate your own unique and soulful understandings about sex. But right now this is even more crucial than usual. You are headed into a phase when you will have the potential to clarify and deepen your relationship with eros. In ways you have not previously imagined, you can learn to harness your libido to serve both your spiritual aspirations and your quest for greater intimacy.

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY EVENT

EAT HERE

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 18–24, 2014 | 39


Boise Weekly Vol. 22 Issue 52  

Not Just Weddings: From death to taxes, Idaho’s ban on same-sex marriage affects nearly every aspect of life

Boise Weekly Vol. 22 Issue 52  

Not Just Weddings: From death to taxes, Idaho’s ban on same-sex marriage affects nearly every aspect of life