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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 22, ISSUE 05 JULY 24–30, 2013

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 7

ROBO PARK CCDC gets ready to automate Boise’s parking garages

NOISE 15

OLD TIMEY Hermit Music Festival brings the folk to the Treasure Valley

ARTS 19

SAY CHEESE New exhibit captures the faces of Boise

FOOD 22

VIKING FARE BW weighs in on 10 Barrel Brewing

“I’ve never taken an IQ test. That’s for everybody else to decide.”

CITIZEN 8


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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone ZHagadone@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor Emeritus: Amy Atkins, Culture@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Sam Hill Sam@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Interns: Skylar Barsanti, Chris Grapes, Ryan Thorne Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Andrew Crisp, Josh Gross, David Kirkpatrick, John Rember, Ben Schultz Advertising Advertising Director: Brad Hoyd Brad@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com BOISE WEEKLY IS LOOKING FOR AN EXPERIENCED SALESPERSON (MEDIA SALES PREFERRED) CALL BRAD HOYD 344-2055 Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow, Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE THE BEST OF THE BEST Like most kids of my generation, born in the late-’70s and early-’80s, I was reared on marketing; slurping down breakfast cereal in a miasma of slogans and jingles was the highlight of my week. Chances are, if we’re about the same age, it was the highlight of your week, too. The impact of all that exposure has been the subject of psycho-social hand-wringing for as long as I can remember, but one benefit of a childhood spent swallowing “calls to action” from the boob tube is that we info-agers have some of the most highly attuned bullshit detectors of all time—at least when it comes to advertising. I can remember, at age 7 or so, watching a commercial for “the best tasting” instant coffee, followed by another claiming to be the “richest in flavor.” I asked my mom how that could be, and she was straight up about it: “They’re pretty much the same.” Because of that experience, whenever I hear something is “the best” anything, the bullshit detector starts going. It’s just that things held up as such so rarely are. One of those rare cases, of course, is Boise Weekly’s annual Best of Boise. Not only is BW’s Best of Boise the original best of Boise, it’s the best best of Boise among Boise best ofs. Why? Because Boiseans are keen judges of character and they take their town seriously. So do we. That’s why we’re making sure voters have as long as possible to pore through the meticulously curated categories and record their opinions. Voting opens for the 2013 Best of Boise Wednesday, July 24, and will run through midnight, Sunday, Sept. 1. You’ll have to be patient, though—winners won’t be announced until the Wednesday, Sept. 25, edition of BW. For those who voted last year and found the system cumbersome, rest assured; this year we’re moving the contest back to our own website. To vote, you just need to be a registered member on boiseweekly.com and put your mouseclicking skills to use. Easy. Standard rules apply: Votes are only accepted for locally owned and operated businesses and organizations, and you have to answer at least 20 questions for your votes to count. If you find yourself needing multiple sessions to get through all the categories, just log off and come back to it later— your progress will be saved. And don’t even try to stuff the ballot. We’ll catch you. This isn’t Florida. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Libby Gruber TITLE: Idaho

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2013 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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MEDIUM: Acrylic on wood. ARTIST STATEMENT: Marked by whim, art can be unpredictably fantastic. Showing at Green Chutes right now. libbygrubercanvas@gmail.com.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

CENTER STAGE Boise’s own The Blaqks performed its first headlining concert after making a splash at this year’s Treefort Music Fest. Miss the fun? BW didn’t. Get the scoop at Cobweb.

ON THE RISE We’ve heard it before: location, location, location. But it turns out geography is even more important when it come to opportunities to climb the financial ladder. Get the details at Citydesk.

HOT WATER The drama at a North-Central Idaho hot springs resort has reached a boiling point. Check out the latest about the situation at the Red River Hot Springs at Citydesk.

OPINION

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BILL COPE/OPINION

WORSE THAN SNOWDEN? (Hint: it’s a long list) “Cope, wheres you gonna get around to callin’ that Eddy Snowden what a no-count coward snake-in-the-grass back-stabbin’ traitor what he is!?” That was Red, of course. He’d stomped in all angry and resentful that I had let weeks slip by without writing anything about that “Bennydick Arnold what expoured our good ol’ ‘Merican secrets out f’r the whole world t’ gawk at.” Curiously, Red stomped in just minutes after Badger Bob had stomped out, also angry and resentful. Bob, however, had an entirely different slant on the Edward Snowden affair. “Cope, this is your chance to stick up for an authentic American hero, a man willing to sacrifice himself on the alter of truth and transparency. Can’t you see that, you f***ing idiot? Edward Snowden has handed us an opportunity to examine the principles and values necessary for a democracy to survive. Why don’t you get off your lard a** and write something that means something!?” They both, in their separate ways, did indeed make me feel a tad guilty for ignoring the Snowden story and its ramifications. But as I explained to them in turn, “Sorry, Bob/Red. I know in my heart that I should be addressing this important matter. But the truth is, I have ambiguous feelings about the whole thing.” Bob said, “That’s your f***ing problem, Cope. You’re ambiguous about everything, you fatuous twit!” Red said, “This ain’t no time f’r amphibylous feelin’s, Cope. The U.S. of A.’s got its neck on the chomping block if’n we can’t spy on whosever needs spyin’ on without ever’body knowin’ we’re spyin’ on ’em!” But neither of them could talk me down from the fence I straddled. Certainly, I agreed with Bob that a democracy can survive only so much secrecy, the invasion of only so much privacy, the violation of only so many basic liberties. And, initially, I had to admire the sacrifice Edward Snowden had made in exposing the NSA’s policies. On the other hand, I shared Red’s fear that Snowden might well have damaged the nation’s security in a world changing so rapidly that even the experts are in a constant frenzy just to grasp what perils the future might hold. I also agree that, after that first flush of what appeared to be selfless sacrifice, Snowden has behaved rather like a naughty little boy, looking for a momma to hide behind. Taken all together, though, it’s a wash. While I don’t like the idea of having my correspondence gone over by some huge intelligence agency’s version of cadaver-sniffing dogs, nothing has shown me—yet—that the NSA has used any of the information it has gathered to the detriment of any citizen who wasn’t up to something we are damn glad he got caught being up to. In other words, did Snowden do us any favors by sharing with us secrets which, had they not been shared with WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

us, might one day save some lives? So I may not know what to make of the man, but that’s not to say he isn’t useful as a standard to put some things in perspective. I put together a list I call the “Who’s Worse Than Edward Snowden?” registry, and the individuals on it are those who, in my estimation, have done even more harm to America than this whistle-blowing runaway. The idea traces to a Democrat congressman from Georgia, Hank Johnson. Asked what he thought about Supreme Court chair-filler Clarence Thomas’ vote to neuter the Voting Rights Act, Rep. Johnson said, “Comparing it to Snowden, I’d say the offense is worse.” Absolutely! thought I, and by extension, that makes four other members of the Supreme Court equally worse than Snowden. (Frankly, we don’t even need to consider their ruling on the Voting Rights Act; the bucket of shit they poured over America with the Citizens United decision would have ensured them a place on “Who’s Worse Than Edward Snowden?” Naturally, I’ve added Donald Trump to the list, and not solely because he was so quick to suggest Snowden should be executed. For years, I’ve felt that Trump’s big, stupid, flapping mouth degraded and cheapened the experience of being an American, reminding us there are many ways to do harm to a nation and its people. John Boehner was one of the first listed, and not for calling Snowden a traitor. Many have called Snowden a traitor, but Boehner went on to say Snowden has “put Americans at risk.” Maybe true, maybe not. But one thing’s for certain: As the Obstructionist-inChief for the GOP, Boehner has put more Americans at risk than Snowden could with a thousand leaks. Of course, I put Bush (George W.) and Cheney (that Dick) on the list. Really, when it comes to harming America, Snowden can’t hold a candle to those two. And at least, when Snowden did his damage, thousands and thousands of people didn’t get killed in the process. Oh, the registry grows even as I write. When you think about it, it’s a wonderment that America has survived the combined abuse at the hands of Rush Limbaugh, Sarah Palin, the Tea Party, the Koch brothers, the Senate sumphole that answers to the name “Mitch McConnell”... so many, many more. However, one name that has resurfaced as this story unfolded will not make the list— Daniel Ellsberg. Ellsberg has compared Snowden to himself, but I can’t help but see an enormous difference between exposing a huge, ambiguous secret— as Snowden did with the NSA—and exposing a huge, murderous lie, as Ellsberg did with the Pentagon Papers. And is it not relevant that Ellsberg hasn’t spent the rest of his life bouncing from port to port, trying to avoid the consequences of what he did?

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OPINION/JOHN REMBER

INDICATOR SPECIES Lessons learned from the road It’s full-on summer here in Sawtooth Valley. Highway 75 is crowded with supersized motorhomes, giant pickups towing flatbeds full of four-wheelers and jet skis, herds of deaf motorcyclists and the occasional bicyclist hovering between fog line and barrow pit, hoping his bike helmet will protect his skull from the extended mirror of the F-250 that’s closing on him at 85 mph. You can tell a lot about the weather and the economy in Southern Idaho and Utah from the sorts of people migrating by these days. Six or seven years ago, Highway 75 was crowded with single 20-year-old males in new pickups. They indicated that a young man could go from high school to restaurant or hotel or call center work, and in two years, qualify for a loan for a four-door Cummins-powered Dodge 2500 with a tonneau cover and Truck Nutz. He could fill the truck with fuel and drive from Boise to Sun Valley to Stanley to Boise, all in a day, exploring the wilderness and maybe having a burger and fries along the way. Then, one September morning, the on-theprowl 20-year-old males were gone. Disappeared. Vamoosed. I figured some catastrophe had happened. Hormonal disruption of mating behavior caused by the outgassing of sunexposed pickup dashes was my first theory. My second theory was that a Great Recession was under way. When the Idaho Statesman downsized and devoted most of its remaining space to foreclosure notices and trustees’ sales, it indicated a lot of young men had lost their jobs and traded their pickups for used Nissan Sentras. Others had gone to college and taken on debt that could have bought two or three pickups—a practice a bit like signing a counter check at a casino after you’ve lost your stake. Some had decided that $4-plus diesel made it better to just stay home and get their wilderness experience with the monkeys in Zoo Boise. In these days of relative plenty, the big pickups are back, but they’re not driven by young single men anymore. They’re driven by young family men. Their MegaCabs and SuperCrews are chock-full of screaming children, and their short beds are full of coolers, bicycles and bungeed-down float toys. They indicate that federal military and security spending have boosted the Utah economy, and if you don’t believe me, you should check the license plates in the parking lots at Redfish Lake. We’re also seeing lots of big guys on fulldress Harley Fat Boys. They indicate that pets and pet owners aren’t the only things that increasingly resemble each other as they age. The motorhomes towing Audis indicate the Great Recession hasn’t impoverished equally. New U.S. Forest Service and Idaho Fish and Game trucks indicate that these agencies are happier buying new equipment than hiring field personnel. A line of top-down Mercedes and Porsches indicates that it’s nearly 100 degrees in Sun Valley. Log trucks laden with

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silvery beetle-killed tree trunks indicate that our summers are getting a little longer and dryer, and that those 100-degree days aren’t always going to stay outside the valley walls. Hummers, of which we used to see bunches, are gone, replaced by the plus-sized motorhomes as the best indication of wretched excess and conspicuous consumption. But I know where they went. Last December, when nighttime temperatures in Sawtooth Valley were hitting minus-25 and the lack of vehicles was indicating that the rest of Idaho had succumbed to a Zombie Apocalypse, Julie and I decided to go someplace warm with a beach. We flew to Panama City, Panama, determined to come back when the days were getting longer and the sun was above the southern horizon. It was a shock. Panama City is a milessquare sheaf of high-rises, rising like a mirrored Oz out of an emerald jungle. What we had thought would be a low-key beach vacation was an intense urban experience, marked by budget-blowing restaurants, wine bars, giant malls, yacht marinas and, at the far edge of their southern range, Hummers. The local tourist newspaper was full of ads from banks, which said, in effect: “Tired of your greedy government taxing your money? We will help you establish a Panamanian investment plan that will protect your wealth from seizure by tax authorities and other parasites. Owners of gold coins will be able to come into our bank every day, open their safety deposit boxes and run their fingers through their tangible wealth.” Condos in the 70-floor Trump Tower Panama were starting at $267,000, with no property taxes for 18 years. Hummers were ubiquitous, driven by rich expatriate Americans or their third or fourth wives. We talked to a few. One bragged he had been there six years and hadn’t learned a word of Spanish. Julie and I fit the profile—a beautiful young woman accompanying a grouchy silverhaired old fart in a Hawaiian shirt, who had a beltline heading for his armpits. The local Panamanians took one look at us and knew who and what we were. Short of renting a Hummer, we could do nothing to make the picture more complete. What we indicated was that the United States was losing some of its less pleasant citizens to Panama. It didn’t seem as if the non-bankers among the Panamanians were all that happy about it. We were glad to get home to Sawtooth Valley at the end of January, and glad that our career as an indicator species had been short. We had experienced an object lesson in stereotyping, and we had been the objects. I resolved to look at the people traveling Highway 75 as real human beings, each with his or her own story, no matter what they were driving. Take away the month of July, and I’ve managed to do just that. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS/CITYDESK GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

NEWS PATR IC K S W EENEY

CCDC’S $1.9 MILLION PARKING GARAGE GAMBLE

Chris and Sue Anderson of, Orofino, recently received a call from the USAF chief of staff.

AIR FORCE TOP BRASS CONTACTS IDAHO FAMILY REGARDING MYSTERY OVER DAUGHTER’S DEATH

Agency is counting on more automation, less staff to increase revenue ANDREW CRISP Boise’s downtown parking garages haven’t changed much since the 1980s. Parking attendant Brandon Johnson says the equipment is older than he is. “They literally don’t make the parts for that machine any more,” he said, pointing to an aged piece of payment processing equipment—one of the many moving parts that keep the garage humming. “It’s jerry-rig, jerry-rig, jerry-rig.” Johnson admits the Downtown Public Parking System, a network of garages with more than 2,500 stalls owned and administered by the Capital City Development Corporation, could use an overhaul. But Johnson’s fellow parking attendants said the bottom line of the $1.9 million being spent to upgrade the garages to automation, including ATM-like kiosks replacing traditional booths, will mean that some of the attendants will be out of a job. “[CCDC] said the new system is designed to work with ‘minimal staff’; that was their term,” said Johnson. Johnson’s not too worried—he starts a new job (with a raise) at Cabela’s soon. “A couple of people were worried, but they said... [some] people gotta stay around to keep the machines running,” said Johnson. “It’ll be a change for those sticking around.” A number of parking attendants, including one who said he’d worked with DPPS for seven years, said they wouldn’t talk on the record regarding the automation. Another cited concern his job would be in jeopardy if he commented on the plan. Maggie Lee—an attendant at the Myrtle Street Garage and a parking system employee since April 2012—said she’s not as concerned, mainly because she already holds down a second job. “But a lot of other people don’t, and they’ve been here 10 years,” said Lee. “They don’t know what else to do, you know?” If all goes according to plan, by spring 2014 CCDC will do away with parking attendant booths entirely, replacing them with a machine similar to an ATM, built by international autoWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Zach Miller mans the booth at CCDC’s Eastman Garage. But the booth, and his job, will soon be replaced by automated kiosks. If he’s lucky, Miller may become a “roving ambassador” inside the garage.

mated systems firm Scheidt & Bachmann. Max Clark, CCDC’s Parking and Facilities director, sold the urban renewal agency’s commissioners on the $1.9 million revamp and replacement of the garage payment system, creatively dubbed PARCS (Parking Access Revenue Control System), at the board’s June 10 meeting. Rather than spend $900,000 to replace 1980s hardware, held together with “duct tape and baling wire,” Clark said CCDC should invest $1.9 million to fully automate the system. Clark told BW that a smaller staff will work not in attendant booths, but on foot, roving the garages as so-called “parking ambassadors.” Staffing will likely drop from 35 fulltime employees to approximately 15-20. “For the first year, there’s virtually no reduction,” said Troy Harris, DPPS general manager. “Then we’ll look at phased reductions.” Clark told BW that he wants to avoid a scenario of simply “throwing up the machines, putting up a few signs and hoping that the customers get it.” In the first year, budget savings ($99,540) and “revenue enhancements” in the form of increased garage use ($98,839), should save a combined $198,379, according to Clark. He estimated bigger savings in the second year ($296,489) and each of the following years ($346,758). The return on investment, according to Clark, is three and a half years. “The reality is, the cashier sits in a booth eight hours a day,” said Clark. “They’re busy for about two hours a day, and for six hours a day, they’re sitting there reading a book, listening to an iPod or doing their homework.” Once PARCS is installed, the garages will operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Currently, much of the system doesn’t open on Sundays. While many motorists choose free on-street parking, Clark said that even those drivers who might want to choose a garage can’t because they’re unusable without an at-

tendant in the booth. For example, Clark said, the Eastman Garage could be open for business on Sundays with the new PARCs system. “We could staff it, but I was losing $65,000 a year trying to staff it on Sundays. When it’s automated, it will be available 24/7,” he said. With the new system, drivers will be prompted to walk up to one of six electronic machines located around the garage and pay for their time before hopping in their car. “When a customer sits in the car and pays a cashier, that transaction takes 30-45 seconds. But, Harris said, with the PARCS system customers can exit in as little as five seconds. “You’re not sitting down creeping through a queue for 45 minutes, in your car, burning fuel,” said Clark. “The idea is you pay for your parking; you get 20 minutes to get out, and 98 percent of the time you’re going to make it out in 20 minutes.” Parking ambassadors will assist customers with the machines and, equipped with smartphones, they’ll be alerted to problems with equipment by an attendant working in a round-the-clock parking office. Harris said the upgrade will also soon help motorists determine the best garage to park in, sending out up-to-the-minute data on the number of stalls available at each location. “The equipment will give real-time occupancy counts for each garage,” he said. “We’ll be looking at installing some new signage over the next couple of years. Imagine driving down Main Street and you’ll see that the Eastman Garage will have 300 stalls available.” Once installed, the system will mean less down time for parking attendants like Johnson and Lee. Until then, during the slow periods, Lee reads, while Johnson works on his skills playing video games on his new laptop. It’s policy to let staff find things to do. “They allow that,” said Johnson, “because they learned that when you don’t let the employees do anything, they go stir crazy.”

Chris Anderson said he and his wife, Sue, haven’t gotten the answers they deserve, but their plight has received attention from the United States Air Force top brass. “Guess who I just got off the line with? Gen. Mark Welsh, the chief of staff of the Air Force,” said Anderson, adding that inquiries from Boise Weekly and the Associated Press are “definitely ruffling some feathers.” It was the first sliver of hope that the Andersons have had since the death of their 19-year-old daughter, USAF Airman First Class Kelsey Anderson. She was found shot with her own service weapon while on duty as a security officer in the early morning hours of June 9, 2011, at Guam’s Andersen Air Force Base. A BW investigation (BW, Feature, “The Long Goodbye,” July 17, 2013) revealed how the trail of witnesses had gone cold, with numerous parties being reassigned from the Guam base since Kelsey Anderson’s death. And more than two years following the incident, the Andersons have yet to receive any communication from the USAF regarding the circumstances of the shooting. The Orofino couple has since filed suit against the U.S. government, listing the USAF as a defendant, with summonses appearing on the doorsteps of the U.S. attorney general and the U.S. attorney for the District of Idaho. “[Welsh] told me he wasn’t in a position just now to tell me anything, and that he just recently found out about Kelsey’s case,” Anderson told BW. Welsh, a four-star general, is the most senior uniformed officer in the Air Force and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. “I asked [Welsh] if he had a daughter, and he told me he did,” said Anderson. “He said, ‘I don’t know what I would do if I were you.’” Anderson said Welsh gave him “a long line of excuses” but ultimately shared his personal cellphone number, telling Anderson that he should expect answers regarding his daughter’s death “sooner than later.” Meanwhile, the Andersons’ Spokane, Wash.-based attorney, Matt Crotty, told BW that he expected the summonses would be getting “some attention” once they showed up in the inbox of U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. “Yes, we’re still waiting, but my sense is that there’s some movement,” said Crotty. —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | JULY 24–30, 2013 | 7


CITIZENS JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

LUKE AND CARL VELLOTTI 14- and 18-year-old brothers will be UCLA roommates this fall GEORGE PRENTICE Seven moves. That’s how long—or short—it took Luke Vellotti to beat me at chess. I could say that I wasn’t paying strict attention to the game because it took place during an interview with a 14-year-old genius. Suffice to say, Vellotti is one of the best players in the nation, recently earning enough points to be considered an International Master by chess’ international governing body. His brother, Carl, 18, is equally competitive and regularly beats Luke at sports and other games (anything other than chess). Boise Weekly recently sat down with the pair to talk about their friendly sibling rivalry and how they’ll soon be in the unique position of being roommates when they begin their freshman year at University of California, Los Angeles.

What’s your earliest recollection of playing chess? Luke: I was probably 4 years old, playing in a chess tournament, and I remember being very happy. I also remember doubling numbers at a pretty early age. I could double all the way to 1 million when I was 4. Did you always attend public schools in Boise? Luke: Yes. I went to Collister, Shadow Hills and Boise High. But I started going to the Treasure Valley Math and Science Center when I was 8 years old. My brother entered [TVMSC] as a sixth-grader. I entered as a third-grader. Carl: We started talking last September about going to the same college when we were done with high school. We applied to a number of places, but when Luke got a full-ride scholarship from the Stamps Family Charitable Foundation to attend UCLA, that pretty much sealed the deal for us to go there. How well do you manage high expectations of yourself? Luke: I always try to work hard. Otherwise there’s not a reason for me to do as well.

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International Master-elect until FIDE approves my latest results. The next level, which is the highest rating in the world, is Grand Master. There are only 1,000 Grand Masters in the world. I’ve heard about the elements of chess magic. Tell me about that. Luke: There are three: The first is multiple chess, playing a number of players at once.

What’s the longest period of time that you’ve stayed away from home? Luke: Four nights, during a national science bowl competition earlier this year.

How many competitors have you simultaneously defeated? Luke: I played, and won, 21 boards at once. It was a 2010 fundraiser to benefit earthquake victims in Haiti. The second element is blindfold chess.

But you must acknowledge that living away from home will be a pretty big challenge. Luke: It will be a lot different from anything I’ve done before. Carl: One of our parents may stay in Los Angeles during our first six months.

Hold it. How is that possible? Luke: Each space is assigned a letter—A through H—and a number—1 through 8. I also play multiple boards blindfolded. The third element is my favorite: speed chess. Each player has no more than one minute to win.

What will your majors be? Luke: Math and computer science. Carl: I’ll be majoring in bioengineering. And what are your professional dreams? Luke: I want to be a doctor. Dr. Michael Gold, an anesthesiologist at St. Al’s hospital, has been a mentor of mine for several years. Carl: I also want to be a doctor, maybe an orthopedic surgeon. How are chess masters rated or ranked? Luke: There’s an international body of chess—the Federation Internationale des Echecs; it’s in France. Right now, I’m an

So let’s talk about the “G” word: genius. Luke: I’ve never taken an IQ test. That’s for everybody else to decide. Does the word “genius” make you uncomfortable? Luke: Not really, I’m used to it. How do you think you’ll manage being around a significantly older student population at UCLA? Luke: I’ve been around older students much of my life. Carl: Honestly, for most students, it’s not that big a deal.

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DOU G S EYM OU R

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Holy Ghost Tent Revival heads to the hills for Idaho-Down.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY JULY 26-27 yee-haw Eight-year-olds, Dude.

THURSDAY JULY 25 the dude abides THE BIG LEBOWSKI Look, let me explain something to you: This is the Big Lebowski, so pull on your bathrobe, polish your bowling balls and gather up your soiled rugs. The Dude abides, and is heading to the Egyptian Theatre for one night only on Thursday, July 25. The Coen brothers’ cult comedy stars Jeff Bridges as Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski, a slacker whom two thugs mistake for a similarly named millionaire, rough him up and “micturate” (read: pee) on his rug. The Dude gathers up his bowling buddies—played by John Goodman and Steve Buscemi—and goes to seek compensation (that rug really tied the room together) from the other Lebowski, sparking off a chain of events involving nihilists, a “kidnapped” porn star and a pederast bowler called Jesus. Boise Classic Movies screened the film last year, but for its first anniversary, it’s hosting an encore of the eminently quotable classic. Don’t expect a quiet night out—Big Lebowski screenings are renowned for their audience participation, shouting out favorite lines, singing along to Creedence and joining in with Jesus Quintana’s infamous dance (that creep can roll, man). The film even has its own multi-city festival, Lebowski Fest, now in its 12th year. As well as keeping the white Russians flowing, the Egyptian will also hold look-alike contests for the best faux Dude, Walter, Maude and other characters. Prepare yourself for a flood of purple bowling jumpsuits. If that doesn’t sound like your thing, yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man. 7 p.m. $9-$11. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1723, boiseclassicmovies.com.

Neal McCoy brings the country to the Canyon County Fair.

10 | JULY 24–30, 2013 | BOISEweekly

IDAHO-DOWN Top three reasons to attend the Idaho-Down Music Festival are No. 1: “no drum circles,” No. 2: free camping, No. 3: kick-ass bands (Holy Ghost Tent Revival and Real Life Rockaz). Deep in the Payette National Forest, Brundage Mountain Resort opens its doors for the annual weekend festival, inviting outdoorsand music-lovers alike to soak up the sounds of musicians from across the region, including Miller Creek, StoneSeed, Stonefed and the Sloppy Hogg Trio, among others. In 2009, Boise’s own Equaleyes decided it loved outdoor summer music festivals so much it wanted to start its own. Now in its fifth year at Brundage—a mere 20 minutes from the center of McCall— Idaho-Down kicks off a weekend of music at 3 p.m. Friday, July 26, and doesn’t let up until well past the midnight hour. Festivities begin at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 27, and keep going throughout the day and into the night. As a safety precaution, Idaho-Down asks patrons to leave the fireworks and charcoal grills at home. And don’t worry about hotel accommodations—Idaho-Down offers free on-site camping in the ticket price, so festival-goers can pitch a tent or stretch out under the stars. Friday, July 26, 3 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Saturday, July 27, 11 a.m.-1:30 a.m. $40-$60. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, idahodownfestival.com.

THURSDAYSUNDAY JULY 25-28 deep fried CANYON COUNTY FAIR No matter your personal feelings on carnival rides, country music and staring at farm animals, fairs deserve at least one yearly visit to enjoy the mass gathering of food vendors. The Canyon County Fair—running Thursday, July 25-Sunday, July 28, in Caldwell—is no exception. Visitors gorge on carnival classics like funnel cakes and handdipped corn dogs, but it isn’t every day you can order bizarre and delicious calorie bombs like the deep fried peanut butter and jelly sandwich from Buffalo Grill or deep fried cheese on a stick from Colossal Onion Blossom.

After filling your belly and winning a giant stuffed animal at the ring toss, throw on your cowboy hat and mosey on over to the free concert each night at 8 p.m. The Oak Ridge Boys take the stage Thursday, July 25, while .38 Special brings its Southern rock Friday, July 26, followed by country crooner Neal McCoy, Saturday, July 27. Things get spiritual Sunday, July 28, with Christian pop band The Afters. While concerts are included with fair admission, reserved seating can be yours for $25 in advance or $30 at the gate, which includes fair admission. Looking for a way to burn off some of those calories? Sign up for the second annual Barnyard Dash, featuring a three-mile obstacle course covered with various barnyard impediments. The course is free and offers a chance to jump start that new country-themed workout routine. Fair tickets can be purchased WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NIC HOLAS K AHN/ R IC HAR D S ELES NIC K

PATR IC K S W EENEY

Contestants face the judges to prove they have the funny to compete.

SATURDAY JULY 27 yuks

Boise Art Museum invites adults to get spacey.

BOISE’S FUNNIEST PERSON It seems everyone’s a comedian nowadays, but after a monthlong hunt for the everyday Boise citizen with the best rib ticklers and side splitters, Liquid Lounge hosts the grand finale of the first Boise’s Funniest Person contest Saturday, July 27. Contestants have performed for a panel of judges every Saturday throughout July, whittling 20 initial comedians (selected from a pool of enthusiastic amateurs) down to five, who will standoff with their stand-up to decide the victor. Just remember, heavy is the head that wears the crown of Boise’s Funniest Person. The winner can expect to hear “tell us a joke” more than maybe they want to. Luckily, the contestants have been teamed up with some of Boise’s top comedians—like Liquid regulars Olek Szewczyk and Mikey Pullman—to help craft their stand-up skills, letting them deflect the hardest of heckles with a well-timed put-down, so they should be armed with a quick response to the endless requests for laughs. The winner will be decided both by the judges—made up of a pool of local comedians and critics—and the audience’s reaction. So turn up for the doors at 7 p.m., pay your $5 entry fee and make your laughter heard for your favorite. 7 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, boisesfunniestperson.com.

online or at the gate. Thursday-Saturday, noon-midnight; Sunday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. $3-$5. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 111 22nd St., Caldwell, 208-4558500, canyoncountyfair.org.

FRIDAY JULY 26 groovy 60/60 Ever wanted to see Honest Abe sport tie-dye, or the Beatles croon to an old-timey banjos? Get ready to scratch that weird desire off your bucket list; the opportunity to combine the 1860s and the 1960s is upon us.

S U B M I T

The Idaho State Historical Museum presents one hell of a psychedelic crossover as it celebrates bygone eras. On Friday, July 26, the 60/60 event combines the sharp shootin’ of the 1860s with the free love of the 1960s. Celebrate your favorite era in Wild West saloon- and Mod-themed bars while period music from the Vinyl Preservation Society wafts through the museum. It will also be a night of vintage costumes, groovy games, contests and prizes. At the same time, check out the Essential Idaho exhibit, where guests can explore the lives of Idahoans from each decade. Admission costs $20 in advance or $25

SATURDAY JULY 27 space oddity MARS AND STARS BAM Control to Major Toms: take your protein pills and put your helmets on for Boise Art Museum’s daylong tour of the Red Planet. From noon-4 p.m. Saturday, July 27, BAM hosts some Martian madness for all ages, with a hands-on workshop creating sculptures for a Martian landscape diorama, a reading of sci-fi stories, an artist’s demo on how to make outer space props from household objects, and other interactive space activities with the Discovery Center of Idaho. That evening, beam yourself up to Mars and Stars, an adults-only event featuring live Martian-inspired music from Radio Boise DJs Matt Daley and Matt Jones, arcade games courtesy of Space Bar and sci-fi themed photo opportunities. Take a telescope to BAM’s Sculpture Garden for some stargazing—and maybe even spot a UFO or two. Make sure to take advantage of the supplied aluminum foil hats to stop the little green men from knowing what you sample at the cash bar. And it’s not just fun and games; the event benefits BAM’s education programs. While there, be sure to check out the Mars Revisited exhibit by renowned collaborative artists Nicholas Kahn and Richard Selesnick. The multi-genre installation uses Idaho’s own Craters of the Moon as a Martian backdrop. Martian Madness is free for BAM members, or included with the price of admission for other earthlings. Mars and Stars costs $10 for members or $15 for the public. Martian Madness, noon-4 p.m. FREE-$6. Mars and Stars, 7-11 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Art Museum, 610 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

at the door and includes one drink and appetizers to sweeten the deal. Museum members save $5 off the advanced ticket price. Come to party, but leave the kids at home—60/60 is limited to guests ages 18 or older. Whether you’re a cowboy

FIND KONSTRUKTOR DIY SLR CAMERA Everyone has a digital camera nowadays— usually built into a smartphone—enabling users to push every nuance of their lives onto $35, shop.lomography.com/us/konstruktor Facebook and Instagram. But there’s still something to be said for the old analog method: the click of the shutter, the whirr of the winder; real, physical photos in real, physical photo albums. Old-school enthusiasts Lomography are determined to make the hands-on experience of analog photography even more tactile, selling a DIY 35mm SLR camera for $35. The aptly named Konstruktor arrives much like a model car kit, with parts needing to be trimmed out of their plastic frame before assembly. Lomography suggests the assembly of the camera and 50mm F10 lens should take about an hour or two. And if you want to get really meta, you can take some pictures of it as you go. Once it’s assembled, you can point, shoot and find out what it looks like once the film’s used up and developed. You’ll be a lot more choosy about your shots with only 24 per roll, but isn’t that a good thing? Does the online world really need to see your every meal? And for fans of Instagram’s retro filters, where do you think they got that look in the first place? —Chris Grapes

or a hippie, crave a dry martini or rot-gut whiskey, it’s time to pick a side or do the Time Warp to mix-and-match. 6:30 p.m. $15-$25. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-344-2120, history.idaho.gov.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JULY 24 On Stage MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING—Beatrice and Benedick undertake a war of wits on their road to love while they uncover a dastardly plot in one of Shakespeare’s most loved comedies. 8 p.m. $12-$41. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. REAL TALK COMEDY WORKSHOP—Refine your comedy routine and stay for the free comedy show at 8 p.m. 6 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Odds & Ends EXPLORE THE GEOLOGY OF THE FOOTHILLS—Join geologist Emerald Shirley for an adult educational program explaining the why and how of rock formations in the Foothills. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

THURSDAY JULY 25 Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FAIR—Enjoy four days of fun featuring free concerts, carnival rides, exhibits, food and livestock events. See Picks, Page 10. FREE-$5. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 22nd Ave. S., Caldwell, 208-455-8500, canyoncountyfair.org. RED LIGHT VARIETY SHOW— Join RLVS on the patio for a burlesque performance. 7 p.m. FREE. Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208424-8244, redlightvarietyshow. com.

Food & Drink BITNER VINEYARDS WINEMAKERS DINNER—Five-course dinner with special wine pairings. Must be 21 years or older to attend. 6:30 p.m. $55. Barbacoa, 276 Bobwhite Court, Boise, 208-3385000, barbacoa-boise.com.

Workshops & Classes WINE 301: CORNERSTONES OF QUALITY—Learn not just the how, but the why behind what you enjoy in the glass. Register online. 6-8:30 p.m. $45. House of Wine at the 44th Street Wineries, 107 E. 44th St., Garden City, 208-297-9463, thehowofwine. com.

Literature BOISE, GEM OF THE MOUNTAINS: STORYTELLING—Local storyteller Ben Kemper performs Starved for Stories, about the Shoshone and Bannock tribes, and As the Good Book Says, about Boise’s black community. Part of the Boise 150 celebration. 7-8 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boise150.org.

FRIDAY JULY 26 Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FAIR—See Thursday. FREE-$5. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 22nd Ave. S., Caldwell, 208-455-8500, canyoncountyfair.org.

60/60: CELEBRATING THE ’60S—Dress in your best 1860s or 1960s costume for a night of drinking, dancing and history as part of the Idaho territory’s 150th anniversary celebration. For tickets or info, see website. See Picks, Page 11. 6:30 p.m. $15-$25. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov. IDAHO-DOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL—A massive music festival on Brundage Mountain featuring music by Equaleyes, Jeff Crosby & The Refugees, New Transit and more. See Picks, Page 10. $35-$60. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800-888-7544, idahodownfestival.org. POOL PARTY—Featuring DJs from WILD 101.1 FM for music, prizes and giveaways. 9-10:30 p.m. FREE. Fairmont Pool, 7929 Northview, Boise, 208-375-3011. YOUNG DAYS RELEASE PARTY—Boise Rock School band Hollywood Hotel releases the Young Days EP, with opening performances by Annika Klein and Against Gravity. Pie Hole Pizza and a full bar are available. 7 p.m. $7. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

On Stage BILL BURR—Catch a performance by actor and comedian Bill Burr. See Arts, Page 18. 8 p.m. $33-$35. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu. THE CLONE PEOPLE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-3850021, kedproductions.org.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

On Stage THE CLONE PEOPLE—This suspense thriller implicates the audience and has a surprise ending. 7 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org. THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE—Young actors ages 10-18 star in this production of the C.S. Lewis story about four children who are transported to Narnia to contend with an evil witch. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET—In this musical thriller a barber returns to London to exact revenge on the judge who abducted his wife and sentenced him to exile. 8 p.m. $12-$41. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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8 DAYS OUT THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$41. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Art ODYSSEY: MELISSA WILKINSON—Culminating exhibition highlighting Melissa Wilkinson’s work during her stay at Surel’s Place. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 208-407-7529, surelsplace.org.

IDAHO-DOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL—See Friday. $35-$60. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800-8887544, idahodownfestival.org.

On Stage BOISE’S FUNNIEST PERSON—Five novice comedians compete for a $1,000 cash prize in the final round of this monthlong competition. See Picks, Page 11. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, boisesfunniestperson. com. THE CLONE PEOPLE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-3850021, kedproductions.org. DENNIS MILLER LIVE—8 p.m. $30-$65. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com.

SATURDAY JULY 27

THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FAIR—Enjoy fun in the sun featuring free concerts, carnival rides, exhibits, food and livestock. FREE-$5. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 22nd Ave. S., Caldwell, 208-455-8500, canyoncountyfair.org.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$41. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Concerts BOISE MUSIC FESTIVAL—Featuring six stages of rock, hip-hop, alternative and electronic dance music, with performances by Vanilla Ice, Poppa Joe, Rebecca Scott, DJ Pauly D and more. See Noise News, Page 15. 10 a.m.10 p.m. FREE-$50. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, boisemusicfestival.com.

Art MARS AND STARS—Explore the exhibition Mars Revisited, gaze at stars in BAM’s Sculpture Garden and relax to space music. Moon boots optional. See Picks, Page 11. 7-11 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Literature BOISE, GEM OF THE MOUNTAINS: STORYTELLING—Local storyteller Ben Kemper tells stories about Boise’s ethnic communities after the lunch hour. 10-11 a.m. and 2-3 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, boise150.org.

Sports & Fitness 4 SUMMIT CHALLENGE—Watch a variety of cycling events in Central Idaho. 8 a.m. Armstrong Park, Main Street, Cascade, 4summitchallenge.com. RUN WILD AT ZOO BOISE—Children race on two short courses and the price includes a T-shirt, afterparty and breakfast, plus admission to the zoo. Check-in begins at 8 a.m. and the race begins at 9 a.m. 8 a.m. $20$25. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-384-4125, zooboise.org.

SUNDAY JULY 28 Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FAIR—See Thursday. FREE-$5. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 22nd Ave. S., Caldwell, 208-455-8500, canyoncountyfair.org.

On Stage

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET— See Thursday. 7 p.m. $12-$41. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 24–30, 2013 | 13


8 DAYS OUT Concerts MUSIC FROM STANLEY—This series of concerts features Idaho musicians performing on the lawn of the Redfish Lake Lodge. Check the website for each week’s schedule of musicians. 4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge, Hwy. 75 to Redfish Lake Road, Stanley, 208-774-3536, musicfromstanley.com.

MONDAY JULY 29

WEDNESDAY JULY 31 On Stage REAL TALK COMEDY WORKSHOP—See Wednesday, July 24. 6 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$41. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Food & Drink COILED WINE DINNER—Fourcourse wine dinner with specialty pairings featuring Coiled Wines and winemaker Leslie Preston. 6:30 p.m. $48. Barbacoa, 276 Bobwhite Court, Boise, 208-3385000, barbacoa-boise.com.

On Stage HYPNOTIST DON BARNHART—Hypnotist Don Barnhart performs. 7 p.m. $10, 208-9412459. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, liquidboise. com. STORY STORY LATE-NIGHT: BIGOT—Host Sean Peabody, musical guest Stardust Lounge and featured storyteller Matt Bragg rip into bigotry in the latest installment of Story Story Night’s after-hours edition designed for adult audiences. Advance tickets available online or buy them at the door. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, storystorynight.org.

TUESDAY JULY 30 On Stage HYPNOTIST DON BARNHART— See Monday. 7 p.m. $10, 208941-2459. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, liquidboise. com. SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$41. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Literature BLIP PLAY READING SERIES— Local actors from HomeGrown Theater read new work by Idaho authors as part of this continuing series. 7 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208429-8220, hydeparkbookstore. com.

Odds & Ends BATS OF IDAHO—Dr. Rita Dixon from Idaho Department of Fish and Game discusses the department’s Bats of Idaho program. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib. org.

ARTS/BOOK REVIEW COPPER MINING’S COMPLICATED LEGACIES GET A HARD LOOK IN OPPORTUNITY, MONTANA With their storm-swallowing massiveness and veined, granitic peaks, Western landscapes invite a comforting lie: Theirs is a resilience no species so thin of skin, so vulnerable to cold wind and sharp rock, could sap. Nobody believes this lie anymore, if we ever did. What contemporary environmentalists believe in is redemption; that we can undo harms levied in a previous age of resource exploitation. Brad Tyer’s Opportunity, Montana (Beacon, 2013) is a meticulously researched, entertaining rant of nonfiction that targets with bullseye precision contemporary environmentalism’s faith in redemption. Tyer, a native Texan and longtime journalist, relocated to Montana more than a decade ago. His book is part love letter to Montana rivers and part exploration of his toxic relationship with his father. But mostly, it’s an examination of the legacies of Montana copper mining. According to Tyer, copper made a few horrendously rich, created jobs for a region, wired a nation and will sicken a landscape for generations. At the book’s heart is a tiny town with an irresistibly ironic name: Opportunity. Opportunity was built in the 20th century for employees of the Anaconda Mining Company, which owned copper mines in and around Butte, Mont. Since the company also owned the land surrounding the town, nobody complained when staggering quantities of toxic smelter residue and mine tailings were dumped onto adjacent wetlands and even used as construction fill. Fast forward to the age of redemption. A decade ago, activists began pushing hard for commencement of a long-promised Superfund cleanup of the Clark Fork, a pretty, poisoned river near Missoula, Mont. They won. Trainloads of toxic soil and residue from those same Butte area mines would be excavated from the riverbed and banks and moved. To Opportunity. Tyer doesn’t say this is wrong. Cleaning up the Clark Fork, he says, is clearly right. But it would be deeply wrong to pretend that the only costs of the cleanup are financial. It would be wrong to pretend, for instance, that the now twice-poisoned town of Opportunity doesn’t exist.

–Jo Deurbrouck Jo Deurbrouck is the author of Anything Worth Doing, winner of a 2012 National Outdoor Book Award. She lives in Idaho Falls.

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U U U U

cinemas cafe videos fun

Opens July 26

Steve Carell, Sam Rockwell, Amanda Peet, Toni Collette, Allison Janney, Maya Rudolph and Rob Corddry star in this warm-hearted story of self-discovery. Fourteen-yearold Duncan (Liam James) is miserable about his summer until he is taken under the wing of the cool manager at a local water park. Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, who co-wrote The Descendants with Alexander Payne, wrote and directed. “ Sam Rockwell steals this show. Feels like this year’s Little Miss Sunshine.”

Inside: Special Events & August-October 2013 Film Schedule Additional films not listed may be shown. Check local papers.

Schedule is subject to change. VOL. 29, NO. 3

Opens August 2

Jordan Vogt-Roberts directs this funny coming of age story about 15-year-old teen-aged boys who build a cabin in the woods to get away from parents and prove they are men. Nick Robinson, Gabriel Basso, Moises Arias and Nick Offerman (who is hilarious, as usual) star. Written by Chris Galetta.

CHRIS BUMBRAY, JOBLO’S MOVIE EMPORIUM

“Sometimes, a movie just has a magic about it, something that makes you look past implausibility and plot holes and whatever other shortcomings it may have and leaves you feeling good just for having seen it.” BILL GOODYKOONTZ, ARIZONA REPUBLIC

Opens July 26

Award-winning director Morgan Neville shines a spotlight on the true story of the backup singers behind some of the greatest musical legends of our time.

“A film that may be the happiest time you’ll have at the movies all summer.” TY BURR, BOSTON GLOBE

Opens August 9 Danish director Tobias Lindholm tells the story of Somali pirates taking over a ship from two perspectives. The audience experiences the attack along with the ship’s cook (Pilou Asbaek), but his story alternates with events occurring in the modern, air-conditioned office of the CEO of the shipping company (Soren Malling) who holds the crew’s life in his hands. In Danish with English subtitles.

A HIJACKING “This feature film shows how much tension, telling detail and sheer dramatic expertise can be squeezed into a running time of less than two hours.” JOE MORGENSTERN, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

CRYSTAL FAIRY & THE MAGICAL CACTUS Michael Cera (Juno) stars as Jamie, an American bumbling his way across Chile. He meets Crystal Fairy (Gaby Hoffman) who offers to help him locate a San Pedro cactus as he and his Chilean roommates are anxious to find out about its powers of enlightenment. Sebastian Silva wrote and directed this offbeat comedy. Winner of the directing award for World Cinema Drama at Sundance 2013

“An unusually insightful look at self-imposed false identities and group dynamics.”

Opens August 16 Mads Mikkelsen (Hannibal, A Royal Affair, Casino Royale) is masterful as Lucas, a teacher whose life is turned upside down by a little girl’s lie. This psychological drama, written and directed by Thomas Vinterberg, raises questions of loyalty and provokes introspection. In Danish with English subtitles. Winner of the Best Actor Award at the Cannes Film Festival, 2012 “Known for his often icy and violent characters, Mikkelsen impresses here as a warm-hearted man who finds himself caught up in a situation way beyond his control.” —BOYD VAN HOEIJ, VARIETY

JORDAN HOFFMAN, FILM.COM

Opens August 9 WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | FLICKS JULY - OCTOBER 2013 FILM SCHEDULE | 1


Decoding Annie Parker

Manhattan Short Film Festival

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Sponsored by the American Cancer Society. !NNE0ARKER (3AMANTHA -ORTON), a sharp witted and irrepressible young woman watches her mother, then sister, fall victim to breast cancer. When she is also diagnosed with the disease, she is resolved to fight back. The film is also the story of -ARY #LAIRE+ING ((ELEN (UNT), the geneticist whose discovery of the BRCA1 gene and its link to breast cancer forever changed the understanding of human disease. !ARON 0AULco-stars. The Idaho premiere and red carpet reception for this film is a fundraiser for American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network. Tickets can be purchased at www.eventbrite.com.

S E A S O

N S

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

An extraordinary global event will take place the week of September 27 to October 6th 2013 when over 100,000 people in over 300 cities across six continents gather in cinemas, galleries, universities, museums and cafes to view and vote on the finalists’ films. Many of these shorts go on to be nominated for Academy Awards. Films are unrated. $9.

ADMISSION Bargain Matinees (before 6:00) .............................$7 Regular Prices: General Admission .........................$9 Children, Students with ID, Senior Citizens 65+ ............................................$7 Active Military .......................................................$7 Flicks Card (10 admissions for 1 or 2 persons) ......$65 Unlimited Annual Pass (for one person) .............$250 Gift Certificates available in any amount.

Finding Joe /#4/"%2s0Finding Joe, an inspiring documentary about *OSEPH#AMPBELL is presented by Idaho Friends of Jung. Tickets are $10 in advance and at the door. More information at www.idahofriendsofjung.org.

TVCTV Presents Leviathan

Located in Boise’s Historic North End 888 W. Fort St. Boise 208.472.4500 www.boise.coop Open Daily 7am - 10pm

/#4/"%2s0This ground-breaking documentary by 6ERENA0ARAVELand ,UCIEN#ASTAING 4AYLORwas filmed off the coast of Massachusetts and features mesmerizing and sometimes terrifying images from under the sea. Winner of the 2012 Experimental Film Award from the L.A. Film Critics Association. Not rated, not suitable for children. $15. More information at www.tvctvonline.org.

A Musical Thriller. Music & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim

King Richard III By William Shakespeare

The Foreigner

Where everyone can shop and anyone can join.

TVCTV presents Band of Sisters: The Remarkable Journey of Catholic Nuns in the United States /#4/"%2s0-ARY&ISHMANS revealing documentary deals with nuns facing change since Vatican II convened half a century ago. $15. More information at www.tvctvonline.org.

2O12

2O13

The Marriage of Figaro November 8 & 10, 2013 The Egyptian Theatre

Carmen

February 28 & March 2, 2014 The Morrison Center

Gianni Schicchi & Trouble in Tahiti April 11 & 13, 2014 The Egyptian Theatre

By Larry Shue Sara M. Bruner*, The Imaginary Invalid (2012).

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Opens August 16 Forrest Whittaker PLAYSEugene Allen AMANWHOSERVEDINTHE7HITE (OUSEOFPRESIDENTS FORDIRECTOR Lee DanielsOprah Winfrey, Jane Fonda, Robin Williams, John Cusack, Alan Rickman, Liev Schreiber, Minka Kelly, Melissa Leo, James MarsdenAND Vanessa Redgrave ALSOSTAR

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$AVID'ORDON 'REENS adaptation of Icelandic comedy, Either Way, one of our favorite films at the Palm Springs Film Festival 2013, stars 0AUL2UDD and %MILE(IRSCH as Texas road crew workers out in the middle of nowhere. A wonderful score by %XPLOSIONSINTHE 3KY and $AVID7INGOSETTHETONEFORTHISQUIRKY character study.

“Warmly enjoyable.� DENNIS HARVEY, VARIETY

7OODY!LLENHASBEENONQUITE a winning streak, producing a home run each time at bat in recent memory. His latest comedy explores the changing life of a woman (#ATE"LANCHETT) whose husband (!LEC"ALDWIN) has cheated friends and clients out of millions in a Ponzi Scheme. 0ETER3ARSGAARD 3ALLY(AWKINS !LAN%HRENREICH ,OUIS#+ and -ICHAEL3TUHLBARG co-star.

Opens August 23 Opens August 30

7RITER DIRECTOR PRODUCERGabriela Cowperthwaite LOOKSDEEP INTOTHEKEEPINGOFLARGEAQUATICMAMMALSIN CAPTIVITYFOROURENTERTAINMENT4HEDOCUMENTARY LOOKSSPECIFICALLYATTilikum AN/RCAWHO HASTAKENTHELIVESOFSEVERALTRAINERS4HESE INTELLIGENT SEEMINGLYGENTLEGIANTSAREFARMORE COMPLEXTHANTHEPUBLICUNDERSTANDS

B L AC K F I S H “A mesmerizing psychological thriller with a bruised and battered killer whale at its center.� *534).#(!.' VARIETY

Opens September 6 -ICHAEL-C'OWANS film is based on the true story of 87-year-old #RAIG-ORRISON(*AMES#ROMWELL) who was determined to build a second house on his New Brunswick property that would be safe for his wife ('ENEVIEVE"UJOLD) who had Alzheimer’s. He relentlessly fought local regulations to achieve something sensible and caring. “A moving celebration of things hand-crafted, traditional and built to last.� GEOFF PEVERE, THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Opens September 6

!NEXCELLENT COMINGOFAGEFILMTHATWILLENGAGEADULTSAS WELLASTEENS James Ponsoldt’s ADAPTATION OFTHENOVELBYTim TharpSTARSMiles Teller ANDShailene WoodleyThe Descendants 4HE OUTGOING FUNNY3UTTERPLANSTOGETHISPOPULAR GIRLFRIENDBrie Larson BACKBYHANGINGOUT WITHBOOKISH!IMEE BUTSOONTHEYDEVELOPREAL FEELINGSFOREACHOTHER FORMINGABONDTHATWILL HELPBOTHWITHOTHERISSUESINTHEIRLIVES “Written by the screenwriters of (500) Days of Summer, the film injects some hard-won poignancy into the tale of a young man wavering on the precipice of adulthood.� !.4(/.9+!5&-!. SCREEN INTERNATIONAL

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BOISEweekly | FLICKS JULY - OCTOBER 2013 FILM SCHEDULE | 3


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Also coming in September and October The Face of Love Opens September 13 Writer/director $AVID,OWERYS nod to Badlands is a tale of outlaw lovers on the lam and the sheriff who gets tangled up with them, set in the Texas Hill Country in the 1970s. 2OONEY-ARA (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo), #ASEY!FFLECK and "EN&OSTER star. +EITH #ARRADINE co-stars. Winner, U.S. Dramatic Cinematography Award at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival

“...truly a fresh voice, exhilarating to hear.� SEBASTIAN DOGGART, THE GUARDIAN

Opens September 13 3HANNON(ALES 2008 novel about a *ANE!USTEN connoisseur who visits an Austen Theme Park has been recreated as a madcap cinematic romp by director*ERUSHA(ESS. +ERI2USSELL stars as the smitten American reader who spends her savings on a trip to England for an Austen experience. An overthe-top satire ensues, complete with *ANE3EYMOURas the romance for profit proprietress. *AMES#ALLIS ** &IELDand2ICKY 7HITTLE are actors hired to charm the guests;*ENNIFER#OOLIDGEand "RET-ACKENZIE (The Hobbit) also star. 4 | FLICKS JULY - OCTOBER 2013 FILM SCHEDULE | BOISEweekly

Fill the Void In 2AMA"URSHTEINS feature film debut, Shira ((ADAS9ARON) is happily anticipating her wedding when her beloved elder sister dies. Because the new widower has an infant son, GEARSAREQUICKLYSHIFTEDAND3HIRAMAYBE expected to marry her brother-in-law. An inside look at a faithful community trying to do the right thing, this beautiful and involving film is the first made by an Orthodox Israeli woman. In Hebrew with English subtitles.

Salinger Writer/director 3HANE3ALERNO (Savages) interviews authors and actors about the reclusive author *$3ALINGER, whose private life intrigued the generation who devoured his novels Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zooey and his short stories. 'ORE6IDAL %,$OCTOROW 0HILIP 3EYMOUR(OFFMAN *OHN#USACK %DWARD .ORTON -ARTIN 3HEEN $ANNY$E6ITO and writer *OHN 'UARE (Six Degrees of Separation, Atlantic City) are among those interviewed.

!NNETTE"ENING plays Nikki, a widow who is enjoying a romance with an art teacher (%D(ARRIS) who bears an amazing likeness to her husband who died five years earlier. 2OBIN7ILLIAMS !MY "RENNEMAN and *ESS7EIXLER co-star for director !RIE0OSEN. Not yet rated. This film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in May.

All is Lost The genius of **#HANDORS (Margin Call) latest film is in the casting of2OBERT2EDFORD as its only character. A skilled sailor making a lone voyage in the Indian Ocean on his 37-foot sailboat is awakened by the crash of a metal container from a freighter hitting his boat. For the next 8 days he will use all of his resourcefulness, energy and strength to mend the damage and survive.

Layout and typography by Margaret Parker, margaret_parker@comcast.net


NOISE/NEWS NOISE

HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL Two-day roots and old-time music festival debuts at Indian Creek JOSH GROSS Boise old-time musician Ava Honey really wanted to see underground country legend Wayne “The Train” Hancock perform. And though he’s gigged in Idaho in the past, Boise wasn’t on Hancock’s radar the way he was on Honey’s. After returning from the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest and Festival in Weiser last summer, Honey threw out an idea to her friend Travis Ward, whom she knew from Wayne “The Train” Hancock is onboard for the first Hermit Music Festival in Kuna. calling square dances for one of Ward’s bands, Hokum Hi-Flyers. from a 2-bar—the reason he’s successful is that “Let’s put together an old-time and acoustic folk music festival featuring major acts from he has always been able to write a good song, around the country. festival,” Honey suggested. even back when he started playing guitar at Scheduling the festival the week before to Ward thought it was a great idea, which age 12. the duo then promptly forgot about for several pick up on the traffic—a tactic employed by Songs like “Moving On #3” and others he Treefort Music Fest in relation to SXSW—was months. wrote in his teen years are still in his repertoire. something Honey described as “somewhat “I didn’t see Travis for a bit,” Honey said. Though Hancock has grown and changed over intentional.” “When I did, I was like, ‘What did you think, the decades, the country tunes he loves and his “We thought that we might be able to get should we do a festival?’ And we’ve met every simple songwriting style have endured. some great acts, but they hadn’t released a full week since then.” “I’ll always like Western twang, and schedule yet, so we weren’t sure,” she said. Those meetings led to the creation of the anybody that doesn’t draw from their roots is Headlining Hermit Fest is Hancock, a man Hermit Music Festival, which will debut either a cheese or a full-blown idiot,” he said. who once described himself as “a stab wound Friday, July 26, and Saturday, July 27, at the “I just came up with that one,” he added. in the fabric of country music in Nashville.” Indian Creek Winery in Kuna. Not only will Honey, for her part, says that the teen years Even he admits it was a bit grandiose. The Train be honky-tonking up the joint, but are actually a major factor in the resurgence of “I thought it sounded cool at the time, so I he’ll be joined by acts like the latin-tinged old-time music. said it,” Hancock told Boise Weekly. “You get rockabilly of Petunia and the Vipers, the lus“You know a lot of kids start out playing a lot of free time on your hands, you think of cious harmonies of The Cactus Blossoms, and the fiddle or the violin and I think there’s a lot bold things to say.” Idaho cowboy Pinto Bennett. resurgence to violin or banjo,” Honey said. “A And though Hancock says he intended the “Selfishly, we wanted to see some of these 20-year-old quote to mean he would be around lot of punk bands are now bringing banjo into bands so we thought a festival would be the for a while—clearly an accurate assessment—it their bands.” best way to make it happen,” said Honey. But that doesn’t mean Honey expects the But personal motivations aside, Honey says also speaks to his old-school style. Hancock is kids to flock out in droves to Hermit Music as much the heir to Hank Wilroots and old-time music help Festival. liams as Hank III—the country to draw communities together. “Teenagers are... I don’t know. They’re legend’s grandson—and refuses “I think it’s a really personal HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL a tougher crowd,” Honey said, particularly to spend more than two days music,” she said. “TraditionalFriday, July 26, 4-10 p.m.; since the Boise Music Festival falls on the same recording an album. ly, this music was passed down Saturday, July 27, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; $25-$60, kids 12 and weekend. “No frills; no slick,” Hanorally. So someone would learn younger FREE. Indian Creek But Honey is hoping people will bring their cock said of his stripped-down, it from their neighbors or their Winery, 1000 N. McDermott kids to Indian Creek Winery, as the festival is jump-country style, which is relatives. … Portland, [Ore.] Road, Kuna, an all-ages event. essentially the opposite of the and Seattle have really big hermitmusicfestival.com. “This kind of music is all about moving and rhinestone-studded Nashville communities with thousands dancing,” she said. machine. of people that come out and Honey added that she and other organiz“One of the problems I have square dance. But our commuwith the modern country or hip-hop or rap is I ers would like to see the festival become an nity hasn’t been exposed to it very much. But annual event, and they have already scheduled the more we can expose people to it, the better can’t understand what they’re talking about,” Hancock said. “And if I can’t understand what a postmortem meeting to see what worked and off we’ll all be.” what didn’t. But for now, she’s just pleased they’re talking about, the songs don’t make The larger scenes in Portland and Seattle they pulled the whole thing off. sense to me.” actually provided a great way for Hermit “If people are inspired to do something, you And songwriting matters. While Hancock is Fest to thrive, as many of the acts will be en have to do it,” Honey said. “You can’t wait for emphatic he’s just a working stiff, not a music route to Stumptown the following weekend scholar—and that he couldn’t tell you a 12-bar it to happen.” for Pickathon, an annual three-day roots and WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Dale Watson joins the Braun Bros in Challis.

HERE’S HOPING ICE IS NICE Now in its fourth year, the Boise Music Festival brings the Treasure Valley’s largest sonic get-together to Expo Idaho Saturday, July 27. This year’s lineup features local as well as national artists—including ’90s chart-topper and self-reinventor extraordinaire Rob Van Winkle, aka Vanilla Ice. The Commercial Tire Main Stage hosts headlining artists Dakota Bradley, Mr. Ice, Hinder, Carly Rae Jepsen, Jason Derulo and Candlebox. On an additional six stages scattered throughout the venue, more than 50 local bands are slated to perform music spanning a wide range of genres. Outside food and drink is prohibited but vendors will be on-site to quench thirst and curb appetites. Free parking is available in the Expo Idaho parking lot, while shuttles to and from the festival will run every 30 minutes from the Boise Towne Square mall. The festival goes from 10 a.m.-10 p.m and tickets are $20, available at BMF ticket stops or online at ictickets.com. Want to score some freebies? Check out on-air giveaways from local PEAK Broadcasting stations 107.9 LITE FM, MIX 106, 103.3 KISS FM, WOW Country 104.3, 580 KIDO or 630 The Fan. boisemusicfestival.com. In the mood for some country music and corndogs? The Canyon County Fair runs Thursday, July 25-Sunday, July 28, and welcomes live performances from The Oak Ridge Boys, .38 Special, Neal McCoy, Julie Roberts and The Afters. You can also see the Gem State Junior Rodeo, an appearance by the Snake River Rangers Cowboy Mounted Shooters, the Oinkari Basque Dancers of Boise and the Hogs-n-Mud Wrestling contest. Concert admission is included in the general admission price, which runs $5 for fair-goers 13 and older, $3 for kids 6-12 and adults 65 and older. Kids 5 and younger get in free. canyoncountyfair.org. There is more family fun to be had at the 2013 Braun Brothers Reunion Festival, happening in Challis Thursday, Aug. 8-Saturday, Aug. 10. The 10th annual festival cranks up the country with performances by Dale Watson, Suzy Bogguss, Micky and the Motorcars, Reckless Kelly and, naturally, the Braun Family musicians. Three-day admission comes out to $105, while two-day passes go for $72. Tickets for children ages 6 to 12 are $15 and will only be available at the gate. Tickets will be available at the gate all three days of the festival. braunbrothersreunion.com. —Skylar Barsanti

BOISEweekly | JULY 24–30, 2013 | 15


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GR EGG R OTH

GUIDE WEDNESDAY JULY 24

MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s MILLER CREEK—7 p.m. FREE. The Drink PATIO CONCERT SERIES: GREG & JOHNNY—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel RAHEL BEAL—6 p.m. FREE. Cosmic Pizza

DAVID OLNEY, JULY 27, THE SAPPHIRE ROOM

Too Slim & the Taildraggers

“The best songwriter you’ve never heard of?” So reads the headline for a 2003 Los Angeles Times review of David Olney’s album, The Wheel. However, quite a few people have heard of the Nashville, Tenn.-based musician. Steve Earle once called Olney “one of the best songwriters in the world.” Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt have both covered his work, and legendary troubadour Townes Van Zandt numbered Olney among his four favorite songwriters (the other three were Bob Dylan, Lightnin’ Hopkins and Mozart). Olney’s album High, Wide and Lonesome features contributions from The Band’s Rick Danko and Garth Hudson, as well as from the Flying Burrito Brothers’ Sneaky Pete Kleinow. So now that you’ve heard of David Olney, go see him at the Riverside Hotel. —Ben Schultz With John Hansen. 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $10 general, $13 preferred seating. The Riverside Hotel’s Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, riversideboise.com.

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: TOO SLIM & THE TAILDRAGGERS WITH LEE PENN SKY—5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza CHRIS GUTIERREZ—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

SNAKE ISLAND—With Marshall Poole and The Bare Bones. 8:30 p.m. $3. Red Room SPEEDY GRAY—With Johnny Shoes. 6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears GAYLE CHAPMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

GAYLE CHAPMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar JEFF MOLL—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub JIM LEWIS—7 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain-Eagle JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOHN KIRLIN AND THE HIGH PLAINS DRIFTERS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Whole Foods

LA LUZ—With Clarke & The Himselfs and Rollersnakes. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

LEE PENN SKY & THE OLIPHANTS—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

SLIGHTLY STOOPID—With Atmosphere and Grouch & Eligh. 6 p.m. $30 adv., $35 door. Idaho Center Amphitheater

MIKE HUNTER—With Vision Vocal Band. 6 p.m. FREE. Artistblue Gallery

TAMBALKA—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar BLIND PETS—With Poney, Nude Oil, and Trigger Itch. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

VIKESH KAPOOR—With Holy Weak. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage

FRIDAY JULY 26

THURSDAY JULY 25

BOISE OLD TIME HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL—Featuring James Coberly Smith, Possum Livin’, Huck Notari, Water Tower and Charlie Parr. See Noise, Page 15. 4 p.m. $25-$60. Indian Creek Winery

DILUTED—With Mr. Gutsy, Zakhaevv and Wolfgang. 8:30 p.m. $3. Red Room

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DAVID CORREA—With Cascada. 7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

JIM LEWIS—7 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain-Meridian

JEANNIE MARIE—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

DAN C. TRUCK STOP TRIO— 7:45 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

LAUREN MANN & THE FAIRLY ODD FOLKS—With Holly Johnson Loves You and Starlings Murmurations. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

OPHELIA—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar RANDY HOUSER—With Adam Craig Band. 8 p.m. $20-$35. Knitting Factory SLIM CESSNA’S AUTO CLUB— With Munly, The Lupercalians and A Seasonal Disguise. 8 p.m. $7 adv., $10 door. Visual Arts Collective SOUL SERENE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub TERRY JONES AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill SET AND SETTING—With Sadgiqacea, Hivelords, The Deadlight Effect, Mariana and Into the Open Earth. 8 p.m. $8. Shredder

SATURDAY JULY 27 ACOUSTIC JAM SESSION—6 p.m. FREE. Boise Stage Stop

Shakespeare UNDER

T H E S TA R S

S E A S O

N S

2013 Plays Much Ado About Nothing Closing Soon!

By William Shakespeare Sponsored by ACHD Commuteride and Idaho Statesman’s Scene and Treasure Magazines

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

A Musical Thriller. Music & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. Book by Hugh Wheeler. Sponsored by Stoel Rives LLP and Boise Weekly

King Richard III

By William Shakespeare. Sponsored by Merrill Lynch and Boise State Public Radio

The Foreigner

By Larry Shue Sponsored by Holland & Hart and 107.1 KHITS

Season Partners

Sara M. Bruner*, Sweeney Todd (2013). *Member Actors’ Equity. Photo—DKM Photography.

GET YOUR TICKETS ONLINE AT

WWW.IDAHOSHAKESPEARE.ORG OR CALL 336-9221

M–F, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

16 | JULY 24–30, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE BOB LOG III—With In The Whale. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux BOISE OLD-TIME HERMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL—Featuring Johnny Shoes and The Rhythm Rangers, Hillfolk Noir, Jonathan Warren and The Billy Goats, The Country Club, Pinto Bennett, The Cactus Blossoms, Petunia and The Vipers, and Wayne “The Train” Hancock. 11:30 a.m. $25-$60. Indian Creek Winery DAVID OLNEY—With Sergio Webb and John Hansen. See Listen Here, Page 16. 8 p.m. $10$13. Sapphire Room

GARTH OLSON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

SUNDAY JULY 28

EVERYTIME I DIE—With Terror, Stray from the Path, and Bone Dance. 6 p.m. $17. Shredder

BEAT CRUSHER TOUR—Featuring DYM and Fractured. 9 p.m. $5. Red Room DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement JASON ALDEAN—With Jake Owen and Thomas Rhett. 7 p.m. $29-$55. Taco Bell Arena

TUESDAY JULY 30

JASON BUCKALEW—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill

BOISE OLD TIME’S OLD TIME JAM—With The Country Club. 6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

JAZZ JAM HOSTED BY SANDON MAYHEW—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

EMILY TIPTON BAND—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

EVIL WINE’S ELECTRONIC ORGASMS—Featuring Shades, Edmond Dantes and CloudSplitter. 8:30 p.m. $5. Red Room

JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

MIKE DILLON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

J BOOG—With Hot Rain. 8 p.m. $18-$35. Knitting Factory

REBECCA SCOTT BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SOFT WHITE SIXTIES—With Sun Blood Stories and Modesto. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $6 adv., $8 door. Neurolux

OPHELIA—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

POP EVIL—7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory

ROGUE GALLERY—With Andrew Gray Hicks. 6 p.m. FREE. Artistblue Gallery BIG YUK—8 p.m. $3. Shredder

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: SOFT METALS—With Psychic Rites. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux REBECCA SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill SWINGIN WITH ELLIE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

PAMELA DEMARCHE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar ROBIN SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

OPHELIA—10 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

MONDAY JULY 29 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $3. Liquid

PARASITIC EJACULATION—With Logistic Slaughter, Mortal Ashes, and End of All Flesh. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

WEDNESDAY JULY 31

GUIDE/LISTEN HERE MAT DUNLAP

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: THE DERAILERS—With Johnny Shoes. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement DALE CAVANAUGH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow DAVE ROBINETTE—6 p.m. FREE. Cosmic Pizza JEFF MOLL—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—10 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s PATIO CONCERT SERIES: KEN HARRIS—With Lawson Hill and Rico Weisman. 6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill PATRICIA FOLKNER—6 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain-Parkcenter

THE SOFT WHITE SIXTIES, JULY 28, NEUROLUX The San Francisco-based hard-rock quintet The Soft White Sixties played this year’s South By Southwest in Austin, Texas. Paste Magazine caught the performance and named the band one of its 25 favorite acts at the festival, along with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, The Flaming Lips, Sharon Jones and Prince. In June, the band played a sold-out release party in San Francisco for its debut album, Get Right. So far, Idahoans have had four chances to say they saw the Sixties “back when.” One of them was a Radio Boise Tuesday set in 2012 and another was a midnight show during the inaugural Treefort Music Fest, which featured frontman Octavio Genera swinging from the Red Room’s stage. If you haven’t seen the band yet, you still have time to get right. The Soft White Sixties won’t stay a secret much longer.

REBECCA SCOTT—7:45 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub RIFF RAFF—9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s SHOOTER GOODINGS—With Goddamn Gallows and The Calamity Cubes. 7 p.m. $18 adv., $20 door. Neurolux SPEEDY GRAY—With Johnny Shoes. 6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears TRUCK STOP TRIO—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar DERAS KRIG—With Of Feather and Bone. 7 p.m. $5. Shredder

—Ben Schultz With Sun Blood Stories and Modesto. 7 p.m., $6 adv., $8 doors. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map. BOISEweekly | JULY 24–30, 2013 | 17


ARTS/STAGE

BILL BURR VS. BOISE Prepare your feathers to be ruffled JOSH GROSS If you pay even the slightest attention to standup comedy, you’ve probably heard the name Bill Burr. He packs large auditoriums worldwide and sits at the top of cracked.com’s list of heckler takedowns in a video titled Bill Burr Tells Philly the Truth. “Fuck you and fuck the Liberty Bell,” Burr told an unruly Philadelphia audience that had booed the previous acts. “Shove it up Ben Franklin’s ass.” Burr then insulted all of Philly’s sports teams, audience members’ mothers and more, counting down his full stage time as the acid work at stand-up. flowed from his tongue. “It didn’t seem possible,” Burr told BW in a For those who haven’t heard of Burr, know phone interview from the set of the upcoming that if you catch his performance at Boise film Black and White. “It was on TV, which State University’s Morrison Center Friday, was like a million miles away. Kids today July 26, there’s a decent chance your feathers will be ruffled. Not because he regularly drops can’t understand that. There was two people in town with a video camera. There was no N-bombs and dishes out the Philadelphia Internet.” treatment, but because his travels have taught He even talks about it with a slightly tranhim that sacred cows are even tastier than scendental tone. Kobe beef. In Burr’s world, childhood obesity “When you first become a stand-up comemight be a defense against pedophiles because dian, it’s like an out-of-body experience,” Burr it makes kids “unfuckable,” and mothers said. “There’s a microphone, you can’t see anywho refer to child care as the “hardest job out there” really ought to have a conversation with thing, there’s a room full of people and lights in your eyes. Now you’re not you anymore, coal miners. you’re you doing stand-up.” “I thought roofing in the middle of July as Burr said it took him a decade of going a redhead, I thought that that was difficult, through existential questions about what kind but these mothers are bending over at the of comic he wanted to be to get back to being waist putting DVDs into DVD players,” Burr himself, to feeling as comfortable on stage as cracked in Why Do I Do This, his 2008 comhe would cracking jokes in a locker room. edy special. “You’re 35 years old and playing “People talk about it like it’s a big mystery. hide-and-go-seek. You’re living the dream.” Am I the political guy? Am I the ranting guy? Burr’s musings are not about insulting Well, I say, whatever you do backstage, that’s people so much as they are telling his sharpyou,” Burr said. “The number of people you tongued version of the truth. And he is fortalk to offstage that are totally different, I have ward about potentially being dead wrong. “None of his opinions are based on any sort empathy for them.” And now he’s dropped the act: “I don’t of reliable information. He tends to go with his write material,” Burr said. “I first thought, because reading haven’t done that for 12 years. makes him sleepy,” reads his I just go on stage and start talkprofile on Comedy Central. BILL BURR ing. Hopefully, I remember it What that means is that no Friday, July 26, 8 p.m., the next night.” offense is intended, even if it is $32.50 advance, $35 day of show. Morrison Center, That approach has made the takeaway. 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Burr a so-called “comedian’s “I’m not being malicious, I Boise, 208-426-1110. comedian,” a performer whom don’t mean anything malicious rising comedians often list as by them. They’re jokes,” Burr one of their influences, though told Bostonist website. “If I didn’t mean anything malicious, I would never Burr said they don’t often tell him that. “People say nice things to me about my act apologize. … The only apology I would make but that ‘comedian’s comedian’ thing, I usuis, ‘I’m sorry you didn’t understand you were ally hear that from people like yourself doing watching a comedian and that you thought interviews,” he said. “Out on the road, doing you were watching Meet the Press.” stand-up is a very solitary thing because you’re The only thing seemingly sacred to Burr is by yourself. You’re not in a band. When you the act of comedy itself. While making people laugh always came naturally to Burr, he had to travel, maybe you travel with one other guy.

18 | JULY 24–30, 2013 | BOISEweekly

Bill Burr brings his feather-ruffling best to Boise.

A lot of time, you go into town and the local guy opens up for you. You meet him and talk to him 20 minutes before and after, then on to the next city.” Another thing Burr seems to revere is the craft of acting, something he’s been doing more of lately. “You go to the Montreal comedy festival, then they say, ‘Do you have an idea for a TV show?’ and I did. And I didn’t want to stink in it, so I started taking acting classes,” Burr said. He quickly discovered that acting also required a serious artistic journey. “I don’t think acting gets enough credit,” Burr said. “I think everybody thinks they can act. I mean, Shaq has starred in movies. But an actor can’t just go play some games for The Lakers. And it’s one of those things where if you have some natural ability for it, and you can play a character that’s like yourself, people can say, ‘Oh, it’s easy.’ And it’s not. Think about Anthony Hopkins. Most actors if they gave a performance like Hannibal Lecter, they’d be typecast for the rest of their career. People can’t see them as anyone else. But he’s literally becoming someone else in a role.” Though he has had roles in films like Date Night and on TV shows like Breaking Bad and Chapelle’s Show, Burr says acting remains more of a bonus than his actual career. “Acting is just like stand-up comedy. It’s just endless. It’s just how far you want to take it, how good you want to get at it. But my goals are all as a stand-up comedian. I am working to get better, but there are only so many hours in the day,” he said. Based on his current success, however, at least one goal is certainly attainable. “I’d like to see how far up the list [of Comedy Central’s greatest comics of all time] I can get, knowing full well that the top 25 are all unpassable. But I’d like to be number 26.” And to get there, Burr might have to offend your delicate sensibilities a smidgen. If he does, know that he did so with the best intentions and nothing but joy in his heart. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


VISUAL/ARTS

THE EYES HAVE IT Jose Angel Saenz’s Collaboration on display at Sesqui-Shop SKYLAR BARSANTI JOS E ANGEL S AENZ

he said. “I’ve had photographers ask On a sunny Saturday in July, Jose me how I do it, and I tell them that’s “Jay” Angel Saenz talked about his my art, getting [the subjects] to do that. latest work, a project mostly completed The technical side of photography is in an extremely short period of time. something I have a limited understandEquipped with a camera, a vision ing of, but the process of getting people and studio space wherever he could to be vulnerable and open and willing get it, Saenz managed to pull off an to be seen in stasis is the art—especially epic-scale, project-turned-production with the Facebook mentality that every in honor of Boise’s sesquicentennial. picture should be you at your best. I The 35-year-old Boise transplant from think this was an interesting way to Austin, Texas, never once associated counteract that, to be willing to be seen himself with the title “photographer.” as just ‘here’s me.’ I found that much “I’ve been into photography for more compelling.” about two years, but I definitely don’t Once Saenz accepted the task of consider myself a photographer,” completing the project for Boise 150, it he said. “Photography was just the was a rush to finish the work on time. medium used to express this particu“When the Boise 150 thing came up, lar project.” it was a mad dash to hit that number,” The project in question, entitled he said. “Sometimes I would just anCollaboration, includes the portraits of nounce where I was going to be, and 150 Boiseans as part of Faces of Boise: people came.” A Look at Local Identity, on display at That was far from the finish, though. the Sesqui-Shop through July 27. “We dove right into two and a half “It didn’t start off as a project for weeks of shooting but then it was like, Boise 150,” he said. “It really started as how do I get them printed?” he said. a way to visualize the people that I was With so many shots, it would have accountable to in the community.” been too costly to print them himself. The project grew, though, and once “[W]e reached out to the community, it was a Boise 150 project, Saenz did and HP stepped in and volunteered to 120 of the shots in about 18 days. print all of them,” Saenz said. “They “Which was a whirlwind,” he liked the project, they liked the work said, “because the process is not, but they only had three days to print ‘Stand there, do this and I’ll take your and deliver, so they really stepped up.” picture.’ It’s a conversation that has Justin Ness was one of 150 Boiseans photographed for Collaboration. Where the exhibit will end up is still to happen between me and the other in question. One option: Collaboration person; and, for me, the art was actucould be stored—in part—in the city of “This is about a conversation, and only if ally in that moment with the two of us Boise’s archives. you’re willing to have the conversation is the talking through things.” “[T]here was a mention that it could be picture going to come out in a way that is It’s these conversations captured on film archived, and I think that would be amazing. I that attracted the attention of Rachel Reichert, interesting to an audience. It’s collaboration would be really humbled if those pictures were between me and the city I love, and a lot of communications manager for the Boise City put in the city archives for future generations the people I care about.” Department of Arts and History and Sesquito enjoy,” Saenz said. The interplay between the artist and the Shop curator and manager. If that doesn’t pan out, Saenz has other finished product is one Saenz likes to keep “We were kind of looking at the whole ideas, including sending the exhibit to galleries behind closed doors. identity of the city. We already had a collecaround Idaho—even the nation. “The sessions were usually private, because tion of projects that explored Boise’s identity, “I wouldn’t want to sell these pieces at all, once there is someone observing the process and Jay’s work naturally fit in with that but it would be neat to show people what [the subject’s] entire persona changes,” Saenz theme,” she said. Idaho is really like, and the people that are said. “There was this realizaCollaboration includes in it,” he said. “When I was at the opening, tion that a smile and a frown portraits of Trey McIntyre FACES OF BOISE: A LOOK there was someone who said, ‘I didn’t realize are very easy ways to convey Project dancers and staff, as AT LOCAL IDENTITY our city was so beautiful.’ I think if you’re emotion, but human beings, well as 94.9 FM the River radio Through July 27, The someone from another city, you might think we’re like smoke. We’re more personality Tim Johnstone. In Sesqui-Shop, 1008 Main Idaho is just corn or potatoes, and that’s not complex and layered. ... [Y]ou a moment of stoic intensity, the St., 208-433-5670, boise150.org/sesqui-shop all we are.” have to determine what they’re monochromatic eyes of each With the Boise 150 exhibit completed, thinking for yourself.” subject look past the camera Saenz is focused on his next move, but ColRespecting the privacy of his and directly at the viewer. Each laboration is something he hopes to continue subjects, Saenz was vague about the sessions. subject of the 20-inch by 29-inch portraits reas he goes along. “I asked them to talk about things they’d sides in a state of natural reaction to whatever “I want to produce new works,” Saenz lost, people they’d missed and things they conversation took place with the artist. said. “But I want to continue this project on “I call it ‘Collaboration,’ because when you loved. We went through really frank and honthe side and continue with the idea that I can est conversations you have with friends you’ve think about getting your picture taken, you do more as I meet and connect with more known for five or 10 years, and a few of these show up and someone tells you how to pose people.” people I’d only known through social media,” and they take the picture,” Saenz explained. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JULY 24–30, 2013 | 19


SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

WAY, WAY BETTER THAN MOST FILMS The Way Way Back is this summer’s must-see GEORGE PRENTICE The Way Way Back—a popsicle of a film that’s refreshing amid summer’s seemingly endless desert of big-screen duds—is 2013’s first bona fide contender to make the Oscar’s Best Picture shortlist. But don’t let that discourage you from The Way Way Back has a little bit of everything: Pac Man, REO Speedwagon, a second-rate water park going. and the pretty (and pretty smart) blonde next door. You needn’t worry that The Way Way Back is one of those self-important films which the a stand-up comic than a counselor, especially Motion Picture Academy adores: you know, looking forward, learned the hard way why when he’s dealing with fellow counselor Caitlin costume dramas and biopics. Instead, the film that extra seat exists: Families usually have (Maya Rudolph), his all-too-serious paramour. is smart, but not sassy; funny, but never obway too much baggage. Caitlin: “We have a situation in the noxious. Not unlike last summer’s Moonrise The Way Way Back’s hero, stuck in his lagoon.” Kingdom—The Way Way Back is this year’s family’s way, way back, is Duncan (Liam Owen: “Is it a homicide?” attempt to make that lengthy catapult from James), a lad with a fishbowl haircut, hands Owen makes regular pop culture referencthe long, hot summer box office toward the dug deep into his pockets, shoulders slumped short, cold end-offorward and eyes ever es to bad movies and music from the 1970s, year list comprised of downward. He suffers and if anyone should trace Owen’s DNA as 2013’s best efforts. as his divorced mother a character, they need look no further than THE WAY WAY BACK (PG-13) when he wears a Hawaiian shirt and ascot Though its setting Pam (Toni Collette) is Directed by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash to a party. In other words, he’s the direct deis contemporary, the blinded by the sumStarring Steve Carell, Sam Rockwell, Maya scendant of Bill Murray as Tripper in 1979’s film has the feel of a mer sun and middleRudolph, Toni Collette and Allison Janney Meatballs. memory play: there’s aged denial while she Opens Friday, July 26, at The Flicks Allison Janney joins the party as Betty, a the weathered beach engages in an inapnext-door neighbor who, when she’s not tipsy, house, the heat-slowed propriate relationship is falling-down-drunk. Plus there’s AnnaSophia rhythm of late afterwith Trent, her total Robb as the pretty blonde who sees Duncan noons, a Pac Man machine and a soundtrack jerk of a boyfriend (Steve Carell). To escape featuring REO Speedwagon (righteous!). his family’s hell, Duncan steals a girl’s banana for the cool but complex kid he really is, and River Alexander as Peter, aka the kid with the And the film’s title will be familiar to those seat bike (complete with embarrassing pink lazy eye (I won’t spoil it for you, but trust me, of us who, as children, were relegated to the streamers, a bell and a basket), and pedals he’s a hilarious addition). seat in the far reaches of the family station until he comes upon Water Wizz, a secondBy the time the end titles scrawled across wagon—remember that lone seat in the way, rate splash park, featuring concession stands the screen (all too soon), I desperately wanted like Sugar Shack and Salty Dawg. way back? But those of us who spent a chunk a Way Way Back sequel to watch ASAP. There, Duncan meets an unlikely menof our childhood facing backward while the Maybe next summer? tor: Owen (Sam Rockwell), who is more of rest of the clan chatted away with their eyes

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings

Opening

BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: THE BIG LEBOWSKI—See Picks, Page 10. Thursday, July 25, 7:00 p.m. $9 adv., $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3450454, boiseclassicmovies.com.

20 FEET FROM STARDOM—The stories of the backup singers behind some of music’s top performers. (PG13) Opens Friday, July 26. The Flicks.

MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: JURASSIC PARK—A group of scientists and children must escape dinosaurs. Friday, July 26, 7 p.m. FREE-$5. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

20 | JULY 24–30, 2013 | BOISEweekly

THE SMURFS 2—The Smurfs must stop the evil Gargamel from stealing their Smurf-essence. (PG) Opens Wednesday, July 31. Edwards 9, 22. THE TO DO LIST—Valedictorian Brandy Klark makes a to-do list of things she didn’t do in high school in this coming-of-age comedy. (R) Opens Friday, July 26. Edwards 9, 22.

THE WAY WAY BACK—Fourteenyear-old Duncan endures a miserable summer until he is mentored by the cool manager of the local water park. (PG-13) Opens Friday, July 26. The Flicks.

THE WOLVERINE—Famous X-Men team member Wolverine travels to Japan, where he faces deadly opponents and an inner battle with his immortality. (PG-13) Opens Friday, July 26. Edwards 9, 22.

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


AUG 8-10

Idaho

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SATURDAY FRIDAY THURSDAY

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REUNION FESTIVAL

tickets avaiable at the gate day of shows or online at

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BOISEweekly | JULY 24–30, 2013 | 21


BEERGUZZLER/DRINK

FOOD/REVIEW

HOP TO IT BREWS

DESCHUTES FRESH SQUEEZED IPA, $4.99$6.49 A trio of hops (citra, mosaic and nugget) comes together in this brew from Bend, Ore.’s Deschutes. The pour is dark amber and sports a decent, light tan head. The brew is fruit-driven on the nose, offering apple, mango and orange, along with peppery hops and caramel. You get sweet caramel flavors up front that segue into ripe citrus, with the hops lurking in the background and on the finish. This is a great summer IPA. LAUGHING DOG PUREBRED CITRA AMERICAN PALE ALE, $4.49-$5.49 From the small town of Ponderay, just north of Sandpoint, this bomber spotlights the mildly bitter citra hop variety. It’s a crystal clear, golden brew, with a thick, porous head that fades quickly. The floral aromas are a mix of bright orange, mango and grass with a whiff of blue cheese. Light but lovely in the mouth, smooth malt and apricot is backed by a decent hit of resiny hops. EPIC HOPULENT IPA, RELEASE NO. 67, $6.49$7.99 This Salt Lake City brewery dry-hopped its IPA with mosaic (one of the new, hot hop varieties), as well as using it in the boil. In the glass, this beer is a cloudy orange ale with a one-finger head that persists nicely. It’s a bit reserved on the nose, but offers aromas of grain, Meyer lemon and pinelaced hops. The flavor profile is much bigger, with bold, resiny hops playing against sweet malt that’s laced with layers of ripe, tropical fruit. A touch of citrus adds balance to the finish. —David Kirkpatrick

22 | JULY 24–30, 2013 | BOISEweekly

Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. JEN GR AB LE

In the Northwest, hops drive the craft brew scene—which is no surprise given the number of varieties that are available locally. In the recent past, monster IPAs with astronomical International Bitterness Unit levels ruled, but a new trend is emerging. Brews that spotlight just a variety or a few hops in a more restrained style work well when the temperature rises. Here are three hop-centric bombers that fit the bill.

10 BARREL BREWING Smoked meat and suds TARA MORGAN 10 Barrel Brewing is built for Vikings. It takes both arms to wrest a solid wood chair from under one of the Boise brewpub’s mammoth tables, giant steel fermenters rise from one end of the always-packed bar area like castle turrets, and piled bags of malted wheat act as bunker-ish room dividers. Not to mention, pulling the dense metal door to the bathroom shut feels like locking yourself in solitary. Industrial? Try Medieval. And that vibe translates to the menu. The charcuterie plate ($14) doesn’t mess around with delicate petals of prosciutto or salami 10 Barrel’s charcuterie plate is what Vikings would have snacked on, pre-raid. shavings, it’s piled high with glistening slabs of honey-glazed pork belly, little beer brats with Let’s not forget the beer. Brewmaster Shawn extra) and this beast of a sandwich is capable the casing sliding slightly off, rocky crumbles Kelso, formerly of Barley Brown’s Brew Pub in of providing two, if not three, meals. of manchego, and a sticky sweet mound of Baker City, Ore., cranks out a variety of suds: The side beet salad ($9) is a more modest “bratwurst flavored” almonds. While the everything from the motor oil-dark P2P Stout affair, with chioggia and red shriveled piles of house-pickled to the hoppy-yet-balanced Red Faucher to beet wedges on a heap of simasparagus and purplish pickled ply dressed, torn red leaf lettuce the easy-drinking Sasquatch. The 20 or so tap onions add a nice zip to cut 10 BARREL BREWING offerings—which include staples along with with a sprinkling of feta and a the fat, the real star is 10 Bar830 W. Bannock St. rotating cask and nitro brews—switch out big pop of tarragon. rel’s slightly runny housemade 208-344-5870 10barrel.com regularly on the colorful chalkboard. Got the term “housemade” mustard, loaded with whole But one half of 10 Barrel’s menu is likely to rattling in your brain now? mustard seeds and perfectly make both Vikings and food-fans furrow their Chef Paul Faucher’s offerings tangy vinegar. don’t stop there. As one of my dining compan- brows: the “pie” list. Ground chuck, bacon, If there is a way to top the meaty excess of onion, lettuce, tomato, pickles, mushrooms, ions put it, “the whole back area smells like a the charcuterie plate, the B.L.A.S.T. sandwich Swiss cheese, 1,000 island sauce and French pork factory”: house-smoked bacon and pork ($11.50)—dubbed “the ultimate BLT”—is shoulder, house-cured corned beef, housemade fries? Or pepperoni, pulled pork, sausage, surely a contender. A mound of crisp-aroundpineapple, jalapenos and garlic alfredo sauce? the-edges, house-cured bacon is surrounded by Mexican chorizo, and house-pickled carrots thick slices of H&H Farms tomatoes, smashed and daikon radishes on the Banh Mi sandwich No thanks. I’ll stick with the smoked meat and (one of the only veggie options, available with avocado, arugula, a smear of pesto mayo and “extra” sourdough. Add a fried egg on top ($1 five grain tempeh or house-smoked pork loin). beer.

FOOD/NEWS Jon Mortimer—Henry as the general manager at Franco Latino in Eagle, and McManus as the general manager at Mortimer’s in downtown For the past three years, Jay Henry and Remi McManus have been Boise. preparing high-end, seasonally influenced pop-up dinners at private resi“When I first came to Boise seven years ago, there were a handful dences under the name Off the Grid Dining. But by late September, the of places with a finer-dining restaurant atmosphere, and when things duo hopes to be on the grid in the former Pacific Rim Wine Stop building went on the downturn, those went away really quickly,” said Henry. “And at 2870 W. State St. that’s when we started doing our pop-ups because we worked for Jon “We’re going to be a prix-fixe seasonal restaurant, so the menu will Mortimer. We saw that those people were still looking for that outlet.” change every two weeks,” said Henry. “So we’re going to do five plated State and Lemp is still in the construction phase—the stucco exterior courses. It’ll be hard seating, as well, so we’ll only do one seating at of the building has been repainted a dark brown, and 6:30 p.m. on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and two seatthere are plans for updated exterior lighting and landscapings on Fridays and Saturdays.” ing. The interior is also being modernized with reclaimed STATE AND LEMP Dinners at State and Lemp will cost $75 per person, wood tables, repurposed metal chairs and local artwork. 2870 W. State St. with the option of adding a $30 wine pairing. There will “This is a small space, so it’s going to feel very com208-371-4003 also be a small beer and wine by-the-glass or by-thefacebook.com/stateandlemp munal, and we want it to feel that way, with everyone bottle menu that will change with the seasons. arriving within that same time frame,” said Henry. “Each “We think there’s a market out there for people who course will come out for every guest simultaneously, so it are looking for something that’s a little bit more elevated will feel like a dinner party.” than the current crop of all the new restaurants—which are great. It’s Henry and McManus hope to have State and Lemp open by late great to see all this restaurant growth, but everyone’s kind of within September. To follow their progress, visit facebook.com/stateandlemp the same price point and the same style. It’s pub fare; it’s a little more or stateandlemp.com, which will be live as of Thursday, Aug. 1. casual,” said Henry. “They’re all going after that same price point and no one has tried to reach a little bit higher.” —Tara Morgan Both Henry and McManus previously worked for local restaurateur

STATE AND LEMP

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CINDERELLA: 4-yearold female domestic shorthair. Darling adult cat with kitten energy. Litterbox-trained. Outgoing. (Kennel 01#10667847)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

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ROSIE: I’m your new best friend and lap warmer all in one.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JULY 24–30, 2013 | 23


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NYT CROSSWORD | SHOW ME THE MONEY BY DANIEL A. FINAN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 5 Old man 9 Give for free, slangily

ACROSS 1 City south of West Palm

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19 Stoker who created Dracula 20 Womb, jocularly 21 Painful boo-boo 22 Winter stash, of a sort 23 Investing in a growth company 25 High-risk investments 27 Hardly parade-worthy, say 28 Antics 29 Ltd., in Lille 30 Hanging piece

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31 Like one trying to hit a piñata, often 33 Pronged, as an electrical plug 34 Norwegian P.M. Stoltenberg 35 Vardalos of “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” 36 Buttonhole, e.g. 37 Big picture: Abbr. 38 Con target 39 Shocked 42 Bolognese bride 45 Sprint, e.g. 48 It should have no effect 50 “No bid” 52 Not so smooth 54 Without 55 Somewhat 57 One-third of Neapolitan ice cream: Abbr. 59 Like the right third of Ireland’s flag 60 Announcer Hall 61 Mrs. Capp and others 62 Add-on features 64 “Cómo ___?” 65 Money … or a hint to how six crossings in this puzzle are to be represented, superimposing one letter over another 68 Ora pro ___ 71 Bully’s coercive comeback 72 Places for picks, informally 73 Admonishment to a puppy 76 Ticks off 78 Gospel singer Winans 79 “That’s nuthin’!” 80 Bead maker? 81 Request from a guest over an apartment intercom 83 Holiday attraction at a mall 85 Inaugurated 87Fame 89 Astronomical distances: Abbr. 91 Eventually 92 Yiddish laments 93 Faunus’s Greek counterpart 95 Beef

97 Ukr., e.g., once 98 Certain lap dogs, informally 100 ___ moons 101 French film award 102 The shortest one has only two verses 105 It appears at the top of a page 106 Instruments played with mallets 108 Bit of corporate attire 110 Quotation sources, once 112 Unrecoverable investment expenses 113 More swanky 114 Confab 115 Robert of “The Sopranos” 116 Draft status 117 Trying to pull a fast one 118 Certain 119 Beef 120 Corp. V.I.P.’s

DOWN 1 Pellet propeller 2 University town named after a Penobscot chief 3 Some liquid assets 4 Ones unlikely to write memoirs? 5 Lacoste offering 6 Gets around 7 #2s, e.g. 8 Director Lee 9 Patient’s liability 10 Wilson of “The Internship” 11 Small role in “Austin Powers” movies 12 Ticket to the World Series 13 En ___ 14 Source of the line “Thy money perish with thee” 15 Melted Popsicle, e.g. 16 Spot on a demand curve 17 Fully blacken 18 Half-kiss? 24 Musical with the song “Summer Nights” 26 “Old ___”

28 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees from Texas 32 “Not a peep!” 34 Fool 38 What best friends keep 39 Church section 40 Song classic “___ to Be Unhappy” 41 Kids’ outdoor game 43 Baptism, e.g. 44 Glowing 46 Head across the Atlantic 47 Big, in ads 49 Ancient Greek coins 51 Convinced 53 It’s a legal thing 56 Designer Mizrahi 58 See 62-Down 61 Australian beer brand 62 With 58-Down, financial topic of 2012-13 63 Feudal figures 65 Horrifies 66 Bar selections 67 ___ alike 68 Texans are part of it, in brief 69 Certain bank deposits 70 Key business figure 73 AA or AAA, maybe 74 Opera part L A S T F I L L E L M O

A N I M A T I O N

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M O T O R H O M E

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75 Disavow 77 South of 79-Down? 79 See 77-Down 80 Briefing spot 82 Warhol’s specialty 84 Squirts 86 Without a contract 88 Crazies 90 Shoulder bone 94 Lead-in to 88-Down 96 Danish bread 98 Plays miniature golf 99 Constellation next to Taurus 100 Unionize? 101 Social level 103 Bottle unit 104 Arizona sights 106 Lamblike 107 Ship’s keel, e.g. 109 Radio station on TV 111 Automaker since 1974 112 [as written] Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

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D A P T I M O U P T O N L A N E S A C T M O R E I T O N B A L T G L O R E S M E B A I T I N E M M O R E T R A A O N M E R O K I R E S E S T

W H O M E

A T U O B M O L I T N O N R O O R U T T H M A P H G A

L A O L H U A A M N G I E N P U A R R E I S T T H E Y A L P L E M E E N O A T S B O O L L E A R R

S O P H O

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T O A S T E R E A G B O R N O K G E L I E N A T M O

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NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES CHANGING YOUR NAME? Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email jill@boiseweekly.com or call Jill at 344-2055 for information.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE SATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Walter Keith Albrecht Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1311934 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE(Adult) A Petition to change the name of Walter Keith Albrecht, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Keith Walter Albrecht. The reason for the change in name is : I have always been called Keith. I want my first name to be that name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) August 29, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Jul 10 2013 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF HE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK Pub. July 24, 31, Aug. 7 & 14, 2013. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 12 14587, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Moon Lake Ranch Owners Association, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Mitchell Buich and Janet Buich, Defendants. TO: MITCHELL BUICH AND

JANET BUICH You have been sued by Moon Lake Ranch Owners Association, the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 12 14587. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the Case No., and paid any required filing fee to the Clerk of the Court at: Clerk of the Court Ada County Courthouse 200 W. Front Street, Boise, Idaho 83702-7300, Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Jeremy O. Evans of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste 101 Boise, ID 83702 Telephone 208-629-4567 Facsimile 208-392-1400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATE: JULY 18 2012. BY: CHRISTOPHER D. RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ LUTOLEDO, Deputy Clerk Pub. July 24, 31, Aug. 7, & 24, 2013.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I have tried in my way to be free,” sings Leonard Cohen in his song “Bird on a Wire.” In other words, he has done the best he can to liberate himself from his unconscious patterns, bad habits and self-delusions. He hasn’t been perfect in his efforts, but the work he has done has earned him a measure of deliverance from his suffering. I recommend you follow his lead, Aries. Do your best to bring more relief and release into your life. Get rid of things that hold you back. Overthrow a pinched expectation and ignore a so-called limitation or two. By this time next week, I hope you will be able to say sincerely, “I have tried in my way to be free.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “There are some things you learn best in calm, and some in storm,” wrote the novelist Willa Cather. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Taurus, you’re in a phase of your cycle when storm-learning isn’t your priority. The educational experiences you need most will unfold when you’re exploring the mysteries of peace and serenity. In fact, I suspect that the deeper you relax, the more likely it is that you will attract life-changing teachings— lessons that can transform your life for the better and fuel you for a long time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Is there a message you’ve wanted to deliver for a long time but haven’t been able to? Are you bursting with thoughts or feelings that you’ve been longing to express but can’t find the right way to do so? Have you spent months carrying around a poignant truth that you have felt wasn’t ripe enough to be revealed? If your answer to any of those questions is yes, I believe the time will soon be at hand to make a move. But it’s important that you’re not impulsive or melodramatic as you initiate your breakthrough communications. For best results, be full of grace and balance. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Bees and other insects can see ultraviolet light, which is invisible to humans. When they look at flowers, they detect designs on the petals that you and I cannot. For example, the evening primrose appears completely yellow to us, but it calls seductively to bees with a flashy star pattern at its center. Many of the secret signs that flowers offer the pollinators are meant to guide them to where the pollen and nectar are. Let’s use this as our metaphor of the week, Cancerian. I am not predicting that you will be able to perceive a broader spectrum of light. But I do believe you will discern cues and clues that are hidden from most people and that have been imperceptible to you in the past.

26 | JULY 24–30, 2013 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I was 6 years old when my parents told me that there was a small, dark jewel inside my skull, learning to be me.” So said the Leo science fiction writer Greg Egan in his story “Learning to Be Me.” Let’s pretend that you, too, have a small dark jewel inside your skull that’s learning to be you. It’s a good metaphor for what I believe has been happening all these years: You have been gradually mastering the art of being the best Leo you can be. It hasn’t been easy. You weren’t born knowing how to be your beautiful, radiant, courageous self, but have had to work hard to activate your potentials. Now you’re moving into an especially critical phase of the process: a time when you have the chance to learn how to love yourself with greater ingenuity. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Dear Astrology Guy: Please tell me why I have to work so hard—meditate, reflect, read, analyze, poke, prod, investigate—to discover truths about myself that must be obvious to others. Why is it so hard for me to see where I need healing and where I need to let go? Why is it such an ordeal to grasp what is interfering with my wholeness when I can quickly pinpoint what other people’s issues are? —Overworked Virgo.” Dear Overworked: I’m happy to report that you Virgos will soon be offered a gush of revelations about who you are, how you can heal, and what strategies will best serve your quest to minimize your anxiety. Are you prepared to absorb some intense teachings? For best results, make yourself extra receptive. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): One of the world’s best race car teams is McLaren. It wins about 25 percent of the events in which it competes. Its skilled drivers account for much of its success, but its technicians are also pretty sensational. During a pit stop in the middle of a race, they can change all four tires on the car in less than three seconds. Do you have helpers like that, Libra? If you don’t, it’s time to intensify your efforts to get them. And if you do, it’s time to call on them to give you an extra boost. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Let’s try an experiment. It’s risky, but I’m hoping you will do it with such flair that there will be no karmic blowback. What I propose, Scorpio, is that you have fun expressing more confidence than usual. I invite you to strut a bit, even swagger, as you demonstrate your command over your circumstances. Enjoy acting as if the world is your plaything... as if everyone around you secretly needs you to rise up and be a bigger, bolder version of yourself. The trick, of course, will be to avoid getting puffed up with grandiose

delusions. Your challenge is to be more wildly devoted to embodying your soul’s code without lapsing into arrogance. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I suspect that you are longing to take a quantum leap of faith, but are also afraid to take that leap. You sense the potential of experiencing a very cool expansion, while at the same time you hesitate to leave your comfort zone and give up your familiar pain. In light of the conflict, which may not be entirely conscious, I suggest you hold off on making a gigantic quantum leap of faith. Instead, experiment with a few bunny hops of faith. Build up your courage with some playful skips and skitters and bounces that incrementally extend your possibilities. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Hoaxes exposed! Bluffs called! Secrets revealed! Curses banished! Taboos broken! Those are the headlines I expect to see emblazoned in your Book of Life during the coming weeks. Can you handle that many holy disruptions? Will you be able to deal with the stress that might come from having so much raucous success? These are important questions, because if you’re not up to the challenge, you may scare away the transformations. So steel your resolve, Capricorn. Mobilize your will. Do what’s necessary to harvest the unruly blessings. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The French novelist Flaubert declared that if you hope to write a book, you should first read 1,500 books. A Roman author named Petronius believed that the imagination does not work at its peak power unless it is inundated with reading material. I suggest you adopt their advice and apply it to your own field, Aquarius. Whatever skill or subject you want to master, expose yourself lavishly to the efforts of other people who have already mastered it. Flood yourself with well-crafted inspiration. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Should you be worried that a venomous spider has crawled into your shoe while you were sleeping? Just in case, should you flip your shoe upside-down before putting it on each morning? My studied opinion: hell, no. The chances of you being bitten on the foot by a venomous spider lurking in your shoe are even less than the possibility that you will be abducted by an alien who looks like Elvis Presley and forced to sing a karaoke version of Beyonce’s “Single Ladies” at an extraterrestrial bar. And if you are going around filled with delusional anxieties like that, you will definitely interfere with life’s current predilection, which is to give you a cleansing respite from your fears, as well as immunity from harm.

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FOR SALE BW FOR SALE Conference tables in 5 different shapes and sizes -The tables link together to form a large conference table space. 34 padded chairs with arms (two different arm styles), 4 Ergo Ball chairs -barely used. All furniture is in great shape. rdunlap@hwcs.com

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JULY 24–30, 2013 | 27


Boise Weekly Vol. 22 Issue 05  

Robo Park: CCDC gets ready to automate Boise's parking garages

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