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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 22, ISSUE 28 JANUARY 1–7, 2014

FR

TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 7

VAST DIMENSIONS 3-D printing opens up a world of possibilities FEATURE 10

FICTION 101 The top stories from this year’s Fiction 101 contest CULTURE 22

LIVELY LIBRARIES How Treasure Valley libraries fill community niches FOOD 26

TREND TALK Local chefs review the 2013 culinary scene

“I’ve had three renowned archaeologists and pre-Mayan experts look at them ... they’re real.”

SCREEN 25


2 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com

NOTE

Office Manager: Meg Andersen Meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor Emeritus: Amy Atkins, Culture@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Sam Hill Sam@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Tara Morgan, Jessica Murri, Brian Palmer, John Rember Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd Brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Tommy Budell, Tommy@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams, Darcy@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Graphic Designers: Kelsey Hawes, kelsey@boiseweekly.com Tomas Montano, tomas@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Erin Ruiz, Adam Rosenlund, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000.

INTERESTING TIMES On Jan. 1 we will all (hopefully) have safely passed through the final test of strength in that gauntlet we call “the holidays”; the giant potato will have dropped in the Grove and it will be 2014. From what I’ve seen published as year-end reviews, it couldn’t have come sooner. 2013 was a tough one. Personally, 2013 was monumental. A year ago, I was a work-at-home dad, filing freelance stories for Boise Weekly from Sandpoint and copy editing the Pacific Northwest Inlander. My son was 5 months old, crawling around my feet and—when sitting in my lap as I worked at the computer— doing his best to insert errors into my articles. My wife was teaching eighth-graders. I had no idea that in 365 days I would have bought a house, moved 400 miles south and become BW’s editorin-chief. My wife would have laughed if someone told her last year that she’d be an adjunct professor at Boise State University. About the only thing that was expected in 2013 was that my son would be a hellion on two legs (mission accomplished). Like all monumental things, there has been plenty of bad with the good. When I officially started as editor in late January 2013, our staff box looked very different. A combination of recessionary pressures, changing technology and media consumption trends have meant hard economic times. BW has not been spared the challenges of the times, and that has required a lot of hard decisions in what turned out to be the hardest year for Boise Weekly since the turn of the century. We’ve survived, though, and adapted. Going into 2014, all signs point to a smoother road. Readership is up—both online and in print—and revenue is back on track. The team here is rock solid and excited about the future. Our new smartphone app, BW On the Town, has launched, and we’ll be unveiling a new special publication in February (we’ll also host our Fiction 101 party at Rediscovered Books that month. Read the winners starting on Page 10, and watch for party details later). Helping lead Boise Weekly during this time has been one of the most challenging and rewarding experiences of my life, and I can’t say enough about both my fellow Weekly-ers and the Boise community as a whole, to which I am deeply grateful for their support of this newspaper. Here’s to you and to us, with all the best wishes that whatever monumental things lay ahead in the next 365 days leave us happy, healthy and glad they happened.

ISSN 1944-6314 (print)

—Zach Hagadone

ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055

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E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of

ARTIST: Troy Passey

Boise Weekly are ©2013 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline:

TITLE: ah hell MEDIUM: ink, acrylic, thread & paper

Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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SUBMIT

Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

KILLING FIELDS The so-called wolf hunting “derby” in Salmon didn’t quite play out as expected. Find out what went down at the post-Christmas kill fest on Citydesk.

ABBEY-TICIPATION The season four premiere of Downton Abbey airs Sunday, Jan. 5. If you can’t wait, hit up Village Cinemas in Meridian, Thursday, Jan. 2, for an advance screening. Details on Cobweb.

PAY RAISE Ten states are raising their minimum wage, effective Wednesday, Jan. 1. Spoiler alert: Idaho isn’t one of them. Get the lowdown on who’s bumping wages on Citydesk.

OPINION

4 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BILL COPE/OPINION

FORE TALES, ’14

Nostril Bill tells it like it isn’t... yet You will recall I adopt the alias “Nostril Bill” for those times I am in the mood to make predictions. The name came to me after listening to a schnockered tenor saxophone player at a New Year’s party years ago. This silly sax man insisted on telling everyone present about some prophesies he’d recently read from the16th century seer Nostradamus, who he drunkenly and repeatedly mispronounced Nostril-damus. And if you’re waiting for me to explain why I thought that calling myself “Nostril Bill” was a good idea, I predict that you have a long, long wait before you. Nostril Bill also predicts: UÊ ÕÀˆ˜}ʈÌÃÊëÀˆ˜}Êv՘`‡À>ˆÃˆ˜}Ê`ÀˆÛi]Ê `>…œÊ*ÕLˆVÊ/iiۈȜ˜Ê܈Ê>ˆÀÊÈÝʘˆ}…ÌÃÊ œvʘœ˜Ã̜«ÊÀˆÃ…Ê`>˜Vˆ˜}]ÊvœœÜi`ʜ˜Ê̅iÊ ÃiÛi˜Ì…ʘˆ}…ÌÊLÞÊ>ÊëiVˆ>ÊFrontlineÊ`œVՇ “i˜Ì>ÀÞÊ̅>ÌÊiÝ>“ˆ˜iÃÊ̅iÊV>ÀiiÀʜvʜ˜iÊ -i>“ÕÃÊ"½ˆVŽ>Þ]Ê܅œÊ…>ÃÊ`i`ˆV>Ìi`ʅˆÃÊ ˆviÊ̜Êw}ÕÀˆ˜}ʜÕÌÊܓi̅ˆ˜}ÊÀˆÃ…Ê`>˜ViÀÃÊ “ˆ}…ÌÊ`œÊ܈̅Ê̅iˆÀÊ>À“ð UʏÜʜ˜ÊÌiiۈȜ˜]ʘœÊiÃÃÊ̅>˜Ê̅ÀiiÊ ˜iÜÊVÀˆ“iÊ`À>“>ÊÃiÀˆiÃÊ܈ÊLiÊ>ˆÀi`Ê̅>ÌÊ ÜˆÊLiÊÛ>Àˆ>̈œ˜Ãʜ˜Ê̅iÊ-…iÀœVŽÊœ“iÃÊ Ì…i“i°ÊThe Game’s AfootÊvi>ÌÕÀiÃÊ>Ê Üœ“>˜ÊÃÕ«iÀ‡`iÌiV̈ÛipShirley œ“iÃp ܅œÃiÊ7>ÌܘÊw}ÕÀiʈÃÊ>ÊLivÕ``i`Êi݇ …ÕÃL>˜`Ê܅œÊÃ̈ÊœÛiÃʅiÀ]ʈ˜ÊëˆÌiʜvʅiÀÊ >``ˆV̈œ˜ÊÌœÊ œŽiÊ >ÃÈV°Ê ˜ÊShor-Loc Homey]Ê>Ê܈Ãi‡VÀ>VŽˆ˜}Ê Ãˆ`iŽˆVŽ]ʇ7>ÌÌ]Ê܈Ê˜>ÀÀ>ÌiÊ̅iÊÜiiŽÞÊ ÃÌÀÕ}}iÃʜvÊ̅iÊ̈̏iÊV…>À>VÌiÀ]Ê>ÊÃÌÀii̇ Ó>ÀÌÊ >ÃÌÊ°°Ê«ÀˆÛ>Ìiʈ˜ÛiÃ̈}>̜ÀÊ>˜`ʅˆÃÊ i˜VœÕ˜ÌiÀÃÊ܈̅Ê̅œÃiÊiۈÊVÀˆ“iʏœÀ`Ã]Ê̅iÊ Ì܈˜ÃÊ>ÕÀÞÊ>˜`ÊÀ̈iÊ,iˆV…i˜L>V…° ˜`Êw˜>Þ]ʈ˜ÊCSI: Baker Street]Ê,œLiÀÌÊ

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 5


OPINION/JOHN REMBER

SAME AS IT EVER WAS And other New Year’s predictions

It’s that time of year again. Psychics, economists, historians, pundits and climate scientists are all taking runs at the future, trying to foretell everything from the numbers of unemployed college graduates on Election Day to next September’s ice cover in the Arctic Ocean. It’s a fool’s errand; but, in the spirit of everlasting folly, here are my predictions for 2014:

Harbin, killing 6 million people in a two-week period. The Chinese government will decree that henceforth, only Obama-certified “clean coal” will fuel Chinese power plants. In Idaho, agriculture will take a hit from the effects of drought, floods, heat, hail, northward-migrating pests and Hispanic PETA members infiltrating feedlots and dairies.

POLITICS

SPORTS

Idaho will remain a one-party state, sending a full slate of Republicans back to Washington, D.C., and Republican supermajorities to the Statehouse. Like any other one-party state—be it Republican, Democratic, Stalinist or Wahabist—Idaho will fall a year further into injustice and corruption, as cronyism, nepotism, kickbacks and quid-pro-quos substitute for action of, by and for the people. In reaction to this stultifying status quo, an Idaho Youth Party will arise, dedicated to forcibly retiring all over-30 elected officials, state employees and corporate executives. Other party planks will include tax-funded texting, a maximum voting age of 39, forgiveness of all college loans, elimination of college tuition, an end to the distinction between cyber-reality and real reality, and incentivized euthanasia for Social Security recipients. Youth Party candidates will win 99 percent of the under-30 vote, which will amount to 1 percent of the total vote. A Youth Party spokesperson will note that the vote percentage, though small, was sure to increase “once the old farts die off and the Millennials lose their faith in passive aggression.” Worldwide, American military bases will begin to close as budget cuts force the contraction of Empire. In Idaho, police departments will be inundated with repatriated military equipment, including A-10 Warthogs, land mines, CS gas, cluster bombs, Abrams battle tanks and depleted uranium ammunition. A number of sheriff’s departments will inaugurate paramilitary auxiliaries, deputizing any citizen with authoritarian tendencies and conducting tank driving and riot-control training, sometimes in the same lesson. These paramilitaries will exist in a fragile peace with any Idahoans who remain out of uniform.

Increasing evidence that micro-concussions cause lifelong damage to developing neocortexes will cause a substantial minority of Idaho parents to forbid their children’s participation in football and soccer. An Idaho school district will be sued for willingly destroying its football players’ ability to conduct abstract thinking. Other districts will be sued when they eliminate football altogether due to financial and ethical concerns. At a conclave of Idaho prosecuting attorneys, a forensic psychologist will lecture on the ties between small town football and a persistent culture of rape. The attack on football will prompt rightwing legislators to suggest that without football, Idaho will no longer need high schools or universities. They will introduce legislation to make Idaho the All-Home-School-and-SafeProgrammed-Learning State, a move expected to result in enormous tax savings, stimulate Idaho’s Creationist software startups and keep foreign ideas from corrupting Idaho’s youth.

EARTH SCIENCE Outgassing from methane hydrate deposits off the Siberian coast will lead to record high Arctic temperatures, which will result in more Northern Hemisphere jet stream anomalies, which will result in extreme Idaho droughts punctuated by record-setting Idaho rainfall. Scientists will explain runaway feedback loops and the Great Permian Extinction. Fundamentalists will explain angels with flaming swords. Venture capitalists will explain opportunities in Arctic oil, Arctic agriculture, Arctic real estate and climate refugee smuggling. In China, levels of atmospheric particulates will reach LD (Lethal Dose)-50 for the city of

6 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

FINANCE Official inflation: 2 percent. Real inflation: 8-9 percent. Official unemployment: 7.6 percent. Real unemployment: 17 percent. Official student debt: $1.2 trillion. Real student debt: all disposable income, payable monthly until death or homelessness. The Dow will go up and up and up. Americans will subject many of their cherished institutions to cost-benefit analyses. College degrees, professional sports teams, local governments, new freeways, vacation condos, home mortgages, suburbs, late-life medical care, children—none of these will pencil out. Sun Valley’s annual summer orgy of excess and schmooze, the Allen & Co. party, will feature 300 armed and uniformed security personnel. The increased security will be instituted after FBI agents reveal a Youth Party plot to steal Rupert Murdoch’s mummified body from its usual table in the Duchin Lounge and hold it for ransom.

CULTURE Miley Cyrus will host the Academy Awards wearing nothing but 8-inch heels, a spiked silver tongue-sheath and strategically positioned Winnie-the-Pooh decals. Wal-Mart will begin hosting “Cage-Fight Wednesdays.” Finally, the Kardashians will not go away in 2014. Not even one of them. Not even when begged. Not even with tears. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

IDAHO’S NEWEST DIMENSION 3-D printing flourishes in the Gem State GEORGE PRENTICE

The generation gap was tangible. When David Ultis revealed his 21st century wonder to a public gathering at the century-old Nampa Public Library, adults stayed near the back of the room with arms folded as younger generations rushed to the front of the room in order to get their first glimpse of a 3-D printer. “An adult is usually going to ask all about the business sense of a 3-D printer,” said UlThe Idaho Commission for Libraries, as part of its Make It at the Library project, hosted Idaho librarians tis. “But a kid will ask, ‘Can I print my own and program specialists in November 2013, where they were trained on 3-D technology and gifted with new 3-D printers to be showcased in libraries throughout Idaho. action figure from my own design?’” If Idaho has a 3-D guru, it’s Ultis—perhaps the most plainspoken and nicest nerd As Ultis was talking to Boise Weekly, concept is to build a 3-D printer using parts you’ll ever meet. two children—14-year-old Jessica and her that have been printed from a 3-D printer. “I find much more contentment in work12-year-old brother William—were inching “There’s a man named Adrian Bowyer, a ing with a sense of wonder versus industrial ever closer to the 3-D printer. British university professor. He found that applications,” he said, before picking up a “We’re kind of curious,” said Jessica. patents that had been used in commercial familiar looking object. “I’m in the 9th grade and I love science and 3-D printing had expired. It was so obscure “Yup, I made a Tardis on the 3-D printbecause it was an industrial application that er,” he said, referring to the time-traveling math.” we didn’t see much in our daily lives. But police box that any Doctor Who fan would When Ultis asked the two if they would Bowyer said, ‘I’ll make a printer which can instantly recognize. Ultis’ 3-D printer had rather buy or build a 3-D printer, William print itself.’ And he protected his notes in made an exquisitely detailed collector’s item didn’t need more than a second to answer. General Public License, meaning that a comfrom what had been nothing more than a “Build one,” he practically shouted. “Oh pany can’t own the technology any longer. few pennies worth of tiny plastic tubing. “I yeah, build one. Besides, kids don’t have a And the public domain of the technology lets lot of money.” also like to print owls—symbols of wisus share freely without violating any laws.” dom—and give them to libraries.” Ultis said, almost to the person, kids are Ultis walked over to his laptop and The 30-year-old Ultis, general manager of interested in learning how to build one of clicked open a huge Boise’s Reuseum—the go-to their own 3-D printers. And he is more than digital file. gadget paradise for engihappy to oblige. REUSEUM “Take a look; all neers and home-inventors— That’s one of the reasons why, a few 108 W. 33rd St. Garden City, the plans are free,” he regularly partners with months later, Ultis stood before a packed 208-375-7507 said. “It flowered like a Idaho libraries to evangelize room at the Idaho Commission for Libraries educate.reuseum.org tree, starting out with on the wonders of 3-D in downtown Boise. The commission had Hack Night one design, then three, technology. flown in teams of librarians from throughout then 40. Thousands and In fact, Ultis said the Idaho to help export 3-D technology to more Every Wednesday, 6-9 p.m. thousands and thousands of the state’s children. Treasure Valley already has Robot Lab of 3-D objects can be its own robust 3-D printing “We have people here from the Ada First and third Saturdays, downloaded and printed Community Library; the Community Library community. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. in your own home.” “Absolutely; there are a Network from up in the Panhandle; the Everything from shoes Snake River School Community Library just lot of us building 3-D printto speakers to pizza have been created from ers in Boise,” said Ultis, who hosts someoutside of Blackfoot; the Meridian District 3-D printers. This past season’s Project Run- Library; and a very small, one-room Goodthing called Open Lab Idaho at the Reuseum, billed as a “community hackerspace and way featured 3-D printed clothes; the New ing Public Library,” said Erica Compton, the York Daily News reports that a 3-D printer makerspace … for hackers, computer geeks, commission’s project coordinator. engineers, circuit benders, crafters, tinkerers, recently created ravioli and cheeseburgers; The five library teams spent the better researchers at the University of Cambridge programmers and artists.” part of 2013 participating in the commishave announced that they can use 3-D “3-D printing was really obscure to me sion’s Make It At the Library project, deprinting technology to create mature central not too long ago,” said Ultis. “But then I signed to create so-called “makerspaces” in nervous system cells. started learning about RepRap.” Idaho libraries for tweens and teens. “Think of that: advanced tissues. I’m RepRap is replicating rapid prototype, the “In February, PCS Edventures 8 really glad that they’re testing in a conscienModel T of 3-D printers, built from most of taught the library teams on basics of its own components. Simply put, the RepRap tious, ethical way,” said Ultis. fissure engineering. The teams worked BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

If the DEQ approves, Alta Mesa will soon move forward with its natural gas processing plant.

SOMETHING IN THE AIR How much is too much formaldehyde? Or Benzene? Or Toluene? A major element of Idaho’s burgeoning natural gas exploration industry is the littlediscussed processing of the raw gas before it can be delivered to transmission pipelines. The processing—at a refrigeration plant— would regularly emit chemicals that the Environmental Protection Agency considers to be Hazardous Air Pollutants or HAPs. And none of it happens without permission from Idaho’s Department of Environmental Quality. Just before Christmas, Texas-based Alta Mesa Services—which snapped up a number of leases and wells from the financially troubled Bridge Resources (BW, Feature, “Bridge Under Troubled Waters, Oct. 5, 2011)—filed an air quality permit application with the DEQ to build such a refrigeration plant near U.S. Highway 30, south of New Plymouth. But unless anyone spent their holidays combing through DEQ permit applications, the 212-page packet submitted by Alta Mesa could have easily been overlooked. In fact, the public only has until the end of business Thursday, Jan. 2, to comment on the application, by sending remarks to tessa.stevens@ deq.idaho.gov. A close examination of the application reveals that the facility has the potential of discharging several hazardous pollutants into the environment, including Formaldehyde (1,700 pounds per year); Benzene (133 lbs/ year) and Toluene (47 lbs/year). All in all, the proposed plant has the potential of emitting more than 1 ton of HAPs per year. But none of the proposed emissions come close to the DEQ’s so-called “screening emission levels.” For example, the expected emissions of Formaldehyde are only about 20 percent of the DEQ’s tolerance threshold. The refrigeration plant, which would dry, pressurize, refrigerate and store the gas before delivering it to the nearby Williams Northwest natural gas pipeline, would take approximately 144 days to build and sit on 5.7 acres of private land on U.S. 30, adjacent to property owned by the L-3 Cattle Company of Fruitland. In October, the Ontario Argus Observer reported that a number of nearby landowners balked at the idea of the facility, with one farmer telling Payette County Planning and Zoning commissioners that they “would be selling the heart and soul of Payette County,” if they gave their approval. But Payette P&Z commissioners voted 5-3 to green light the plant, pushing the permit process to the DEQ, which will be deciding the fate of the facility sooner than later. Alta Mesa has indicated that it wants to have the plant up and running by spring. —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 7


NEWS on that in their local libraries for a few months, and then we brought 7 them back in the summer for a twoday training on robotics, and now here we are and it’s all about 3-D printing,” said Compton. Compton beamed from the back of the room as Ultis led the librarians on a 3-D journey. “Congratulations,” Ultis told the group after their third day of training. “You’re

printing your very own designs.” The group burst into laughter and a round of applause. “You’re doing much better than you think,” Ultis assured the librarians. Compton told Boise Weekly that she couldn’t have been happier, given that when the librarians returned home, they would be sharing 3-D technology with the project’s target audience. “Tweens and teens. The sweet-spot are

those aged 11 to 15,” she said. The cost of the 2013 project was approximately $10,000 in federal funds for each of the five participating library systems. “And that’s everything; all the materials, all the travel and, yes, even their own printers,” said Compton. And that was the big surprise for the librarians; their own 3-D printer, which had been built by Ultis.

“I typically ask for about six weeks to fully assemble and calibrate a new 3-D printer,” Ultis told BW. “But we did all five of these in five weeks.” Three librarians, all youth service specialists, from North Idaho’s Community Library Network told BW that they’ll be showcasing their 3-D printer at a number of their network’s libraries, including Athol, Hayden, Harrison, Pinehurst, Rathdrum and Spirit Lake. “We’re even thinking of taking the 3-D printer into our region’s school libraries,” said Nick Madsen. “We’ll show it to the teachers first, and then they’ll be invited to bring in their students.” Madsen and his North Idaho colleagues said they only had “some passing knowledge” about 3-D technology, but “now here we are making our own designs and printing our own creations.” “As far as we know, this will be the first 3-D printer in our part of Idaho,” said Madsen. “I promise you that there will interest across-the-board when we get this back home.” Compton said the Idaho Commission for Libraries has already been asked to share its Make It at the Library success at national and international forums. “Just a few months ago a few of us were in this same room talking about the Maker Movement, via video, to a conference being held in Paris, France,” said Compton. “And we were just invited to make a presentation before the Institute of Museum and Library Services in Baltimore.” Each of Idaho’s library districts will need to consider new policies regarding the use of 3-D printers, not just how to operate them, but what should or shouldn’t be printed. “They’ll need to ask, ‘How do we use these?’” said Compton. “For instance, what if a patron comes in and wants to print a gun?” Good question. The 3-D printing world was immersed in controversy in the spring of 2013, when public domain files surfaced detailing how to print a 3-D firearm. The U.S. House of Representatives had to weigh in on the matter, voting Dec. 4, 2013 to extend for another 10 years the Undetectable Firearms Act, banning weapons made of plastic. “But the benefits of 3-D printing outweigh the controversy,” said Ultis. “Think of the human prosthetics, think of the scientific advances; it’s pretty exciting.” Even though he repurposes many of the parts from previous 3-D printers to build newer models, Ultis clearly has an attachment to his creations. When BW asked if he, by any chance, had a name for any of his 3-D printers, he paused and smiled. “Well… yes, now that you mention it. I named two of them Nord and Fjorr. And this one,” he said pointing to his latest 3-D creation. “This one is Creamsicle.” Cool. Very cool.

8 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CITIZEN

CHERIE BUCKNER-WEBB Grandchildren and grace GEORGE PRENTICE It was the late Sunday afternoon of Nov. 17, 2013, and Boise Democratic Sen. Cherie BucknerWebb was missing her granddaughter. “I hadn’t seen her all day and I needed some face-time,” she said. Indeed, that’s exactly where Buckner-Webb turned: FaceTime—a smartphone app that allowed her to chat with granddaughter Zaida, who sat on the lap of Buckner-Webb’s son, Phillip Thompson, on the other side of town while Buckner-Webb spoke from her North Boise home. But Thompson said something “wasn’t right”; his mother looked tired and she even called her granddaughter by the wrong name. “I flew over to her house,” he told Boise Weekly. “Her speech was impaired and we needed to get to the hospital.” Buckner-Webb said that her first instinct was to go to bed. “But I’ve been told by people that if I had gone to sleep, I would have been in serious trouble,” she said. Buckner-Webb’s scare is over now. But in a candid conversation, with her son and granddaughter nearby, the state senator spoke of her recovery, hopes for the 2014 legislative session and growth in grace.

Do you recall feeling specific sensations during the stroke? Buckner Webb: It was really a lack of sensations. Thompson: I said, firmly but respectfully, “We’re going to the hospital.” It was painfully obvious that she was having a stroke. How much time had lapsed? Thompson: We actually time-stamped it for the doctors. It was less than 30 minutes from the time of the FaceTime conversation to the time we got to the emergency room. Had anything like this every happened before? Buckner-Webb: Never, never, never. I kept saying I didn’t have time for this. I just wanted to go home. But they did admit you to St. Luke’s. Buckner-Webb: Oh, yes. I was there for three nights. I just didn’t want the label of a stroke; it has a connotation of being infirmed.

Thompson: Once you have a stroke, there’s a strong possibility of having a second stroke, and in those first few weeks of recovery, you have to be careful. If you break a bone, it takes six to eight weeks to heal; and your brain is infinitely more complex. Talk to me about your recovery. Buckner-Webb: I went through physical and speech therapy three times a week for a while. But I must also tell you that acupuncture has been a real treasure for me. It was a wonderful complement to the traditional medical treatment. It helps the body help itself heal. And do you have any lessons-learned from this? Buckner-Webb: I have many women friends that work so hard but just don’t necessarily take care of themselves. I’m kind of a zealot now about women’s health issues— especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and stroke. Women just don’t take the time to acknowledge that they can find

JE

themselves in precarious situations. Have you gradually begun your public schedule again or are you waiting for the beginning of the legislative session? Buckner-Webb: On Dec. 17, I visited three schools in my district—Hillside Junior High, North Junior High and Boise High. Because I sit on the Senate Education Committee, it’s so important to understand what the real education landscape looks like. I’m visiting three more schools before the beginning of the session. I’m certain that you’ve seen the 20 recommendations from the governor’s Task Force for Improving Education; among those is the restoration of pre-recession funding for K-12 education. Buckner-Webb: I’ll be dancing a jig if we can do that. We have shortchanged our children and our future by continually cutting education funding. You know what? I may be preaching before this session is over.

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2014 is one of those years—with so many legislators preparing to run for re-election— but I’m hoping for a kinder, gentler session. And I’m hoping that we all keep in mind that we serve the public and need to do what’s best for Idaho. And I’m presuming that you’re in support of the proposal to fund a pilot program for an Idaho pre-K program. Buckner-Webb: If you don’t have reading proficiency by third grade, you’re doomed. Pre-K is absolutely critical. Looking back on 2013, how was your first year in the Idaho Senate? Buckner-Webb: I just seem to gravitate to whatever happens to be the super-minority. It’s a little humbling from time to time. Reflection is so important: replicating those things you do well and getting done with those things that you need to let go of. Overall, 2013 was a good year. How are you any different? Buckner-Webb: I hope I’m growing in grace. I used to be a little more impatient. When I look at all that is happening in the world, I know that we need to do a few things different. But you know what? We’re doing some things pretty well. I need to ask you if you were at all afraid about the stroke incident impacting your singing voice. Buckner-Webb: You know what? It was my sister that brought it up in front of my doctor. And the doctor said, “Give it a try.” I really hadn’t tried until then, but it was all right. [At that moment, Buckner-Webb broke into a glorious, full-throated anthem of freedom.] Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me ‘round… turn me ‘round… turn me ‘round. [And with that, Zaida flashed her grandma a big smile.]

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 9


12TH ANNUAL

FICTION 101 SHORT

ON

WORDS,

LONG

ON

C O N T E S T

IMAGINATION

I L L U S T R A T I O N S

B Y

E R I N

R U I Z

2014 JUDGES R I C K

A R D I N G E R :

Executive director of the Idaho Humanities Council

C O R T

C O N L E Y :

Director of Literature at the Idaho Commission on the Arts

L A U R A

D E L A N E Y :

Owner of Rediscovered Bookshop

A L A N

H E A T H C O C K :

Professor of English at Boise State University and award-winning author of Volt

C L A Y

M O R G A N :

Adjunct professor of English at Boise State University, author and former Idaho writer-in-residence

As a wordsmith of any experience will tell you, it’s harder to write short than long—and the more you can do with little, the better at it you (probably) are. Though likely apocryphal, the story goes that Ernest Hemingway could break hearts with just six words: “For sale: baby shoes. Never worn.” Crafting a six-word novel is extreme—and a little absurd—but telling a fully developed story in 101 words? That’s a worthy challenge, and one that more than 170 Boise Weekly readers threw themselves into. For the 12th year running, Boise Weekly is pleased to unveil the winners of the 2013 Fiction 101 Contest. From the poetic to the bizarre, the sentimental and sardonic, below you’ll find the top three finishers, plus two honorable mentions and five judges’ picks. Special thanks go to our judges, who parsed through the entries over the course of a month—plus a rapid-fire adjudication session at BWHQ—and artist Erin Ruiz, whose brilliant work has illustrated the contest winners this year, and in several years past. They say brevity is the soul of wit, and this introduction has already run more than twice as long as our 101-word mandate, so in signing off, we save our final thanks to those who submitted stories. Winners or no, they prove that you BW readers are a lyrical lot, which I guess must be why we get along so well.

FIRST PLACE, $400 “IT IS TRUE, I LOVED HIM” J S P

—Zach Hagadone

J A C O B S , H U N T I N G T O N B E A C H , C A L I F.

In 1986, I was one of Andrew McCarthy’s personal assistants. I went cross country skiing with him and peeled his oranges. He was trying to quit smoking then, so he was eating a lot of oranges. I’d peel two in advance, kept in sandwich bags inside my parka’s fur-lined pocket. “I know, right?” he’d say to someone important/lovely/both, citrus-scented breath puffing into the cold. He’d reach his hand backwards at me, wiggle his fingers (his signal for orange. Now). I’d remove one, flex my thumbs in its center, plop it into his palm. It would fall open like a moist bloom.

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B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


SECOND PLACE, $250 “MOM” N I C O L E

LEFAVOUR, BOISE

My mother was the jackalope queen of Challis sagebrush. When I was born, she carried me papoosestyle laced in deer hide under a rabbit skin shade, hunted ducks and geese in the marshlands. In town, she wore a long knife on her belt, drank firefighters under the table at Bux bar. At home she met white tie missionaries on the bridge with her shotgun. She wrangled draft horses and ranch wives, fed my sister and me frogs’ legs and liver, rare; finally lost us in a run away buggy incident, bee stung horse streaking through hay fields where the mustangs ran.

HONORABLE MENTIONS, $50 “STEEPLECHASE” E R I C

WALLACE, EAGLE

The first two spires he blew to hell with his 12 gauge. The third he demolished with a full-choked bore. One spire every week. Churches panicked. Cops stalked. He switched to rifle and scope. Harder, but he’d studied bullet selection, learned to fire devastating clusters. Four. His daughter had died in a schoolyard shooting. Pure randomness, officials said. He had no argument with the NRA. No problem with the Second Amendment. His dispute was with God. Five. If God allowed carnage, why did congregations still so complacently babble heavenward? He’d sever the damned connection. Five spires down. Many more to go.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

“ROCK PAPER” D O U G

KIZER, BOISE

During math, he passed her a slip of paper saying he loved her. After recess he found it cut into strips on his desk. He tried again, tiny triangles left on his chair. So, he found a rock and scratched her name on it during art and later tossed it far out in the pond by his house. The next morning he wasn’t surprised to see her but she was changed. Her smile, her laugh, she was no longer someone he could ever love. Later he found another rock, the kind he liked, round and smooth and cool to his touch.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 11


JUDGES’ PICKS, $25 “ONE DAY AT THE VOLCANO” MAURICE HAMLIN, NAMPA RICK ARDINGER’S PICK

A loveable 1952 Ford with its working vacuum tube radio once traveled a volcano. I helped by driving. We once discovered a hidden place nested in sugar cane where wisdom and produce sat under a galvanized, corrugated, open raftered roof. It was just three or four million years ago that where we parked arose from beneath a glistening ocean. Now this day at the volcano we joined in wonder. From the rafters above floated yellowed paper banners with the visions of philosophers and seekers there upon reflected. I glimpsed the world of hidden things, bought wilted vegetables and we drove away.

“ZOMBIES” DOUG KIZER, BOISE CORT CONLEY’S PICK

He was cold and selfish when they made love. Each day she could feel him becoming more distant and blamed herself. She followed him when he went out and read his email when he wasn’t looking. She didn’t expect to find anything. She knew there was no other woman just as she knew it was all her fault. When he quit speaking to her altogether, she sat silently each night pretending nothing was wrong. And then one day he was gone. The next night she danced with the men in the bars. She could smell their need, feel their beating hearts.

“BABY I’M YOURS” MELANIE MENDENHALL, BOISE LAURA DELANEY’S PICK

THIRD PLACE, $150 “THE HUNGRIEST MAN ON EARTH” C O D Y

GLITTINGS, BOISE

Bellagio devours single engine airplanes. On stage beneath the Big Top, the crowd goes wild, yet Bellagio longs for something with more… substance. He begins with his ex-wives’ homes, consuming them chronologically, sparing no time to check for occupants. He doesn’t mind the screaming, and crunching of bones. His appetite swells. Before long, the landscape resembles a quiet sort of devastation; half-eaten buildings miming crooked teeth. Unsatisfied, Bellagio lies on his back and weeps. There is food on other planets, surrounded by stars, he believes. There must be. A rusted crop duster stands idling in a field nearby. Bellagio takes flight.

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I never believed in reincarnation back when I promised you everything. I’m sure I would have thought better of the beach and barefoot vows. You, in a tie, for once. Now we’re licking our feathers seaside, watching the younger birds strut themselves across this sandy stage while our day unrolls itself like every other day. Wherever I go, there you are. Some would find it comforting. Same face, same thoughts for all eternity. It’s not that I don’t love you anymore. I do, okay. Even that corny little song you coo before you sleep. But a bird’s gotta spread her wings.

“THE HIGH COST OF DISHWASHERS” SHEILA ROBERTSON, BOISE ALAN HEATHCOCK’S PICK

Pop was complainin’ I don’t see good ’nough nowadays to get the dishes clean. So the kids bought me a secondhand dishwasher. Come night, Pop saw something scuttlin’ around. They was cockroaches from outta that dishwasher. I called the secondhand man to come get that dang thing. He ran and ran it. Said it washed them all out. Next week Pop found roaches in my toaster, my microwaver and my bread makin’ machine. Yelled how we couldn’t spray poison and eat outta them. Threw them and the dishwasher out. I wash by feel again, like I always did. Pop’s not complainin’.

“WHAT’S LEFT” PATRICIA STAEHELIN, S C A R S D A L E , N . Y. CLAY MORGAN’S PICK

She asked God for a computer. He said, “You don’t need one. Just peer down through the clouds.” And there she saw it. Her whole life, on eBay. Bobby’s eggcup. The clown was still smiling hard enough to keep an adult world at bay. Her white gloves with curly fur at the wrists—plastic still protecting her memories. One dollar and twenty-six cents for her set of ruby red anchor hocking tumblers! That wouldn’t cover wrapping. And the glass luncheon set in its original box. Wouldn’t it be nice, she thought, to have just one more tuna sandwich and tomato soup.

B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FIRST THURSDAY

FIRST FIRST Three ways to First Thursday it up downtown HARRISON BERRY There’s no better time to go big than First Thursday. But with New Year’s Day fresh in the rearview mirror, some folks might be wondering what events could possibly be worth pausing in the middle of some Netflix binge-watching and leaving their warm homes. This month, Boise Weekly isn’t giving you a list of what not to miss in downtown Boise First Thursday, Jan. 2—we’re providing three great reasons for you to throw off your Snuggie, throw on your boots and spend the evening rushing from warm indoor space to warm indoor space. From the Boise Art Museum in downtown’s southeast corner to The Crux in the far west, the City of Trees will be rife with fun. Let BW be your guide. TRIENNIAL-ISM AT BAM Here’s a familiar story: You go to the art museum and look at the art. Maybe some of it is inspiring. You go home; possibly you think about some of the art you saw. At the Boise Art Museum, that sounds an awful lot like the rote process of observing high culture. Blithely calling it “absorbance” or “assimilation” wasn’t cutting it anymore, so BAM started mixing things up for First Thursdays, making access to the museum by donation, and providing educational studios and activities for children. The result is that BAM is packed on First Thursdays. People let the art blow their hair back. They have conversations, and that’s all art ever wanted from us. This First Thursday is a very special one: It’s BAM’s first since the opening of its once-every-three-years Triennial exhibition, which draws submissions from across Idaho and features 65 works by 40 artists—24 of whom hail from Boise. This time around, artists were asked to riff off the theme of “Sustain + Expand.” What’s more, photographers Maria Essig and Warren Lassen will discuss their work, installations and influences during the museum’s Art Answers program from 4-7 p.m. Concurrently, the public is encouraged to join BAM staff for Studio Art Exploration and create artworks inspired by the Triennial. BAM’s hours have been extended for First Thursday, so feel free to check out the action anytime between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

See Twin Falls-based Milica Popovic’s mixed-media work “Two Windows” (2013) at BAM.

6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, GETTING LOUD AT THE BOISE 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, PUBLIC LIBRARY boisepubliclibrary.org. If there are two things every kid knows about libraries, it’s that they’re full of THE COLLECTIVE GALLERY PARTY books—and you’re supposed to be quiet in AT THE CRUX them. Slowly but surely, that’s beginning to The Crux has become a crucial comchange (see Culture, Pages 22-23). As libraries expand in their role of media ponent of Boise’s downtown. In lieu of a bowling alley or laser tag establishment, it’s repository, as well as cultural and activity the only place where people not old enough center, the image of the curmudgeonly old to drink but plenty aged to party can go librarian, index finger pressed to withered lips, is being replaced by that of the smartly after dark. And what they do there is way cooler dressed, hip, young bibliophile, complete than laser tag or bowling: listen to live—and with Dewey Decimal System tattoos and frequently local—music, chat and sip coffee. an encyclopedic knowledge of young adult It shouldn’t surprise anybody that The novels. Crux has become the epicenter for Boise’s After soliciting community input folyouth culture, with live music lowing December’s First playing practically every night Thursday, the library took and frequent art shows. This a cue from the public and COLLECTIVE GALLERY PARTY First Thursday will be no decided on an offering in 6 p.m.-close. FREE. The Crux, exception. January that would appeal 1022 W. Main St., Boise, faceStarting at 6 p.m., the to families. For January, the book.com/thecruxcoffeeshop. all-ages venue will ring in the library has a plan. new year with the Collective Thursday, Jan. 2, Boise Gallery Party. Public Library will host Somehow the term “exhibition” doesn’t Boise Rock School. From 6:30-8 p.m., two of the school’s bands will play as the library quite capture the scope of the event, which includes work for view and for sale by the greets the new year by getting loud. As the 45 artists who contributed to Collective’s bands play, guests can participate in free 2013 issue, which was released Oct. 30, also interactive workshops. at The Crux. “[The library] has been a great spot for Add to that live performances by a few us because libraries are usually pretty quiet places,” said Ryan Peck of BRS, which most as-yet-unannounced bands and an “awesome surprise” from Guru Donuts, and you recently performed at a Get Loud at the have a recipe for one of the hopping-est Library event this past summer. According to Joanne Hinkel, the library’s First Thursday events in town. The event is free and open to all ages. community and media relations manager, For those age 21 and older, there’s beer to the tunes are a welcome asset serving the warm your belly on a cold January night. If library’s community-oriented agenda. not, feel the burn from The Crux’s selection “We really provide all kinds of learning of coffee. and entertainment. Music contains preFor more ways to First Thursday it up see literacy skills and we think it fits in quite our listings on Page 14. well,” she said.

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FIRST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BASQUE MARKET—Enjoy a free wine tasting and New Year’s sale table. Paella is ready by 6 p.m. 4:30 p.m. FREE. 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208433-1208, thebasquemarket.com. BOISE ART GLASS—Make your 1 own float for $40 per 30-minute session while enjoying beer, wine and snacks and watch a free glass blowing demo. 5 p.m. FREE. 530 W. Myrtle, Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

THE BRICKYARD—Check out Brickyard’s Home Grown Thursday with an American Revolution cocktail for $4 or Payette Outlaw IPA or Rodeo Rye Pale Ale for $3. 6 p.m. FREE. 601 Main St., Boise, 208-287-2121, brickyardboise.com. BRICOLAGE—Signals and Cycles, 2 featuring new work by Salt Lake City artist Kyle B. Jorgensen. 5 p.m. FREE. 418 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208345-3718, bricoshoppe.com. DRAGONFLY—Enjoy 40 percent off all clothing and a complimentary wine tasting. 5 p.m. FREE. 414 W. Main

St., Boise, 208-338-9234. FLATBREAD NEAPOLITAN PIZZERIA—Kids younger than 12 eat free with a purchase. Happy hour goes until 6 p.m. and every bottle of wine is on sale, starting at $20. 5 p.m. FREE. 615 W. Main St., Boise, 208287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com. FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE— 3 Featuring a series of handmade ceramics by Amanda Riley. 5 p.m. FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com.

GUIDO’S ORIGINAL NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA—Serving pizza, strombolis, salads and beer. 11 a.m. FREE. 235 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-3459011, guidosdowntown.com.

SILLY BIRCH—Join a cribbage tournament hosted by Deschutes, with free Deschutes bratwurst barbecue during the tournament and drink specials. 5 p.m. $10. 507 Main St., Boise, 208-345-2505.

MELTING POT—What goes better with art than wine and cheese? Enjoy all three with two glasses of wine and one cheese fondue $22. 5 p.m. $22. 200 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-3438800, meltingpot.com.

WISEGUY—$6 pitchers of Rainier, $1 off draft beers and $3 glasses of wine on First Thursday. 5 p.m. FREE. 106 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-3367777, wiseguypizzapie.com.

SAMMY’S—Check out Keg Cup night. 6 p.m. FREE. 509 W. Main St., Boise.

ZOOMCARE—ZoomCare will be offering free exams to the community on a first come, first served basis. Patients will have the opportunity to be seen by Dr. Lauren Chasin for acute care needs at zero charge for the medical exam. ZoomCare believes that good health makes people happier and more productive, and provides great care at an affordable price. These free exams are made possible by the ZoomCare Foundation. 5 p.m. FREE. 510 Main St., Boise.

South Side ATOMIC TREASURES—Celebrating reuse with vintage and retro art and found objects. 5 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-0811. BOISE ART MUSEUM—Hear artists Maria 4 Essig and Warren Lassen discuss their photography in the BAM 2013 Idaho Triennial Art Answers program. 10 a.m.-8p.m. By donation. 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY—Enjoy a performance from the Boise Rock School. 6:30 p.m. FREE. 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org. FRESH OFF THE HOOK—Free glass of house wine with purchase of meal. 5 p.m. FREE. 401 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0220. HAIRLINES—Stop in and talk to Lui the Hair Whisperer. 5 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-383-9009. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM—Join 5 Susan Buchel, retired National Park Service historian, for 20-minute programs at 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. on how Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery tried to make Christmas and New Year’s special under successively more difficult conditions as they journeyed to the Pacific Ocean and back. 5 p.m. FREE. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov. LIQUID—National Headlining Comedy Show with Sean Rouse. Buy-one, get-one-free tickets. Doors open at 7 p.m., show starts at 8 p.m. Live music following the show. 7 p.m. $10. 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com. THE MONOGRAM SHOPPE—Stop in to check out gift ideas. 5 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, themonogramshoppe.com. MR. PEABODY’S OPTICAL SHOPPE—20 percent off any eyewear frames exluding readers, featuring new frames from the Oliver Peoples collection. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Ste. 101, Boise, 208-344-1390, mrpeabodysoptical.com. NFINIT ART GALLERY—View work by 22 lo6 cal artists, including Robert Fehlua, in various mediums on display for the holiday season. 5 p.m. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 131, Boise, 208-371-0586, nfinitartgallery.com. NORTHRUP BUILDING—Featuring work from 7 the Artists in Residence program. 5 p.m. FREE. Eighth and Broad streets, Boise. QUE PASA—Check out a selection of Mexican artwork, including wall fountains, silver, metal wall art and blown glass. 5 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018. RENEWAL UNDERGROUND—Featuring work 8 from the Artists in Residence program. 5 p.m. FREE. 517 S. Eighth St., Boise. SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Celebrate the release of Snake River Winery’s first vintage port and purchase clearance merchandise. 5 p.m. FREE. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-345-9463. SOLID—Every First Thursday, Solid hosts an art show as well as tastings, live music, free appetizers, two for one drinks and a $6 happy hour menu. Enjoy live music from Kayleigh Jack, happy hour food from 4-6 p.m. and 10-midnight, free tasting by Proletariat Winery, and liquor tasting

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FIRST THURSDAY/LISTINGS from local vendors. Art by David Day, featuring Boise photography on metal. Free appetizers at 6 p.m. and Last Call Trivia at 8 p.m. 4 p.m. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620, solidboise.com.

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WELLS FARGO CENTER RETAIL BUILDING—Featuring work from the Artists in Residence program. 5 p.m. FREE. 801 Main St., Boise.

Central Downtown ALL ABOUT GAMES—Join a board game challenge. The highest score at the end of the night wins a prize. 5 p.m. FREE. 120 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3450204, allaboutgamesboise.com. THE ART OF WARD 10 HOOPER GALLERY— Featuring 25 percent off all Christmas items and prints. 5 p.m. 745 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-866-4627, wardhooper.com.

COSTA VIDA—Satisfy your hunger for beach-inspired Mexican food. 5 p.m. FREE. 801 W Main St., Boise, 208-429-4109, costavida.net. FINDINGS—Check out the semi-annual clearance sale with 20 percent off fall and winter clothes and shoes, and an extra 20 percent off clearance items. Sample from a variety of local breweries and munch on snacks. 5 p.m. FREE. 814 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-343-2059.

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LUX FASHION LOUNGE—Check out a unique selection of resale clothing and jewelry. 5 p.m. FREE. 785 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-4589. OLD CHICAGO—Two kids eat free with purchase of one adult entree. Karaoke begins at 9 p.m. 5 p.m. FREE. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-0037, oldchicago.com.

7. Nor thrup Building

2. Bricolage

8. Renewal Underground

12. The Studio: An Elite Salon and Spa

4. Boise Ar t Museum

9. Wells Fargo Center Retail Building

13. The Alaska Center

5. Idaho State Historical Museum

10. The Ar t of Ward Hooper Galler y

14. Ar t Source Galler y

6. Nfinit Ar t Galler y

11. Lux Fashion Lounge

3. Flying M Coffeehouse

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be on display during the month of January at The Studio: An Elite Salon and Spa. Featuring a variety of styles including the Old Masters technique, impressionism and plein air. Her subjects include Idaho landscapes rich in color and texture as well as still lifes and sub tropical scenes. She is a founding member of the Plein Air Painters of Idaho. For the past year she has studied Russian Impressionism with Antonin Passemard, a former Boise artist who is one of the top 50 up-and-coming young artists in American Plein Air. 5 p.m. FREE. 702 W. Idaho St., Boise.

THE ALASKA CEN13 TER—Check out the After Christmas Art Show featuring

FIRST THURSDAY/NEWS

new paintings by Chi E. Shenam Westin and an open studio night for portraits with Allan R. Ansell. 5 p.m. FREE. 1020 Main St., Boise. ART SOURCE GAL14 LERY— Featuring a gala reception for seven artists from the Elks Rehab Center. 6 p.m. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. BEN & JERRY’S SCOOP SHOP—Enjoy $1 scoops in cups or cones all day long. 5 p.m. $1. 103 N. 10th St., Boise, 208342-1992, benjerry.com. THE RECORD EXCHANGE— Buy two and get one free, including used CDs, vinyl and more. 5 p.m. 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com.

YOUNG GIRL FROM SILVERTON , BY AN NA FID LE R, 99” X72”

1. Boise Ar t Glass

THE STUDIO: AN ELITE 12 SALON AND SPA—E. Rose Elkovich’s oil paintings will

West Side

HENRY PITTOCK, BY ANNA FIDLER, 99”X72”

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

SHIGE—Complimentary California roll with purchase of two drinks. 5 p.m. FREE. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 215, Boise, 208-338-8423, shigejapanesecuisine.com.

“Eveyln,” by Anna Fidler, acrylic, colored pencil on paper, 90” x 72”

SINK YOUR TEETH INTO ART January can be such a bummer after the excitement and good cheer of Christmas and New Year’s celebrations. There are a couple of ways to deal with the post-holiday letdown: Leave the tree and lights up for a few weeks or make the most of the cold, short days of the year’s first month knowing spring will soon be here. If you choose the latter, Boise Art Museum has a whole host of events coming up in conjunction with its upcoming exhibit Vampires and Wolfmen by Anna Fidler. The artist’s work in this series is the result of her longtime fascination with horror films, and “based on photographic portraits of early residents of Oregon.” Fidler uses unexpected lines, colors and textures to create haunting visages that seem to float on psychedelic backgrounds, so it seems oddly fitting to kick off the exhibit with a screening of the grandfather of vampire films, Nosferatu (Thursday, Jan. 23, 5:30 p.m., $10 members, $15 nonmembers). In this 1922 silent film, vampires are not glittering, pensive, forever-beautiful creatures. German director Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau’s Nosferatu is based on Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and though the film is tame by today’s standards, Murnau’s sanguivorous, hooked-nosed, hairless monster is still pretty frightening. If your sweetheart has a sweet spot for bloodsuckers, don’t waste your money on chalky hearts or a stuffed teddy bear holding an “I Wuv U” heart. Please. Take him/her to BAM’s Love Bites: Valentine’s Dinner (Friday, Feb. 14, 6 p.m., $60 members, $75 nonmembers, 21-and-older only). You don’t need pointy canine teeth to enjoy a four-course meal with wine pairings and you don’t need to be a creature of the night to enjoy the museum after dark. Later in February, meet Fidler and hear her talk about Vampires and Wolfmen (Friday, Feb. 21, 5:30 p.m., $10 members, $15 nonmembers), which may provide some inspiration for BAM’s Art of Fashion Show: reVamped (Saturday, April 26, 6 p.m., advance tickets $10 members, $15 nonmembers), in which budding fashionistas design looks that “transform on the runway” and audience members vote for a winner. —Amy Atkins

Tickets for all BAM events available at boiseartmuseum.org

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

The trash man cometh.

Yep, those hills are alive.

MONDAY-FRIDAY JAN. 6-10 kicking christmas to the curb

THURSDAY JAN. 2

CITY OF BOISE HOLIDAY CLEANUP WEEK

the hills are alive SING-ALONG SOUND OF MUSIC Do, a deer you might see on the drive Ra, to the Valley of the Sun Me, and you and your family, too Fa, not far to go to sing along OK, so maybe those aren’t quite the right lyrics but it’s OK because this singalong to The Sound of Music features subtitles for all the songs. Warm up your vocal chords, pack up the family and head to the Liberty Theatre in Hailey to experience the classic musical film as a participant as well as audience member. The show will have an intermission, a great time to visit the school-bus-turned-food-truck The Haven, which will be slinging gourmet snacks like bourbon-baked brie with fresh apples and crostini, roasted veggie skewers with balsamic reduction, and fancy hotdogs. 5:30 p.m. $5 kids, $10 members, $12 nonmembers. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-788-6195, sunvalleycenter.org.

THURSDAY JAN. 2 the healing benefits of art ART SOURCE GALLERY GALA RECEPTION Recovery isn’t easy. It begins in a hospital bed and ends when your physical therapist says so. In between is the pain of performing once-simple

tasks with increased difficulty, flirtations with despair and moments when getting back to normal feels like a Herculean task. Being in a familiar, friendly environment helps and some artists and designers specialize in making recovery spaces—from hospital rooms to physical therapy studios—more inviting and conducive to healing. A few of those artists have been through recovery in one form or another themselves, and have created art to help others through the process. Art Source Gallery is

16 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

hosting a gala reception from 5-9 p.m. for artists who have used art as part of the healing process at Elks Rehabilitation Center. Therapy will also come in the form of music from Johnny Shoes and beverages from Indian Creek Winery. Also on display will be art by two new additions to the member-owned gallery, photographer Andy Anderson and mixed-media artist Debi Bonsack. 5 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

Funny how that twinkling evergreen looks so delightful in the living room on Christmas Eve but is such a nuisance New Year’s Day. The city of Boise is offering its so-called “holiday cleanup week” until Saturday, Jan. 4, when residents can push their overflow trash to the curb. We’re reminded not to put the trash in boxes or plastic bags but to use 20- to 32-gallon trash cans or carts. No overflow stickers necessar y. Boise residents can recycle Christmas trees and bundled branches curbside from Monday, Jan. 6, through Friday, Jan. 10. Christmas trees set out for collection must be free of lights, ornaments and tinsel, and be cut to 4-foot lengths or shorter. Tree branches must also be bundled and weigh less than 60 pounds. Flocked trees and wreaths won’t be accepted for recycling. The city of Boise will also offer extra curbside collection of leaves during Christmas tree collection week (Jan. 6-10). Leaves must be in paper leaf bags. For any questions, Boise residents can call 208-384-3901 or send an email to curbit@ cityofboise.org. Or they can visit http://curbit.cityofboise.org for some holiday waste reduction ideas.

See Marilyn Cosho’s small-scale, twig-constructed “fairy chairs” at Art Source Gallery.

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JEFF DOW

ALLIER AE PHOTOGR APHY

FIND

Toe tappers.

FRIDAY JAN. 3

DAS HORN These cats will blow your top, and that’s no jive, jack.

man of constant sorrow HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE AND OLD-TIMEY MUSIC It was so sultr y in the roadside recording studio you could have cooked an egg in your bare hand. A blind man was sitting by a desk nodding his head to the whine of cicadas when the ramshackle quartet calling itself the Soggy Bottom Boys, led by Ulysses Everett McGill, asked to sing into the blind man’s tin can and scratch its tunes in hot wax. That’s the scene in O Brother, Where Art Thou? in which we first hear the old-timey band per form from a soundtrack that had audiences practically dancing in movie theaters. You can strain your ears recalling the boxy twang of Tommy Johnson’s guitar, or you can roll down to the Linen Building from 7-10 p.m. for a taste of the real deal with the Hokum Hoedown Square Dance and Old Timey Music. The bona fides are in the name: The Hokum Hi-Flyers— Scott Knickerbocker, Jonah and Gar y Shue, Travis Ward, Patrick Harren and Mike Waite—whip up some traditional folk dance and swing tunes, while a cast of guest MCs call the dances. For $7, you can join the Hi-Flyers for an evening of swing and two-stepping Western dancing, red-hot fiddle playing and unplugged Appalachian shenanigans. And for anyone fighting to muster the gumption to hit the dance floor, a full bar with ID can help loosen the limbs. 7-10 p.m. $7. Linen Building Event Center, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

SATURDAY JAN. 4 hoops on the hardwood BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY VS. FRESNO STATE UNIVERSITY

S U B M I T BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

Boise State University is well known for athletic excellence. The blue tur f is synonymous with greatness, thanks in part to the nowdeparted Chris Petersen and living legend/cyborg quarterback Kellen Moore. The end of one era gives way to another, but there are non-football teams at Boise State as well. Led by head coach Leon

SATURDAY JAN. 4 old school JUKEBOX JUNCTION: THE DIAMONDS WITH THE JIMMY DORSEY ORCHESTRA Do you need to find an outing for grandparents who extended their holiday stay through January? Do you dig that big-band sound yourself? If you answered yes to either question, the Jukebox Junction function may be the thing to get Nana and Papa out of the house for a few hours, or feed your own need for nostalgia. The Diamonds, a four-man band of glittery matching costumes, choreography and harmonies, join with the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra for swing, rock and doo-wop. Snap your fingers to the “Crocodile Rock,” bop your head to “At the Hop,” go back in time with “Rock Around the Clock” and get lost with “The Wanderer” in an afternoon filled with music from a bygone, but not forgotten, era. 2 p.m., $19.50-$39.50. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1110, mc.boisestate.edu.

Rice and players Anthony Drmic, Derrick Marks and Jeff Elorriaga, the Boise State men’s basketball team got off to its best start in team histor y with eight consecutive victories before dropping back-toback nonconference games to 11th-ranked University of Kentucky and the always competitive Saint Mar y’s College. Despite a couple of disappointing losses, the Broncos look primed to finish with their best season in years and are a clear

Congratulations: You made it through the holidays. There are no more gifts to give—no more aunties demanding big, wet smooches, or feigned enthusiasm for ugly sweater parties. All that remains is the snow up at Bogus, your trusty winter jacket and your good looks to get you through what remains of winter. You deserve a drinking vessel to match your achievement. When skinny-stemmed champagne sippers and Charlie Brown-themed mugs o’ Irish coffee just won’t do, there’s Das Horn, which, for you non-Old Norse speakers out there, means “The Horn.” With its soothing white coloring and gleaming steel rim band, this Dark Aged alcohol delivery system looks the horn of an aurochs engineered by Steve Jobs, and goes perfectly with bellowed battle cries, storming castles and victory. Wear it with you on a neck strap dashorn.com, $24.99 (included) or mount it among the other souvenirs taken from your fallen enemies with the official Das Horn display stand. Das Horn holds 24 ounces of your favorite beverage and will set you back $25. —Harrison Berry

contender for the Mountain West Conference title and a spot in the NCAA tournament. With nearly five players scoring in double figures, the Broncos take a true team approach en route to getting the W’s. Cheer them on as they face Fresno State University in their first conference game at home and witness the other Boise State team that has ever ybody talking. 7 p.m. $12-$18. Taco Bell Arena, 1401 Bronco Lane, Boise, 208-426-1900, broncosports.com.

an event by email to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JAN. 1 Festivals & Events BOISE S-ANON MEETING— Troubled by someone’s sexual behavior? S-Anon can help. Email sanonboise@gmail.com for questions/more info. 6:15 p.m. FREE. 1111 S. Orchard St., Ste. 112A, Boise. HELICOPTER CHRISTMAS LIGHTS TOURS—See the Christmas lights of Boise. Silverhawk Aviation’s tours will take you over downtown Boise, then soar over the Botanical Gardens and Foothills. Call to make a reservation. Daily through Jan. 5. 6 p.m. $125 for two, $150 for three. Western Aircraft at Boise Airport, 4300 S. Kennedy St., Boise, 208-453-8577, westair.com. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW— Tour the Idaho Botanical Garden light display. Daily through Jan. 5. 6 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

TEA AND TAROT—The Laughing Spirit Tea Room and Eatery is the place where hostess Midge Woods pairs tea with teachings about each Major Arcana tarot card. Take your friends and your cards for an opportunity to practice readings. 7:15 p.m. $10. Spirit at Work Sanctuary, 4948 Kootenai St., Boise, 208-3883884, spiritatworkevent.com.

On Stage SOUND OF MUSIC SINGALONG—Celebrate the new year in Hailey by singing along with the classic musical. The film has subtitles for viewers. See Picks, Page 16. 5:30 p.m. $5-$12. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools. org.

Art Kids & Teens ELKS REHAB ARTISTS GALA RECEPTION—Art Source Gallery is showcasing work from sevel local artists from the Elks Rehabilitation Center. Their work is a major part of their rehabilitation and the public is invited for a viewing while enjoying Indian Creek wine and music from Johnny Shoes. See Picks, Page 16. 5 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery,com.

HOLIDAY DAY CAMP—Featuring field trips to Idaho Ice World and Overland movie theaters, making gingerbread houses, Planet Kid indoor playground, rock climbing, gym games and winter-themed adventures. For ages 3-5 and K8th-graders. Call for price details and to sign up. 7 a.m. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, wingscenter.com.

On Stage REAL TALK COMEDY WORKSHOP—Refine your comedy routine and be sure to stay for the free comedy show at 8 p.m. 6 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Sports & Fitness DROP-IN VOLLEYBALL—Drop in for a day game of volleyball. Nets and balls provided. 9 a.m. $4 adults, $3 seniors, $2 youth. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, 208-384-4486, cityofboise.org/ parks. NEW YEAR’S DAY 5K—Start the new year off right with a run for your health. 10 a.m. $20-$30. The Ram, 709 E. Park Blvd., Boise, 208-345-2929, theram.com.

Odds & Ends DATE NIGHT—Featuring live music, massages and champagne. 6 p.m. Varies. The Springs, 3742 Idaho 21, Idaho City, 208-3929500, thespringsid.com.

THURSDAY JAN. 2 Festivals & Events ARABIAN NIGHTS AT THE CAZBA—Enjoy music, drumming and good food. Entertainment by local belly dancers. 7 p.m. Cazba Restaurant and Opa Lounge, 211 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208381-0222.

18 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

NOISE/CD REVIEW HIGH RISE, STONE TEMPLE PILOTS To be brutally honest, Stone Temple Pilots hasn’t been relevant for a very long time. No. 4 (Atlantic Records, 1999) was the last release that even approached respectability, and the only reason anyone paid attention to STP after that was the selfdestructive behavior or former frontman Scott Weiland. Now that Weiland has been replaced by Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington, that’s changing, and the new STP’s debut EP, High Rise (Play Pen, 2013), feels like a breath of fresh air. “Out of Time” is a classic STPstyle driving rock number, and the Brothers DeLeo show they still know how to put on a good three-minute rock show. The band changes pace with the bluesy “Black Heart” and the glammed out “Same on the Inside.” The crunchy, gritty “Cry Cry” feels like a Jet B-side, and the closer, “Tomorrow,” is eerily reminiscent of “Silvergun Superman.” While some of these songs are a bit derivative of STP’s previous work, sonically, they aren’t half bad. Bennington makes an impression on this EP, as much for what he doesn’t do as for what he does: He doesn’t imitate Weiland’s delivery, and his trademark screams never appear on the album—not once. Bennington shows off the more melodic, skyscraping quality of his vocals, and the effect works pretty well. With High Rise, STP sounds like a new band. Some fans will certainly piss and moan about how Bennington doesn’t compare to Weiland and the band should just break up, but it feels like its members are having fun for the first time in a long while. High Rise, though far from perfect, might be the start of something really cool. —Brian Palmer B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends CAPITAL CITY SOUND—A group for enthusiastic women who like to sing a cappella in the barbershop style. The ability to read music is not necessary. 7 p.m. FREE. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 2206 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-375-3862, ststephens.episcopalidaho.org. CHIP AND A CHAIR POKER— Practice your poker skills for free while earning points toward prizes and glory. 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. FREE. Eastside Tavern, 610 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-3453878. EAGLE MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION MEETING—Eagle business owners and managers are welcome to participate in this roundtable meeting. 5:30 p.m. FREE. The Blue Door Cafe, 3300 W. State St., Eagle, 208-9386123, bluedoorcafe.com. STROKE SUPPORT GROUP— Stroke sur vivors, their families and caregivers receive education, support and social interaction in the Coughlin Conference Room 1. 2 p.m. FREE, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center, 1055 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-367-2937, saintalphonsus.org. YOGA AND SOAK—Enjoy a kidsfree night with one hour of yoga and one hour of hot springs relaxation. Reservations required. 6 p.m. Prices vary. The Springs, 3742 Idaho 21, Idaho City, 208392-9500, thespringsid.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 3 Festivals & Events ALL KEYED UP—Join musicians from the Boise Philharmonic, Boise State University and Boise Baroque for an evening of piano, organ and glockenspiel music. 7:30 p.m. Suggested $10 donation. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208343-7511. HOKUM HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE AND OLD-TIMEY MUSIC SERIES—Enjoy music from the Hokum Hi-Flyers while you learn square-dance moves, followed by an old-time hootenanny featuring a cast of callers. Pie Hole pizza will be served and a full bar is available with ID. See Picks, Page 17. 7 p.m. $7. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

Kids & Teens

Kids & Teens

Religious/Spiritual

Literature

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME—Stories and fun for preschoolers. 10 a.m. FREE. Garden City Librar y, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrar y.org.

PUPPET SHOW—Bring the little ones to the library for a puppet show on the first Saturday of the month. Noon. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

ACA 12 STEP SUPPORT GROUP—See Friday. 6 p.m. FREE. Collister Methodist Church, 4400 E. Taft, Boise, adultchildren.org.

MORNING BOOK CLUB FOR GROWN-UPS—Join the discussion of Half Broke Horses by Jeannette Walls. The Morning Book Club for Grown-ups meets the first Tuesday of the month. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org.

ACA 12 STEP SUPPORT GROUP—Adult Children of Alcoholics & Dysfunctional Families provides a safe setting in which adults who grew up in dysfunctional homes can feel safe and find a way to share their stories. It is a place of healing, wisdom and hope. 6 p.m. FREE. Collister Methodist Church, 4400 E. Taft, Boise, adultchildren.org. REFUGE RECOVERY—The Fire Lotus Recovery Group investigates Buddhist principles applied to recovery from addiction of all kinds. The group will meet every Friday evening in the Gallery Room. 5:30 p.m. FREE/ donation. Owyhee Plaza, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-649-4264, heartofdharma.org.

Sports & Fitness IDAHO STAMPEDE VS. RIO GRANDE VALLEY VIPERS—See Friday. 7 p.m. $8-$380. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com/ home.aspx.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Odds & Ends FIRST FRIDAY LADIES NIGHT OUT—A night of wine, relaxation and fun, with spa specials available. Spots are limited, and you must reserve your space. Call for details or reservations. 6 p.m. $15. 123 Skin at Looks Unlimited, 4620 Emerald St., Boise, 208-490-1390.

SATURDAY JAN. 4 Festivals & Events SUPERHERO SATURDAY—Kids and their families can make superhero masks, wristbands, shields and more. Costumes are encouraged. Event takes place in the Lemhi Room. 1 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-5624996, boisepubliclibrary.org. THIRD SPACE SATURDAY—Join Spacebar Arcade, DJ I.G.A. the Independent Grocer and the Vinyl Preservation Society for video games, beer and community. 10 p.m. FREE. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208918-0597, spacebararcade.com.

Sports & Fitness

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Odds & Ends

Religious/Spiritual

BOISE STATE MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. FRESNO STATE—See Picks, Page 17. 7 p.m. $12-$18. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1900, tacobellarena.com. IDAHO STAMPEDE VS. RIO GRANDE VALLEY VIPERS—7 p.m. $8-$380. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com.

SUNDAY JAN. 5 Religious/Spiritual ENERGY/MEDITATION CIRCLE—A different energyfocused meditation each week. 1 p.m. Donations accepted. Boise Holistic and Metaphysical Coop, 1615 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-6393, boiseholisticcoop.com. MEDITATION AND AWARENESS—Join Randy Stillman and Konnie Nelson for Sunday meditation. Great for the beginner or veteran meditator alike. Small donations accepted, but not required. Doors open at 9 a.m. For more info, email lifecyclewholistic@gmail.com. 9:15 a.m. By donation. The Dojo, 1512 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-720-3663, 10thstreetdojo.com. TEA MEDITATION—Relax with tea, Qigong breathing exercise, and guided meditation. Routine practice will expand your awareness, improve you sense of well being, and reduce stress. Held weekly on Wednesdays and Sundays. 7 p.m. $5. Pudge’s Place, 2726 W. Smith Ave., Boise, 208-550-8327.

HOLIDAY CLEANUP— The city of Boise offers holiday cleanup week to those with a Christmas tree they’d like to unload. Set your tree and excess trash at the curb for pickup. Occurs daily through Jan. 10. See Picks, Page 16. 6 a.m. FREE. Boise. WATSU MASSAGE—Get a Shiatsu massage while you soak in the hot springs. Reservations are required. 1 p.m. Prices vary. The Springs, 3742 Idaho 21, Idaho City, 208-392-9500, thespringsid.com.

TUESDAY JAN. 7 Festivals & Events HEALTH CARE/VETERANS JOB FAIR—Meet a variety of medical employers who will be hiring for a variety of positions. Veteran representatives from the Idaho Department of Labor will be on hand sharing resources available to veterans for education and re-entering the workforce. 1 p.m. FREE. Carrington College, 1122 N. Liberty St., Boise, 1-877-2062106, carrington.edu.

Odds & Ends HOLIDAY CLEANUP—See Monday. 6 a.m. FREE. Boise. KILROY COFFEE KLATCH—Join other WWII-generation members for a morning of conversation and friendship. All veterans are welcome and there are often guest speakers. For more info, email suepaul@warhawkairmuseum.org. 10 a.m. FREE. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-465-6446, warhawkairmuseum.org.

WEDNESDAY JAN. 8 Festivals & Events BOISE S-ANON MEETING— Troubled by someone’s sexual behavior? S-Anon can help. Email sanonboise@gmail.com for questions/more info. 6:15 p.m. FREE. 1111 S. Orchard St., Ste. 112A, Boise.

Odds & Ends

Odds & Ends

SALSA DANCING—Every Sunday, enjoy a salsa dancing party, starting at 7 p.m. with a lesson, and then open dancing until 10 p.m. 7 p.m. $5. Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3713904.

HOLIDAY CLEANUP—See Wednesday. 6 a.m. FREE. Boise.

EYESPY MONDAY JAN. 6

Real Dialogue from the naked city

On Stage 5X5 READING SERIES—BCT presents Gina Gionfriddo reading Rapture, Blister, Burn for the first installment of the 20th Annual 5X5 Reading Series. 7 p.m. $10-$50. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Literature DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Free to writers who wish to hone their skills, work on character development, overcome writers block and be inspired. Led by Adrian Kien, a poetry and composition professor from Boise State University. 6:30 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 19


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE THURSDAY JAN. 2

FRIDAY JAN. 3

CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BEN BURDICK AND DAN COSTELLO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE B3 SIDE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CARL HOLMES BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

POSSUM LIVIN’—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BEST KNOWN METHOD—11 p.m. FREE. The Crux BREAD AND CIRCUS—9 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow BROCK BARTEL—6 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s DAN COSTELLO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

TENNIS, JAN. 4, NEUROLUX Indie darlings Tennis are indeed that: darlings. Singer Alaina Moore’s voice is still as sweet as a croquembouche as she delivers “Mean Streets,” off the band’s latest EP release, Small Sound, (November 2013, Communion Records), which would have been a perfect summertime song—and not only because the first word in the song is “summer.” There’s a groovy edge to the tune as Moore sings over little more than drum and cymbals, the space between the verses punctuated by chill key and guitar chords. It’s hard to imagine this band on a street that is anything other than nice. Tennis, anyone? —Amy Atkins With Poor Moon. $12 adv., $14 door, 8 p.m. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement HOKUM HI-FLYERS—7 p.m. $7. Linen Building Jeff Moll

Frim Fram Four

JEFF MOLL—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WOOLLY BUGGERS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

KAYLEIGH JACK—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MISSISSIPPI MARSHALL—7 p.m. FREE. Whole Foods River Room

REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill SATISFACTION—Rolling Stones tribute band. 8 p.m. $10-$35. Revolution STONESEED—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill

SATURDAY JAN. 4 ANDY BYRON AND THE LOST RIVER BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s CHUCK SMITH TRIO—With Nicole Christensen. 8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE DIAMONDS WITH THE JIMMY DORSEY ORCHESTRA— See Picks, Page 17. 2 p.m. $20-$40. Morrison Center

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

OPHELIA—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

20 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

MEMORY HOTEL—With Burn, Wooden Vale and Woodwind. 7 p.m. $5. The Crux

WEDNESDAY JAN. 1

D BUNNY KITTY—With Bitcoin, Unicorn Hair and Lerk. 11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux Kevin Kirk KEVIN KIRK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE K ELLY S TEFFEY

GUIDE FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MINDSHOES—With Sunshine Genocide and Space Car. 8 p.m. $3. The Crux

TUESDAY JAN. 7

WEDNESDAY JAN. 8

BERNIE REILLY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

CANDY’S RIVER HOUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

Reverend Horton Heat

Boise Old Time Jam

JANUARY SINGER-SONGWRITER SHOWCASE—7 p.m. FREE. The Crux

The Horse I Rode THE HORSE I RODE—With Reverie, Dislich and Stepbrothers. 8 p.m. FREE. The Crux REBECCA SCOTT BAND—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

MARIA TAYLOR—With PJ Bond and Sleepy Seeds. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $5. The Crux

REVEREND HORTON HEAT— With Jello Biafra and Old Man Markley. 7 p.m. $13-35. Knitting Factory

STONESEED—6:30. FREE. Highlands Hollow BOISE OLD TIME JAM—With The Country Club. 6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TENNIS—With Poor Moon. See Listen Here, Page 20. 8 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. Neurolux

THESE THINGS TAKE TIME TOUR—Featuring The Codependents, Traff the Wiz, Hemingway, Rude Max, DJ Tonality, and Oso Negro. 9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

TOMIAS TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

VDJ DISCO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THE FIDDLE JUNKIES—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill

A TASTY JAMM—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

IDYL TIME—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

Whitey Morgan and the 78s

DJ GILBERT—5:30 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

RADIO BOISE PRESENTS OBSCURED BY THE SUN—With Fox Alive and Brain Radio. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

SUNDAY JAN. 5

MONDAY JAN. 6

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

TRAVIS WARD—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE VLIETS—With Rollersnakes and Velvet Hook. 7 p.m. FREE. The Crux

WHITEY MORGAN AND THE 78S—With Parade of Bad Guys. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

MARIA TAYLOR, JAN. 8, THE CRUX If there’s a lullaby-esque quality to Something About Knowing (October 2013, Saddle Creek), the latest release from singer-songwriter Maria Taylor (of Azure Ray, formerly of Bright Eyes), there’s a reason for that: Taylor’s newborn child inspired some of the tracks. In our review of the album last month, we wrote that not all great art has to come from a dark or difficult place, and “sometimes there is beauty in simplicity and it, too, can resonate.” This Duck Club/Ten Gallon Cat show at The Crux promises to be great, with opener PJ Bond, a down-to-earth New Jersey singer-songwriter, whose website description is simply, “I write songs and sing them. I move my body around the world. I love people and pizza”—and the rich, dreamscape sounds of locals Sleepy Seeds, who will kick off the show. —Amy Atkins

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

With PJ Bond and Sleepy Seeds. $5, 8 p.m. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., 208-342-3213, facebook.com/thecrux

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 21


CULTURE

LIBRARIES GET LOUDER Striving to stay relevant, Boise libraries shift into community centers JESSICA MURRI

LU N D

22 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

AD AM R O S EN

On a recent Saturday, Duale Mohamoud and Mehereteab Giday sat across the table from each other in a bright conference room at the Library at Hillcrest, nestled in a strip mall beside Albertson’s, Honk’s $1.00 and Rent-A-Center on the corner of Overland and Orchard. The room had two uplifting azure-painted walls and two walls of clear, clean glass. Mohamoud, 24, wore a white and red button-down and spoke cheerfully about coming to Boise from Kenya in 2006. Giday, on the other hand, is 50. He looked down at a yellow folder and scribbled faint lines, staying quiet. He wore a black hoodie and coughed every few minutes. Mohamoud wasn’t deterred by his quiet company. He’s come to the Hillcrest library every Saturday from 3-4 p.m. for two years, helping refugees and New Americans practice English. “Tell us what you like most in Eritrea that you don’t have in the United States,” Mohamoud said to Giday, who looked back at him with a detached expression. “I do not understand,” Giday said. “‘Tell us,’ that means all of us in the room. If I say, ‘Tell me,’ I mean only me,” Mohamoud explained. “I know only Boise and my country,” Giday said. “Boise is very different. Boise is cold.” “What do you like of Boise?” Mohamoud asked. “I don’t like,” Giday said. “The weather is very bad for me.” Giday said he came to Boise a year ago from Eritrea, a country in East Africa on the Red Sea. Mohamoud told BW that refugees get no choice in where they relocate. “I don’t know perfect English,” Giday said. “If you don’t know language, can’t get a job.” That’s what the English Conversation Corner at the Hillcrest library is trying to fix. The every-Saturday program is designed to bring new Americans together to listen to English—our English, with our accent and our colloquialisms. Mohamoud and Giday never talked about family or anything below the surface. Every week, Mohamoud simply tries to lead refugees out of their shyness and into talking about their day, or what they did in the past week. Mohamoud noticed Giday wandering around the library earlier that week and told him to come to these sessions. This was Giday’s first time, and on this particular day, it was only the two of them. On other Saturdays, there is standing room only. These aren’t services you’d find so regularly at libraries around Boise, but the Library at Hillcrest is surrounded by refugee and non-English-speaking households. Staff started the English Conversation Corner three years ago in an effort to cater to their community. What’s more, Hillcrest offers one-on-one staff time to help with application forms, computer use and citizen requirements; adult skills classes like math, reading, spelling and workplace skills; and a collection of fiction and nonfiction books for adults new to English to check out. The programs offered at Hillcrest are indicative of the changes taking place at libraries across the Treasure Valley— once considered places of quiet study, libraries are increasingly serving as community centers, geared toward those living around them. “People tend to think of libraries as places where you check out books,” said Joanne Hinkel, community relations coordina-

tor for the Boise Public Library. “Staying relevant is a challenge because you have to be constantly reinventing yourself.” Hinkel started at the Boise Public Library in 2001. She said she’s seen the library shift into something more like a community center over time. The Boise Public Library downtown has made it a point to offer space, not just for library programs, but for the community to use. There’s a partnership with organizations like the Nonprofit Center, which hosts a grant workshop once a month. There are also occasional free legal clinics from Concordia University School of Law and tax help from Boise State accounting students. The inaugural Library Comic Con, held in August, brought 7,000 people through the door in one day. Hinkel said it’s difficult to get the word out about these programs, though. She’s constantly looking for inexpensive ways to raise the library’s profile. Her goal for the new year: new users. From Oct. 1, 2012, to Sept. 30, 2013, the four branches of the Boise Public Library system (Hillcrest, Cole and Ustick, downtown and Collister) saw more than 1.4 million visitors. That equals almost 4,400 average daily visits to a library somewhere in Boise. Nearly 16,000 new library cards were issued this year alone. In 2009, those four libraries offered almost 2,000 programs; by 2013, the libraries added more than 1,000 programs. Program attendance went from just shy of 53,000 people to more than 78,000 attendees. The library will also bring back a First Thursday event that it hasn’t had the staff time or resources to host for a few years. Set for Jan. 2, 6:30-8 p.m., the event includes a performance from students at the Boise School of Rock, followed by an interactive workshop with the audience members.

Hinkel is also excited about another program this year: one for “adult makers.” The Jan. 15 event will be an introduction to home brewing, hosted by Marcus Bezuhly of Home Brew Stuff. “There are things that libraries have always done,” she said, “but we’re doing way more of them than we used to.” Across town, at the Ada Community Library on Victory and Five Mile, librarian and program coordinator Diane Rice puts almost all her energy into creating a diverse set of program offerings for her neighborhood. Her budget for programs: zero. But that hasn’t stopped her from developing reading groups with themes like modern marvels, train tracks, Jewish adventures in graphic novels, food, art, science and more. She’s brought in speakers on topics, including Birds of Prey, smallbusiness operations, filmmaking and mushrooms. She’s featured authors and actors and musicians. Rice moved to Boise 30 years ago after pursuing a career as an anthropologist-archeologist. When she moved here, she thought she’d landed in a “monoculture.” “Since then, many things have gotten better, but we have all these communities you don’t see a lot of times unless you go looking for them,” Rice said. “I found them, bit by bit.” When she started at the Ada Community Library 13 years ago, she wanted to bring whatever cultural exposure she could through art and literature. In May 2013, she received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association that only 124 other libraries in the country received. The grant let her start a “Let’s Talk About It” reading group on the theme “Muslim Journeys.” The grant included 25 books, four DVDs and the resources to hire two scholars to run the book discussions. The project B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


ARTS/NEWS CULTURE kicked off with an “Islam 101” lecture and a Bosnian culture celebration that included food, music and a performance by Bosnian youth dance group Mladi Behar. Then the reading group met once a month through the fall to discuss five different books. The last meeting was a smaller group of six women, generally older than 50, who sat in a circle on the first Tuesday evening of December. They mostly wore short hair, scarves and sweaters. Someone brought juice and dixie cups and baklava. Icicle Christmas lights ran around the edges of the room. The conversation wove through the differences and similarities of the women—specifically, growing up in Idaho, which is a decidedly non-oppressive society compared to the one with which Muslim women must contend in the book Dreams of Trespass, by Fatima Mernissi. There were comments like: “The women [in the book] lived in these walls, while we got to live in the outdoors.” “I remember I couldn’t do things that boys Duale Mohamoud (left) helps lead the conversation at the Hillcrest library’s English corner every week. could do because I was a girl. We wore dresses This is the first time Mehereteab Giday (right) has sat in. and boys wore pants. I remember being part of the female society that was pushed down.” ternoon teaching about sheep. They set up a about how to handle the negativity that could “In the ’40s [when the book is set], we sheep pen in the backyard of the library and come up. But she only heard a few comments weren’t all that advanced either.” demonstrated the various uses of wool. from Ada Community patrons. Mostly, some Sandi Augsburger and Nona Driscoll have “[The program] connects resources bewere concerned their tax dollars were paying attended every gathering in the Muslim series. cause we all don’t have much money and we for the program, but it’s all grant-funded. “You develop friendships in these groups,” all don’t have much staff,” Rice said. “We’re trying to introduce our neighbors,” Augsburger said. Lack of resources and lack of staff are Rice said. “These people aren’t coming in She spends more time at the Lake Hazel common challenges, but as more people and taking our resources and threatening our library than the Ada Community Library, and homes. No. These people, who look to local libraries as more than book she notices the same things repositories, demands on infrastructure are are living side-by-side with us happening there, too. BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARIES and raising their children, they increasing. “There is no community Downtown Back in 2002, the city of Boise purchased just have a different perspeccenter down by Lake Hazel 715 S. Capitol Blvd. a plot of land at Bown Crossing for a new tive of the world. It’s OK. and the library fulfills that 208-384-4076 library. Today, that land behind the Tavern They’re good people. Our need,” she said. Library at Cole and Ustick restaurant and Flatbread Pizzeria is a dirt lot neighbors.” Driscoll comes to more 7557 W. Ustick Rd. people use for parking. Rice is working on extendthan the book groups. She 208-570-6900 It’s not a library yet because the city hasn’t ing the grant for the next also uses the Fit and Fall Library at Collister had the funding to build or operate it. installment of the Muslim Proof exercise program ev4724 W. State St. Adam Park, spokesman for Boise Mayor Journeys. In the meantime, ery Tuesday and Thursday. 208-562-4995 Dave Bieter, said the library’s completion is she’s already secured a grant “[Libraries] are active Library at Hillcrest a high budget priority, but it competes with for a new “Let’s Talk About and they’re busy and it’s 5246 W. Overland Rd. other city plans, like upgrading fire stations. It” series starting in March not like, ‘shhh,’ anymore,” 208-562-4996 He said if the Yes! Yes! Boise bond pack2014: Humanity of Science Driscoll said. “There’s so ADA COMMUNITY LIBRARIES age would have passed earlier this fall, the and Technology. The books much going on. ... How mayor wanted to see the library built within include The Immortal Life of could it not increase your Hidden Springs 18 months. That wasn’t a specific proviHenrietta Lacks and Animals quality of life?” Hidden Springs Dr., Boise 208-229-2665 sion in the bond, but it would have freed up in Translation. Driscoll said the library enough money elsewhere. The Ada Community doesn’t charge for anything, Lake Hazel 10489 Lake Hazel Rd., Boise Park said that now, the City Council and Library is embarking on which enables older people 208-297-6700 the mayor have to go back and create a new another program Rice is exwho live on a budget to Star cited about—one that widens plan for all these projects to be completed. participate in activities. She 10706 W. State St., Star And even if the new library can be built, volunteer opportunities from enjoys the companionship. 208-286-9755 the city still needs to find a place in the the simply shelving books to “My husband passed Victory budget for the actual operation. inviting local people to teach away 10 years ago, then my 10664 W. Victory Rd., Boise Park said the library would have been classes on topics in which aunt came and lived with 208-362-0181 built sooner if it weren’t for the economic they are particularly skilled. me and she passed away downturn in 2008. But in 2012, the Boise “It’s bringing in really three years ago, and then experienced, cool people who know a lot and Public Library Community Survey showed my mom passed away last year. So I am just the majority of surveys completed wanted to want to volunteer at a library, but do more kind of coming out and discovering myself, see a library expansion in Southeast Boise. and this is a great place to figure out fun things than straighten shelves,” Rice said. “It’s still a very high priority. It’s been The program is called “Makeiteer,” and to do,” Driscoll said. promised to that neighborhood and Southso far, only Idaho and California have made Rice said she felt nervous at first, offering use of it. At the Ada Community Library, one east Boise,” Park said. “We think it’s very the Muslim Journeys reading group. After a library in Chicago received the same grant and local woman has been teaching dress-making important that it’s built, we just don’t know in recent weeks. Another woman spent an af- when that will be.” faced protests, she had to undergo a training BOI S EW EEKLY.COM

Wouldn’t it be nice to give this to someone for a New Year’s present?

ISN’T IT NICE THAT HE WROTE A CHILDREN’S BOOK? Art is often born of hardship or heartache, but it can also come from an artist’s reflections on the world and how different his perception can be when he looks at it through a child’s eyes. In his new children’s e-book, Isn’t It Nice That..., local artist/cartoonist EJ Pettinger (Mild Abandon) illustrates this worldview with bright colors and sometimes funny imagery, while sharing messages about life, the universe and everything else. Pettinger, a father, said he made Isn’t It Nice because he not only likes the picture book genre but he likes “the picture book audience.” “Kids have expectations for art that seem really well-suited to art,” Pettinger said. “Kids don’t try to make too much of art or too little of art. They just let it do its thing.” When asked why he chose the messages he did, Pettinger said he considered the book a kind of “primer for pre-sleep rumination. Instead of saying to your kid, ‘OK. Go brush your teeth, put on your pajamas, think about eternity for 10 minutes and then go to sleep,’ you can give them a book that includes the observation that the night sky gets bigger when they start to wonder about all the before and all the after. Presto! You’ve got a little deep thinker!” Isn’t It Nice That... is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes and Kobo sites. —Amy Atkins

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | 23


24 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

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THE SMALL SCREEN/SCREEN JEFF DU NN

SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW Antiques Roadshow kicks off 18th season with Idaho premiere JESSICA MURRI

For 18 years, Idaho Public Television General Manager Ron Pisaneschi tried to get Antiques Roadshow to come to Boise. He finally got the call around this time last year. “It was from the president of Boston [Public Betty Krulik (left) appraises a Sanford Robinson Gifford oil painting for $300,000 in Boise, Idaho. Broadcasting]. He said, ‘Ron, you’ll get all the details from the staff, but I want to let you “All the appraisers came to Idaho on their plate designed by Pablo Picasso that previously know that Boise is going to be chosen for the own dime,” Pisaneschi said. “They don’t get hung above a stove collecting grease; and a summer tour.’” said Pisaneschi. “We were just 1974 signed George Nakashima end table, sold paid. That’s how public TV works. But we absolutely over the moon.” heard they had a fun time. They kept saying by Nakashima himself. Six months later, the show’s 18-wheeler how everyone here was so nice.” On that sweltering Saturday back in June, rolled into Idaho for the first time. On June Getting Antiques Roadshow to come to 29, 2013, more than 5,000 hardcore antiquers Idaho Public Television supplied the producBoise wasn’t even a possibility until a few years tion crew with 130 volunand thrift store aficionados teers to help wrangle guests ago. The show has traditionally required a host presented their dolls, books, city to have a facility of 100,000 square feet and sort them by object: violin cases and exotic art to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW under one roof. That doesn’t exist in Idaho, books, collectables, silver the show’s star appraisers. SEASON PREMIERE and they couldn’t do the taping in a stadium and more. On Jan. 6 at 7 p.m., AnAirs Monday, Jan. 6, at 7 p.m. on Some people left feeling setting like the Taco Bell Arena or the Idaho tique Roadshow’s 18th season Idaho Public Television Center. But when the production team tried a ecstatic; others left feelpremieres with Boise. The smaller venue and it worked, show organizers ing disappointed or even show boasts an average 8 mildecided to include one such small-staged stop offended. Boise Weekly lion-10 million viewers every each year. In 2013, they picked Boise. caught up with one grandfatherly Indiana Monday night, making it the most-watched The first three episodes of the season all Jones-looking man who stormed away after show on public television. take place in Boise, showcasing the Egyptian Pisaneschi said the production team usually hearing his pocket-sized Peruvian sculptures Theatre, the Old Idaho State Penitentiary and starts the season with a city that has something were only replicas. the Boise Art Museum. After that, the televised “I’ve had three renowned archaeologists particularly spectacular. Turns out, Boise had treasure hunt continues in Detroit, Mich.; and pre-Mayan experts look at them, and the most valuable item of the season—an they all confirmed they’re real,” he said with- Baton Rouge, La.; Kansas City, Mo.; Anaheim, oil-painted Italian landscape by Hudson River Calif., Richmond, Va.; Jacksonville, Fla.; and out stopping. artist Sanford Robinson Gifford. Knoxville, Tenn. Pisaneschi thought that was half the fun of The painting—filthy and living in the Pisaneschi said Antiques Roadshow’s visit the event—he was surprised by which objects owner’s basement for the past 50 years—was has already been hugely positive for Idaho were worth a lot, and sometimes even more valued at $300,000. Public Television. surprised by which weren’t. He also enjoyed But the Gem State brought forth a myriad “We know there’s lots of new supporters to of other intriguing objects: a first edition of the getting to meet many appraisers he’s watched the station because of it,” he said. Book of Mormon circa 1833; a 1955 Madoura since the show first aired almost 20 years ago.

LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

Opening

Opening

DEAD POETS SOCIETY—An unconventional teacher (Robin Williams) introduces his students to poetry and encourages them to live boldly and. Also starring Robert Sean Leonard and Ethan Hawke. Thursday, Jan. 2. 2 p.m. FREE. Library! at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208562-4996, boisepubliclibrary.org.

THE RAILWAY MAN—Eric Lomax is held as a prisoner of war and tortured at a Japanese labor camp during World War II. When he discovers that the man responsible for his suffering is still alive, he sets out to confront him. Based on a true story. Starring Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman. (Rating not available) Opens Wednesday, Jan. 1. Edwards 9, 22.

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES—In this fifth installment of the found-footage franchise, a group of teens investigates the death of a woman and find items used in black magic. When Jesse (Andrew Jacobs) finds a bite mark on his arm, his friends must try and save him from otherworldly forces. (R) Opens Friday, Jan. 3. Edwards 9, 22.

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WINESIPPER/DRINK TOP THREE WINES FROM 2013 As we turn the page on another year, this is the traditional time for reflection. I’ve tasted hundreds of different wines in the past 12 months, and while most were well made, the trend continues toward bigger, bolder reds with oodles of oak and richly extracted fruit. They’re enjoyable for a sip or two, but overall, I find those wines to be a little overwhelming. My three favorites hail from different regions, but share a certain style that puts the emphasis on fresh fruit flavors and balance. Great on their own, these wines are also welcome at the dinner table. 2012 M. LAPIERRE RAISINS GAULOIS, $13.99 This is what Beaujolais Nouveau would be if it could. It’s made with gamay noir grapes from the Lapierre estate’s younger vines located in the Morgon region of France. The aromatics are marked by ripe red berry that carries through to the palate. It’s a remarkably fresh wine with a silky finish that sports a cleansing touch of cranberry. This wine is priced right for everyday drinking. 2011 SYNCLINE WINE CELLARS SUBDUCTION RED, $21 A Rhone-styled red that blends mourvedre, grenache, syrah, counoise, carignan and cinsault, this wine is sourced from Washington’s Columbia Valley. When I first tasted through the Syncline lineup, this wine floored me. Remarkably well balanced, it’s the antithesis of so many over-the-top Washington reds. It has all the dark cherry and raspberry flavors you could want, with a bright food-friendly finish that’s colored by spice and black pepper. 2011 DONKEY AND GOAT GRENACHE, $27 This Berkeley, Calif., winery is riding the wave of the natural wine movement, boasting no cultured yeasts, added enzymes, nutrients or enhancers. The bush vine grenache from El Dorado vineyards is crushed the natural way as well—by foot. The result is a deeply flavored, meaty red with juicy berry flavors and touches of mineral and ginger on the lush finish. —David Kirkpatrick

26 | JANUARY 1–7, 2014 | BOISEweekly

FOOD

TALKING TRENDS Local chefs dish on the Boise dining scene TARA MORGAN The National Restaurant Association recently dropped its 2014 Culinary Forecast, which polled 1,300 professional chefs across the country about the biggest food trends on the horizon for the coming year. The top 20 trends for 2014 include things like locally sourced meats and seafood, locally grown produce, gluten-free cuisine, nose-to-tail/ root-to-stalk cooking and smaller portions for a smaller price. We asked a handful of Boise chefs and restaurateurs to give us their thoughts on the past year in the Boise dining scene, and to make some predictions for 2014. These are the folks we polled:

V Chef and owner Richard Langston—Cafe Vicino BRF Owner Dave Krick, Beverage Manager David Roberts and Prep Manager Justin Thain—Bittercreek Ale House and Red Feather Lounge M Chef Nate Whitley—The Modern Hotel and Bar FA Owner Cameron Lumsden and Chef Wiley Earl—Fork and Alavita B Chef and co-owner Sarah Kornfield— Bleubird What was the biggest trend in the Boise dining scene in 2013? V : Casual pub food. BRF : Donuts. M : It seemed that the brewpub trend remained strong in 2013. FA : Locally sourced meats and produce. Gluten-free dining. B : Even though it’s been resurging the past few years, still an emphasis on local, farmto-table, etc. What do you predict will be the biggest trend in 2014? BRF : Idaho noodles; it’s gonna be huge. M : Being optimistic, hopefully the pushing of boundaries. Specifically State and Lemp and Woodland Empire [Ale Craft] are two ventures that seem to have that as their goal. FA : Both local and sustainable sourcing will continue to build momentum, which is great for our local foodshed/support of local producers. Also, restaurants being more sensitive to the growing population of potential guests that need more gluten-free options. Simplicity—a resurgence of the “back-tobasics” approach. B : Haute comfort foods and lots of heritage foods like pickling, jams, chutneys and ice cream sandwiches.

Boise restaurants kept steady in 2013 with an emphasis on casual pub food, locally sourced meats and produce, and offerings for the gluten-allergic. Look forward to noodles, comfort food and pickles in 2014.

What restaurant/bar/brewery opening were you most psyched for in 2013? BRF : Bittercreek remodel. M : Bleubird, which I guess opened late in 2012, but I got the most excited about them in 2013. FA : Alavita. B : Janjou [Patisserie].

What food terms or phrases make you want to stab someone with a paring knife? V : Deconstructed. Hen eggs. What? Have you ever seen a rooster egg? BRF : We are tolerant of all ideas. M : I’m gluten-free. FA : Calling extra virgin olive oil, “EVOO.” B : Gluten-free.

What openings are you anticipating in 2014? V : Ruth’s Chris Steak House—it will be interesting to see how Boise responds to a high-end national restaurant. BRF : Bogus Brewing. M : I am looking forward to the Woodland Empire opening up. FA : The Zions Bank Building and all the F&B operations that go with it. Anything locally owned and operated. B : St. Lawrence Gridiron.

What dish do you hope you never see on a Boise restaurant menu again? V : Farm-raised salmon in any form. BRF : Local organic chicken breast wings (it was a huge mistake). M : Salmon Caesar. FA : Poutine.

What was the most overused ingredient of 2013? V : Kale—its publicist did a great job. Now move over and make room for something else. BRF : Pork belly. M : Ranch dressing. FA : Pickled onions and gluten-free alternatives. B : Arugula—I’m guilty. What ingredients are you most amped to work with in 2014? V : More locally grown meats. BRF : Pork belly, we just can’t let go. M : Pork, and then the usual procession of produce which makes itself available at different times of the year. FA : Fresh pastas prepared/served in new and dynamic ways. Pig heads, rabbit and game birds. B : After a long winter, I always look forward to late spring and summer herbs and vegetables/fruits.

What dish do you wish you could find in Boise? V : Not so much a specific dish, but a really good Spanish tapa restaurant. BRF : Local duck. M : More variety, not one specific dish. FA : High-quality, well-executed Chinese cuisine and Callitos Mazatlan. B : Sticky toffee pudding; it’s my favorite dessert. What’s the best kitchen/cooking advice you’ve ever received? V : A good chef never blames his failures on poor equipment—you have to be flexible and creative. BRF : You’ve got crack a few eggs to make an omelet. M : Use salt. FA : Panic is the enemy of clear thinking and productivity. Always keep going! Choose your attitude! B : You can never use too much butter, heavy cream and white wine.

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Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

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SHAE: 5-year-old, female pit bull terrier. Cuddly, eager to please. Plays well with dogs her own size and larger. Enjoys the company of people. (Kennel 407- #21072669)

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NYT CROSSWORD | GOOD ONE! 5 Part of a pharaoh’s headdress 8 Worker with a trowel

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27 With 63-Down, 1997 P.G.A. champ who captained the 2012 U.S. Ryder Cup team 29 Good scores in diving 30 Like many coats and tunes 33 Make calls 34 General ___ chicken 35 Special mall event 37 Bride of 1981 39 Jules or Jim in “Jules et Jim” 40 Amarillo-to-Dallas dir. 41 L.G.B.T. rights advocate 42 Iowa city 43 Done: Fr. 45 Lands 47 Without ___ (dangerously) 48 It may be full of icons 51 Tease, with “on” 54 2-Down, for one 55 Some H.S. math 56 Slanting 58 “Say what?” 59 One more 61 Words that precede “Born is the King …” 63 House committee chairman Darrell 64 Mexican sauces 65 Ear-related study 66 Hilarious types 67 Strain 68 Reproductive stock 70 New hire, typically 72 Hydrocarbon suffix 73 Target number 74 Fr. holy woman 75 British rule in India 76 [I’m mad!] 77 “Don Quixote” composer 79 Idiosyncrasies 81 Overseas assembly 83 Number-crunching grp. 84 Bach’s “___, Joy of Man’s Desiring” 85 Greek earth goddess 86 Robe closer 89 Nuke

90 Chef Lagasse 92 Unseen scenes 94 Taunt 95 One ___ customer 96 Name on a swim cap 98 Funny Anne 100 Giving a boost 103 How-___ 104 Moneymaker for Money 106 Compact Olds 107 Futuristic weapon 109 Like a rendition of “Deck the Halls” 110 He’s no Einstein 111 Boo-boos 112 Thriller writer Follett 113 Rural storage 114 Preser ve, in a way 115 China producer 116 Nettle 117 Half of a noodle dish?

DOWN 1 Gray 2 Good source of aluminum 3 What cowlings cover 4 Took up the slack in 5 River of Pisa 6 [See blurb] 7 Something it’s not good to go to 8 [See blurb] 9 Cousin of “aargh!” 10 Lose traction 11 Mrs. ___ cow 12 Braced (oneself) 13 Give it the gas 14 [See blurb] 15 Expulsion, as of a foreign diplomat 18 Majority owner of Chr ysler 19 Play callers, for short 20 Big money units, in slang 22 Lead-in to while 26 ___ cheese 28 Beatles tune from “A Hard Day’s Night” 31 Some wings

32 Broad 36 ___-Coeur (Paris basilica) 38 Unknot 44 Suffix with sentimental 46 Cries of joy 47 Throw for ___ 48 Common game piece 49 Expulsion 50 Futuristic weapon 51 One of 11 pharaohs 52 Bedub 53 [See blurb] 55 Termite’s nemesis 57 Item in Santa’s sack 60 Eastern holiday 62 Ransacks 63 See 27-Across 65 Home of Thunder Bay: Abbr. 66 ___ Rao, “The Serpent and the Rope” novelist 68 Tailors’ inserts 69 Sister of Helios 70 [See blurb] 71 Charged 73 In the role of 78 Guest-star in, say 80 Nile deity 81 Mideast ruler L A S T C C C C C

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82 Symbolic effort in support of equal rights 84 “Cloud Shepherd” artist 85 Departs 87 Writer Ann 88 Mideast national 89 Self-sealing bag 91 Vintage wedding gown fabrics 93 Mideast ruler 94 Spanish cession in the Spanish-American War 97 Millennia on end 99 Extension 101 Charge carrier 102 Greek diner order 105 Winter sports locale 108 Son of ___ 109 Bit of winter sports equipment Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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LEGAL NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email jill@boiseweekly.com or call 344-2055 for the rate of your notice. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE SATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Matthew Ray Bailey Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1322014 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Matthew Ray Bailey, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Fiona Ellen Kilfoyle. The reason for the change in name is: To right a terrible wrong. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) February 11, 2014 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: December 17, 2013. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: ANNAMARIE MEYER DEPUTY CLERK PUB DEC. 25, 2013, Jan. 1, 8, & 15, 2014.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Deep bronzes and smoky cinnamons and dark chocolates will be your lucky colors in 2014. Mellow mahoganies and resonant russets will work well for you, too. They will all be part of life’s conspiracy to get you to slow down, deepen your perspective and slip into the sweetest groove ever. In this spirit, I urge you to nestle and cuddle and caress more than usual in the coming months. If you aren’t totally clear on where home is, either in the external world or inside your heart, devote yourself to finding it. Hone your emotional intelligence. Explore your roots. On a regular basis, remember your reasons for loving life. Stay in close touch with the sources that feed your wild soul. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): For years, French painter Edouard Manet and French poet Stephane Mallarme hung out with each other every day. Mallarme referred to their relationship as “the most complete friendship.” They influenced each other to become better artists and human beings. I’m guessing that in the coming months, Taurus, you’ll thrive on that kind of stimulating companionship. Having such regular contact with a like-minded ally might even be an important factor in ripening your intelligence. At the very least, I predict that soulful friendship will be a crucial theme in 2014. You will attract blessings and generate luck for yourself by deepening your ability to cultivate synergistic bonds. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): St. Peter’s Basilica is a very old church in Vatican City. It contains a life-sized bronze statue of St. Peter that is at least 700 years old. Over the centuries, countless visitors have paid their respects by kissing and touching the feet of the idol. The metal composing the right foot has been so thoroughly worn down by these gestures that the individual toes have disappeared, leaving a smooth surface. You will have a similar kind of power in 2014, Gemini. Little by little, with your steady affection and relentless devotion, you can transform what’s rigid and hard. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Big rivers don’t travel in straight lines. Their paths are curvy and complicated, with periodic turns and bends. In some places they flow faster and in others they’re slower. Their depth and width may vary along the way, too. Your own destiny is like one of those big rivers, Cancerian. In some years, it meanders for long stretches, slowing down as it wanders along a crooked course. It may even get shallower and narrower for a while. But I expect that in 2014, you will be moving more rapidly than usual. You will be traveling a more direct route, and you will be

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both wide and deep. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “In games there are rules,” writes science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson, “but in life the rules keep changing.” This is always true, of course, but I think it will be an especially poignant truth for you between now and your next birthday. During the coming months, you may sometimes feel as if every last law and formula and corollary is mutating. In some cases, the new rules coming into play will be so different from the old rules you’ve been used to, they may at first be hard to figure out. But now here’s the happy ending: It may take a while, but you will eventually see that these new rules have an unexpected logic and beauty that will serve your future well. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I predict that you will commit no major acts of self-sabotage in 2014. Congrats! I also foresee that you will be exceptionally careful not to hurt or damage yourself. Hooray! More good news: You won’t be as critical of yourself as you have sometimes been in the past. The judgmental little voice in the back of your head won’t be nearly as active. Yay! Even your negative emotions will diminish in frequency and intensity. Hallelujah! Whoopee! Abracadabra! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The citizens of Iceland love literature, but many are not content to simply read. One out of every 10 Icelanders writes and publishes a book at sometime in his or her life. I know it’s unrealistic, but I would love to see at least one in 10 of all my Libra readers do the same in 2014. I think you’re ready to make a big statement— to express yourself in a more complete and dramatic way than ever before. If you’re not ready to write a book, I hope you will attempt an equivalent accomplishment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I’m hoping you will find a new teacher or two in 2014, maybe even a mentor. Not a guru who tells you what to do. Not an exploitative “expert” who claims to know what’s right for you or a charismatic narcissist who collects adoration. What I wish for you, Scorpio, is that you will connect with wise and humble sources of inspiration... with lifelong learners who listen well and stimulate you to ask good questions... with curious guides who open your eyes to resources you don’t realize you need. In the coming months, you are primed to launch a quest that will keep you busy and excited for years; I’d love to see you get excellent help in framing that quest. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 2014, it’s possible you will be given a cabbage farm or a pet-

ting zoo or some bequest that’s not exactly in close alignment with your life’s purpose. But it’s more likely that the legacies and dispensations you receive will be quite useful. The general trend is that allies will make available to you a steady flow of useful things. Your ability to attract what you need will be high. In the coming months, I may even have good reason to name you an honorary Scorpio. You might match those Great Manipulators’ proficiency at extracting the essence of what you want from every situation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Would you be interested in a motto that will help set the tone for you in 2014? I’ve got a suggestion that’s in alignment with the astrological omens. It’s from a poem by Margaret Atwood. Try saying this and see if it works for you: “Last year I abstained / this year I devour / without guilt / which is also an art.” If you choose to make this affirmation your own, be sure you don’t forget about the fact that devouring without guilt is an art—a skill that requires craft and sensitivity. You can’t afford to get blindly instinctual and greedy in 2014; you shouldn’t compulsively overcompensate for 2013’s deprivations. Be cagey and discerning as you satisfy your voracious hunger. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The coming months will be a good time to meditate on the concepts of happy accidents and benevolent trouble. Go ahead and throw constructive mischief into the mix, too, and maybe even a dose of graceful chaos. Are you game for playing around with so much paradox? Are you willing to entertain the possibility that fate has generous plans for you that are too unexpected to anticipate? There’s only one requirement that you have to meet in order to receive your odd gifts in the spirit in which they’ll be offered: You’ve got to be open-minded, eager to learn and flexible. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I think we humans need some new emotions. It’s true that old standards like sadness, anger, jealousy and fear are as popular as ever. But I would personally love to be able to choose from a greater variety, especially if at least 51 percent of the new crop of emotions were positive or inspiring. Now it so happens that in 2014 you Pisceans will be primed to be pioneers. Your emotional intelligence should be operating at peak levels. Your imagination will be even more fertile than usual. So how about it? Are you ready to generate revolutionary innovations in the art of feeling unique and interesting feelings? To get started, consider these: 1. amused reverence; 2. poignant excitement; 3. tricky sincerity; 4. boisterous empathy.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 22 Issue 28  

FICTION 101: The top stories from this year's Fiction 101 contest

Boise Weekly Vol. 22 Issue 28  

FICTION 101: The top stories from this year's Fiction 101 contest