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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 22, ISSUE 30 JANUARY 15–21, 2014

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

INSIDE THE EXCHANGE The realities of the Affordable Care Act FEATURE 11

‘I DO’ Stories from same-sex couples in Utah NOISE 21

KIN-ETIC ENERGY Modern Kin retools as a trio REC 24

BEATERS, CHASERS, KEEPERS, SEEKERS All about Boise State Quidditch

“She can’t bring her partner to the company Christmas party. That’s no quality of life.”

NEWS 9


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B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com

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Office Manager: Meg Andersen Meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com Associate Editor: Amy Atkins, Amy@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Sam Hill Sam@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Tara Morgan, Jessica Murri, Eric S. Peterson, John Rember, Ben Schultz Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd Brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Tommy Budell, Tommy@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams, Darcy@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Graphic Designers: Kelsey Hawes, kelsey@boiseweekly.com Tomas Montano, tomas@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, Jennelle Brunner, Ted Rall, E.J. Pettinger, Tom Tomorrow, Patrick Sweeney Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000.

GUN RIGHTS AND GAY RIGHTS We’re only halfway through January and it’s already been a real life-liberty-and-pursuit of happiness-kind of month. Nearly 1,000 people turned out on the Statehouse steps Jan. 11 to demonstrate in favor of adding the words “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to Idaho’s Human Rights Act. It’s a proposal that lawmakers have said “no” to seven times in recent years, despite polling by Boise State University that suggests more than 60 percent of Idahoans are in favor of formal protections for LGBT people in areas including employment, housing and education. It’s also an extension of rights that cities across the state—from Sandpoint to Boise to Pocatello—have embraced. Only two days later, another crowd assembled in downtown Boise to rally for the protection of rights, though ones they already have. About 200 members and supporters of Idahoans for Liberty, many toting rifles and handguns. convened Jan. 13 on the Grove Plaza for a march to the Capitol, where they reminded legislators of just how important the Second Amendment is to them. The threats to gun ownership are, to put it lightly, less pressing than the withholding of basic things like access to jobs, housing and education for an entire group of citizens. Lest we forget, Barack Obama is the president who made it legal to carry firearms in national parks and to pack heat in checked baggage aboard Amtrak trains; yet it is still perfectly legal in Idaho to fire someone because you’re grossed out by their romantic life. That said, it’s not really fair to rank these issues by relative importance: Gun rights and gay rights exist along the same continuum, and both play a part in fulfilling that old promise of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness mentioned above. The first time I discharged a firearm I was about 10 years old, blasting soda cans with my great-uncle Wilbur’s .410 shotgun. I shook my head at data showing the rate of U.S. private gun ownership at 101 firearms per 100 people—until I counted the number of guns in my own house and came up with six. Is it my right to own those guns? Absolutely. Do I think that’s as important as someone else having the right to secure employment, housing and education regardless of whether they’re in a same-sex relationship? Absolutely. Is there a chance that the Idaho Legislature will in any way curtail my gun rights? Not likely. Will it be similarly rights-minded and act on extending basic protections for the LGBT community?

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—Zach Hagadone

ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is locat-

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SUBMIT

Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

TRADER JOBS

A Public School of ’œ“ŒŽ

THINK WORLD

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Boise Weekly’s social media channels blew up Jan. 13, when it was announced that Trader Joe’s is hiring for its downtown store. Find out the possible opening date on Citydesk.

CLAY CREATURES A new exhibition of ceramic and clay portraits at Brumfield’s Gallery caught BW’s eye this week— especially the anatomically correct gophers. Read more about the show on Cobweb.

THE CANDIDATE Republican Jim Risch is facing a Democratic challenger for his seat representing Idaho in the U.S. Senate. Learn who has thrown his hat in the ring on Citydesk.

OPINION

Lottery Open Houses JAN 22 & 23

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK WE GIVE EVERYONE IN THE CITY JAVELINS AND THE LAST ONE STANDING GETS TO USE 8TH STREET AS A PERSONAL WALKWAY. IT’S ONLY FAIR.”—Kevin Hanks (via Facebook, “How Should Traffic,

Bicycles Flow on Boise’s 8th Street?” Jan. 12, 2014)

MAIL GETTING IT RIGHT IN THE BOULDER-WHITE CLOUDS It’s hard to tell by reading his piece (BW, Opinion, “Against a Boulder-White Clouds Wilderness,” Nov. 13, 2013) just what John Rember is in favor of protecting in Central Idaho. You don’t have to read his screed twice to know whose motives he impugns—virtually everyone who has worked to protect the Boulder-White Clouds for the past half century. We take particular offense, as we suspect many Idahoans will, at his characterization of former Gov. and Secretary of the Interior Cecil D. Andrus who, Rember charges, is “messing with his legacy and risks being remembered by his former supporters as a person who spent the meager political capital of his party on a monument to his glory days.” What a load of bull-pucky. Just to be clear about the historical record, Cece Andrus was leading the charge to protect the White Clouds from commercial exploitation in a campaign for governor in 1970, while Rember, by his own admission, concluded in 1973 that “the Boulders lacked recreational potential,” a conclusion he reached, “in spite of having just spent an idyllic summer in them.” In other words, Rember really suggests: just stay out of my playground. The nearly constant effort to provide greater conservation protection for the Boulder-White Clouds has been a dominant theme of Idahoans committed to conservation for 50 years; Idahoans who, unlike Rember

apparently, actually believe that we can use the mechanism of federal law, science and a dose of common sense to conserve one of the last great unprotected landscapes in the lower 48. A little more historical perspective is in order for the latter-day rejectionists of congressional or executive conservation initiatives who foolishly say, “Wilderness designation doesn’t preserve anything.” Idaho, with vast areas like the Frank Church Wilderness, the Gospel Hump and the Seven Devils, is Exhibit A of the silliness of that statement. As for Andrus, he tried in 1987, in bipartisan collaboration with Sen. Jim McClure, to designate the Boulder-White Clouds as wilderness. A few misguided souls then, like Rember today, disparaged that effort and the area has remained in management limbo—and threatened—ever since. More recently, Rep. Mike Simpson has battled forces in his own political party to bring Idahoans together to rally around more certainty and more protection for the area. The fact that Simpson has failed has more to do with dysfunction in Washington, and in Idaho’s own delegation, than any lack of need in Custer County. If there is one Idahoan, in addition to the late Frank Church, who doesn’t need to worry about his conservation “legacy,” it has to be Cece Andrus. As secretary of the interior in the Carter administration, Andrus devised a complicated and ingenious strategy to use the president’s power under the Antiquities Act—the mechanism of choice for

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

most of the nation’s great conservation efforts, from the Grand Canyon to the Grand Staircase—to force a constructive resolution of the bitter fight over Alaska’s vast unspoiled lands. In that case, the president’s “stroke of pen” brought the Alaska delegation to the table and—we forget such things today—during a lame duck session of the Congress in December 1980, the House and Senate passed and President Carter signed legislation that is widely considered the greatest conservation accomplishment of the 20th century. Imagine for a moment that Rember’s prescription to leaving things alone and unprotected had carried the day in Alaska. Such a moment comes along once in a generation, if we’re lucky, and people who really care about conservation seize the moment. Presidential action aimed at national monument designation for the Boulder-White Clouds is at such a moment right now. If the chance is fumbled, don’t expect it to come again anytime soon. For John Rember to suggest that Andrus, and for that matter the Idaho Conservation League, need a national monument designation in the Boulder-White Clouds to satisfy some ego or legacy need is both silly and an insult. About this much John is correct: “Cecil Andrus has done a great deal for Idaho.” A great deal more, it turns out, than those misguided folks who spend their time ginning up red herrings and questioning the motives of people who have actually spent a lifetime working to bring common sense conservation to some of the last and best places in Idaho and America. —Chris Carlson and Marc C. Johnson Chris Carlson and Marc C. Johnson both served as press secretaries to Gov. Cecil D. Andrus.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | 5


OPINION/BILL COPE

SILLYRIOUS They’re coming for your backyard, Idaho As dismal as I generally find the holiday season to be, I will say one thing for it: During the past three weeks or so of the year, I don’t feel obliged to produce any serious stuff to fill this space. For those who think I fritter away an opportunity by writing silly predictions columns or silly advice columns, I say, Oh yeah? Well I think your whole damn holiday season and just about everything you do during it is silly, so don’t come bitching to me about being silly when you’re out inflating a giant Frosty on your front yard and worrying whether you should say “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Holidays” to total strangers as you’re throwing money away on crap that by the end of the month, your spoiled brat kids will either break, lose or forget they ever had! While most of us would insist there is a time for silly and a time for serious, the realm of politics as often as not proves there is room under the same umbrella for both. Nowhere is that more true than the Idaho Legislature, and we have learned that even those things about Idaho’s ruling party we consider the silliest produce consequences of the most serious nature. Remember, for example, how ridiculous it seemed that leaders of the Idaho GOP felt they needed to restrict the primary process to party members only. They were convinced Democrats were slipping in by the thousands and voting for somewhat less-than-lunatic candidates who didn’t live up to the strict ideological standards of the verifiably lunatic. It was a silly gesture insisted on by silly men. But silly or not, they got their way. And as a result of independents and undeclared voters no longer being able to chose between a relatively reasonable Republican and a... let us say... Mark Patterson-level Republican, our Legislature has turned harder and harder right. A serious situation indeed, considering it was already safely under the thumb of the Koch brothers and their surrogate, ALEC. Surely you know of ALEC, but let me refresh you. The American Legislative Exchange Council is a consortium of some of the biggest corporate interests in the United States and beyond, and its only goal is to gain more and ever more power in state legislatures by flooding local markets with boatloads of politician-buying cash. And what interest would rich, rich, rich people have in owning a sack full of legislative yokels from a backwater like Idaho? Well, what else, silly? So they can get richer and richer and richer. Take that arrangement Idaho had with a private prison corporation. You know, that deal that will likely continue to cost us for years to come? You can’t image that happened without a lot of inside legislative rigging, can you? Or Tom Luna’s efforts to auction off Idaho education to whomever put the most

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into his campaign coffers? Do recall, please, that it was legislative overlords who pushed through that parcel of privatization poop and who barely gave the opposition an opportunity to speak. The point being, if it seems very little good happens in Idaho with such a Republican-dominated Legislature, we can be sure nothing bad happens in Idaho without their help, if not their instigation. And as adults who (presumably) no longer believe in fairy tales, we must recognize that the libertarian ideals so many of these goofy bastards espouse are more often than not just a smokescreen for another massive acquisition of publicly and commonly owned assets by privateers who don’t give a shit for either ideals or the public interest. This year, unless we fight like pissed-off Apaches, we will be watching the most extreme asset grab in our state’s history. They want to put our publicly and commonly owned lands—Forest Service and BLM lands—under state control, which in Idaho Republicanese translates as: You blow enough cash my way... maybe set me up with a fat job once I get off this Legislature hayride... and I’ll fix it so you can buy the whole damn state and turn it into an amusement park, if that’s what you want. Frankly, I have been avoiding this issue for months—ever since the rumblings for state control reached the surface. It is so utterly depressing and despicable that so few people, possessed as they are by an ethic of greed and a philosophy that describes only their own desires, could propose a change that will, if successful, alter the very nature of Idaho, forever and irrevocably. I have diverted myself with the sillier side of this column, twiddling my thumbs until I could think of the right words to argue against it. But I must admit this movement is almost beyond my ability to take it seriously, and the arguments against it will have to be as powerful and serious as the powers that are lined up behind it. But it is vital that we resist this. Idaho is what it is for one reason only—the common lands. It has nothing whatsoever to do with some silly-ass illusions that the people here are exceptional, or that the good Old West is still alive here, or that we Idahoans would be better off if a sack of yokels from Canyon County (and points even dumber) were to assume control of those lands. No, the Idaho that is worthy of love and loyalty is the Idaho of free, open and public lands. Our federal government, representing the interests of the rightful owners of those lands—the American people, all of ’em—is adequately fitted with checks and balances enough that it could never squander the Idaho we love for short-term gain. But can we say the same for Idaho’s leaders and lawmakers—seriously? B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


JOHN REMBER/OPINION

HEIRLOOMS/ERRORLOOMS Reflections on genetic inheritance

My mother and father were children during the Great Depression, and they both grew up in families whose savings had been wiped out. They knew a deep poverty, and both had stories about times when their families farmed them out to relatives or friends because there wasn’t enough money. Later, when they had jobs and income and kids, they saved money compulsively, never bought anything they didn’t need and never threw anything away. Toward the end of their lives, they got in the habit of going to garage sales. The bargains they found tipped them over the edge into full-blown hoarding. I remember a day spent trying to help them clean up their place in Sawtooth Valley. I had devoted the morning to loading their pickup with what I thought was junk. When it came time for them to drive it all to the dump, they piled half of what I had intended to get rid of in the driveway, because to them it wasn’t junk. Someone could use it someday. They drove off with the other half, but they found enough treasure at the dump that they came home with the pickup loaded up again. After that I just organized stuff into piles when I attacked the clutter around their place. My parents, despite their weakness for other people’s throwaways, were good, honest, strong, loving people. They provided me with moral guidance and food and clothing—in that order—and a love of hard physical labor and a good education through high school. They were willing to pay for my college but they made it clear that they preferred I take care of that myself. My paying for college was also a gift, as it forced me to spend summers working for tuition. Probably the deepest lesson I learned during college was when I looked at the check I had received for firefighting in July and August, walked it over to the registrar’s office, and watched it all disappear. It made me pay attention in class, because I had spent exhausting overtime hours earning my time there. And although firefighting provided plenty of hard physical labor, I nonetheless wanted a life that didn’t include smoke, helicopters, logging boots and a Pulaski. It worked, but my education also alerted me to my genetic inheritance. Not all of my parents’ behavior had been due to early poverty. Psychology classes revealed that hoarding is a heritable mental disorder. A serious one. Hoarders sometimes die when towers of junk mail, piled high in living rooms, fall down and suffocate them. People end up with 134 cats, or rooms full of National Geographics. They buy clothes they never wear, and pile boxes of quiltsquares to the ceiling. They end up living in attic alcoves, the rest of their houses being too full of stuff to live in. BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

I began to search back through the generations of my family, finding recluses, suicides, people who didn’t raise their kids right and a bunch more hoarders. I remembered my paternal grandmother dragging pieces of old oak furniture home from the Hailey dump, cleaning and repairing them and finding places in her already crowded house for them. I went through old sepia photos, discovering cars and houses and even clothing that outlasted their purchasers, staying in the family until the 1930s melted it all down. In my own life, I understood that my obsessive high-school hobby—collecting old bottles from abandoned mines west of Hailey—had not been an entirely voluntary activity. I dug bottles, cleaned them, arranged and rearranged them, stayed awake at nights planning to find more of them, and filled the attic of my parents’ garage with them. It took care of my adolescent free time for two or three years. It didn’t do much for my adolescent social life. Depending on how psychoanalytic you want to get, you can say that the real reason behind any obsessive-compulsive disorder is that it allows you not to have a social life. In my case, that was a good thing, keeping me off the football team or from knocking up one of my classmates so that I would have had to drop out of high school and work at an auto-body shop until it was time to go to Vietnam. So perhaps there is Darwinian survival value in being born into an OCD family. As the circular Darwinian formula goes, if you’ve made it this far, it’s adaptive. These days, I’m mostly obsessed with Julie’s cooking. I’ll also admit to a fascination with Julie. She tells me that either one is a good thing, after two decades of marriage. But I no longer collect stuff—even books, except for remainders of ones I’ve written. I do have too many skis in the garage. And once a year I go on a tear with a chainsaw, trying to collect enough firewood to endure the Ice Age that seems imminent every November. No doubt these behaviors are embedded deep in my genes. Fortunately, their grasp has loosened enough that I’ve been able to maintain an illusion of free will. Right now, free will is directing me toward the dinner table. Later, it will direct me to do the dishes, pack in a couple of loads of wood and bank the fire for the night. I’ll turn on the nightlight and, comforted by its pale warmth, go to bed. It’s a life-affirming routine, and a happy one. And if the dark still threatens, I know that down in the crawl space are boxes of old purple bottles, each carefully cleaned and lovingly wrapped in newspaper, each glowing with precious material magic. Somebody’s going to need them someday.

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CITYDESK/NEWS NEWS

ACLU TO BOISE, AFTER RE-WRITE OF SOLICITATION ORDINANCE: THIS COULD HAVE BEEN AVOIDED It wasn’t one of those cork-popping celebrations, but make no mistake: Opponents who have been fighting Boise’s controversial solicitation ordinance are cheering the city’s concession that it needed to backpedal on the legislation, which was slated to go into effect earlier this month. But it’s not as if city officials weren’t warned that they would need to—sooner than later—unwind the ordinance that critics said unfairly targeted Boise’s homeless. “The three members of the City Council who voted in favor of the ordinance are getting exactly what they voted for—a federal lawsuit,” ACLU board member Erika Birch said last November as her organization filed a 19-page complaint against ORD-34-13, the city of Boise’s Anti-Solicitation Ordinance. Last June, Boise Weekly first examined the model legislation that Boise officials had used as a blueprint. Adopted in San Francisco, an independent review of the measure found it had “not been effective at abating aggressive panhandling, soliciting or panhandling (BW, News, “Out of the Panhandle, Into the Fire,” June 5, 2013), let alone the legal flaws of the then-proposed ordinance. “The ACLU warned the city on multiple occasions that the ordinance was unconstitutional, but they chose to pass it anyway,” said Birch. But after listening to hours of public testimony, overwhelmingly opposed to the ordinance, the Boise City Council voted 3-1 in September 2013 to pass the measure, which prohibits solicitation for donations colored by intimidation, obstruction of right-of-way or repeated attempts at solicitation after a negative response. Voting in favor of the ordinance were Council President Maryanne Jordan and Councilmen Ben Quintana and T.J. Thomson. The only Council member voting against the ordinance was Lauren McLean. Meanwhile, the city continued to dig in its heels on the matter. “The ordinance was carefully crafted to prevent aggressive solicitation while still ensuring the protection of all citizens’ speech,” Adam Park, spokesman for Boise Mayor Dave Bieter, said in November. “The city will defend the ordinance and is confident it will withstand this legal challenge.” That was then. On Jan. 2, the very day that the ordinance was scheduled to go into effect, U.S. District Court Judge Edward Lodge ruled in favor of the ACLU of Idaho and enjoined the city from enforcing the anti-solicitation 9 law. Lodge wrote that the Boise ordinance was poorly crafted “to suppress

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PATR IC K S W EENEY

The city of Boise wants a do-over of its antisolicitation ordinance.

CREDITS, PENALTIES AND DEADLINES The realities of the Affordable Care Act in Idaho GEORGE PRENTICE There’s a reason that David Chase didn’t use the word “Obamacare” Jan. 8 while detailing the ins and outs of the Idaho Health Insurance Exchange: His audience couldn’t have cared less about the politics surrounding the Affordable Care Act. But just to make certain that he’s sensitive to his audience, Chase said he usually takes the political temperature of the room. “I come right out and ask people if they prefer to call it the ‘Affordable Care Act’ or ‘Obamacare,’” Chase told Boise Weekly. “I’m perfectly OK with either.” But on this particular day, Chase sat in front of a group of Idahoans who were rich in diversity but unified in their interest—they were looking to save some money while securing health care. “Let’s face it: The name of it is the Affordable Care Act,” he said, with particular emphasis on affordable. “People want to know if they can get a decent policy for a good deal.” And while not everyone is finding those cost savings, Chase—a so-called “in-person assister” from Boise-based Mountain States Group—said some have had better luck than others in keeping some money in their pocket. “I’ve seen people save $200 or $300 a month, just by canceling their current policy and signing up for a plan that’s similar to the one they just canceled,” said Chase. “The big difference is, they’re getting a subsidy to help pay for that coverage.” And those rebates—a lynchpin of the ACA—was a main topic of conversation as Chase facilitated the latest in a string of workshops held at the Collister Branch of the Boise Public Library. Chase pointed to a chart (see Page 9) that outlined who qualifies for those rebates under the new law. “And those credits range anywhere to 2 [percent] to 9.5 percent of your income,” said Chase. Currently, the Idaho exchange includes health care coverage from four carriers—Blue Cross of Idaho, BridgeSpan, PacificSource and SelectHealth—and each provides plans in four categories: platinum, gold, silver and bronze. Simply put, the bronze plans cost a lot less but has high deductibles and co-pays. Conversely,

David Chase, in-person assister with the Mountain States Group: “Let’s face it; it is the Affordable Care Act,” with particular emphasis on affordable.

platinum plans cost more but have very low deductibles and co-pays. Chase said bronze plans cover approximately 60 percent of what an insured person might normally pay for health care in a year; the remaining 40 percent would be the approximate out-of-pocket expenses that a patient would incur through doctor visits, treatments and prescriptions. “That’s about a 60/40 ratio,” he said. “Silver is 70/30; gold is 80/20; platinum is 90/10.” And that’s when Chase gave his first “inside tip” to the attendees who were still doing some comparative shopping on the exchange. “Take a good look at those plans in the silver category. That’s where the screaming deals are,” he advised, getting everyone’s attention. “We’ve seen some deals that were only about $10 or $20 a month after the subsidy. ” In Idaho, the four approved carriers offer a total of 43 different plans through the exchange: 14 bronze plans, 15 silver, 11 gold and two platinum. But no matter what the plan—from bronze to platinum—every new policy offered through the exchange includes what the ACA mandates to be “essential health benefits”: chronic disease management, emergency services, hospitalization, lab services, maternity and newborn care, mental health and substance abuse services, outpatient services, pediatric care (including vision and dental), prescription drugs, preventive and wellness services, and rehabilitation services and devices. As for additional benefits, it still takes consumers a fair amount of research and more than a few phone calls to figure out what’s covered and what’s not. For example, alternative medicine—including acupuncture, chiropractic care, massage therapy and other homeopathic treatments. According to the National Institutes of Health, about four in 10 American adults are using some form of alternative medicine. Section 2706 of the 2,400-page ACA

requires that insurance companies “shall not discriminate” against any state-licensed health care provider. But that doesn’t mean that insurance carriers in Idaho are required to include alternative treatments as part of the “essential health benefits” even if the services are provided by state-licensed providers. “I’m a yoga teacher,” said Naomi Jones, who is also the founder of the Idaho Health and Yoga Awareness organization. “I was told recently by a specialist who works for the International Association of Yoga Therapists that if a doctor prescribes yoga, chiropractic services or acupuncture, you can get a reimbursement through your insurance company.” Chase paused before he answered. “It’s possible,” he said. Boise Weekly contacted the Your Health Idaho call center to find out who did and who didn’t, but we were ultimately directed elsewhere. “What you need to do is call the individual insurance carriers to verify if their plans include alternative services,” said Ian, a Your Health Idaho customer service rep. And when BW contacted each of the approved carriers in the exchange, we got a mixed bag of answers. “None of our plans through the exchange include acupuncture but, yes, some plans include chiropractic service,” said a representative from Blue Cross of Idaho. “And I guess it would depend if there was a massage therapist affiliated with the chiropractor’s office if we were to pay for massage.” A customer service representative from PacificSource told BW that all of the plans they offered through the exchange would include coverage for alternative care, including acupuncture and chiropractic services but not massage therapy. And representatives from BridgeSpan and Select 9 Health said some of their plans included coverage for chiropractic services, but B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CITYDESK/NEWS NEWS JES S IC A M U R R I

ONE MORE TRY Add the Words effort returns to Statehouse JESSICA MURRI When Susie Matsuura’s son came out at the age of 17, she said to herself, “We live in Blackfoot, Idaho. Could we live in a place where it would have been more difficult to come out? I don’t think we could.” Since her son came out almost 10 years ago, Matsuura said she watched him face discrimination in Blackfoot and Boise, before he ultimately moved to Seattle with his boyfriend. Matsuura watched the Idaho Legislature, time and again, refuse to add the words “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to Idaho’s Human Rights Act. In front of nearly 1,000 people, while apologizing for her trembling voice, Masuura talked about being the mother of a gay son. “I love him and I will protect him,” Matsuura said. “That’s why I’ve worked so hard on this issue. History has shown us that you can change attitudes by changing laws.” Emilie Jackson-Edney, co-chair of Add the Words Idaho, said the rally was to get people “engaged, excited and maybe even angry.” “When gay or lesbian people come out, they don’t come out just to crawl back into the closet. They come out to live as they truly are,” said Jackson-Edney. “A working gay woman has to guard herself. If a co-worker asks her what she did this weekend, she can’t say, ‘Well my partner and I did this,’ because if

About 1,000 people gathered at the Statehouse Jan. 11 to press for an expansion of Idaho’s Human Rights Act to include protections based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

someone at her firm has a moral objection to that, she could be fired and there’s no recourse. She can’t put pictures of her family on her desk like everyone else. She can’t bring her partner to the company Christmas party. That’s no quality of life.” Jackson-Edney said she wouldn’t be able to end such discrimination without the help of straight allies, like Matsuura. Another straight ally who spoke at the rally was Ken Bass, morning host from Boise’s The River 94.9 FM, telling the crowd that he saw a woman at the rally with a sign that said, “Don’t Add the Words,” on one side and a slur on the other.

not acupuncture or massage. George Meintel, a 60-year-old salmon fisherman who splits 8 his time between Alaska and Idaho, said his reason for attending David Chase’s presentation came down to how much money he might be able to save if he were to cancel his current policy and secure new coverage through the exchange. “I pay through the nose. It’s ridiculous,” he said. “That’s why I’m interested in the ‘affordable’ part of the Affordable Care Act.” But he’ll need to shake a leg. If Meintel were to secure new coverage this week, it wouldn’t be effective until March 1 (any policy purchased after the 15th of the month has to wait a month and a half before it’s in effect). Additionally, this year’s cutoff for signing up through the exchange is March 31. “And after the end of March, you won’t be able to purchase through the exchange until the next period opens in October,” said Chase. “And you better keep in mind that you will be penalized if you don’t have insurance coverage for three months or more. In the first year, the penalty is $95 per person ($47.50 for children) or 1 percent of your income, whichever is higher. In year two, it doubles. By year three, it’s $600 per person ($300 per child) or 2.5 percent of your income. Let’s face it; they want people to pay that money to get health insurance, not to pay penalties.” As BW was going to press, approximately 19,922 Idahoans had signed up for coverage through the exchange. Idaho is aiming to have at least 40,000 enrolled in 2014. BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

“She saw the size of this crowd, and I saw her jaw drop,” Bass said. “And she turned and she walked away with her sign behind her.” At the rally’s end, organizers handed out blue, pink, yellow, red and green ribbons for attendees to write down their names and cities. Then each person stepped up to lines strung between lamp posts and tied their ribbons in place as a symbol of support. Jackson-Edney said she remains confident that a hoped-for legislative hearing would be packed with people who have been victims of discrimination. She said if it doesn’t happen this year, then she’ll try again next year… or the next.

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particular speech” and that the case was “not about whether being asked 8 for a donation of money on a sidewalk makes a person feel uncomfortable,” but instead, “about whether under our Constitution, a person has a First Amendment right to ask for money. Business owners and residents simply not liking panhandlers in acknowledged public areas does not rise to significant governmental interest.” A Boise City Hall statement on the day of Lodge’s ruling indicated that the mayor and City Council were reviewing the ruling. A week later, officials said they wanted a do-over of the ordinance. In particular, Lodge took issue with the part of the ordinance that aimed to criminalize all solicitation—including speech aimed to “request, ask or beg, whether by words, bodily gestures, signs or other means, for an immediate donation of money or other thing of value.” Lodge wrote that the definition of solicitation was much too broad, adding that “every person who solicits for money or property in the public areas defined in the statute are potentially criminally liable based merely on the content of their speech.” And even though the city was pressing the reset button, Bieter wasn’t admitting defeat. “It’s important that we have an ordinance in place that helps alleviate unwanted solicitation while upholding constitutionally protected rights,” Bieter said in a written statement. “This process has allowed the city to find that careful balance and will let us move forward with the most effective ordinance possible.” A spokesman for ACLU of Idaho said the organization is viewing the city’s rewrite as a win-win for Boise citizens. “In effect, they’re repealing the sections of the ordinace—everything we challenged in court,” said Leo Morales, communications and advocacy director for ACLU of Idaho. “Regrettably the city’s decision only came after a lawsuit at taxpayers’ expense.” City officials maintain that the ordinance still prohibits what is defined as “aggressive solicitation,” including: -nonconsensual physical contact. -continued solicitation within 5 feet of the person being solicited after a negative response. -intentionally obstructing the safe or free passage of the person being solicited. -threatening statement intended to cause a reasonable person to be intimidated into responding affirmatively. A statement from the mayor’s office indicated that the city hoped the revised ordinance would go into effect immediately, but the Boise Police Department was planning on “educating the public for the first several months, and will take enforcement action only when circumstances require it.” “It’s really critical that they’re revising the ordinance in a swift manner,” Morales told BW. “The city could have appealed this and continue to take it through the court, but obviously, they decided that it wasn’t necessary.” Morales added that the ACLU of Idaho had always hoped to avoid a legal battle. “And we hope that it doesn’t take this type of legal action in the future to avoid something that really should have been taken care of at the city level,” he said. —George Prentice

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What did you learn in your 2012 campaign versus 2010? If anything, it reinforced what I thought I knew, and that’s education was the No. 1 priority, and that was reaffirmed as I went door-to-door. It’s going to take several years to get where we need to get to restore things that were cut from education.

HAM

Do you have an idea of how far back we need to go? I’m presuming that, at least, it has to be pre-recession levels? Funding for education in Idaho has never been near the top in the nation, that’s for sure.

JANIE WARD-ENGELKING Idaho’s Newest Senator GEORGE PRENTICE The political fortunes have changed dramatically for Janie Ward-Engelking. After losing Idaho House Seat 18A by a mere seven votes to Julie Ellsworth in 2010, Ward-Engelking, renewed her challenge for the House seat in 2012 after the district had been dramatically reshaped (BW, News, “Turning 18,” Sept. 4, 2012). “Really hard work pays off,” said Ward-Engelking, who admitted to not celebrating her victory until hours after the last votes were counted on election night 2012. “Everybody kept saying, ‘It’s good.’ But I just didn’t allow us to celebrate until about 7 the next morning,” she recalled. And now, following only one year in the House, Ward-Engelking is one of only seven Democrats and six women in the 35-member Idaho Senate. She was sworn into the more exclusive club Jan. 6 after Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter appointed her to replace former Sen. Branden Durst, who resigned his post, citing “family needs.”

Talk to me about your decision to place your name into consideration for the Senate. I thought about it long and hard. I loved the House, coming in with a full group of new freshmen was pretty fun. We had a lot of camaraderie. I’m definitely the newbie on the Senate side.

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Were you surprised at Branden Durst’s decision to give up his Senate seat? I knew it was a hard for him—he worked hard to get there and really loved the job. I feel badly for him.

And the governor’s task force, which you were a part of, insists that we have to turn that around sooner than later. If the Legislature only takes a couple of the task force’s 21 recommendation, we’re not going to get the product we want. What do Idaho teachers need right now that they’re not getting? I believe they need job-embedded collaboration.

I’m presuming that you’re in favor of Boise Rep. Hy Kloc’s proposal for a Pre-K pilot program. I’m planning on being one of its cosponsors. Have you been talking to teachers about how it’s going in the first year of implementation of the Idaho Core Standards? Things are going fairly well in Boise and Meridian because they were farther along in developing their lesson plans. But that’s not true in the entire state. In some schools, they’re just now learning about it and they’re not where they need to be. Consequently, they’re scrambling because they haven’t had the professional development they need. Do you think that’s where some of the uncertainty and skepticism is coming from? The resources and tools aren’t there yet, and I think it makes people nervous when they can’t see it.

I’m not sure I know what that is. Simply put, they have to talk to one another. They have a lot of great ideas, but there’s no time to share them. They’re isolated. Maybe we need to have an early dismissal one day a week or possibly a late start.

Is it fair to say that we could have done a better job in rolling out Idaho Core? As an educator, I would have liked more time before implementation. But there have been big cutbacks, and one of the first things set aside by a lot of school districts was professional development. Teachers are great when you give them time to talk about it, analyze it and develop their lesson plans. But if we don’t give them those pieces, it’s going to continue to be a bumpy road.

Are you talking about school-to-school dialogue? You could do that, but in districts like Boise and Meridian, I’m thinking of dialogue within the building.

Do you spend time talking to others, encouraging them to run for the Legislature? So many people are very disillusioned with public service and politics. Some think it just doesn’t matter.

But I’m guessing those opportunities have gone by the wayside because of furloughs and elimination of in-service days due to budget restraints. That’s right. They’re gone. There’s no money for professional development.

Don’t you think that’s generational? I’m really encouraging more legislators to go into classrooms and talk to students about how it does make a difference and how their vote matters. Believe me, I know. I lost an election once by seven votes. Oh, yes, it really matters.

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JUST MARRIED Same-sex couples in Utah share their stories ERIC S. PETERSON | PHOTOGRAPHY BY NIKI CHAN

In the moments after federal Judge Robert Shelby struck down Utah’s law barring same-sex marriage Dec. 20, the reaction was explosive. For supporters, it was an outpouring of joy. “If they were to take another [marriage equality] poll like they did back in 2004, it would be completely different,” said a jubilant Daniel Musto moments after wedding his longtime partner. “Just seeing all the love people have for one another here, how could you deny it?” Conservatives, however, responded with head-exploding outrage. Eagle Forum leader Gayle Ruzicka registered her “disgust” with the marriages, and conservative activist and author Candace Salima opined on Twitter that “Surely the heavens must be weeping.” At the Salt Lake County Government Center on Monday, Dec. 23, the line of excited couples seeking marriage licenses wrapped around two floors. Equality advocates had warned couples that they might have only a few hours to get their licenses; if a judge granted the state its request for a stay, it would put a freeze on further same-sex marriages. But as historic as the occasion was, the couples themselves were not so different from straight couples in their motivations for being wed. In fact, had the haters met some of those who were lined up that Monday, they would have found people who fundamentally fit the mold of Utah couples: People raised to believe in commitment, looking to start families—or looking to keep whole the families they already had.

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Sure, the county building was not exactly the reception hall, wardhouse gymnasium or temple of a typical Utah marriage ceremony. Hundreds of couples waited in line, many with their children in strollers. Volunteer clergy filled the lobby of the building, next to tables stocked with coffee and donuts. Walking between the impromptu ceremonies, you’d catch snippets from officiants’ addresses, like “May each day be as precious as the first day you fell in love.” A hallway down from the cheers and commotion, a Zen priestess quietly married a lesbian couple. In the lobby, one priest pumped her arm in the air after reciting, “by the power of the state of Utah, I pronounce you spouses for life!” The scene was chaotic, joyful, anxious, loud and, well, very gay, but it also hammered home the fact that for these couples, the day wasn’t really about politics or making a statement. For them, it was a day they’d only dreamed of, a moment to finally solidify years-long commitments and to seal their rights as a couple—rights that would allow them to protect their families, to visit loved ones in the hospital, to share benefits, and, above all else, to finally be a married couple. But since Utah successfully convinced the U.S. Supreme Court to pass Jan. 6 a halt on same-sex marriages while the high court deliberates on the issues, these hundreds of couples now exist in legal limbo. Some fear that if the Supreme Court or the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals invalidates Shelby’s ruling, all the rights and privileges of these marriages could be dissolved. Here are just a few of those couples’ stories, of what they gained that day—and what they now stand to lose, depending on the Supreme Court’s ruling.

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BRIAN BENNINGTON AND DUANE JENNINGS

DUANE JENNINGS AND BRIAN BENINGTON Dapper and dashing in matching purple shirts, Duane Jennings and Brian Benington were easy to pick out in the line where, they proudly noted, they were the 104th couple. The friendship and love between the two men charted an unusual path, rooted in the LDS faith they both grew up in. Benington first met Jennings when he was quite young; Jennings’ LDS missionary companion helped convert Benington’s family to the faith while proselytizing in South Africa. In the decades that followed, Benington married and had several children before separating from his wife and later reconnecting with Jennings. The couple has been together for nine years, and marriage has often been a topic of discussion. For both men, though they are no longer church-going, being able to wed means the realization of values they were raised with that they’ve never given up on. “I was raised in a very traditional LDS family, and as I came out, it was, like, ‘Well, I still want to be with someone and commit my whole life to them,’ ” Jennings said. These values were not lost on their families; Benington’s grown son cried on the phone when he heard his father was getting married,

and as the two men were being interviewed by City Weekly, Benington’s daughter was rushing to the county building to act as their witness. “People need to understand that we have values. Many people don’t think we do, but marriage is one way of holding that up,” Benington said. “I had to tell my parents I may not be a proper Latter-day Saint anymore, but all the values I was raised with are still what I live my life by.”

BRYAN TURNER AND KAYLA SALVATORI Perhaps one of the most unique couples to take advantage of the historic day was actually a pairing of a man and a woman. Kayla Salvatori identifies her authentic gender as that of a woman. She’s been transitioning from male to female, so, ironically, it took a court decision legalizing gay marriage for the couple to be wed as man and wife. “He’s straight, so it’s different and not everyone gets it,” Salvatori said. “But you fall in love with the person and not the body, so we’re lucky.” Bryan Turner and Salvatori have been together for more than eight years, since meeting on MySpace, of all places. For their first date, Turner, who lived in Richfield, met Salvatori, who hails from Salt Lake County, at a gas station in Panguitch before they drove back to Richfield to do some stargazing.

BRYAN TURNER AND KAYLA SALVATORI

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THE REV. EUN-SANG LEE FROM FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH AND THE REV. CURTIS L. PRICE FROM THE FIRST BABPTIST CHURCH IN SALT LAKE CITY

“I wasn’t used to the stars being so bright, being from the Salt Lake area, and he was all, like, ‘Look at the stars, they are as beautiful as your eyes,’” Salvatori said with a laugh. While the social-media site hasn’t quite stood the test of time, the couple’s love has. They say they’ve felt nothing but support, even from Turner’s family, whom Salvatori describes affectionately as “super LDS.” She said she hopes more people will see the good that’s come of the day and try to accept the LGBT couples and families around them. “How can you deny love and deny all the happy looks on everyone’s faces and all the families that are now complete?” Salvatori said. “That’s got to wake some people up.”

ago, and got engaged two months ago. Before the ruling changed things, they had plans to travel to Seattle to be married. Surrounded by family, including plenty of stoked LDS kin, the couple said their vows and were wed near the entrance of the county building. The goofy grins on the couple only buoyed the applause, hugs and tears of witnessing family. As the reverend who officiated their marriage walked away, she turned to a friend to say, “How much fun am I having!” And for Gowers and Porter, the fun is just beginning.

MEGAN GOWERS AND KAYLA PORTER

Wearing a lily-white wedding dress and holding a bouquet of roses and a bag packed with snacks and Powerade, Heather Collins had been camped outside the county building since 3 a.m on that chilly Monday morning. Needless to say, she and Jax were pretty excited for the doors to open at 6 a.m.—two hours earlier than usual—for the rush of newlyweds-to-be. When asked how long the couple has been together, the simultaneous answers of “five years” from Heather and “six” from Jax was cause for some mock indignation from Heather. “How come

The lady whose hair Megan Gowers was cutting Dec. 20 will likely always remember exactly when she heard that same-sex marriage had been deemed legal in Utah. After hearing the news, Kayla Porter started trying to track down her girlfriend to tell her the news. She eventually left her work early and interrupted Gowers cutting a customer’s hair. Porter introduced herself to the lady whose hair Gowers was cutting and broke the news to them both. “It was awesome,” Gowers said. The two have been together since meeting on a camping trip in Southern Utah a year

HEATHER AND JAX COLLINS

HEATHER AND JAX COLLINS

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HEATHER AND JAX COLLINS

you don’t know how long we’ve been together?” she asks. Heather recounted their first storybook encounter at local bar the Paper Moon this way: “Yeah, we totally met at a bar, and I was really cool, and was, like, ‘Hey, good looking, we should dance,’ and we did—and that’s how it happened.” “Yeah, sorta like that,” Jax said with a laugh. Jax says she knows there will always be hostility from some; she says she’s been punched in the face simply for being gay. But there’s something to be said about having equality in spite of the rancor that still lingers in the community. “We walk around every day, and we know that we’re different,” Jax said. They know that some people who see them together “don’t like it,” she said. “So that won’t change for us. The thing that will change is we can say, ‘we’re just like you.’ ” “Yup, and we’ll have the license to prove it,” Heather said, beaming.

MELISSA AND DAWNN CHATWIN After their marriage was completed at 9:15 a.m., as other couples were expecting a court decision that might have stopped the marriages at any moment, the Chatwins were finally able to relax, with license in hand. “After all the excitement from being here the whole night, now I can finally breathe,” Dawnn said. The couple had friends save a spot in line the night prior while they arranged for someone to watch their 5-month-old son. As part of the first wave of married couples that morning, the Chatwins were still rocking between the joy and bliss of marriage and the shock and awe of samesex marriage being legal in Utah. Asked their thoughts on Utah being the 18th state to allow same-sex marriage, their simultaneous response was simply, “weird.” For them, it was a weird relief, as it finally gave them equal privileges when it comes to raising their child. Prior to

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getting married, only Melissa, the biological mother, had rights. “Since we have a baby together, it is so scary thinking she can’t take him to the hospital if I’m not there because she’s not legally his mother,” Melissa said. While the couple did find Utah’s (temporary) spot as the 18th state to allow gay marriage somewhat surprising given the local culture, they said that their personal experience has been mostly positive, receiving lots of support from family and friends. “There’s more support here than not,” Dawnn said. They say that people all over are just becoming more accepting, including Melissa’s Baptist grandmother. “Even though she knows we’ll go to hell, she’s still OK with us as people,” Melissa said with a laugh.

BARBARA CHRISTENSEN AND MELANIE HANSEN While many courtships started at clubs, bars or in the workplace, Barbara Christensen and Melanie Hansen met on a court— the racquetball courts at the Marv Jenson Recreation Center in South Jordan. “We were pretty competitive, but it was also just for fun and exercise,” Hansen said. “Then we just became friends and figured out life together.” The couple staked out their spot in line with their 21-month-old son, Kaden, in tow. Kaden, having spent hours in line in the hallway of a county government center, was struggling to keep still. Kaden, whom Hansen gave birth to, is not the first child she’s considered immediate family. In a previous relationship, her partner was the biological mother. The two eventually separated, and without having been officially married, Hansen had no right to the child she had helped raise as an equal parent. It’s a part of her story she doesn’t like to dwell on. “History is history, but I learned a lot from it,” Hansen said. “It’s motivated me to move forward, and helped me learn how much rights really mean to protect people.” Same-sex marriage not being legal, Hansen said, is “not going to stop people from having families.”

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DANIEL MUSTO AND CHRISTOPHER JOHNS

SHANE ATKINSON AND DARRELL WHATCOTT At 7:30 a.m. Dec. 23, Shane Atkinson and Darrell Whatcott found themselves near the end of the line. They had been caught off guard and hadn’t staked out a spot at the county building the night before, as other couples had; like most Utahns, they hadn’t expected same-sex marriage to happen in Utah. “Not without the help of federal troops!” Atkinson joked. Atkinson and Whatcott had long considered themselves married, having been together for the past 28 years. The couple met when Atkinson was a lab teaching assistant for a college engineering class that Whatcott taught. “Our first date was at Hire’s, we had root-beer floats,” Whatcott said. “You know, traditional Utah thing.” The couple had planned to be married out of state in the spring to reap federal healthcare benefits now available under the Affordable Care Act, but with marriages suddenly legal in Utah, the couple decided to tie the knot in their home state. “Now we have the legal and the health benefits we are entitled to,” Whatcott said. “I don’t know how many thousands we’ve spent on lawyers, just trying to set up trusts and trying to get some of the basics that you get with a marriage license.”

RUSTY JAMES AND MELVIN NIMER In their matching baby-blue sweaters, Rusty James and Melvin Nimer drew reporters to them like moths to a flame. Like others, the couple was caught up in the excitement of the moment, ecstatic about the recognition of their right to marry. And for James, 35, being able to have a say in the health-care decisions of his soonto-be husband, the 65-year-old Nimer, is hugely important. “If something happens to him, I don’t have to worry,” James said. “I can take care of him and know that he’ll be taken care of.” Nimer fondly recalled the couvv ple’s first rendezvous at Club Try-Angles where, he said with a grin, James “kept stalking me until I fell in love with him.” The couple has been inseparable for the 6 1/2 years since. For Nimer—a board member of the gay caucus group Utah Log Cabin Republicans BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

and the treasurer of the Salt Lake County GOP—the day was momentous politically as well as personally. He said he hopes same-sex marriage will provide a lesson to fellow conservatives about being consistent when it comes to advocating against big government. “True conservatives want government out of their lives as much as possible,” Nimer said. “A conservative wants everyone treated equally, but most of them are lost when their definition of ‘everyone treated equally’ means everyone like them, instead of all people. We’re trying to teach conservatives how to be true conservatives.”

DANIEL MUSTO AND CHRISTOPHER JOHNS Daniel Musto and Christopher Johns were wed in the lobby of the building, with their ceremony officiated by Johns’ brother, surrounded by smiling, teary-eyed family members, including a young girl armed with an iPad, busily Skyping the union to family from out of state. Interviewed after being married for all of five minutes, Musto and Johns had no complaints about the married life. “It’s amazing,” Johns said. “It feels like something I didn’t even know I could dream to have come true.” The couple first met after being set up on a blind dinner date by friends. It wasn’t love at first sight. “I hated him at first,” Musto said with a grin. But their love grew; the couple had been together eight years before their wedding day. For Musto, the fact that the bang of a judge’s gavel could bring marriage equality to the state was surprising, but was something he had long wished for. “I have been praying and praying, and I just couldn’t be happier about it,” Musto said. “We’re finally being validated for the love we have for one another in the eyes of the state. Our love for one another hasn’t changed, but now it’s official: I can say this man is my husband.” This story was originally published in Salt Lake City Weekly, Jan. 8, 2014.

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“Grand Canyon with Rainbows,” by Elliot Anderson, part of his exhibit Average Landscapes at Sun Valley Center for the Arts in Ketchum.

THURSDAY JAN. 16

FRIDAY-SATURDAY JAN. 17-18

not-so-average landscapes

put on your red light

ART HISTORY LECTURE WITH ELLIOT ANDERSON Some think of fine art as something high-society folks admire through a pair of designer bifocals while sipping wine and caressing their fancy cat. In truth, art is seen and appreciated by all in one form or another, and it is a link that bridges cultures and generations—particularly the ubiquitous landscape painting. There’s a good chance you’ve seen one on a hotel room wall, in a doctor’s office waiting area or at Aunt Martha’s house, and there’s a good chance it made its way into Elliot Anderson’s exhibit, Average Landscapes. Anderson, who has worked in computer technology since the early ’80s, culls tourist photographs of 19th century landscape paintings from the Internet and uses a software program he wrote to create digital composites. In his lecture, Anderson will talk about the “link between American landscape painting and American tourism” and how Average Landscapes—currently part of the Wish You Were Here exhibition at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts—“reimagines the American desire for the sublime.” Leave the cat at home, but bring the bifocals just in case. Arrive at 5:30 p.m. for a tour of the exhibition. 6 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. East, Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

THURSDAY JAN. 16 word up THE WORD READING SERIES Human beings are moved by stories. We read them, we watch them, we listen to them and we create them. Stories come in the form of film, poetry, fiction and more, and many writers aspire to great heights, even if they do

so in secret. Case in point: Michael Scott (Steve Carell) from NBC’s The Office had a script titled Threat Level Midnight hidden away in his desk for years before it saw the light of day. Perhaps you have a short story hidden in your desk drawer, or maybe a chapbook full of poetry in your closet. Either way, The WORD reading series at The Cabin will show you that you don’t have to write behind closed doors. Writers Kerri Webster, Danny Stewart and Heidi Kraay will be on hand

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Hot blooded old times.

to read selections from their body of work. Webster and Stewart are poets, while Kraay specializes in playwriting. All work as teachingwriters for area schools and share their love of literature with Boise students. Wear your most sophisticated ensemble and bring a pen and pad of paper in case inspiration strikes. The event is free and open to the public. 7 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: NOSTALGIA By the 1970s, burlesque was practically dead in the United States. The art form, fueled by the flow of liquor, suffered a crippling blow during Prohibition. In the 1950s, titty mags like Playboy replaced the striptease and the big reveal with no-holds-barred centerfolds. Finally, the fast-food sexuality of video porn upset burlesque’s balance between sensuality, performance and humor. But in an age when music lovers are turning away from MP3s and (back) toward vinyl records—and more than a few gamers are abandoning their PlayStations for board games— some people are also retreating from the unconvincing sexuality of Internet smut and returning to the spectacle and winking suggestion of burlesque. Boise lovers of the outrageous, hilarious and stylish have long savored Red Light Variety Show, which is now staging performances of its 2014 winter showcase. RLVS’ latest performance series, Nostalgia, has been running since Jan. 9, but there are still plenty of chances to catch the RLVS crew’s antics. This time, their partners include special guest Joe Golden of the Fool Squad, with music by Frim Fram 4. Catch Angela Bryson, Frankly Frankie, Juniper Rose, James Sharp, Kate Ponozzo, Kelly Green, Kristen Hill, Allison Holley, Erynn Leonardson and Lynn Knickrehm-Fisher as they perform acrobatic feats, Vaudevillian skits, stripteases and more Fridays and Saturdays through Saturday, Feb. 1. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. 9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, redlightvarietyshow.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 17 what’s new, pussycat? INTERNET CAT VIDEO FILM FESTIVAL If aliens from a faraway galaxy landed on Earth and

were shown the Internet as their first introduction to its human inhabitants, the extraterrestrial beings could be forgiven for thinking cats are part of a hive mind hellbent on world domination—a search of “cat video” on Google yields more than 1 billion results, some of which have tens of millions of views. Watching videos of

our furry friends is usually a solitary activity… until now. With the Internet Cat Video Film Festival, strangers can sit together in one room and share laughs while watching 75 minutes of two tabbies on a treadmill, a kitten who leaps from a kitchen counter right into a trash can, a frisky feline ambushing a toddler, a capering kitty who attacks B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FIND

Resolve to drown and/or dance away your guilt.

MONDAY JAN. 20

SATURDAY JAN. 18

civil rights

resolution: fail BROKEN RESOLUTIONS BALL ’14 It’s not even the third week of January and you’ve gained 10 pounds, showed up late every day for work and haven’t even begun those university applications you set out on your desk Jan. 2. Look at yourself in the mirror: You’re halfway through January and somehow you’ve completely failed to realize any of your New Year’s resolutions. Never fear. According to a 2007 study by the University of Bristol, about 12 percent of resolutions make it off the ground. The Guardian reported a less dismal success rate in 2010—22 percent. You may be a failure, but at least you’re not in the minority. Admit your failures and hit up the fourth annual Broken Resolutions Ball, which goes down Saturday, Jan. 18, starting at 7:30 p.m. There, you can achieve your real resolution: taking in more music, with performances by Interstate, Soul Serene, Dirty Like Money and other, as-yet-unannounced performers. Break out your list, nix your pie-in-the-sky dreams and add more achievable resolutions like eating more Pie Hole pizza, partaking of more full bars and burning off excess calories by cutting it up on the dance floor. Rockin’ tunes, more pizza than you can shake a stick at and drinks aplenty will help you recalibrate your expectations for 2014—and have a great time doing it. 7:30 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. The Linen Building, 1402 Grove St., brokenresolutionsball.com.

his reflection in a mirror, and much, much more. Organizers suggest this festival “isn’t about watching cat videos, it’s about watching cat videos together,” and a portion of the evening’s proceeds benefit a local animal nonprofit. Plus, there’s a special appearance by Charlie Schmidt and his Keyboard Cat. So while tickets are a little steep at $20-$35, you can’t really put a price on that kind of cat camaraderie. 8:30 p.m., $20-$35, tickets available at ticketweb. com. Knitting Factory, 416

S U B M I T BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

Dream a big dream.

S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

2014 MLK LIVING LEGACY CELEBRATION When President Ronald Reagan made the third Monday in January Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 1983—15 years after King’s 1968 assassination—the holiday was immediately opposed by political figures from across the country, including in Idaho, where MLK Day wasn’t enacted as a state holiday until 2006—23 years after passage of the federal holiday, and 38 years after King’s death. King and his holiday have been lightning rods of public debate ever since. In 2013, students, the public and representatives from a diverse set of organizations met at Boise State University and marched on the Capitol Building, calling for marriage and race equality. One of the speakers was Boise State’s first openly gay student body president, Ryan Gregg. “I dream of a time when marriage as recognized by your God is not the same as marriage as recognized by your government,” he told the crowd. Boise State will once again kick off its MLK Day with poster making (materials provided) Monday, Jan. 20 at 8:30 a.m. in the Jordan Ballroom of the Student Union Building, followed by a march on the Capitol starting from campus at 10:30 a.m. with an 11:30 a.m. arrival at the seat of Idaho state politics. There, participants can hear impassioned pleas for the extension of King’s nonviolent and social equality principles to everything from Native American and immigrant rights to the addition of the words “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to Idaho’s Human Rights Act. Posters and march start: 8:30 a.m., FREE. Jordan Ballroom, Boise State University Student Union, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1000, mlk.boisestate.edu; Rally: 11:30 a.m., FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-322-1302, capitolcommission.idaho.gov.

ONE LINE A DAY Do you ever wonder, “What was I doing on this very day last year?” Well, here’s your chance to find out—if you’re writerly and disciplined, that is. The One Line a Day: A FiveYear Memory Book, from Chronicle Books LLC, actually gives you five lines per day, every day, for five years to record the ups and downs of daily life. Every page is labeled with a date, like Jan. 15, and contains five separate sections and a place to write in the year on each. What better way is there to see if that hasty marriage lasted, to track the progress of your lifelong dreams, or to find out if you were able to handle that alcohol problem all by yourself? How fun Flying M would it be to look back a year ago, or Barnes and Noble two or three or four, and think, “Man, $16.95 I can’t believe I was so worried about eating gluten in 2014”; or “Hey, good thing nothing ever came of that whole ‘global warming’ thing”; or “Hah! Gay marriage was illegal once?” You can find this little gold leaf book—complete with a ribbon to keep your place—at the Flying M gift shop or Barnes and Noble for $16.95. You’ve only missed the first 15 entries of the year so far. —Jessica Murri

Prediction: In the future, images of cats will be used as currency.

an event by email to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JAN. 15 Festivals & Events WOOLLYBUGGER MEETING— Children ages 7-16 are invited to join the largest fly fishing club in North America for monthly meetings. Family membership fees are $20 per year (fee is per family not per child). Idaho Fish and Game Headquarters, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-3228118, bvff.com.

Literature BOOK SIGNING: SNAKE RIVER DISCOVERED—Photographer Kirk Anderson chases the elusive elements of light, weather and seasons through four states over four years along the 1,200-mile length of one of the American West’s most dramatic rivers. For more info, visit kirkanderson. com. 10 a.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705.

THURSDAY JAN. 16 Festivals & Events THE SCIENCE OF SNOW—Learn all about snow and explore the whole museum without kids. Featuring live music from Deviant Kin, food trucks and more. 6 p.m. $8 members, $10 nonmembers. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-3439895, dcidaho.org.

On Stage COMEDIAN JAKE SHARON— Comedian talks about his bizarre encounters with Craigslist strangers, bed bugs, bad tattoos and his wife. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. LIE, CHEAT AND GENUFLECT— Laugh-packed farce filled with twists, turns, puns and pratfalls. 7:30 p.m. $14-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT—Random Acts of Theatre presents this Tony Award-winning musical for the first time in Southern Idaho. Tickets on sale through the CSI Fine Arts Center ticketing system at tickets.csi. edu. Seating is reserved. 7:30 p.m. $17. College of Southern Idaho, 315 Falls Ave. W., Twin Falls, 208-733-9554, csi.edu.

Art ART HISTORY LECTURE WITH ELLIOT ANDERSON—Join artist Elliot Anderson, whose Average Landscapes series is on display as part of the Wish You Were Here exhibit, for a lecture on the connections between American landscape painting and American tourism. See Picks, Page 16. 6 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E.,

18 | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOISEweekly

Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Literature THE WORD READING SERIES—Hear Kerri Webster, Daniel Stewart and Heidi Kraay read selections from their bodies of work. See Picks, Page 16. 7 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

Talks & Lectures RESEARCH & HOPE DAY—Each January, Cancer Connection Idaho brings a world-renowned speaker to Boise who speaks to the cancer community. This year’s topic is The Art & Science of Living Fully: Research and Real World Practice, by keynote speaker Susan Bauer-Wu, Ph.D. Open to the public. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483, parklaneco.com/ roseroom.

Odds & Ends CHANT MASTER PETER TANORIKIHO—Come experience chanting. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Facets of Healing Wellness Emporium, 717 Vista Ave., Boise, 208-429-9999, facetsofhealing.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 17 Festivals & Events THE INTERNET CAT VIDEO FILM FESTIVAL— Check out all your favorite crazy cat videos when the touring film festival comes to town. See Picks, Page 16. 9 p.m. $20-$35. The Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo. knittingfactory.com. SECOND CHANCE SQUARE DANCE—7 p.m. $7. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

NOISE/CD REVIEW MUSICIANS MEET-UP AT THE CRUX Being a successful musician means knowing more than how to sing or play an instrument. Go Listen Boise President Stephanie Coyle said some of the musicians her organization has worked with in the past didn’t quite understand this. “They don’t have a great press kit. They don’t sometimes have music samples that we can listen to. Bios seem to be a little bit challenging for people to put together,” she said. In the hopes of filling that knowledge gap, Go Listen Boise has begun hosting the Musicians Meet-Up at The Crux, a weekly series of meetings that will precede the coffee shop’s Mondaynight open mic. They’ll start with a meet-and-greet from 6-7 p.m., during which performers can sign up for the open mic and get to know each other. On the third Monday of each month, GLB will host a Musicians Development Session from 6-7 p.m., in which local pros will talk about topics relating to the music business. The idea for the Musicians Meet-Up came from local musicianpromoter Heather Roberts, who also organizes The Crux’s monthly Singer-Songwriter Showcase. Roberts was an open mic regular before she began promoting shows as Ten Gallon Cat, and she hosted the inaugural Musicians Meet-Up on Jan. 6. Roberts’ concept dovetailed with GLB’s longstanding wish to create a “social of some sort” to bring people together to learn about the industry. “And we haven’t been able to really pull it off in one fell swoop, so this provided a good opportunity to touch base on a lot of different topics,” Coyle said. GLB has announced topics for the first three Development Sessions: Jan. 20, Finn Riggins keyboardist and Duck Club Presents promoter Eric Gilbert will talk about band basics. Following that, on Feb. 17, Record Exchange marketing director Chad Dryden will give pointers on building a press kit. On March 17, local artists will discuss the connection between visual art and music. —Benjamin Schultz B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT On Stage

Odds & Ends

On Stage

COMEDIAN JAKE SHARON— See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

GURU DONUTS POP UP SHOP—Every Friday, enjoy a selection of fresh-made donuts, maple bacon bars, fritters and more. Call ahead to pre-order by the dozen or just go on down; no minimum required. 7:30 a.m. $2-$3. Guru Donuts, The Garro Building, 816 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-571-7792, gurudonuts.com.

COMEDIAN JAKE SHARON— See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

LIE, CHEAT AND GENUFLECT— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $14-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $17. College of Southern Idaho, 315 Falls Ave. W., Twin Falls, 208-733-9554, csi.edu. RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: NOSTALGIA— Pay tribute to the sultry side of the past with burlesque, aerial arts, comedy and live music from Frim Fram 4. See Picks, Page 16. 9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Literature GHOSTS & PROJECTORS POETRY READING SERIES— Featuring Boise State University Professor Martin Corless-Smith and Idaho Writer-in-Residence Diane Raptosh. 7 p.m. $2 donation. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-8220, hydeparkbooks.net.

SATURDAY JAN. 18 Festivals & Events IDAHO REMODELING & DESIGN SHOW—Explore 100-plus exhibits of the newest products on the market to discover what’s hot in decorating, kitchen and bath renovations, landscaping and more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com. POLAR HAWAIIAN DAY—Dress the part for this Hawaiian-style party as you channel some warm weather with Hawaiian-themed food, giveaways and more. Noon. FREE. High Desert HarleyDavidson, 2310 E. Cinema Drive, Meridian, 208-338-5599, highdeserthd.com.

| SUDOKU

IDAHO REMODELING & DESIGN SHOW—See Saturday. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $3. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208336-8900, boisecentre.com.

MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $17. College of Southern Idaho, 315 Falls Ave. W., Twin Falls, 208-733-9554, csi.edu.

On Stage

RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW: NOSTALGIA—See Friday. 9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Art ARTIST SWEATSHOP III—Artists will be on hand to draw sketches and they will be available for purchase for $5-$10. All proceeds directly benefit artists. Cash only. Noon. FREE. Crooked Fence Barrelhouse, 5181 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-376-4200, facebook.com/ crookedfencebarrelhouse.

Sports & Fitness

Kids & Teens JUNIOR DUCK STAMP ART DAYS—Young artists and wildlife enthusiasts from kindergarten to high school are invited to create and submit their own masterpiece to the Idaho Junior Duck Stamp art contest. All the necessary supplies will be provided. 10 a.m. FREE. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor’s Center, 13751 Upper Embankment Road, Nampa, 208-467-9278, fws.gov/deerflat.

Religious/Spiritual MINDFUL-EATING MEDITATION—Guided mindful-eating meditation with Marya Bruning, RD. Open to all. No registration required. Take something to eat or drink. 9 a.m. FREE. Hyde Park Mennonite Fellowship, 1520 N. 12th St., Boise.

Animals & Pets Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Festivals & Events

LIE, CHEAT AND GENUFLECT— See Thursday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $14-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

IDAHO STAMPEDE VS. SANTA CRUZ WARRIORS—NBA Development League basketball. 7 p.m. $8-$380. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com/home.aspx.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

SUNDAY JAN. 19

FAMILY FIELD TRIP SATURDAY—Cure cabin fever with fun and educational programs focused on conserving birds of prey. Visitors will see live bird demonstrations, tour the falconry archives, participate in family-friendly activities, and enjoy spending time outdoors on the scenic interpretive trail. 10 a.m. $3-$5. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-3628687, peregrinefund.org.

COMEDIAN JAKE SHARON— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. FAMILY READING SERIES: RAPUNZEL—A beautiful princess and her amazingly long, braided hair has been kept away from the dangers of the world but won’t be able to resist the idea of freedom with someone she loves. Based on the story by the Brothers Grimm, and written by Carole Whiteleather. 2 p.m. $7. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State University campus, Boise, 208-426-1609.

Animals & Pets MEET THE CRITTERS—Zamzow’s Small Animal Presentations features a different critter every third Tuesday of the month, including rabbits, snakes, mice, chinchillas, tortoises and hamsters. All ages welcome. No library card or registration required. 4:15 p.m. FREE. Nampa Public Library, 101 11th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-5800, nampalibrary.org.

WEDNESDAY JAN. 22 Festivals & Events BOISE S-ANON MEETING— Troubled by someone’s sexual behavior? S-Anon can help. Email sanonboise@gmail.com for questions/more info. 6:15 p.m. FREE. 1111 S. Orchard St. #112A, Boise.

Kids & Teens

LIE, CHEAT AND GENUFLECT— See Thursday. 2 p.m. $14-$16. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

KIDS EXPERIENCE—A science and art program for children ages 6 and older held in The Secret Garden. 3 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

MONDAY JAN. 20

KINDERGARTEN READINESS— Prepare your children for kindergarten. 1 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

Festivals & Events MLK RALLY—Join students at Boise State University as well as members of the public from various organizations for a rally and march in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. and human and civil rights. See Picks, Page 17. 8:30 a.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, boisestate.edu.

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young designers, inventors and engineers can bring their creations to life with Legos. Bring a shoebox full of your own if you’ve got them. Some will be provided for you if you don’t. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

PRESCHOOL DAYS—Children ages 4 and younger can create sans studio fees. 11 a.m. Ceramica, 1002 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-342-3822.

Odds & Ends BECOME A TEACHER—See Tuesday. 4 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. FREE. Mountain Home Public Library, 790 North 10th East, Mountain Home, 1-877-6692228 (Option 1), mhlibrary.org. BIOTZETIK BASQUE CHOIR— You don’t have to speak Basque and there are no tryouts, just singing. The choir meets at Bishop Kelly High School. 6 p.m. FREE, 208-853-0678. Bishop Kelly High School, 7009 W. Franklin Road, Boise, bk.org. DATE NIGHT—Featuring live music, massages and champagne. 6 p.m. Varies. The Springs, 3742 Idaho 21, Idaho City, 208-3929500, thespringsid.com. LATIN NIGHTS—Learn salsa, bachata and Brazilian zouk lessons, followed by social dancing. 8:30 p.m. $5. The Press, 212 N. Ninth St., Ste. B, Boise, 208336-9577, www.facebook.com/ thepressboise?sk=info. LIQUID LAUGHS OPEN MIC COMEDY—Enjoy some of of the best stand up comedians Boise has to offer. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— Work on public speaking and leadership skills. For more info call 208-921-2480. Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Elmer’s, 1385 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-343-5714.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

TUESDAY JAN. 21 Odds & Ends BECOME A TEACHER—Learn how you can become a certified teacher in Idaho. Dates and times subject to change. For upto-date information, email contact@abcte.org. 4 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 1-877-669-2228 (Option 1), boisepubliclibrary.com. NAMI SUPPORT GROUP— Share your experiences, coping strategies and offer support and encouragement to others living with mental illness. Call for more info. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-3764304, flyingmcoffee.com.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | 19


CULTURE/GAMING

GETTING ON BOARD Tabletop games enjoy a renaissance HARRISON BERRY

20 | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOISEweekly

EL

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BR

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NER

how smooth it goes and how much fun my friends are having,” he said. N Fun and play are central to JE the growing small-batch game industry in Idaho, since striking it rich on a game idea is rare. As fledgling designer Patrick Runyan of Boise is learning, getting a small-batch game to market requires business research, a love of gaming and few expectations of the economic outcome of bringing a game to market. “If you want to make money, don’t publish a board game; you won’t,” Runyan wrote in an email. His as-yet-untitled game is based on reversing the dungeon crawl model typified by Dungeons & Dragons: Players take on the roles of evil forces that must populate dungeons with monsters, hoard treasure and compete for domination of the world outside the dungeons. Runyan has conferred with producers of published games and play-tested his game 40 to 50 times, but his research into getting his game published and distributed has taken him well beyond his computer desk and game table. When it comes to production, most small-batch board games are manufactured in China, in part because American factories have a high minimum-order quantity. Runyan said one American manufacturer “basically told me to piss off” when his MOQ was lower than 5,000 units. Publishers and distributors can be easier to find at game expos like Origins N

A troupe of adolescents slipped into All About Games’ Eighth Street location, followed by a young couple with an infant. The kids were looking for an upscale backgammon board; the young couple was in search of a two-player learning game for a dyslexic nephew. Debbie Kessler, who works at AAG, directed the couple to a puzzle game designed to cultivate creativity. Kessler said AAG sees a staggering variety of visitors because “they want to have fun with each other,” pegging AAG’s success—a growing customer base and steady profits through three otherwise economically tumultuous years—to the broad appeal of board- and tabletop games as counterpoints to the television, computer and phone screens that have taken a cut out of many people’s social lives. “I think people are looking to lure kids away from these screens,” Kessler said. Low-tech games have been undergoing a renaissance for at least the past decade. In that time, worldwide sales have grown 10-20 percent each year, according to game review site Shut Up & Sit Down. Riding the tide of that phenomenon have been numerous Idaho game and gameaccessory designers, most of whom produce games in small batches of fewer than 10,000 units. One of those designers is Mark Hanny of Joe Magic Games in Idaho Falls. He has been designing games since the 1990s and his most recent production is UFO Hunter, in which players compete for evidence of extraterrestrial life while avoiding pitfalls like unsubstantiated rumors and alien abduction. Hanny has pitched games to name-brand firms like Mattel and Parker Brothers, but for many designers, the path of least resistance is funding games themselves—usually through crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo—and letting potential customers decide what kinds of games they’d like to play. That has affected the variety and complexity of games that are being produced. “Boutique gamers are going to sell games that have a few more things going on; that have a few more choices to make [like] strategy, things to think about,” Hanny said. Changing attitudes toward player involvement, play length, complexity and chance-versus-skill are products of the rise of so-called Euro-games like Settlers of Catan and deck-building games like Magic: The Gathering, both of which boast millions of players and were introduced in the 1990s. With a new generation of trailblazing games, designers started to see alternatives to winning a game based on driving the other players off the board. “I don’t want a guy to sit there at the table and say, ‘I’m not in this game and I’m not having fun anymore,’” Hanny said. As expected, entertainment and inclusion are important to game creators like Hanny, who is an avid player himself, as are many game designers. “When I put a game down [on the table], I’m looking for

Game Fair in Columbus, Ohio, and GenCon in Indianapolis, Ind. During the process of developing, testing, manufacturing and distributing a game, interested parties try to change designers’ products, and Runyan is learning to adhere to his vision for the game without being inflexible. “Honestly, development is a tug-of-war,” he wrote. “You have to remember to make the game you want to make, but not be so stubborn that you aren’t able to make clear improvements.” Scott Morton of Silver Arrow Audio Works in Boise has adopted a different strategy for his role-playing and boardgame accessory. Instead of tailoring his product to its market, he intends to show gamers a product that will add an unanticipated dimension to play. Silver Arrow’s first release will be Ambient Soundscapes Vol. I: The Wilderness—a 17-track album of 10-minute-long, loopable ambient soundscapes to be played in conjunction with tabletop role-playing games. The tracks have generic but appropriate titles, like “Deep Forest,” “Snowy Mountains,” “Eerie Dungeon” and “Adventurers Tavern.” Morton has plenty of experience designing audio for games. After graduating from Boise State University with a degree in music composition, Morton spent five years with Canadian videogame developer BioWare, where he worked in sound design on hugely popular titles like Mass Effect and Star Wars: The Old Republic. He returned to Boise in 2013 to start Silver Arrow Audio Works. Morton said that the audio is always secondary to the play experience; nevertheless, as the thematic content of games has expanded—they’re set in locales as disparate as deserted islands, 8-bit dungeons and outer space—so has the desire among players to make gaming a more immersive experience, and sound is a big part of that experience. “The audio helps to amplify the imaginative process,” he said. Gamers have long been lifting sound effects and scores from movies and videogame sound files, mixing them into compelling backgrounds for their board- and role-playing game sessions, and The Wilderness gives those players a professionally assembled audio backdrop in 5.1 surround sound. Audio-visual media like films and videogames have been trending away from musical soundtracks and toward ambient and atmospheric sound, and Morton is following that trend; but The Wilderness isn’t chasing a well-defined market demographic. “It’s that Steve Jobs mentality: People don’t know what they want until you give it to them,” Morton said. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


ARTS/NEWS NOISE/CULTURE

THOROUGHLY MODERN MUSIC Modern Kin rips it up and starts again BEN SCHULTZ After years on the Boise music scene, Nampaborn musician Kris Doty needed a change. “Boise has always been a really supportive scene for me,” she explained, “but I [felt] like maybe I overplayed for a while. And so I needed to go play some new places, be around new blood, just mix it up a little. I didn’t want to become stagnant.” In 2009, Doty moved from Boise to Portland, Ore., where she’d lived once before and played in the band Five O’Clock People with singer-songwriter Drew Grow. The two had kept in touch—Grow opened at Doty’s CD release show at Neurolux in February 2007— and reconnected in Portland. They performed for the next two years with drummer Jeremiah Hayden and keyboardist Seth Schaper as Drew Grow and the Pastors’ Wives. But after Grow was injured in a car wreck in 2011, the time had come for another change. When the band went into the studio in 2012, Doty noticed a shift in his writing. “It became clear that Drew had done a lot of thinking about deep things because of almost dying,” she said. “That definitely gave a lot of food for his lyrical writing, but I think it also made him feel like it was time to get things moving.” Now called Modern Kin and comprised of Grow, Doty and Hayden, the band has been making big strides. Modern Kin, the first full-length album since Grow’s accident, was released Oct. 22, 2013, on Hayden’s Amigo/Amiga record label. Produced by Janet Weiss—drummer for indie-rock groups Quasi, Wild Flag and Sleater-Kinney, as well as Grow’s girlfriend—its 12 songs forgo Drew Grow and the Pastors’ Wives’ wistful tunes and ambling rhythms in favor of stomping beats, ghostly organ drones and rousing, bluesy riffs. Boiseans will get to hear the results of this evolution when Modern Kin opens for Seattle, Wash.-based neo-soul group Pickwick at Neurolux Saturday, Jan. 18. Trimming down to a trio made the name change feel appropriate, Doty said—especially as the band started recording the new album. “We took it about as far as we could with being crazy and experimental and kind of noisy,” she said. “[T]he sound was shifting. We were tightening it up and arranging more and caring about our parts being right. It sounded like a different band.” For Grow, the new name represented a change not just in sound but in spirit. He’d chosen the band’s old name, he told the Habanero Collective blog last October, because “it

Timothy Burnicle’s piece, which graced the cover of Boise Weekly’s Sept. 12, 2007 edition, sold for $1,900 at auction.

BECOMING A 30-PERCENTER

Modern Kins(wo)men: Jeremiah Hayden (left), Drew Grow (center) and Kris Doty (right)

“finally met somebody that was enough for felt risky and vulnerable for me to incorporate him” and added that Grow regularly intromy heavily religious past in my present decidduces the lurching, Tom Waits-esque rocker edly nonreligious music. It was a stage of my “Wicked Crush”—which features the lines self-acceptance.” But he’d grown tired of “the “Oh my my, just my size / Would my woman pseudo-gospel fad” and “the pervasive worfit my mind”—as a love song. ship-team sound—all the clapping, bad lyrics Seattle Weekly Editor-in-Chief Mark and predictable harmonies gross me out.” Baumgarten caught Modern Kin’s perforThe name “Modern Kin” better suited the mance at the Barboza on July 12, 2013. In a making of the new album, which Grow felt July 16 review, Baumgarten praised the band’s “relied heavily on our animal natures, our “terse, direct songs built around growling creature-ness. … This energy and freedom electric-guitar lines and spare-but-insistent was a great beginning and continued to be our drum hits,” declaring that Grow “is in fact driving force going into the new material, but destined for great things.” with transformed execution.” On Oct. 25-26, Modern Kin staged a virWeiss aided in that execution. Doty credits tual “world tour,” performing seven live sets her with “helping us figure out how to bring at Portland’s Mississippi Studios, which were out the best qualities of the music. … Somestreamed on Youtube at 10 p.m. in seven time times, you can be a little attached to your own zones. Covering the event for MTV Hive, Cosong and think, ‘But I wrote this bass part; lin McLaughlin wrote that the band “poured it’s so amazing.’ And then [Weiss] can be like, copious amounts of charm and energy into ‘Yeah, but it doesn’t serve the song. What each set, even during early morning hours about the song? What about the art?’” when live music of this volume should not be Modern Kin’s penchant for oblique lyrics happening.” suggests that Grow is For her part, Doty discovering the best MODERN KIN enjoyed the performancqualities in his life as Opening for Pickwick, Saturday, Jan. 18, $10 es but admitted that well. The radiant baladv., $12 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., “there is nothing like a lad “Pony” celebrates neurolux.com. real flesh-and-blood live domesticity (“Oh, audience.” the grown man. / Oh, Modern Kin should see plenty of those the down-home. / Oh, the pony in his stable in the coming months. The band has started stays”). On the raucous, soulful “Groundworking with Eric Gilbert and Duck Club wire,” Grow cries, “Out in the sun, my love Presents and hopes to tour beyond the North/ something has changed.” The uplift of these west. In March, the band will perform at songs balances the intimations of mortality Treefort Music Fest. on “Sooner or Later” (“You’re gonna fly too. Doty looks forward to playing Treefort / You’re gonna die too”) and the digital-age again. She remembered catching Quasi’s set at discontent of “Congratulations Lack Earth” the El Korah Shrine during last year’s festival. (“Til we’re living alone again / are we living “I was standing with [Built to Spill’s] alone again / could I be satisfied with cold imaginings”). It also contrasts sharply with the Doug Martsch to my right,” she said. “And I was like, ‘This is so cool.’ And other old songs on 2010’s Drew Grow and the Pastors’ friends that I could see. I just loved seeing Wives, whose lyrics are rife with spiritual and Doug be so supportive of other musicians. … romantic unease. While Doty was reluctant to discuss Grow’s It really makes it feel like a community, you know?” relationship with Weiss, she did say that he

In his Dec. 4, 2013 “Note,” Boise Weekly Editor-in-Chief Zach Hagadone told readers about BW’s new cover art policy. In short, for the last 12 years, we’ve paid artists $150 per published cover art submission. After the 2013 Boise Weekly Cover Auction, which drew about 300 people to the Visual Arts Collective Nov. 20, 2013, and raised $25,270, we adjusted the policy, and published covers now score artists 30 percent of what their covers net at auction. The average going rate for a piece of cover art is $500, but it’s not unusual for a piece to go for $600-$1,000 (in 2013, Veiko Valencia’s “Process of Conflict” sold for $1,000). Since 2002, the Boise Weekly Cover Auction has netted $118,675, which has gone to organizations, grants and even BW itself.With this new policy, artists will receive a bigger slice of the pie. In that same “Note,” Hagadone introduced readers to two new members of the BW family, artistic team Tomas Montano and Kelsey Hawes, who brought with them another evolution in the cover art process: When BW began publishing works by local artists on its cover, artistic works had to be physically submitted to the Boise Weekly office at 523 Broad St. in Boise. From now on, the preferred method of art submission is electronically by high-resolution JPEGs. In the past, BW has asked artists whose work was not selected to retrieve pieces within 30 days of submission, and works not picked up after six weeks have been discarded to the heartbreak of everyone involved. Electronic submissions will hopefully prevent such tragedies from taking place. While BW makes being an artist pay a little better, another window is closing for artists looking to fund their creative endeavors. The Idaho Commission on the Arts is still accepting applications for Fiscal Year 2015 grants and awards, but the deadline for applications—Friday, Jan. 31—draws near. That due date applies to artists, who may apply for up to $1,500 for projects or $10,000 for a Writer in Residence grant; noneducational organizations for up to $1,500 for projects or formula-driven grants; and arts education organizations like schools for $1,500 for projects or $15,000 for an Arts Education Project Grant. More info at arts.idaho.gov. —Harrison Berry

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | 21


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE JENNY S TOR M ENT

GUIDE WEDNESDAY JAN. 15

THURSDAY JAN. 16

FRIDAY JAN. 17

CHRIS GUTIERREZ AND FRIENDS—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

BLOODHOUND—With Sheep Among Wolves, Fires in France, Fox Alive, The Grace Theory and Stepbrothers. 6 p.m. $5. The Crux

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement JEFF MOLL—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub JOHN BISTLINE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

Q DOT, JAN. 17, THE CRUX In the way the Pacific Northwest isn’t a hip-hop mecca, The Crux isn’t the first place a person would expect to find an Invictawearing, Macallan-loving, piano-playing rapper. But The Crux is right where Federal Way, Wash.-based Quincy “Q Dot” Henry will be Friday, Jan. 17. Q Dot is one of those guys who has come so close to the brass ring—he was twice signed to a label and both times the deal fell through—that he might have thrown in the towel by now. Instead, he scaled back and has since released a slew of songs and videos; started Juice Radio, a popular online radio station; toured with some big names; and received recognition from the likes of BET, the Grammy Awards and more. A grip of local hip-hop artists will join Q Dot on The Crux stage for the night, so although Boise isn’t the first place people think of when they think hip-hop, on Friday, Jan. 17, The Crux should be. —Amy Atkins With Mayor Coalz, Known, Bo Gator Raider and Big O. $5 adv. at brownpapertickets.com, $8 door, $10 adv. ticket and CD. The Crux, 1022 Main St., facebook.com/thecruxcoffeeshop.

22 | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOISEweekly

YER MAMA—8 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

SATURDAY JAN. 18

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Garth Olson

MARSHALL HOPPER—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 Heartless Breakers HEARTLESS BREAKERS—With Search Lights, Fox Alive and Sheep Among Wolves. 7 p.m. $5. Shredder GARTH OLSON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 Otter Creek Duo OTTER CREEK DUO—With Dan Costello. 7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

JT AND GAYLE CHAPMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Rice OPHELIA—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill Q DOT—With Mayor Coalz, Known, Bo Gator Raider and Big O. See Listen Here, this page. Tickets available at brownpapertickets.com. 7 p.m. $5-$8. The Crux

The Barking Owls THE BARKING OWLS—With Tylor Bushman. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s BROKEN RESOLUTIONS BALL—Featuring Interstate, Soul Serene, Dirty Like Money and more. See Picks, Page 17. 7:30 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. The Linen Building DJ IGA THE INDEPENDENT GROCER—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

REBECCA SCOTT BAND—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

REILLY COYOTE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THOMAS PAUL BAND—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

DR. DELICIOUS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

TITLEWAVE—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FIVESTAR—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE K YLE JOHNS ON

GUIDE LAMP IN THE DARK—With The Renewing and Recycled. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Fill My Cup Church of the Nazarene

GHOSTBOX—With Gorcias, Pop Overkill and Oilslave. 7 p.m. FREE. The Crux JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

MINDRIPS—With Art Fad, DXVD, Give Chase and Aquatic Vampire. 8 p.m. $3. The Crux NANCY KELLY AND BRIAN WARD—6 p.m. FREE. Artistblue PICKWICK—With Modern Kin. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux REBECCA SCOTT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

MONDAY JAN. 20

ERIC MILLER TRIO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 EV AND GEORGE—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

WEDNESDAY JAN. 22

PEPPER—8:30 p.m. $18. Knitting Factory

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

RADIO BOISE PRESENTS FIRES IN FRANCE—With A Sea of Glass and Mt. Joy. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

JEFF MOLL—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub JIM LEWIS—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

Ramming Speed Dan Costello

PICKWICK, JAN. 18, NEUROLUX

THOMAS PAUL & FRIENDS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

SUNDAY JAN. 19

Michael Kirkpatrick DAN COSTELLO—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

RAMMING SPEED—8 p.m. $6. Shredder TOM TAYLOR—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

TUESDAY JAN. 21

MICHAEL KIRKPATRICK—With Mt. Joy. 7 p.m. $5. The Crux PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel REBECCA SCOTT BAND—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

—Amy Atkins

BERNIE REILLY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s DJ Maxim Klymenko DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISE OLD TIME JAM—With The Country Club. 6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

Boise has a gravitational pull on some bands. Tours start and end here, CDs are released here and a few bands return so regularly, they’re mistaken for local acts. Even though Pickwick is barely two years old, with appearances at the 2012 and 2013 Treefort Music Fests, as well as a return to Boise for Alive After Five in 2013, the six-man band is firmly on our radar. Fortunately, the bluesy neo-soul-slinging Pickwick hails from neighboring Washington, meaning they’re likely to land in Boise more often. Unfortunately, the band’s 2013 debut release, Can’t Talk Medicine, is 40-plus minutes of fabulous which, combined with a dynamic live show, means Pickwick’s star will continue to rise. Hopefully our pull is strong enough to keep them coming back.

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

With Modern Kin (see Noise, Page 21). 8 p.m., $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | 23


NEWS/REC REC

SNOW PARK SALE APPROVED, CURLING TOURNEY SET Following months of finger-pointing between Ada County and city of Eagle officials, county commissioners on Jan. 7 voted 2-to-1 to sell 35 acres of the Ada-Eagle Sports Complex so that Eagle can move forward with its plans to build an all-weather terrain park. The city has had a 99-year lease for use of a public park on approximately 85 acres of the Ada County-owned land, which sits a half-mile north of East Floating Feather Road off of North Horseshoe Bend Road. In particular, Eagle had its eye on some of those acres at the Ada-Eagle Sports Complex for its proposed outdoor sports park, which would feature a sled hill, snowmaking equipment, water retention pond and wakeboard cable park. But commissioners balked at Eagle’s plans, saying a commercial snow park wasn’t allowed under the lease agreement. Ultimately, the Eagle City Council voted to make an offer to Ada County to buy 35 of the acres at $4,000 per acre, which Ada Commissioners Rick Yzaguirre and Jim Tibbs voted to accept. Commissioner Dave Case voted against the sale. In other sliding-things-around-in-the-snow news, the Boise Curling Club has announced the dates for this year’s second annual Sawtooth Outdoor Bonspiel, set for Friday, Jan. 24-Sunday, Jan. 26, at the outdoor ice rink in Stanley. For the uninitiated, curling is a centuriesold sport first played in Scotland and Northern Europe, in which players push specially shaped and weighted stones across a sheet or rink of ice, aiming at a target area of four concentric rings called a “house.” The closer the stone rests to the center of the house, the higher the point value. Similar to deck shuffleboard, curling— which is competitively played in tournaments called “bonspiels”—has had a long, though spotty history in organized play. A part of the first Winter Olympic Games in 1924, it disappeared from the event until 1984, when it was then presented as a demonstration sport with no medals on the line. That changed in 1998, when curling was offered as a medal sport in men’s and women’s tournaments at the games in Nagano, Japan. Since then, Canadian and Scandinavian teams have dominated, though the U.S. men’s team took the bronze in 2006. Get in on the bonspiel action in Idaho with a free “Learn to Curl” session on Saturday, Jan. 25, at the Stanley ice rink. Check out the Boise Curling Club league schedule at boisecurlingclub.org, and find more info on the bonspiel at sobidaho.com.

K EAR NEY THOM PS ON

If you build it, they will slide on it.

SCRATCHING THE QUIDD-ITCH A fantasy sport from Hogwarts turns into reality HARRISON BERRY

—George Prentice and Zach Hagadone

The players formed two lines facing each other across the field. When signaled, they charged at a row of volleyballs arranged on the field’s center line—makeshift brooms jerking stiffly Members of Boise State University’s quidditch team, the Abraxans, skrimmage on campus this past summer. between their legs—and swarmed between the goals on each side of the field, which had been made from hula hoops. referee. Potential referees must first pass a writdescended on Kissimmee, Fla., for the Muggle The cloud of players, brooms and volQuidditch World Cup VI, “the highlight of the ten test, scoring at least 80 percent. The second leyballs had roved close to the sideline near phase is a field test administered by a current Muggle Quidditch year.” a concrete sidewalk, where one player was In October 2012, when Driflot assumed the referee, followed by a probationary period. checked so hard that, for an instant, she was captain’s position for Boise State, the team was There are three different levels of referees: ascompletely airborne before slamming onto the practically nonexistent: Driflot, whose captain- sistant, snitch and head referee. Couch passed path behind the Albertsons Library at Boise the head referee written examination in the ship represented the first time he’d “underState University. early morning hours of Oct. 22, 2013. taken anything leadership-wise,” was building “If I see another hit on the sidewalk, I’m To her delight, she and a few teammates a team from scratch. The first batch of players canceling practice,” said Boise State Quidwere able to adjudicate several Quidditch (all 12-14 of them) were, at first, unprepared ditch Captain Stewart Driflot—yes, that’s his matches at the Western Cup, and Couch looks for Quidditch’s athletic rigors. real name—as the downed player stood and forward to her head referee field examination “Half of us were [dressed] in jeans and brushed off the heels of her hands. this month at the Snow Cup in Salt Lake City. button-ups,” Driflot said. The original Quidditch is a creation of J.K. Casey Thompson’s love of the sport, Not long after, a fresh seriousness began Rowling, author of the Harry Potter young however, came first from a love of the books to permeate the Boise State Abraxans, in part adult novels—a game played by the young and a zeal for gameplay. Thompson, majoring because of team manager Kym Couch, who witches and wizards studying at Hogwarts in material science engineering and creative School, who fly high on magic brooms above a has helped arrange team funding and equipwriting, is an athlete who has played football, Quidditch field, trying to score points by catch- ment through players and Boise State grants soccer and lacrosse, and describes himself as a (Couch said she’s the manager “because I’m ing the snitch, a bewitched, fast-flying ball. “team sports sort of person.” He has also read really good at paperwork.”) Quidditch, as played by the Boise State the Harry Potter books 17 times. Stiff competition on the field followed unteam, is a coeducational sport that contains “I’m really a geek at heart,” he said. borrowed elements of rugby, dodgeball and la- der Couch and Driflot’s leadership. They held Like many of his Abraxan teammates, the first Abraxans meeting in October 2012, crosse. The object is to score points by throwThompson discovered the sport by accident: “I and by Valentine’s Day 2013, the team was ing a volleyball past a goalkeeper through a was on the [Boise State] quad and looked over officially a Boise State student organization. hoop goal while eluding “bludgers,” who try and said, ‘Hey, those are Quidditch hoops!’” In March 2013, the Abraxans defeated the to temporarily remove other players from the That season at the Rocky Mountain Chamaction with dodgeballs. To end the game, play- Moscow Manticores of the University of Idaho pionship, he broke his hands after a rough ers must catch the “snitch”—a ball attached by at the Spring Break Throwdown. tackle but kept playing. In November 2013, the Abraxans para wristband (or in a sock) to a neutral player. “I’m not worried about our players, but I ticipated in Western Cup V in Players must at all times keep a am worried about other teams that play a bit Tempe, Ariz., where the team broom between their legs. BOISE STATE QUIDDITCH more aggressively,” he said. competed against (and lost to) It’s a fearsomely physical For more information on the Boise State Abraxans, visit The sport stresses competition, but it also Arizona State University (150sport. Driflot, a sophomore at facebook.com/BSUQuidditch. stresses inclusivity. According to the “two50), the Silicon Valley Screwts Boise State, has seen numerous minimum gender rule,” each team must field (130-0), Utah (210-30) and injuries during his tenure as at least two players whose gender identity is the University of Arizona (130-40). Inclemcaptain of the Boise State Abraxans, including different from at least two other players. ent weather forced the teams to play indoors, cracked ribs, twists, pulls and sprains. This Still, Thompson said many mischaracterize where they competed barefoot. No one had past season, he tore a leg muscle at a tournaquidditch as indulgence in fanboy enthusiasm. brought shoes appropriate for indoor turf. ment in Arizona. But, he said, “the players “There’s this sense that we’re living in Despite the losses, Couch was pleased with know what they’re getting into.” Harry Potter-world,” Thompson said. the team’s performance this past season. Since Quidditch’s reputed beginnings in For Thompson, that misses the true allure “Although we did not win any of our 2005 at Middlebury College, hundreds of of the sport: competition. teams have cropped up across the globe and an games, were able to score against three-quar“They don’t understand the competitive ters of the teams we played in our bracket,” international body has codified its more than level of the game. People practice a lot and Couch wrote in an email. 700 rules into a 172-page rulebook. Accordtravel a long way for these tournaments,” he For Couch, as for several Abraxans, a ing to The Atlantic, in the spring of 2013, an said. estimated 1,500 players and 12,000 spectators source of passion for the game is becoming a

24 | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

COMING ATTRACTIONS Our most anticipated films of 2014 GEORGE PRENTICE Oscar, shmoscar. We know the Motion Picture Academy is unveiling its nominees this week to honor 2013’s best films, but that’s so last year. We’re more inclined to look forward to some of this year’s more intriguing titles. So, here is one of our New Year’s resolutions: to watch every entry on this roster of 2014 films that we’re overly anxious to see. Topping our must-see list is Unbroken (sadly, not due out until December), a film adaptation of the almost-too-harrowing-tobelieve true story of Louis Zamparini, a U.S. Olympian who survived in a raft for 47 days after a near-fatal plane crash in World War II, only to be sent to a Japanese prisoner-ofwar camp. Serena is another literary adaptation, this time from Ron Rash’s bestselling novel of the same name, and stars Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper as a Depression-era couple who build a timber empire in the mountains of North Carolina. It’s slated for an April release. Even the trailer for The Grand Budapest Hotel, Wes Anderson’s newest madcap menagerie, is an instant classic. We’ll be first in line when it opens Friday, March 7. Exodus (opening in December) isn’t a remake of the 1960 film. Instead, this Ridley Scott-directed take is based on something a bit more mature: The Old Testament. It stars Christian Bale as Moses, and co-stars Aaron Paul and Sigourney Weaver. There are, in fact, several biblical blockbusters set for this year, including Noah, star-

choose a

CLASSIFICATION Among the anticipated 2014 titles are (clockwise, beginning in the upper right) Noah, Serena, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Exodus and Dumb and Dumber To (sic).

ring Russell Crowe as history’s first accurate weatherman. The rain starts falling Friday, March 28. Inherent Vice once again teams the mad genius of Joaquin Phoenix and director Paul Thomas Anderson (The Master). Their latest film is based on Thomas Pynchon’s classic detective yarn and co-stars Martin Short, Reese Witherspoon, Josh Brolin and Maya Rudolph. Hearing we get to see Robert Downey Jr. not suited up as Ironman or Sherlock Holmes is welcome news. In The Judge (opening in October), Downey keeps his street clothes on as a big city lawyer who returns to his childhood home, where his estranged father, the town’s judge, (Robert Duvall) is suspected of murder. Our apologies, but we can’t wait to see

Dumb and Dumber To (sic), opening in November. We won’t be surprised to see Jim Carrey return as Lloyd Christmas, but the very thought of Jeff Daniels, who has gone all straight-laced in HBO’s The Newsroom, returning to his flatulent portrayal of Harry Dunne is like asking an 8-year-old to wait for Christmas. And finally, we’re pretty pumped to see Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar, starring Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway and Jessica Chastain. Interstellar chronicles the adventures of a group of explorers who discover a wormhole that blasts open the limitations of human space travel. It opens Friday, Nov. 7. At least on paper, 2014 promises to be a pretty wonderful year for the big screen, so let’s go to the movies.

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EXTRA/SCREEN MOVIES AT THE LIBRARY Did you know Jennifer Lawrence was paid $500,000 for her role in the The Hunger Games and $10 million for her role in the sequel? These are the types of facts librarian Julie AutumnCook likes to print out on a trivia sheet for movie screenings at the Hillcrest branch of the Boise Public Library. Starting Saturday, March 1, Hillcrest will show a movie every Thursday from 2-5 p.m., and from 6-9 p.m., and a family friendly flick on the fourth Saturday of each month, from 1-4 p.m. “[The library] is not just for BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

books anymore,” said AutumnCook. “The library is tending to be a place where people gather, so we’re reaching out [to] the neighborhood.” AutumnCook picks the movies and after each screening, she opens up the floor for discussion—and she always provides popcorn. The library at Cole and Ustick has a similar program on Thursdays, with teen movies from 4-7 p.m. and “groundbreaking black-and-white classics” from 6:15-9 p.m. Movies are free thanks to an annual licensing fee the library district pays to major studios. The license forbids the libraries

from naming the movies online and in mass media, so we’ll give you some hints: Jan. 16, 2 p.m., Hillcrest— This 2013 biopic tells the story of African-American Major League Baseball player Jackie Robinson. Jan. 16, 6:15 p.m., Cole and Ustick—A 1993 film crew goes to a tropical island and discovers a colossal gorilla who takes a shine to their blonde female star. Jan. 23, 2 p.m., Hillcrest— Clint Eastwood stars in this 1971 film as Harry Callahan, a hottempered cop who fights crime by his own rules. Jan. 23, 4 p.m., Cole and Ustick—A young itinerant worker is forced to confront his secret

extraterrestrial heritage in this 2013 movie. Jan. 25, 1 p.m., Hillcrest—Narrated by Tim Allen, this 2012 Disney nature documentary follows a three-month-old chimpanzee separated from his troop. Jan. 30, 2 p.m., Hillcrest—Tim Robbins stars in this 1994 film as a banker, facing a life sentence at Shawshank prison. —Jessica Murri

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. BOISEweekly | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | 25


IMBIBE/DRINK FOOD/NEWS

FLAVORED TEQUILAS

JOSE CUERVO CINGE, $18.95 If you’re in the market for boozy Red Hots, Jose Cuervo’s Cinge should do the trick. Clocking in at 35 percent alcohol by volume, this syrupy hooch has about as much in common with tequila as Fireball does with whiskey. Though Cinge is almost thick enough to pour on a pile of pancakes, we suggest adding a few glugs to a mug of hot chocolate and pairing it with a side of cinnamondusted churros.

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

I’ll be honest: Drinking flavored tequila is about as enticing to me as taking body shots at a Cancun Carlos’n Charlie’s. After college, there’s no good reason to stumble down that road. I prefer to savor good tequila straight up or with a touch of lime and sugar, margarita-style. But that treatment won’t cut it with these three tequilas, which require ample mixers to get down the hatch.

BOISE BOOZE NEWS Openings, events and collaborations TARA MORGAN

—Tara Morgan

We’ve got a lot of booze news to cover, so we’ll get right down to business: Woodland Empire Ale Craft is finally open at 1114 W. Front St. The brewery’s opening day bash went down Jan. 14, with taps pouring the City of Trees IPA, Rabbit Fighter ESB, In the Morning Mild with Doma Coffee and Gold Days Tripel. Boise Weekly stopped by for a sneak peek tour of the building Jan. 13. You can check out a slideshow at boiseweekly.com. If you missed the opening day party, The original canned beer, now at Whole Foods’ River Room. Woodland is also hosting two pint night events this week: one at Bittercreek Ale course and finally to The Chocolat Bar for “We have known Ninkasi for a while. House Thursday, Jan. 16, and the second dessert. Tickets are $35 per person, which Actually, our brewer, Ian [Fuller] was at Bier:Thirty Friday, Jan. 17. A selection includes gratuity and Payette beer pairings. Ninkasi’s first employee over in Eugene of Woodland beers will be on tap and some Tickets can be purchased at Payette Brewing, when they opened, so he’s always had a of the brewery’s crew will be on hand both 111 W. 33rd St., Garden City, or by calling close connection with them,” explained nights to chat about their beers. Payette’s Sheila Francis. “At the 2012 Great 208-344-0011. Speaking of beers on tap, the Whole And that’s not the only event Payette has American Beer Fest, all the guys were hangFoods River Room is now offering Pints to on the horizon. The brewery is also organizing out—our brewers, their brewers—and Go in its upstairs bar. After making a $1 dewere like, ‘You know what? We should do a ing the 2014 Brewer’s Bash Saturday, Feb. posit on a glass Mason jar, patrons can cart 8, at Fourth and Grove streets. According to collaboration.’” home 16 ounces of their favorite craft beer The two breweries used Payette’s facilities the event’s Facebook page: on draft. It’s like a much smaller growler fill “If you have ever wanted to watch some to concoct 45 barrels of an India dark lager that we’re totally sure you’ll wait until you craft breweries to go head to head in a they’ve dubbed the Cabaret, which will be get home to drink. snowball war, this is it. We are gathering the released Friday, Jan. 17, at 6 p.m. And in other Whole Foods River Room “We’re starting at Payette Brewing, where brewing community together to raise money news, the space recently beefed up its menu. we’re going to tap it, and then Payette Brew- for a couple of nonprofits by throwing snowYou can now order from a wider selection balls at each other.” ing has also secured tickets to the Red Light of small plates like grilled halloumi, a vegan Here’s how it works: The breweries are kale salad with pickled beets, wood-fired piz- Variety Show over at the Visual Arts Collecdivided into two teams—Payette Brewing, zas and an array of sliders including The Old tive, where they will also have the Cabaret Woodland Empire, The RAM Boise, Slanted on tap,” said Francis. “It’s the Cabaret and Pen with turkey meatloaf and the Hyde Park Rock Brewing Company and TableRock there’s conveniently a burlesque show a few beet burger. Brewpub on one side, and 10 Barrel Brewing blocks away, could this be more perfect?” In other grocery store booze news, the Company, Sockeye Brewing, Crooked Fence Payette will be giving away 15 tickets to Boise Co-op is now bottling and selling Brewing, Edge Brewing and Kilted Dragon Walla Walla, Wash.’s Proletariat Wines in its the Red Light Variety Show’s Nostalgia perBrewing on the other. formance, which starts at 9 p.m. (see Picks, main store. You can purchase a Co-op wine There are donation stations set up at most Page 16). If you can’t make bottle for $4.99 and then fill of the participating breweries. A $1 donation the Cabaret release party, it with one of four Proletariat buys a snowball for that team’s arsenal, with Francis said the beer will be wines on tap: a sangioveseWHOLE FOODS RIVER ROOM a cap of 500 snowballs per team. The Payon tap at around 20 Boise cabernet blend, a cabernet, 401 S. Broadway ette team has selected Idaho Brewers United 208-287-4600 establishments. a red blend and a reserve wholefoodsmarket.com/ as their nonprofit, while 10 Barrel’s team has “At this point, it’s not chardonnay. Fill prices range stores/boise planned to go back to Ninkasi picked Fuzzy Pawz. One hundred percent of from $15.99-$17.99 a bottle, the proceeds will benefit the two nonprofits, just because there were so and you can fill bottles from with 70 percent going to the winning team’s many interested parties here 4-6 p.m. every day. nonprofit and 30 percent to the other. “Right now we’re just filling our bottles,” in the area that we figured it was better for The event starts at 2 p.m. and will us to sell it here,” she said. explained the Co-op Wine Shop’s Kathy include a beer garden, music, fire pits and And in other Payette event news, the Warr. “I guess if you had a wine bottle and food truck grub from Archie’s Place and brewery is hosting a Walk About Beer Dinyou came in, we could probably do that.” Voluptuous Vittles. ner in downtown Boise Wednesday, Jan. 22. And speaking of boozy partnerships, “A big ol’ snow ball fight downtown for Payette Brewing Company joined forces with The progressive beer dinner starts at 6 p.m. a nonprofit? Sounds like a great time to us,” Eugene, Ore.’s Ninkasi Brewing Company in at Taphouse Pub and Eatery and winds its added Francis. way to Bittercreek Ale House for the second late November to craft a collaborative beer.

26 | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

1800 COCONUT, $27.95 This concoction smells like someone spilled tequila inside a tanning booth at a scented candle outlet. Though it’s made with 1800 Silver Tequila infused with “natural coconut flavor,” 1800 Coconut doesn’t retain any of the original spirit’s smoothness. This one would fare better inside a real coconut mixed with enough fruit juice and flowery accoutrements to distract you from the taste. Spring Break bonus: The bottle stopper doubles as an awkward shot glass. TANTEO JALAPENO, $37.95 “Oh, God,” was the first thing uttered after we popped the top on this aggressively fragrant tequila. Made with 100 percent agave blanco tequila infused with “a proprietary blend of small farm, coastal jalapenos,” this hand-numbered tequila tastes like biting into a fresh pepper. Don’t like drinking peppers? Buy a shot for an unsuspecting friend and watch the fireworks.


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SUSIE: 18-month-old, female, domestic longhair cat. Dainty, sassy little gal. Likes her chin scratched. May prefer to be an only cat. (Kennel 15- #21817845)

WARLOCK: 1-year-old, male, domestic longhair. Handsome, large cat. Confident and outgoing. Will require regular brushing. (Kennel 103#21798607)

BRUISER: 12-weekold, male, domestic shorthair. Needs a home with lots of toys. Enjoys roughhousing with other kittens. (Kennel 16#21548532)

Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

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MILO: 1-year-old, male, pit bull terrier/Labrador retriever mix. Silly, social, sweet dog. Knows some basic commands. Could use more training. (Kennel 304- #21779272)

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APPA: 4-year-old, male, pit bull terrier mix. Good with older kids and other dogs. Needs an indoor, cat-free home. May prefer a female owner. (Kennel 300- #21532560)

RILEY: 4-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. High energy, good with other small dogs. Appears to be housetrained. Smart, treat motivated. (Kennel 305- #10480215)

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | 27


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NYT CROSSWORD | CLUED IN ACROSS 1 The “who” of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant 8 “Most ___” (“For sure”) 11 The “where” of a Clue accusation, whose identity is hinted at by the three shaded answers in this quadrant 15 Not skilled in 21 What you can bring up, in a phrase 1

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ARE YOU TRYING TO REHOME YOUR CAT? Submit your information & a photo to info@simplycats.org We will post it on the Simply Cats website on our OUT of FACILITY page. Simply Cats Adoption Center 208-343-7177.

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Photo lab abbr. “M*A*S*H” star Midwest capital George’s mother on “Seinfeld” 26 Luau dish 27 Part of Caesar’s boast 28 Thrown out of the country 29 Got logged off, in a way 31 Textile tool 33 “The Lion King” queen 34 Blows one’s mind 37 Ain’t right?

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Saturnalia Thing in doubt? Conned Wrestling star Lou Opening for a dermatologist? 95 Running wild 96 Jungian complex 97 Bordeaux wine 98 Some Ivy Leaguers 99 Start of the accusation 101 Untouched? 102 ___ girl 104 Firm group: Abbr. 105 Tennis’s Petrova 106 Like some football teams 108 Fringe 109 ___-Cat 111 Makeshift ballot box 112 Classic gaming inits. 113 Middle of the accusation 118 Expressing 121 Feature of a baseball shutout 122 Sainted archbishop of Canterbury who founded Scholasticism 123 Phone abbr. 126 Friend of Franco 127 What Lou Gehrig played 132 1939 Garland co-star 133 Home-body? 135 End of the accusation 137 Author Kingsley or Martin 138 Actor Richard 139 “So that’s ___?” 140 1990s-2000s Volkswagen vehicle 141 2010 film “___ Men” 142 Greeted the villain 143 Want 144 Director Mack of early slapstick

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1 Chateau ___ Michelle 2 Hesitant sounds 3 Fixed 4 Ballpark fare 5 More elusive 6 Appeases 7 Coat rack 8 A.T.M. offering 9 Formally declare 10 Move like a butterfly 11 Become entwined 12 Tony the Twin 13 More anomalous

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38 Southern terminus of I-35 40 Pyrexia 41 Unfrost 42 Old Tokyo 43 Go pfft 44 Varsity award 45 Early Coleco hand-held game 53 The Palins, e.g. 55 Musical notation 56 ___ bleu 57 Tad 58 Motor coach 62 To boot 11

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14 Its seal has an anchor and a moose 15 Prehistoric menace 16 Noughts-and-crosses loser 17 Have a thought 18 “Cool it!” 19 Cub Scouts leader 20 Cries of pride 30 It may contain aspartame 32 Starting point? 34 Genial 35 Not so smooth, maybe 36 An ace is a good one 39 Completely, after “in” 41 Major part of a tooth 44 Bush who wrote “Spoken From the Heart” 45 ___ to the finish 46 “I don’t care what they do” 47 Basket fiber 48 It’s a knockout 49 Ordeal 50 Confound 51 Farrell or Firth 52 Work, as clay 54 Actor William 59 Entreat 60 French article 61 Bering ___: Abbr. 63 Mr. Onassis 73 W.W. II group 74 “___ Enchanted” 75 Captain’s last order 76 “Gay” city 77 Pepsi brand 78 Hardly at all 79 Some German cars 80 Cartoony clubs 81 React to a loss 82 “Uh-huh, definitely” 83 “Brave New World” drug 84 Part of U.S.: Abbr. 85 Endure 86 E-commerce site 87 Crime buster Eliot 88 Tic ___ (candy)

89 Antony’s player in “Julius Caesar,” 1953 90 Repressed 91 Inevitability of life 92 Result of 91-Down, maybe 100 Sauce brand 103 Years abroad 107 Coke, for one 108 High rails 109 Having no direction, in math 110 Generic 113 Sort of 114 In ___ Patris (prayer words) 115 King in “The Little Mermaid” 116 Grant for filmmaking? 117 Cybermemos 119 Recto’s flip side L A S T POCKET B

120 Slangy denials 124 Coastal raptor 125 Scanned 127 Bit of office greenery 128 Unyielding 129 Go all over 130 Tiff 131 Backpack item 134 Dr.’s order 136 Cry’s partner Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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MUSIC BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION

BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE COMMON GROUND COMMUNITY CHORUS AUDITIONS Common Ground Community Chorus will be holding open auditions the first three Monday’s in January. Come sing with this great choir of diversified individuals. All sections are needed. Email director@commongroundboise.org for all the details. SECOND CHANCE CONCERT BAND! Do you play an instrument or have you ever? Dust it off & show-up. Mulligan’s Adult Second Chance Concert Band. Meets 8:15am on Saturday mornings at Dunkley Music. Simply drop by. SINGER NEEDED Project looking for a female singer in the style of The Kills, Garbage, Keane, The Smiths, The Sundays, Jessie Baylin, The Pretenders, The Dandy Warhols, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Chris Isaak or Radiohead. My sound at reverbnation.com/grenadinedream and reverbnation.com/superloser . Having your own car would be a plus. References available.

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LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email jill@boiseweekly.com or call 344-2055 for the rate of your notice. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE SATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Matthew Ray Bailey Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1322014 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Matthew Ray Bailey, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Fiona Ellen Kilfoyle. The reason for the change in name is: To right a terrible wrong. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) February 11, 2014 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: December 17, 2013. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: ANNAMARIE MEYER DEPUTY CLERK PUB DEC. 25, 2013, Jan. 1, 8, & 15, 2014.

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Age 48 white male 6’1” 215 lbs, long strawberry blond hair, short goatee green eyes, born on Valentines Day. In search of a female companion, maybe more, I’m a peaceful man, down to earth, easy going also I’m a veteran; love reading and writing, poems, and enjoy walks, and hanging out. Mailing address: James K Gregory #52043 ICC Unit U-8B PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. Hi My name is Samantha, but you can call me Sam. I’m 20 years old. I’m 5’4 with brown hair and beautiful blue eyes. I weight 135 lbs. I enjoy being healthy and working out. I’m a positive per-

son so please don’t be negative. I’m honest and I hate being lied to. I love to laugh and have fun. I have about three and a half years left until I’m up for parole. I’m not proud of my past and I’m doing everything I can to be a better person. I’m interested in a real fun loving pen pal to keep me company. Looking forward to meeting you! Samatha Kookonen-Peterson #107531 1415 Albion Ave Burley, ID 83318. My Name is Kimberly Hyatt. I’m 47 5’2”, 135 pounds with brunette hair and green eyes. I’m currently incarcerated but am still very adventurous, open-minded and live a life. Of excitement. I’m looking for men between 40 and 60 who like fun and companionship. I value loyalty and honesty and want someone who is consistent, who loves to laugh like me. So lets meet and discover each other. Kimberly Hyatt #105329 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, ID 83204.

I am 5’9 170lbs Native American “Ute Mtn. Ute,” long black hair to back of my thigh, interested in females to become friends with, I am open honest, and single, write me at Javis D Cantsee 90550 iSCI 7-D 33-B Po Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. My name is Andree Bower I’m 20 years old white female, looking for a pen pal. I’m at Elmore county jail right now writing to go to prison for about 12 more months. I’m a fun, outgoing girl looking for someone to write me while I’m locked up and maybe be friends when I get out. Hope to hear from someone soon. Elmore county jail 2255 E 8th North Mountain Home, ID 83647. 28 year old ex-stripper doing time seeks pen pal. Write Christine Purcell #95766 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd Pocatello, iD 83204.

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FITNESS

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Whose enemy are you? Are you anyone’s adversary or obstructionist or least favorite person? Answer honestly, please. Don’t be in denial. Next question: Do you derive anything useful from playing this oppositional role? If your answer is yes, that’s fine. I won’t try to talk you out of it. Continue to reap the benefits of being someone’s obstacle. But if, on the other hand, you get little value out of this negative relationship, now would be a good time to change it. You have more power than usual to free yourself from being an antagonist. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You Tauruses are customarily more grounded than the rest of us. But this week, I’m wondering if you will be tempted to escape the laws of gravity and rebel against the call of duty. I suspect that your dreams, at least, will feature uninhibited forays into the wild blue yonder. While you’re sleeping you may float weightlessly in an interplanetary spaceship, become an eagle and soar over forests, wear a futuristic jet pack on your back and zip through the sky, sail across the Serengeti Plains in a hot-air balloon, or have a picnic on a cloud with a feast of cotton candy and sponge cake and mint tea. Would you consider bringing this kind of fun into your waking life? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What part of your life is too small, and you want to make it bigger? Is there a situation that’s overly intense and dramatic, and you wish you could feel more lighthearted about it, less oppressed? Are you on a quest that has become claustrophobic, and you’d love to find a way to make it more spacious and relaxed? If you answered yes to any of those questions, Gemini, there’s good news. Very soon now, you will have a close encounter with the magic you need to open what has been closed and expand what has been narrow. Be alert for it. Be crafty as you gather it in and harness it for your use. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In her poem “Catch a Body,” Ilse Bendorf says she dislikes the advice “Don’t ever tell anybody anything.” On the other hand, “Tell everyone everything” isn’t the right approach, either, she says. Judging from your astrological omens, Cancerian, I surmise that you’re wavering between those two extremes. You’re tempted to think you’ve got to do one or the other. Should you cultivate the power that comes from being silent, and keep people guessing about your true feelings? Or should you seek greater intimacy but risk giving away your power by confessing all your inner thoughts? I suggest you take a middle path. Tell the vivid truth, but carefully and incrementally.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If a substance has been burned, it can’t be burned again. There’s no flammable stuff left to feed a fire. That’s simple physics. Now as for the question of whether a person can be burned more than once—we’re speaking metaphorically here—the answer is, unfortunately, yes. Some folks don’t learn from their mistakes and don’t have enough emotional intelligence to avoid the bullies and manipulators who burn them again in the future. But I’m confident that you aren’t one of these types, Leo, or that at least you won’t be in the coming days. You may have been burned before, but you won’t be burned this time. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “People who don’t take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year,” said author Peter Drucker. “People who do take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year.” In general I agree with that assessment. But I think it needs to be altered for your situation in the coming months. Here’s the adjusted version of the formula: Virgos who don’t take risks in 2014 will make an average of 3.1 big mistakes. Virgos who do take risks in 2014 will make, at most, a half a big mistake. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “You know what the greatest tragedy is in the whole world?” asks novelist Terry Pratchett. “It’s all the people who never find out what it is they really want to do or what it is they’re really good at. It’s all the people who never get to know what it is that they can really be.” If that description applies to you even a little, Libra—if you’re still not completely sure what you’re good at and what you want to do—the coming months will be prime time to fix that problem. Start now! How? Open your mind to the possibility that you don’t know yourself as well as you someday will. Take vocational tests. Ask smart people you trust to tell you what they think about your special aptitudes and unique qualities. And one more thing: Be wildly honest with yourself about what excites you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In his book Schottenfreude: German Words for the Human Condition, Ben Schott dreams up new compound German words for use in English. Here’s one that would serve you well in the coming week: Fingerspitzentanz, meaning “fingertips-dance.” Schott says it refers to “tiny triumphs of nimblefingered dexterity.” His examples: fastening a bracelet, tightening a miniscule screw, unknotting, removing a recalcitrant sticker in one unbroken peel, rolling a joint, identifying an object by touch alone, slipping something off a high shelf. Both literally and metaphorically speaking, Scorpio, you now have an abundance of

this capacity. Everything about you is more agile and deft and limber than usual. You’ll be a master of Fingerspitzentanz. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The four elements that compose cocaine are the same as those that make up TNT, caffeine, and nylon: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. The combinations and proportions of elements are different in each substance, of course. But the point, for our purposes, is that the same raw materials lead to different results. I foresee a similar drama unfolding in your own life, Sagittarius. How you assemble the ingredients you currently have at your disposal could produce either a rough and ragged high, a volatile risk, a pleasant stimulation or a useful resource. Which will it be? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Metaphorically speaking, you have recently come into possession of some new seeds. They are robust. They are hardy. They have the potential to grow into big, strong blooms. So when should you plant them, metaphorically speaking? I’m going to suggest that you wait a while longer. It wouldn’t be bad for them if you sowed them right now, but I think their long-term vitality will be even greater if you postpone the planting for at least a week. Two weeks might be better. Trust your intuition. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Flemish artist Jan van Eyck (ca. 1390-1441) was renowned for his innovative mastery of oil painting. He signed many of his works not just with his name but also with his motto: Als ick kan. Its idiomatic translation is, “The best I can do.” What he meant was that he had pushed his talent and craft to the limit, and then stopped and relaxed, content that he had given all he could. I invite you to have a similar attitude as you wrap up the projects you’re currently involved in, Aquarius. Summon all your passion and intelligence as you create the most excellent outcome possible, but also know when to quit. Don’t try too hard; just try hard. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s an excellent time to rise up and revolt against conventional wisdom. I urge you to immunize yourself against trendy groupthink as you outwit and outmaneuver the status quo. Have fun and activate your playful spirit to the max as you create workarounds to the way things have always been done. At the same time, Pisces, stay acutely attuned to your compassion and common sense. Don’t be a quarrelsome intransigent. Don’t be rebellious just to please your ego. If you follow these guidelines, you will be able to pull off a graceful insurrection that both soothes and stimulates your soul.

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For future generations Boulder-White Clouds needs protection now. Throughout my years of public service, I’ve been passionate about keeping Idaho a beautiful and healthy place to raise a family, and that’s why I strongly support National Monument protection for the Boulder-White Clouds area. Let’s guarantee that the majestic landscape we see today will be here for Idahoans to enjoy for generations to come.

Good for Families, Good for Idaho boulderwhiteclouds.org

Photo: Glenn Oakley

Wendy Jaquet Former State Representative

Boise Weekly Vol. 22 Issue 30  

‘I Do’ Stories from same-sex couples in Utah

Boise Weekly Vol. 22 Issue 30  

‘I Do’ Stories from same-sex couples in Utah